Aug 05 2020

Programme

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

WINTER TIMETABLE   PETER JOHNSON PARK CARPARK  9.15am for 9.30 DEPARTURE

12 August.

Trampers. Grahams Bush/Mt Cargill. Leaders: Jill Reid and Theresa White.  M+. $5.00.

Hikers. Sandymount. Leaders: Dave Roberts and John Gardiner. E. $6.00.

19 August.

Trampers. Heyward Point*.   Leaders: Keith Munro, and Phil & Helen Morris. M+. $8.00.

Hikers . Silverstream. Leaders : Jenny Finnerty and Jan Butcher. E. $0

20 August, 1.30 p.m. AGM.  To be held at at the Mosgiel Presbyterian Church, 11 Church Street.

26 August

Trampers. Harbour Cone. Leaders Margreet and Neil Simpson. M+. $6.00

Hikers. Outram Area. Leaders: Kathryn and Jeanette. E. $3,00

2 September

Combined Bus Trip  Millennium Track (one way). Leaders : Eleanore Ryan, Heather Kirk, Jay Devlin, Barbara Shackell. M. Cost to be announced.

9 September

Trampers.   Orokonui-ecosanctuary -guided tour. Leaders : Gordon Grant, Judy Dennison. E+. Admission $15 (to be confirmed). Travel $7.00.

Hikers. Karitane. Leaders : Ady Whitson, Linda Partridge. E. $9.00.

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Aug 01 2020

Booth Road, Ben Rudd

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

No. 43 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Booth Rd – Ben Rudd, R Hakkaart. Year Round”

Click Ben Rudd Article for background information.
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
5/8/2020. Combined. Davies Track, Ben Rudd’s Shelter, Pineapple Track.

Tramper’s Report. Leaders Wyn and Ross

The Trampers and Hikers congregated at Peter Johnstone car park where Wyn and Ross got to model the new high-viz vests for tramping leaders. Arthur reminded everyone that leaders are now responsible after the day’s walk for handing over to the vests and the emergency locator beacon to the leaders for the following week. It’s also the responsibility of the following leaders to make sure they get the vests and beacon, and to familiarise themselves with the beacon instructions. We all met up at the bottom of the Pineapple Track in Wakari and started with a combined walk along McGouns Road. Just past the bridge we turned left into the bike track maze in the Redwoods. We safely navigated the maze to the skid clearing at the far end of McGouns Road and here we had our combined morning tea. 

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “We’re off!”

Just past the bridge we turned left into the bike track maze in the Redwoods. We safely navigated the maze to the skid clearing at the far end of McGouns Road and here we had our combined morning tea. 

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Photo and Caption Pam – “A happy group having morning tea.”

We separated then, and the 27 trampers immediately started off to join the Davies Track and head up the slopes of Flagstaff. The lower part of the track was a little slippery and damp, but good for this time of year.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Heading up Davies track.”

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Photo and Caption Pam – “The bush kept changing but was very pleasant.”

The track was mostly clear and easy to follow. As we gained height we began to be rewarded with views out over the city. The day was overcast and almost misty higher up. We eventually emerged above the forest. The track above this point is easier to follow, especially towards the top through the area which was devastated in the fire. It is worrying to see that the gorse might be a big winner from the burning process. 

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Some of the aftermath of the September 2019 fire.”

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Photo and Caption Helen – “Which will win – the gorse or the natives?”

We reached the Flagstaff-Pineapple Track and headed south and then west to the Firebreak Track on the other side of Flagstaff and then south and down to Ben Rudd’s Shelter.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “A welcome, relaxed lunch.”

This was a good place for lunch and a rest and a group photo.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “The happy 28 trampers.”

Then we retraced our steps back up to the Firebreak Track and north along this to the Swampy Ridge Track. Here we turned right towards the city to meet up with the Pineapple Track and the steep descent back to where we started about 4 hours before at the bottom of Booth Road.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Heading down to pineapple track.”

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Not far to cars”.

Total distance was about 10.5 kms. It was a pleasant day for a nice walk; not too hot and not too cold, and hardly any wind and of course the company was great. 

We regrouped at Coffee Culture Café in the old Roslyn Fire Station for afternoon tea/coffee/cold drinks and they did a good catering for us all (with advance notice).

Written by Ross and Wyn

Hiker’s Report. Leaders Ady Whitson and Noi McCunn

We started off from the start of Pineapple Track but deviated up the lower McGouns track walking through lovely tall timber where I promptly tripped up as I was looking at the trees.  All fine and carried on up the Skid Track to where we had morning tea.
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Photo and Caption John – “Combined morning tea”

The trampers then departed up the Davies Track.  We departed with 17 Hikers down to the start of McGouns track proper.  The weather was ideal for a hill climb and off we went.  Passed the cairn that was placed to commemorate 100 years of DCC Forestry in 2006.  It’s a lovely walk through that part towards the Pineapple Track with tree ferns and lovely native trees.
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Photo and Caption Michael – “The hiking ladies found this trunk amusing!”

As well as keeping an eye on where I walked.
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Photo and Caption Ady – “I made everyone stop and appreciate the view.”

At the start of the Pineapple Track I told everyone this part is quite steep and thanks to Ross’s advice from our reconnaissance (had to look up dictionary to spell that)  last week we took small steps and slowly up we went.  We did have a few stops but everyone was fine with this. Stopped for lunch about 11.45 as it was getting a bit steep.  We did walk on a bit further than intended but turned back for lunch. We started back down the track which is in really good order.
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Photo and Caption Ady – “View of Dunedin from Pineapple Track.”

A couple of places there is new gravel which you had to be careful walking over.  Arrived back at the cars at about 1.20 and off to Village Green for afternoon tea.  Thank you Noi for being tail end Charlie and I think a few laughs was had by all.  We travelled approx. 6.5 km, 115 Floors and 14000 steps.  Ross those small steps made a big difference and Doug came all the way.

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Jul 30 2020

Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Rongomai

Published by under Trampers

Location: 37 km.
From Evansdale Glen. Route. DOC. Stream crossings. Preferably February when water most likely to be low.
Track up Careys Creek alone: an easy walk.
Click information on the Seacliff Dam, historical creek track and pipeline.
15. 29/7/2020. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Rongomai, Honeycomb. Leaders Arthur and Gwenda
The Trampers and Hikers congregated at Peter Johnstone car park, Arthur reminded everyone that hiking bags needed tags and new safety orange short sleeved tops for leader and tail end Charlie, for our groups. The trampers headed off to Evansdale Glen with a smaller group of fifteen (10 ladies 5 men). In overcast conditions we made our way up the dense bushed valley, making numerous water crossings, in reasonably dry conditions with muddy patches.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “One of the many!”

The birds were chirping and the pigs had being digging up the tracks in abundance. The morning tea stop was under a dry area under pine trees. Arthur with his strong knowledge of the area pointed out where we were heading as he described a tennis racket loop.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Smoko.”

He advised we would be heading up Honeycomb track and there would be a steady climb in somewhat slippery conditions.
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Photo and Caption Gordon -“Another one!.

There were a couple of slips but we worked up the climb energetically with normal stops to check all was good at the back.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “A welcome break after the climb.”

The lunch stop was made at 12.40 with a view of the hills where we would meet the nature track as it was called.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Welcome rest and lunch.”

There were a variety of trees in view and fantails buzzing round and the odd pigeon taking off when disturbed. Gordon on the job taking some good shots of the group. After 20 minutes we put our lunch boxes back in our tramping bag with advice that the next bit was a bit up and down, already said 2 of our ladies we haven’t finished, in chirped Gordon, we all know why that is!! The group erupted with laughter.
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Photo and Caption Helen – “The Rongomai junction with a great view.”

We moved on with many finding the terrain slightly gruntie after a lunch break, but none were going to say so, the sound of a stray goat and a grunt from a pig helped break the beauty of the nature.
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Photo and Caption Pam – ” Arthur sawing a downed branch lying on the track”.

By the time we got to the end of the nature trail Arthur and a small group waited for a few moments, then Arthur went back to check group behind and found Gwenda had strained her calf so needed help from nurse Helen with medication to help strain. Once we had regrouped at the junction we headed down Rongomai Trail, noticing a fantail had joined in with the group, chattering more than the group, taking in last bit of tramp and enjoying the calm.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Down Rongomai track.”

Thanks Gwenda and Arthur for an enjoyable 12.2km jaunt in the Glen.

We arrived 2 minutes late (3.32) at Blueskin Nursery, with chairs on table, so NO afternoon tea, the cars returned to Peter Johnstone Park.
Written by Helen and Phil

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Jul 29 2020

Warrington

Published by under Beach,Uncategorized

Distance from carpark: 40 km.
9. 29/7/2020. Hikers. Warrington. Leaders: Jenny and Faye
After arriving at the Warrington Domain, all 35 of us, we had a cuppa before setting off. We moved on up the hill towards the settlement. After giving the large mixed group of hikers and tramper’s a health and safety talk re: road rules, we set off through a track which was a bit muddy in parts, but ok.
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Photo and Caption John – “Morning tea over already.”

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Photo and Caption John – “Think I’ll just spend the day here!

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Photo and Caption Jenny – “Up the hill towards the settlement”.

At the top was the St Barnabas church which we had a wee look around area after which we crossed the road to a no exit road that took us up the hill to look at some of Dunedin’s great views down the coast then over Blue Skin bay.

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Photo and Caption John – “Churchyard muster!”

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Photo and Caption Jenny – “Dunedin’s great views down the coast”

Back down the hill and along Coast Road onto Park Road back to the Domain for lunch.
We couldn’t find the 3 Ramblers but I heard tell they were sheltering from the wind beside  a macrocarpa hedge.
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Photo and Caption John -“Come back Judy we all wonder what’s around the corner.”

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Photo and Caption John – “Don’t do it Judy – the water is too cold.”

After lunch we did a 40 minute walk along the beach, brrrr, then off for a nice hot drink and piece of “sweet” slice at the Blue Skin Cafe. Another good day!     Jenny and Faye

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Jul 22 2020

Brighton Walks

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers

15 km from car-park.
7. 22/7/2020. Hikers. Brighton area. Leaders Alex and Liz.
20 hikers including ramblers reported at Brighton Surf Life car park to a sunny but cool area to start there 11 ks hike. After about 10 minutes it was time for morning tea break at resident Sue’s house.
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Photo and Caption Alex – “Morning tea in the sun”.

From here 3 ramblers went for there own direction while the hikers continued climbing up Scroggs Hill to the top.
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Photo and Caption Alex – “In the shelter near the top”.

 

Time was about  11 50 am so down McIntosh Road for lunch about 12noon. It had been very windy up till now but more sheltered on this road.
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Photo and Caption Alex – “Lunch by a big tree”.

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Photo and Caption Alex – ‘Amazing views from the top of the road”.

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Photo and Caption Alex – “Pleasant scenery on the homeward downhill walk”.

Cruising down until we came  to Star Fish exhibition shop where some purchases happened and from here onto Brighton Cafe for more good company to finish the day.   Alex and Liz.

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Jul 22 2020

Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth

No. 47 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Toko Beach. M Young”; also No. 65 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Chrystalls Beach Farm”

Location: 59 km from the car park.

Directions: On SH1, before Milton, at Helensbrook intersection, left onto Forsyth Road, right onto Back Road, left onto Glenledi Road.
Best in Summer. The stock winter over.
20. 22/7/2020. Trampers. Chrystalls Beach. Leaders : John Gardiner and Dave Roberts.
Ever been to Chrystalls Beach? Do you know where it is?
Whenever I ask these questions, the answer is always :-
“Never heard of it”.
Well now myself and 30 other trampers can answer these questions.
Chrystalls Beach is just east of Milton, north of the Tokomairiro River Mouth.
On Wednesday 22nd July, seven cars transported our group of 31 to the starting point for our tramp, parking on the side of Irishman’s Road.
The journey took us about an hour, and included four different gravel roads from S.H.1. just before Milton.
Our usual “strict” timetable for morning tea and lunch was somewhat disrupted by our late arrival(approx. 10.45 am) and the lack of suitable shelter from an icy cold blustery South Westerly wind.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “And we’re off”.

Setting out “into the teeth” of this wind, we had brunch (really morning tea and lunch combined) in the shelter of a hayshed at 11.25am.
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Photo and Caption John – “Brunch in the hayshed – note the mud in foreground”.

This early part of the tramp was over a Dairy farm, with all Dairy farm’s usual trappings on offer i.e. cow pads and mud.
As expected the mud was particularly deep around gates, and on the farm tracks. A number of electric fences traversed these tracks  the “ gates” comprising plastic insulators and hooks.
A special shout out to Margreet Simpson who grabbed one of these fences, wearing woollen gloves, exclaiming “It’s not on” only for the next person to come near it exclaiming “it’s hot!”.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Through the live electric fence to the river”.

Not surprisingly we all treated this bit of fence with the respect it deserved!
A special thanks to the farm manager, Gareth Ferguson, for allowing us to tramp through the property.
We left the property to tramp along the side of the Tokomairiro River towards the river mouth.
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Photo and Caption Helen – “Low tide essential for this pleasant estuary walk”.

Here we scrambled through some marshy terrain for a short spell before a sandy river edge made the going much easier. This is definitely a tramp best attempted at, or near,  low tide.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Toko mouth village”.

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Photo and Caption John – “Well spread out trampers.”

At the river mouth, on the far side, lies Toko Mouth Township. A quaint little town of at least 21 very eclectic cribs – delightful.
The river mouth included a huge area of accumulated coarse river sand , as Bruce Wright exclaimed,  “ideal for lining the Budgey Cage!” At this point a large row of sand hills separated us from the beach,  but we were obviously below sea level as breakers could be seen, not far out, over the top of these sand hills. Apparently Chrystalls Beach got it’s name from the sparkles (like crystals) in it’s sand.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “On the windy beach”.

The walk along the beach with a tail wind now decreasing in intensity and sharpness, gave the leg muscles a good workout, but was very pleasant. This is obviously a rugged piece of coastline with the wave pattern erratic, indications being that these are very dangerous waters. Indeed this beach is the site of the February 1907 wreck of the French sailing ship Marguerite Mirabaud.
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Photo and Caption Eleanore – “Shipwrecks along the Otago coast – in particular Toko mouth/Chrystalls beach”.

Interestingly an auction was held on the beach to dispose of the ship’s cargo.  By 1.00 pm, with our group being a bit spread out, we regrouped at Cooks Head .
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Photo and Caption John – “Reaching a milestone – Cooks rock”.

This is a large rock that stands proud alone on the beach. It looked airily alien, like it had just been dropped there, and somehow didn’t belong!
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Cook’s Head Rock”.

Arthur Heenan climbed to the top, while the rest of us investigated it.
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Phot and Caption Gordon – “Arthur at the top”.

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Photo and Caption John – “Ready to go again”.

Not sure where the Cook’s name comes from, no doubt there’s an interesting story as to how this rock got its’ name.
A short walk from Cook’s Head saw us back to the cars at approx. 1.00 pm , having tramped 7.3km.
By 2.15pm we were at the Blackstone Cafe’ for post tramp analysis, the usual banter, and socialising.
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Photo and Caption Helen – “Enjoying everyone’s company after a satisfying tramp”.

A special thanks to Arthur Heenan for providing Dave Roberts and myself with directions, an aerial photo of the area, and advice along the way during the tramp.
Regards,
John

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Jul 15 2020

Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully.

Published by under Committee Minutes,Trampers,Year round and tagged: , ,

Click Mount Cargill history for background information.

No. 11 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bethunes Gully to T.V. Mast Organ Pipes. Wiggins. Year Round.”

No. 100 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bethunes Gully – Brown House – Signal Hill – Chingford Park Year Round”

22 km from carpark

Cars meet at Bethunes Gully. A broad gravelled track from picnic ground. NB. Opposite Brown House corner is an RSA Memorial to First World War servicemen the old Junction School.

21 km from car park.

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Jul 15 2020

Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 89 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Outram Glen – Lee Stream Year Round”

13. 15/7/2020. Trampers. Outram Glen. Leaders : Joy and Kathryn

 18 keen trampers arrived fully kitted out for an easy but in some places slippery tramp up to the Lee Stream.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Off we go.”

This is a favourite hike with the odd little challenge of fallen trees or wash outs adding some variety.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Negotiating the washout”

After several days of damp weather the river was running higher than normal and the rapids could be heard above the chatter of the group.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Smoko break.”

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Tackling the steps.”

 

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Photo and Caption John – “Which way?”

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Photo and Caption John – “Lunch”

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Ready to head home.”

Gordon challenged us all to count the number of drainage pipes on the return trip. Seven, I believe was the winning number.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Final Obstacle.”

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Jul 08 2020

Lower Silverstream tramps

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

22. 8/7/2020. Hikers. Silverstream Gladfield road south. E. Leaders : Jim and Betty
Due to inclement weather the walk to Doctor’s Point was cancelled.
Thirteen walkers braved the cool conditions for an alternative walk to the Gladfield ford, (Silver Stream South). This was achieved without encountering any rain.  Nine made it to the Blackstone Cafe for a pre lunch hot drink.
Betty & Jim Finnie.
21. 26/6/2019. Hikers. Silverstream floodbank from Carlyle Rd to Confluence. 13+ km. Leaders: Shona and June.
On a clear but cool morning, we car pooled to Wal’s rear park before walking along Bush and Carlyle Rds to access the Silverstream floodbank.

Morning tea was had in the sun at Riccarton Rd bridge.

C.1) Morning tea beside the streamc

Morning tea beside the stream. (Clive pic and caption.)

We continued to the confluence of the Silverstream and Taieri river

C.3) where two streams meetc

Where two streams meet. (Clive pic and caption.)

where we had lunch,

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Lunch at the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.)

with most finding enough room to avoid the numerous sheep droppings.

Returning back along the track to Wal’s we straggled out a bit like “Brown’s
cows” so some were leaving after coffee as others were still arriving. –  Shona.
20. 24/8/2016. Hikers. Lower Silverstream to mouth. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

Number of people in the group: 19.

The weather was a very cold northerly that threatened rain, fortunately rain coats were not required.

The hikers followed north from the car park on Factory Road and turned left at L J Hookers which took the group through the civic gardens, across the soccer field to the Silver Stream flood bank which was followed to the Taieri River. Because of the cool conditions there was a short lunch break

Lunch at the Taieri River. Sheltering as much as possible from the cold Nor-wester.

Lunch at the Taieri River. Sheltering as much as possible from the cold nor-wester.

Another lunch photo.

Another lunch photo.

then it was a return along the same flood bank back to Carlyle Road to meet Bush Road and back to the car park.

A coffee break was had at Topiary’s. – Betty and Jim.

Lunch to coffee map. An 8 km distance!

Lunch to coffee map. About an 8 km distance!

19. 3/9/2015. Both. Lower Silverstream to mouth. Leaders: Arthur and Ian
This was a fall-back option. The programmed tramp to the Ship at Anchor area (still under snow) had been rescheduled by the leaders to the Racemans-to-weir area. However 17 of us gathered at the car park in only a suspicion of a drizzle, were faced with the prediction of solid rain in the afternoon and the prospect of muddy conditions even before one got up to the Racemans after the overnight rain. But the weather at the moment was getting lighter. So we decided on the walk along the lower Silverstream flood-bank. Two of us had other engagements so it was fifteen who set off making our way to the start at the Gordon Road bridge. Sloppy mud on the flood-bank confirmed suspicions of what life would have been getting to the Racemans. The Silverstream was quite a sight, rushing a good torrent of muddy water. The day was brightening. We were going well. Time grew on. With today being the first of the nine o’clock start, some began to pant for their still distant 10.00 a.m. morning tea stop.
River and hedge

The big macrocarpa hedge had been machine sawn back considerably. Silverstream visible on the left.

Eventually, come ten, we found an ideal bank in the sun at the Gladfield Road ford whereon to stop and drink. Stones and a stick were  placed by the water’s edge to determine whether the water would rise or fall. Verdict: it was falling, but just a bit.
Sheltered morning tea in the sun. Note stones and stick to mark water level.

Sheltered morning tea in the sun. Note stones and stick to mark water level.

Then up and on again to reach the Riverside Road bridge. Time now 10.30 a.m. Time perhaps, to ensure returning dry before the 12.00 o’clock rain. However, the Trampers in the party, delighted to be walking in territory new to them, inquired how much further it was to the river’s mouth. On being informed it was an eight [Ed. note: Sorry, should have been ‘seven’.] km trek car-park to the mouth, they thought that at this stage it couldn’t be all that much further. So four of them went on with Leader Arthur and the remaining ten returned with Ian. When the returnees found themselves back beside the Sewerage Station at high noon and there was still no sign of rain, Marjorie proposed a stop and just a little further on  where she had espied an inviting Rotary seat, backed by a high wood fence. So we sat, some seated, some ‘grassed’ and lunched in the sun. Some little time later the trampers turned up, declaring the mouth had been only about two kilometres further on. So the five joined the ten for an enjoyable time together in the sun.
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Tidying up after lunch.

Happy day. Eventually we picked ourselves up again and began an zigzag cut-through of streets, new to some, back to the cars. Back at the car park we each took our separate ways, with a remaining seven resorting to coffee at Wals and Ian’s Shirley joining us. Conversation between Ian and Shirley with Jan turned up a surprising mutual connection with Duntroon, and the fact that Ian had married and buried one or two of Jan’s elder relatives – recollection of some wonderful people and local areas. Jan hadn’t heard of ‘rattling rocks’ in the Maerewhenua River. Must show her sometime. Small world.

A great day out, a vindication of the value of the Club’s practice of leaving final decisions for the car park and an example of making your own luck by giving things a go. (Where was all that rain anyway?) – Ian.

18. 24/6/2015. Hikers. Silverstream to River. Leaders: Les and Margaret.

GPS from Taieri River back to car park. Therefore, total distance 14.28 km.

GPS from Taieri River back to car park. Therefore, total distance 14.28 km.

Thirty-one hikers trekked the Silverstream flood-bank.

 

A Gaggle of Ducks. (John pic)

A Gaggle Doggle(?) of Ducks. (John pic)

A wafting wind from behind blew coldly, especially noticeable when we stopped for our morning cuppa.

Cuppa. (John pic)

Morning cuppa. (John pic)

But it mercifully stopped as we sipped and the rest of the day was calm. 14 km on hard grass is a solid distance for Hikers, made no less easy by the relentless use of  same leg muscles unrelieved by any rough track variation. So it was no surprise that some of our wiser (?) ones chose an early lunch stop-off,

Early lunch (John pic)

Early lunch (John pic)

while the rest carried on to the stream mouth at the Taieri River. Here, a number of flood-washed-up logs provided welcome seating, promising later easy rising untroubling arthritic knees.

Logs to sit on. (Panorama)

Logs to sit on. (Panorama)

A touching moment of obeisance.

A touching moment of male obeisance.

The calm confluence of the two streams was breathtaking in its beauty.

Confluence panorama

Stream confluence panorama

Time to return. Refreshed. Time passes. Legs getting weary. Ah! A pedestrian walkway promising a shortcut zigzag through streets back to the car park instead of having to walk right up to Gordon Road. We cut through, lane after lane. Ah, the bliss of car seats again.  Next, coffee adjournment. But not without cleaning up or divesting entirely filthy sheep-droppings-caked boots. Thanks to Margaret and Les for a trek we hadn’t done for some time now. – Ian.

17. 10/7/2013. Hikers. Silverstream to River. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

16. 15/8/2012 Both. Silverstream. Gordon Road to through-way to Goodall St. Coffee Shop.

Silverstream. It was only a light rain. The stream had gone down a lot but was still quite high. Seven of us. Love the brolly.

Exiting cafe. After-thought pic. Well, why shouldn’t we have made an occasion of the day?

15. 25/7/2012. Hikers. Silvestream and Blokes Shed. – Leaders: Molly and Elaine.
We had a good walk around the Silverstream along the banks.
Morning tea was at the “blokes shed”. We had a chance to have a quick look around at the awesome projects that these retired guys are doing.
Lunch was had a sunny spot by Riccarton Road.
A stroll along, then to Wals plants in Bush Road. This place is really going ahead. The veggie boys are building a big shop there.
A cafe is opening soon there also. Yum Yum. It’s people that ran the No 8 in Outram.
Also they have a railway that children can ride on.
A very nice day out. – Elaine.  (Stand-in for Bill Hunt)

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Jul 01 2020

Midwinter Dinner Occasions

Published by under Midwinter Dinners

6. 1/7/2020 Mid-winter Luncheon. RSA. Leaders : Eleanore and Jill.

Due to  the abysmal weather yesterday afternoon, we cancelled the planned walk along the Silver stream, thank goodness we did because the rain kept going last night and today.
Instead, It was lovely to be greeted at the Mosgiel R.S.A. restaurant by 60 Happy faces, particularly our Senior Members, who always enjoy our shared occasions.  We were all  ready for a good catch up after the Coronavirus lockdown.
Past President Jill welcomed everyone along.  Also, on behalf of the Club Jill passed condolences onto Margaret Smith, due to  the recent Passing of her  beloved  Husband Les.

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Photo and Caption Helen – ” Vice President Jill welcoming everyone.”

At our 30th Anniversary, Jill as President, had the honour to present both  Les and  Margaret with Life Membership.  Margaret  joined in 1988 and Les in 1990.   Both dedicating many years of service to the club.
President Arthur thanked both myself and Jill for organising the venue and meal.  Also, he mentioned about the trampers’ track clearing trip set down for 8 July.
Grace was delivered by Ian Fleming, another Life Member of the Club.

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Photo and Caption Helen – ” Enjoying the lovely food.”

It was now time to enjoy tasty, well presented Dinners.   Choices being—Hot Ham, Fish, Braised Steak or Wiener Schnitzel.  Followed by beautifully presented Fruit Crumble or Ice Cream Sundae.  Tea, Coffee and Chocolate to finish off with.

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Photo and Caption Helen – “Enjoying seeing everyone.”

Full credit must go to the chef, manager and staff for their effort they put into the meal, and service given.
I hope you all enjoyed the outing as much as Jill and I did.
Eleanore Ryan and Jill Dodd

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Jun 25 2020

Bull Ring, Swampy, Nicols, Pt Pineapple, Davies, ret

Published by under Trampers,Year round

No. 80 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bull Ring – Whare Flat. Swampy Year Round”
Click Dunedin’s Hills’ History for background information.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.

 

Nicols Creek circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group. DCC land.

Pineapple Track—the curious name of this track originates from a tradition involving a local grocer in the 1920’s.  He guided parties up a track in this area and would provide tinned pineapple as a refreshment at the top.  The empty cans were left as litter.

24/6/2020 FLAGSTAFF   WALKWAY   ONTO   SWAMPY   RIDGE   TRACK   and   RETURN. Leader Eleanore
After a couple of head counts our group of 24 (including 3 new faces) arrived at the Bull Ring at 10am to a very foggy morning.  As well as us,  staff were parked up waiting to spread gravel on Pineapple and Firebreak tracks, that was to be dropped by helicopter.  We commented that it would be something new to look at as we were walking.

After a short sharp climb we arrived at the Plane Table marked by a drainpipe at a height of round 660 metres for smoko, still in fog and no views we headed off again down and around to the Pineapple junction, passing by damage caused by a fire last year.

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Photo and Caption John – “Morning tea – not to be MIST!”

This section of the Pineapple track was wet and slippery along with the odd patch of icy puddles, we had to make sure we kept our feet firmly on the ground!!

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “You couln’t have MIST this group of trampers.”

 

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Still slogging up hill!”

We arrived at the junction of Swampy and Firebreak tracks at 11am, then continued through more mud, noticing quite a lot of broom had been recently cut down—-thanks to those concerned.

 

After some climbing along the way, passing Moon, Powerline, and Telecom Microwave Station tracks, we arrived at the Aircraft Navigation Station at the Swine Spur junction at 12:15pm.  Up till now, the only sight to be seen was the person in front of you!!  Occasionally, one hoped for the fog to lift,  so the amazing views could be enjoyed—so far, not happening.

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Photo and Caption John – “Lunch at Swampy summit.”

 

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Photo and Caption John – “Gotcha Dave!”

At 12:40pm, after a shortened lunch it was time to head for home, negotiating the slippery, slidey slopes along the way reaching the Firebreak junction in 1 hour, we took the shortcut back onto Flagstaff track, and enjoyed the mostly downhill walk to the cars, arriving at 2:30pm.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Homeward bound.”

The boots covered a good 13kms.

This was the first tramp with the Club I have  been on that the fog never lifted the entire day.   We were ready for coffee,  cake and a yarn to celebrate our achievement at Blackstone Cafe.

As always, I hope you all enjoyed the day as much as I did.
Eleanore

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Jun 25 2020

Tomahawk Lagoon and nearby tracks/areas

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Ocean Grove, also known as Tomahawk, is a suburb in the southeast of the New Zealand city of Dunedin. … The suburb was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name not being a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”.

No. 23 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karetai Rd via Monument from Lagoon. Year round.”

Distance from car-park: Tomahawk: 19 km; Smaills Beach: 22 km;  Paradise Road: 26 km.’

DCC List: 41 Peg Track. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Oregon St. 3.5 hrs ret. Tramping track – unbenched. Managed: DCC CAM, private land.
Description – This track provides a link between Ocean Grove and Highcliff Road. Access to the track in Ocean Grove is off Oregon Street. An attractive walk around Tomahawk Lagoon then climbs through gorse and native bush. Turn right towards Soldiers Memorial through paddocks with gorse sometimes obscuring the rock walls.

  • Classification – Hard
  • Time – Approximately 45 minutes.
  • Parking – Limited at Highcliff Road. No dogs.
  • Dogs – No
*****
38. 24/6/2020 Hikers  Ocean Grove/Tomahawk
Twenty-four hikers departed from the Marlow Park entrance near the toilet block at approximately 1000 heading up path behind the dinosaur slide, through the car park and continuing along the grassy sports fields to reach the metal gate at the end. We turned left at the road behind the St Clair scout building and at the crest of the sandhill took a track to the right which led to the Sir James Barnes prospect which looked out over the Forbury Park trotting facility.
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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Heading up the track to Barnes Prospect.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “View from Barnes prospect.”

We then headed towards St Clair down the concrete steps on left and along the crest of the sandhill for about 50 m to where the track branches to the right.

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Descending from sandhills crest to above sand sausage.”

We left the track at that point and went down a sandy track towards the beach and then continued along above the sand retaining sausage, up a sandy slope, and then up some concrete steps to the St Clair Surf Club building. We had morning tea at 1030 in the playground behind the building.

At 1045 we went down the sandy slope again and continued along the beach past the St Kilda surf club rooms until we reached the far end at Lawyers Head at 1140.
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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Approaching groyne at St Clair.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “At Lawyers head end of beach.”

We then took a track up to John Wilson drive and had lunch in the region of the Sir Leonard Wright memorial at the top of the hill at approximately 1205.
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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Track heading to John Wilson drive.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Clambering over an obstacle on the track.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Sir Leonard Wright memorial.”

The last of the Golden Oldies golfers had just completed the nearby hole as we arrived.
After lunch we walked around the perimeter of the course marked by red posts and avoided walking on the greens. At the far side of the course we went down a short path, near an entrance to the crematorium and cemetery, and down a foot path to the right to reach a green transformer and Tomahawk road which led down the hill to the bridge over the outlet of Tomahawk lagoon. We took the sandy path to the beach just before the bridge and followed the dry stream bed to the beach.
We initially looked at the cliff face and caves by the golf course and then walked to the cave atthe far end of the beach.
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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Cave at golf course end of Tomahawk beach.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Length of Tomahawk beach.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Cave at end of Tomahawk beach.”

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Exploring the cave.”

We then came back along the beach about 200 m to walk up to the sand dunes and the path leading to the playground on Tomahawk Road.
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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Walking back from cave.”

We then walked down the hill and turned left into Luke Street going past the Otago Anglers Association Club rooms on the corner. We ascended the rise at the end of the street, walked past the site of the demolished Tomahawk School and swimming pool and noted that the dental clinic had been removed in the past week. We followed a path towards the car park, sporting facilities building and the playing fields to emerge at the far end at the outlet bridge.
We retraced our steps up the path to the left at the green transformer and took the path to the right between the golf links and the crematorium gate. After briefly detouring to the right into the cemetery at a rose bush near the memorial to the women who died in the Seacliff hospital fire in 1942, we went to the left to rejoin the track through the golf course.

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Photo Clive and Caption Bruce – “Memorial to women who died at Seacliff in a fire on 8th December 1942.”

Near the club house we went up the hill to the left to go behind the club house to regroup and then continued around the club house and followed the perimeter of the course until we reached a path which led to the Pirates Rugby Club fields. We crossed these to arrive back at the cars at 1540 and then proceeded to Nicols for coffee.
The weather was better than it might have been with a bearable temperature and overcast, 100% cloudy conditions, but no wind. This gave the Ocean Grove beach a slightly misty appearance.
The distance covered was 14 km. We extend our thanks to Alex Griffin who stepped in to assist as leader after Marjorie had to leave early for another commitment.
Marjorie and Bruce

37. 12/6/2019 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Monument – Karetai Road. M. $5.00 Arthur and Eleanor.

P.Route map, courtest Hhil.)194

P.Route map, courtesyH Phil K.)

Trampers last walked this circuit 24/6/15.  Report quoting “A record number of 11). Was a very frosty morning and we were somewhat amused at the ducks flying onto their frozen runway—-parts of lagoon were solid ice.
This time we had a group of 17 and only 5 had previously walked this circuit with the club, shows the increase in members!  Weather was much warmer too. We parked at Lagoon and set off at 10am, climbing up through bush, paddock and corridors of gorse for 20 mins.
G.3rd-- Heading ever upwards towards Soldiers Monumentc

Heading ever upwards towards Soldiers Monument. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to enjoy a breather and smoko on remains of a stone fence.  Onwards and upwards to the Monument with the lone Soldier and a magnificent 360 degree vista of our very own piece of paradise.

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Soldiers Memorial. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Next we walked down the well used track to High Cliff road.  Crossing to left, we walked about 2km single file along this rather busy stretch of road.  We knew when we were approaching the pig farm by the smell, also being a little amused at reading the sign installed when neighbouring property went on the market.  Shortly after we turned right into Karetai Road.

We continued downhill on the no exit sealed road, then down the gravel road, stopping for lunch at 12.15pm, enjoying the sunshine, chatting and  scenery all around us.

G.7th-- Lunch out of the breezec

Lunch out of the breeze. (Gordon pic and caption.)

(Even offered water from a passing home owner) Then it’s down past the trees and onto the track.  At the cliff edge, some ventured to the left for a look towards Boulder beach.  On regrouping, we decided to walk along the cliff side of the fence (no place to bring 12 year old triplet grand children) towards Smail’s beach,  was a bit of a scramble through the last few metres before we hit the road.

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I spot a surfer. (Phil K. pic and caption.)

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More Cliffs of Moher?. (Phil K. pic and caption.)

We stopped at the Tautuku fishing club building and took a picture to forward to Jenni Wright— was her family home many years ago.  On the road and uphill past Smail’s beach to the cars, arriving at 2.10pm.We found our way to Tuppence cafe in Waverley where we enjoyed coffee, cake and tea for 1.  This ended another most enjoyable 12km tramp.
Good friends, good weather and good walks——what more do we need out of life! – Eleanore.

36. 8/5/2019. Hikers. Tomahawk – Marlow Park ret. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Tomahawk hike 8.5.19 (2)c

Route map of Tomahawk Hike, courtesy Bruce.

Thirty-four hikers assembled on a cloudy morning with a chilly NE breeze at the carpark near the Tomahawk Lagoon outlet on Tomahawk Road, just over the bridge on the right down the hill from the crematorium entrance, before setting off, at 0929, past the white gate on to the Ocean Grove sports fields. At the top left corner of the sports grounds we went up the mown path and turned to the right along a cut path in the grass and emerged near the site of the now demolished Ocean Grove school and swimming pool. The rotunda and dental clinic building have been retained. We then walked down the track on the left and along Lock St before turning left into Tomahawk Road at the Otago Anglers Association building on the corner, then right into Oregon St, and then left into the right of way leading to the Tomahawk Lagoon.

We walked along the path on the right bank of the lagoon, at which were mallard and paradise ducks together with black swans, to the style at the fence at the end and then turned back and retraced our steps to Tomahawk Road where we turned left and went up the hill to the Ocean Grove playground on the right where we had morning tea.

After morning tea we followed the track leading to the beach …

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Over the sand dunes to Tomahawk Beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

… and then turned left to explore the cave at the north east end of the beach.

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Cave at end of Tomahawk Beach. (Ian pic and caption.)

We then proceeded back along the beach to the south west end, turned right towards the bridge and took the track up the bank on the right, crossed the bridge and went up the hill to the green transformer where we took the track up to the golf course

We followed behind a group of golden oldie golfers to the green ahead keeping to the perimeter of the course and avoiding walking on the greens. We took the track up to the Leonard Wright memorial which starts near the tee off area.

We inspected the view from Lawyers Head,

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Tomahawk Beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

noticed the colourfully painted seats with their message of hope for those contemplating suicide, had a group photo taken …

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Group photo at one of the ‘Hope’ seats. (Clive pic.)

… and walked the length of the John Wilson drive to the Marlow Park playground for lunch

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Lunch at Marlow Park. (Clive pic and caption.)

arriving from 1155 to 1210.

After lunch, we passed the right side of the Pirates Rugby Club building and crossed the rugby ground to enter the golf course at the entrance sign situated in about the middle of the field. We proceeded through the course keeping to the left hand side, eventually passing to the right of the club house, climbed the small hill behind the club house and went down to the left to the start of the path that leads through the golf course to the north east end where we went on to the path.

Most of us then deviated to the left to meander through the cemetery while a group of 4 kept on straight ahead to head back to the cars. On the cemetery walk we passed the plaques acknowledging those who donated their bodies for use in medical education and the 37 women who died in the Seacliff mental hospital fire on 8 December 1942. Further on was the grave William Edgar Adams. Professor William Edgar Adams (1908–1973) was a distinguished University of Otago student, graduating MB ChB in 1935. In 1944 he became Professor of Anatomy and was appointed Dean of the Medical School in 1968. He was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Zoologists (India) in 1955, Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 1959 and Honorary Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in 1962. He died in office on 18 May 1973.

After following a semicircular route through the cemetery we emerged by crossing the fence at the bottom of the hill on the path where we had entered the golf course earlier in the day and arrived back at the cars at approximately 1343. Coffee was enjoyed at Nichols. Distance travelled 12.25 km.

Bruce and Marjorie

35. 18/10/2017. Hikers. Tomahawk. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce

34. 15/2/2017. Trampers. Highciff Road, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Paradise ‘Road’, Highcliff Road.

Our tramp started on Highcliff road. 11 of us today. Lovely to see Judy out again, also Bruce after his holiday. Also back again was Neil number 3 after an outing with us last
week. Along Karatei Road to McMeeking Road and past farmhouse. Got onto Highcliff track after our morning tea.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Some stunning views of Boulder beach,

Boulder Beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

farmland and the coastline. Along the side of the hill

Along the side of the hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

and down to not quite the beach.  It was closed for the penguins.
Passed the old houses and onto Paradise  track up to the road having lunch on the way.
Up the road then and back to our cars. Decided to go to the pool cafe at St Clair for our coffee debrief. A lovely trampall up. – Helen.

33. 8/6/2016. Hikers: Tomahawk/Smaills Beach. E. Leaders: Judy and Jay.
Nike Route Map.

Hikers’ Nike app Route Map.

A fine frosty morning found 30 hikers heading for the crematorium carpark.  We wandered down the track from the carpark corner out onto Tomahawk Road, and along to the Tomahawk School (now closed) for morning tea.
Unfortunately the planned walk up between the two lagoons could not be followed due to a last minute refusal from the land-owner.  So instead of a round trip, we turned into Oregon St and followed the track around the north lagoon, a pleasant walk in the bush.  The swans on the lagoon made a great sight (and noise) as they lumbered across the still waters and took flight from our invasion.
Across the style, and then a short climb up though the bush to a second style.  18 keen types carried on up the fence line for another 10 minutes, enjoying the views on such a marvellous morning.  (This track continues on up to the Soldiers’ Monument on Highcliff Rd.)

Calm lagoon, from Peg 14 track. (Sharyn pic.)

Calm lagoon, from 41 Peg track. (Sharyn pic.)

The rest wandered back down the track to wait at the picnic tables for the others to return.
Then it was back out to Tomahawk Rd, and a long pull up the hill past the gun emplacements, …

White Island, from gun emplacements.

Islet off Smaills Beach, taken  from WWII gun emplacements area.

… across the Centre Rd junction and down to the Tautuku Fisherman’s Lodge …

The notable Glen Cairn stone house. Originally owned by the Smaill family, early 1880 settlers in the area. (Sharyn pic.)

The notable Glen Cairn stone house. Built by the Smaill family, early 1880s settlers in the area. (Sharyn pic.)

… for lunch.  With no-one in residence there we had to crawl under the barrier arm and across the cattle stop, a good exercise in balance!
After a leisurely lunch,

Leisurely lunch. (Judy pic.)

Leisurely lunch at the Lodge. Where’s Fred off to with his chocs? (Judy pic.)

Ah, here's Fred. Good one!. Gotcha!. (Judy pic.)

Ah, here he is. Gotcha! Good one! Thanks, Fred, for the weekly treats. (Judy pic.)

it was back up the hill to the bus terminus, then through the track to the sand-hills and down to the beach.  A good low tide allowed some to explore the cave …

Exploring small cave at northern end of Tomahawk Beach. (Adrienne pic.)

Exploring small cave at northern end of Tomahawk Beach. (Adrienne pic.)

… at the end of the beach before proceeding to the far end, then out to the road and back up to the cars.
Coffee at Nicholls was enjoyed before it got too cold to hang around!
– Judy and Jay.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce

Bruce

32. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

31. 15/7/2015. Trampers. Buskin Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track. After a bit of a mix up over pickup points, we parked up beside Penzance Kennels, where we had a discussion on which way we would tackle the days walk. We settled on going down Buskin Track & worrying about the return journey later.
The track was mostly dry apart from a few areas where it has been damaged by water scouring it out quite badly. As two of the party of three, had never been there before we took some time to check out the cribs [baches] at the bottom of the track.We also came across an employee of Otago Pest Destruction [I think that’s what they are called] who was happily banging a possum on the head, after it got caught in one of his traps. He said he got 27 the day before, so much for a possum free peninsula !!!
We then made our way out to the beach for some boulder hopping practice, before gaining the sand at the northern end. As we passed by the log shelter I noticed an intruder lying inside, looking very cosy indeed.

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

It lifted its head to survey me for about two seconds, then just went back to sleep ! What a life !!
We wandered along the beach wondering where all the sand had gone, the bank holding the tussock is badly eroded, & about 1 meter high. So now, there is no way for the Yellow Eyed Penguins to climb up & get to their nests further up the hill.
We walked back past the intruder in it’s cosy shelter,

3 Anothe shot of the intruder.

3 Another shot of the intruder.

& had lunch sitting on a large bit of driftwood,

Boulder Beach, Otago Peninsula New Zealand

1 Lunch spot at Boulder Beach

before walking up Braidwood Rd. to the gate into the paddocks leading along to the Double Bay area, where I had an unsuccessful look for the viewing hide I had seen at an earlier date, but the vegetation had me beat, so we retraced our steps around to the bottom of Paradise Track, made our way up there, & back along Highcliff Rd. to the car.

We walked 10km
ave 3.3km/h
climbed 475m – Ken

30. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
4.1km/h
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water …

Ducks on ice. (Eleanor pic.)

… or swans trying to get out of frozen water?

Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic.)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.

Soldiers’ Memorial. (Eleanor pic.)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…

Tarseal Road. (Eleanor pic.)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk. (Eleanor pic.)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil.
29. 29/1/2014. Hikers. John Wilson Drive, Golf Course, Beach, Cave, Tomahawk Lagoon, return Lawyers Head Paper Road. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
A few of the over Christchurch over 40s Tramping Club contingent lodging for the week at Waiora Scout Camp went off with our Trampers but the majority at the car park threw in their lot with the Hikers. The task for the Christchurchian cars to navigate through the city to the St Kilda playground adjacent to the John Wilson Drive was made easier by someone’s suggestion that locals spread themselves out amongst their cars as pilots and that worked well.
When we were eventually all gathered at the beginning of John Wilson Drive, Marjorie counted 51 of us. An all-time record? The views along the drive, with the Chisholm Park Golf Links and city on one side, the beach and sea on the other, was remarked upon by all. Further there were no cars to bother us this early in the day. It was time for morning tea when we reached Lawyers Head, one of a series of basaltic headlands which punctuate much of this section of the Otago coast, (others nearby being Maori Head and Blackhead). This one is named for the likeness of the cliff face to the profile of a lawyer in traditional legal wig, …

Lawyers Head.

… so we supped our cuppas  around the Leonard Wright memorial at the Head.

Lawyers Head Lookout.

Hidden hard nearby was a narrow steep track connecting down to the golf links, around whose Lawyers Head coastal edge the leaders had gained permission for us to single-file our way. We found ourselves right on the crest of the Lawyers Head cliff, the Tomahawk beach stretching out below us. We made quite a strung-out sight.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless applauded tee shot.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless ironically applauded tee shot at the end of our links perimeter stroll.

Now down and away from the links along another narrow, but lengthier track out and across to the Tomahawk Road.

A long line.

Looking back upon another strung-out sight.

We emerged upon a playground on Tomahawk Road.

The suburb beyond us, now called Ocean Grove, was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name being, not a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”. (Wiki).
We descended the road a little way to the lower of the twin-lobed Tomahawk Lagoon, this lobe being its outer one,  whose outlet we skirted on its true left to emerge onto the Tomahawk Beach.
The day’s trip had been selected for one of Dunedin’s low-tides, so the beach was ours, as was the small tidal cave at its end, an addition to the area’s features.

Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Up a small but energetic sand-hill and we were on another track out to the road again, down it a bit, and into a side road leading to yet another side route and out onto a recreation area alongside Tomahawk Lagoon’s inner lobe, this one a wildlife reserve, although both lobes are noted for their bird life.

Here was to be the lunch stop, but prior to that there was a short walk up alongside the lakelet to where our local club members knew of a Trampers’ track leading up to a soldiers’ memorial on by the Peninsula high road. But this was to just to wander the level part of track and enjoy (??) at one spot a strong pong from the the slightly stagnant waters and mud verge. (Roll on a storm flush!)

So we lunched leisurely, variously at tables and on ledges until our leaders judged it time for the return journey.

Out on the road, a motor cyclist stopped to talk and admire our impressive size. He was glad to hear we were returning by the Lawyers Head paper road and invited us to notice the “use it or lose it” graffiti posted in a couple of places before its entrance. (Apparently the City Council proposed closing it.) We were going to be a wonderful “use it” example.

The ‘road’ led us through a corner of the Andersons Bay Cemetery, close by the towering Crematorium and out through the Chisholm Park Golf links. Then across the Pirates Football Club pitch and we were at our cars again and adjacent to a useful new toilet block by the playground.

Now came farewells and dispersal time. There were many appreciative remarks from the Christchurch Club members about the unique difference of such a walk, with its wonderful unexpected variations. ‘The best of their week so far’ was one comment.

I know our club felt quite proud to hear such unstinted praise, and of course are so indebted to Marjorie and Bruce for their careful planning, taking into account the meal stops, the permissions sought, and the trip duration. Bravo. Of course the day’s excellent weather didn’t hurt either. – Ian.

28. 28/11/2012. Trampers. Tomahawk, Soldiers Monument, Buskin Track, Highcliff,  Karatai Rd

GPS Tomahawk Soldiers Monument Buskin Track Karatai Rd, courtesy Ken.

Lunch at junction of Boulder Beach tracks. (Ken caption and pic)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic)

27. 26/9/2012. Trampers. Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road.

Karetai

Six of us parked at Smaills Beach car-park. We had dropped the idea of Silver Peaks because of the forecast rain with its fog. As we went up Karetai ‘Road’, we reached the rain level at our tea break and had to ‘parka-up’. We turned off further up onto the Highcliff Track …

Boulder Beach from Highcliff Track

and round to Beatties Cottage where we lunched. We didn’t bother going down to the beach but lazed in the sunshine (temporary but happily well-timed) in the shelter of the cottage’s large hedge from the wind.
The climb up Paradise Track gets no shorter but by and large, with its couple of zig-zags, provides a good gradient.
Along Highcliff Road, we forewent turning down the Buskin Track, with its promised steep climb back up the Highcliff Track, and carried on to the Karetai Road turnoff, returning down it to the cars.
Surprisingly Ken’s GPS recorded we had done 14.5 kms! A useful day’s walk. – Ian

26. 1/6/2011. Both. Bowls Stadium, Cemetery, beach, Fishing Club, Karetai Rd, Smaills Beach, return. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Select only coastal part of GPS for this route. GPS Courtesy Ken. Distance travelled = 11.7km Moving time = 2hr 46min. Moving ave. = 4.2k/hr Stopped time = 1hr 50min.

Twenty-three hikers and trampers set off from the Westpac Bowls Stadium in Tahuna Road at 1000 in cool cloudy conditions and went up the grass verge between the road and the Chisholm Park golf links before entering the first gate on the right to the Andersons Bay cemetery. We walked through part of the cemetery before continuing down the hill, watching some horses train behind a motor vehicle, and crossing the bridge over the outlet from the Tomahawk Lagoon. Immediately over the bridge we followed a gravel road alongside the outlet stream and then, after 80 metres,  a track alongside the stream down to the beach where trucks were removing sand, probably for attempting to remedy the erosion at Middle Beach.

Truck and loader for removing sand from Tomahawk beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We proceeded along the length of the beach to the two caves at the far end and had morning tea on the rocks there. Some inspected the cave, risking getting wet feet in the process with high tide approaching at 1430.

Morning tea near the caves at Tomahawk Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After morning tea we ascended the sand hill to the Tomahawk Road and continued down the private road to the Tautuku Fishing Club, Dunedin and Haast Inc. We arrived there at approximately 1130 and were kindly shown around and given a history of the Club and the fine bluestone building by the club president Brett Bensemann.

Tautuku Fishing Club premises. (Pic: Ken. Caption: Bruce.)

Bob pic.

Bob pic.

The building was originally the homestead of Alexander Smaill and was bought by the club, together with some surrounding land, by the Club in 1972 for $5000.
At 1205 we continued up Karetai Road for 15-20 minutes

Bruce on Karatai Rd. track with others in the background. (Ken pic and caption.)

to the corner near the style leading to a black and white Geodesic Trig on the right.

About nine of the group, following a route pioneered by Ken, went down to the trig …

Ken at the Geodesic Trig looking towards Sandymount (Bruce pic and caption.)

… and then contoured around on a track

Bob pic.

back to the lower reaches of Karetai Road while the others retraced their steps down the non-rutted road in good  condition for walking. We lunched in a sheltered area close to the start of the first track on the left leading from the road to Smaill’s Beach.
After lunch we proceed to the beach via three routes, necessitated by a slip which had damaged the track (a) up the sand hills to avoid the slip, (b) via a narrow edge beside the river, or (c) retreating back to the gate and taking an alternative direct to the beach instead of going alongside the river bank. After briefly looking at the windswept beach and the offshore Bird Island (which has claimed many lives on account of a strong under-current including William and Thomas Henderson of Tomahawk  in about 1900)

Doug and others leaving Smaill’s Beach with Bird Island in the background. (Bruce pic and caption.)

we climbed back up to the gun emplacements at the Jack Fox lookout. Two six inch Vickers coastal defence guns were part of a network of coastal batteries during WW2. The guns were removed  in 1945. A cluster of three similar batteries were present at Taiaroa Head  and the mother of one of the group nursed there.
We returned to the cars via Tomahawk Road, Luke Street, the disused Tomahawk School, the soccer playing fields and the cemetery grounds which we entered via the pedestrian entrance on the left a short distance above the bridge. We arrived back at 1445 somewhat wind buffeted but knowing more about Porbeagle Sharks which are only caught in the local area. (For more information about the Tautuku Fishing Club see: Tautuku Fishing Club) – Bruce.

25. 23/9/2009. Hikers. Tomahawk, Centre Road. Medium. Leaders Arthur and Barbara.

24. 4/6/2008 Both. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial, Centre Road. Leaders: Joyce, Ian, Lesley G
Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Three shaggy dogs

Three Irish Wolfhounds

23. 26/9/2007 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Memorial. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Although the day dawned very cold, overcast and threatening to rain, 8 intrepid Hikers turned up at Glascow St. carpark for the day’s tramp from Tomahawk Lagoon. In spite of weather we had a very happy and enjoyable day. We left cars in car park by the Lagoon and set off up the track to WW 1 Soldiers Memorial on Highcliff. Although track was very wet and muddy it is now much improved to what it used to be when we tramped in the area many years ago. Morning tea was a very welcome and refreshing break in the slippery slog up the hill. Up to the Monument and lovely views of our beautiful harbour.

Peninsula Soldiers’ Memorial

Highcliff Rd to Centre Rd. was pretty cold but we soon warmed up. Then we had the great views over the other side of the Peninsula. Found a nice sheltered spot for our lunch and were vastly entertained by a very interested audience of 3 Irish Wolfhound dogs. Hard to say whether dogs or people were most fascinated.
Down the road and round the corner, back to cars after an enjoyable, sociable and refreshing day out. – Bev.
22. 25/7/2007. Trampers. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial. Moderate. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

21. 14/2/2007. Trampers. Boulder Beach, Karetai, Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders; Bruce and Marjorie.

20. 31/1/2007. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Mary M.

19. 13/4/2005. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Rosemary and Jack.

18. 3/12/2003. Hikers: Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Dot T

17. 29/10/2003. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Joan H, Chris.

16. 14/5/2003 Hikers. Karetai Road, Boulder Beach. Medium.Leaders: Colleen, Betty

15. 11/4/2002 Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Ray, Les W

14. 20/3/2002. Alt. Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Smaills Beach. Medium. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

13. 15/8/2001. Alt. Tomahawk, Karetai. Leaders: Nancy, Val, Peg C.

12. 11/4/2001. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Les W.

11. 19/7/2000. Boulder Beach, Karetai Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris, Joan H.

10. 23/2/2000. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Ria H.

9. 30/6/1999 Tomahawk Lagoon. Centre Road. Leaders: Jean Y, Denise, Eleanor W

8. 12/8/1998. Highcliff Centre Road from Lagoon. Leaders: Molly, Frank.

7. 18/3/1998. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road round trip. Leaders: Jean, Ria H.

6. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean

5. 18/9/1996. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Chris, Joan H, Ngaire.

4. 13/4/1994 Tomahawk Lagoon, Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Buskin Road, Soldiers Track and return. Medium. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, June G, Betty H

3. 8/7/1992.  Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Centre Road. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, Bev H, Merle

2. 7/3/1991. Cars park Karetai Road Car Park. Karetai Road from car park. A good peninsula walk. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret S, Les W, Jack M.

1. 12/7/1989 Centre Road, Highcliff. Average +. Leaders: Kees & Ria, Diana
B, Ria H

 

 

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Jun 20 2020

Michelles Farm, North Side Taieri River, Outram

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 87 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Michelle’s Farm Outram Farm”

11 km from car park.

 

Park under Outram Bridge. Contacts: Seek 3 permissions
Proceed east side of Taieri River along gravel road to gravel pit.  Bear right uphill to power lines. Follow generally along grass farm tracks to top of hill.
Landmarks: Trig marker on right; also obvious paper road between two fence lines; Long barn on right (good for lunch stop); large wool shed on top of hill straight ahead (this is still on Hyslop’s property.
Straight on access is to Taioma Road but we don’t usually go that far!
Plenty of mushrooms in April – take a bag!
17/6/2020. Trampers. Nichols Farm. M. Leader: Gordon
From the carpark under the Outram Bridge 24 members started the walk beside the Taieri River in nice weather but with forecast for rain at 1.00pm. At the end of this track we turned off and headed up hill. Parts of this were quite steep but finally reached a nice flat spot for morning tea.
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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Still slogging up hill”.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Morning tea stop”

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “Hurrah finally levelling out.”

Heading uphill again after smoko we soon came out on to  grass paddocks and continued  on a gentle gradient to the cattle-yards at the top.  from there walked a short distance before heading downhill on a steep ridge to the start of a small pine forest at the bottom, about ½ km from main road.
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Photo and Caption Wendy – “Haven’t seen those people for a while!”

From there we walked a short distance before heading downhill on a steep ridge to the start of a small pine forest at the bottom, about ½ km from main road.
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Photo and caption – “Wandering thru the trees”.

A pleasant walk through the trees to a farm track which we followed uphill to a stile where we crossed into Walmsley’s property. Followed cattle track down to gully then along foothills to lovely lunch spot with terrific views.
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Photo and Caption John – “Comfortable lunch spot”.

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Photo and Caption Gordon – “What a view”.

After lunch carried on along foothills before returning into forestry for assent to top after climbing through neighbours.
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Photo and Caption John – “Panorama from the top”

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Photo and Caption Helen – “Who’s watching who?”

After a “Pow Wow” at top, decision was made to head back on shorter route to cars which also allowed time for refreshments and catch up at Wobbly Goat. A good day to start off the tramping calendar after all the lock downs I really enjoyed it.   Gordon.

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Jun 19 2020

Mary Young, Club Member 1987-2011, 24 years.

Published by under Uncategorized

Mary Young died on the 19th of June, 2020, aged 88 years. She joined the Taieri Recreational Group on 21/1/1987 and was on the Steering Committee helping it to became a Club on 4/3/1988. She resigned in 2011, concluding a membership of 24 years.

Nine present and former Club members attending her funeral on 26/6/2020, were: Ian Fleming, George and Elizabeth Haggie, Chris Hughes, Ria Lippers, Doug Moir, Denise Pearce, Margaret Smith, and Dot Taiaroa.

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Jun 19 2020

Woodhaugh Gardens and Leith

Published by under Hikers,Year round

19 km from car park.
10. 17/6/2020. Hikers. Woodhaugh gardens and the University area. Dawn Pool and Pam Clough.
 20 people from the Hiking Group had a very pleasant 7k walk from the yacht club car park up 260 steps to the botanical gardens, where we enjoyed a beautiful view and morning tea.
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We then wound our way down through the grounds, enjoying lots of things on the way, arriving at the duck pond, where we stopped for lunch.
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 An interesting walk through the University and back to the cars.
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 Just as the weather changed we reached the cafe by the stadium and all enjoyed a hot drink before heading back home.
Hope the trampers enjoyed their day.
Regards
Dawn Pool

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