Jun 13 2018

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2018

Winter Start Time: 9.30 a.m.

20 June.
Trampers: Greenacre Street/Boulder Beach. M-H. $5.00. Dave.
Hikers: Wingatui Viaduct/Taioma.* M. $3.00. Jenny and Shona.

27 June.
Trampers: Machine Creek* M-H. $7.00. Sue.Bullring loop. M-H. $3.00. Helen.
Hikers: Clarendon area/whale fossil* M. $8.00. Outram Ramble. $3.00. About 10 km. No hills. Boots best for farm bits. Peter and Wendy.

4 July:
Combined: . Mosgiel subdivision street walk. E. Peter D and Jan Y.

*****Mid-Winter Dinner.*****

Weavers Retreat 12.00 p.m. for 12.30 p.m.

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Jun 13 2018

Chain Hills-Friends Hill Tramps

Published by under Hikers

No. 102 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Friends Hill Chain Hills Year Round”
Saddle Hill Hotel

38. 13 Jun 2018. Trampers. Friends Hill circuit. Leader: Janene.

As I was quickly sweeping the outside doorway, 12 trampers arrived, enthusiastic about what I had in store.

The weather was cool (not cold) and clear as 13 trampers set off from The Pixie Patch, Friends Hill and crossed the road onto the start of the well known ‘Chain Hills’ walking track. After passing the water reservoir we turned left downhill and followed a track along the bottom gully, passing the entrance to the old railroad tunnel …

The old railway tunnel. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… before ever so elegantly scrambling over the barbwire fence (it had been lowered!) Now on Abbotsroyd Farm we all powered up a sizeable hill, the promise of a coffee break at the top deterring any breathless moments, to find a magnificent few of Abbotsford, Green Island, Saddle Hill and all surrounds. While on our refreshment break, the whistle blew and along came the Fonterra train passing along just below us.

So this is what’s on the other side of the hill. (Phil pic and caption.)

All that replenishing and the long downhill traverse with excellent footing saw us speedily depart Abbotsroyd and venture onto road-walking for a while. North Taieri Road then Abbotts Hill Road was a steady climb turning to a track then reaching the tarseal of Mount Grand Road.

Scotch mist o’er Abbotsroyd. (Phil pic and caption.)

The weather had started to slowly deteriorate with a misty fog surrounding us. From there the steady climb turned ’real grunty!’ Come on people – was a lovely avenue of huge old macrocarpa trees at the top and I did allow a lunch break there!

Lunch under the trees. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After lunch we continued, somewhere along the way the road changed from Mt Grand to Dalziel Road, and at the Mt Grand reservoir we turned into Brinsdon Road for more ‘gentle’ climbing, passing through the ‘no vehicles’ track on to Halfway Bush Road which also at some unknown point becomes Friends Hill! The downhill …

Heading back to the cars. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… was a little treacherous and all that mud sure stuck to the boots – and the promised views were detained in the fog – but we had no muddy bums and no complaints (that I heard). Probably because we had coffee and eats at the Pixie Patch afterwards, and everyone went in the front door after I swept the main doorway!!

13.3km covered in great company and I delivered some walnut cookies from afternoon tea to Abbotsroyd the next day. – Janine.

37. 17 Jan 2018. Hikers. Friends Hill Road. M. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Route Map, courtesy Ian, not including racecourse walk.(Ian pic and caption.)

We parked at the Wingatui Racecourse. From there 23 hikers set out in very pleasant temperatures for a trek up Friends Hill Road

Road (Clive pic and caption.)

to the top gate where we stopped for morning tea.

morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

We then set off for a walk round farmland with views over the  Taieri.  We made our way to a little cottage that was first built about 15 years ago as a B & B but was never completed inside.

A surprising substantial unfinished cottage. (Ian pic and caption.)

Unfortunately the door didn’t do its job properly so the starlings made good use of the free accommodation leaving behind a carpet of their own making!!!

From there we carried on this farmland which backs on to Invermay to a track through a stand of Manuka trees and then made our way to our lunch spot which was at the home of tramper, Janine Hearn who kindly said we could sit on her deck, enjoy the views and walkaround her lovely garden.

A friendly tramper who lives on Friends Hill said we could use her back garden for lunch – Thanks Janine. (Clive pic and caption.)

 After lunch we headed back to the cars and five of us did a circuit of the racecourse and the rest opted to go for coffee at Blackstone.  – Jay and Jan

36. 2 Aug 2017  Both. Fairfield to Friends Hill. M.  Leaders: Keith and Shona.

It was drizzly and cold as we gathered at the Bush Rd car park.

After considerable discussion 20 people caught the bus …

What does the Taieri Recreational Tramping Club do and a wet cold winters day – They catch a bus and head for the hills! (Clive pic and caption.)

… to Fairfield, where further discussion occurred before Keith led the group along and up Flower St to the morning tea stop in the trees.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to start it only at morning tea stop! so add 1 km from Flower St bus stop. Tunnel diversion for the “8” added 3 km. Do your own math for your total.

We headed up the track to Chain Hills Road where we met Janine and her little dog Rocky.

After about an hour we made it to the top of Chain Hills Road that was covered in mist with constant rain. (Clive pic and caption.)

By then the drizzle had eased and after the first downhill, …

Among the gum trees on the descent of Chain Hills. (Clive pic and caption.)

… 8 went [yet further! – Ed] down with Janine to inspect the Wingatui tunnel …

Eight of the more intrepid trampers branched off to view [& walk! – Ed] the old [800m – Ed.] railway tunnel [end to end, return! – Ed.].  Several found the novel way down [the first track – Ed.] by sitting down in the mud (unintentionally)! (Clive pic and caption.)

… and the rest negotiated the muddy track, climbed the stile and moved into Janine’s home to eat lunch. (Thanks, Janine.)

As we left, the 8 appeared [back up! – Ed.] over the stile and we all meandered back to Mosgiel, 7 having coffee at Blackstone.The remainder had disappeared (?) home for coffee, showers or even lunch for some. – Keith and Shona.

35. 19 Jul 2017. Trampers. Chain Hills. Leader: M. Helen.

A nice tramp today. Starting from Gladstone Rd and walking up hill over the top of the motorway. Turned onto Chain Hill Road. Found a nice spot for our morning tea on the top of a hill overlooking Mosgiel.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

View from top of inversion layer over Mosgiel. (Helen pic and caption.)

The 12 of us then proceeded along the ups and downs along to the end. Turning left over the stile and the down through the paddocks to Friends Hill Rd. Down to the racecourse where we sat in luxury in the grandstand for our lunch.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

Chen a leisurely walk along Gladstone Rd back to our cars. Coffee for 9 of us at Blackstone’s. Lovely day and a nice 12.2km tramp. – Helen.

34. 10/5/2017. Hikers. Friends Hill, Chain Hills, Gladstone Road. M. Clive, Jay and Jan.

Nike app route map, courtesy Ian.

Autumn on the Taieri.   One of those Southern days of sunshine found an intrepid band of hikers (16) setting out from Wingatui racecourse to walk up Friends Hill and then across country to Chain Hills Road.   The going to start with was steep and a challenge for some,  but then it came to the stile to get onto the public pathway to Chain Hills Road; the step up to stile was about a meter and made for more limber people.   Well all rose to the challenge and made it over the stile to the sheep pens at the top of the hill where we rested for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and watched the fog in the valley roll away.    By now the temperature had risen to the promised 17 degrees and jumpers and fleecy jacket were shed to climb the next couple of hills to Chain Hills Road.   It was then we found that the first stile was just a taster for the next two stiles that were very high and over barbed wire.    Some gentleman from years past laid down his coat so that the ladies did not snare their stocking on the barbed wire. [’twas the reporter! – Ed.]    We gained Chain Hills Road by 11 o’clock so it was a nice walk along the ridge line to arrive above Mosgiel just before midday and a spot to sit and eat lunch.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

A herd of friendly cows watched from across the road and then when they realized we were not there to feed them showed their opinion in that unique bovine manner – pats all round.

Thanks for the view too, Clive, as well as all the above. (Clive pic, Ian caption.)

The walk off Chain hills had the leader focused on road safety and the safest way to negotiate Morris Road (a busy road), down to Quarry Road.   Then it was along the flat back to Wingatui to pick up the cars for afternoon tea and Blackstones cafe.   I think we got a suntan on the way! – Clive.

33. 18/5/2016. Hikers. Flower Street, Friends Hill, Wingatui, Car Park. M. Leaders: Keith and Shona.
Hikers' Route.

Hikers’ Route. Morning Tea stop in rain at about 1 km. Lunch in sun at 6 km. Coffee at 10.6 km.

18 Went by bus from outside the Mosgiel Post Office, arriving Flower St, Fairfield about 9.30 a.m.

Wandered up to the top of Flower St to have morning tea in the gum trees, as there was still drizzly rain falling.

Rain eased and we progressed over the stile and up the grass track, exiting onto Chain Hills Rd. After turning right, followed it to the end. Negotiated the stile there safely and followed the fence line down, up, and around, …

Green Island(?) from Flower Street. (Sharyn pic.)

Green Island from a ‘down’ paddock. (Sharyn pic.)

Wingatui from Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

Wingatui from above Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

… eventually exiting onto Friends Hill Rd.

Walked to Wingatui Race Couse for lunch, where there were toilets and dry seats in the grandstand for the rain had stopped. Made our way down Wingatui Rd, through track, across Haggart Alexander Drive, down Green st to end at Blackstone Cafe for a coffee. – Shona and Keith.

32. 11/6/2014. Hikers. Chain Hills, Flower Street. M. Leaders: Pam, Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Cars parked foot of Coalstage Rd, Morris Rd overpass, Chain Hills Rd, Flower St, Kennedy Rd, Walkway, Main Rd, Park by Fairplay St, Main Rd, Saddleview Pl, Underpass, Saddle Hill Rd, Coalstage Rd again. Distance: 8.93 km; Fastest 4.78 kph; Slowest 3.73 kph.

Pam and Dawn led us, thirty strong this trip, on a route largely familiar to most, but a little less so to this reporter. We took the SH1 overpass, stretched out indian-file, making quite a picture no doubt to motorists passing underneath, to judge by the horn toots we got.
Bridge

Overpass. (John pic)

Down Morris Road to turn sharply up Chain Hills Road.

We ‘morning-teaed’ at the red spot on the map between kilometer marks two and three on the GPS map.
Panorama

The customary morning tea spot on Chain Hills Road. (John pic)

A little further on as we took the Chain Hills Road right fork taking us down to Fairfield. The top of Flower Street lay through private land, guarded by locked gates provided with not-very-accommodating styles.

Style queue

The style at the Flower Street top locked gate. (John pic)

Further down again (or was it higher up?) we came across this mock farmyard, complete with tractor, water wheel, cow, et al.

Glove

A rubber glove udder for a tinny cow. (John pic)

Down in the paved part of Flower Street we were taken with a letter box making industry operating out of a private property.

Letter Boxes to order

Letter Boxes made to order.

Then it was into Kennedy Road, out through a walkway to emerge on the Main Road and on to lunch at a park abutting Fairplay Street.
Collage

Collage of lunch groups (John collage)

From there it was further up the Main Road, then to be pleasantly surprised by the leaders taking us not via the customary Morris Road but by Saddleview Terrace and through the SH1 underpass and up, very steeply up, Saddle Hill Road to Coalstage Road. A short distance along and we stopped to admire Janice’s house and to farewell her down the driveway. Then it was just on down back to the cars.

A good day out, despite an icy edge to the light wind at times. Thank you, leaders. – Ian.
31. 12/3/2014. Hikers. Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
We parked our cars  up Quarry Rd to the right of the overbridge on the north side of the
Saddle Hill.
25 fit and healthy Hikers started up over the bridge and up Chains Hill Rd.
We were met early on by a very fit brown lab dog who followed us all the way …
Dog

Dog (Pic John)

… to the morning tea stop.

Morning tea

Morning tea. (John, pic.)

It sat down and waited while we ate and sipped our tea and water.

Continuing on, we arrived at the Chain Hills Rd end. I thought the dog would have gone home. The DOG sat down and waited till we all leaped over the stile (some climbed carefully).
The DOG then left and went home.
Lunch was at a cosy spot …

Sheltered lunch spot

Sheltered lunch spot (John, Panorama pic.)

… out of the wind.
Fred gave out chocs.
The ground was even and not at all muddy. The views are worth stopping for to catch a breath.
When we reached Gladstone Rd North, we walked to the Wingatui Hall where we had cunningly had a car parked for those who needed a lift back  to the cars up saddle hill. Several Hikers took up the offer and Fred transported them up to their cars. We continued down Gladstone Rd North to the z station, then up quarry rd back to the cars.
Several hikers took up the offer of going for coffee to Wals at the end of the day. (Can’t guess who. – Ed)
A very hot day enjoyed by all. – Elaine.
30. 11/12/2013. All.  Friends Hill, Chain Hills. End of Year finger-food lunch at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS of route

GPS of route from Friends Hill to Chains Hill road, return.

Our leaders had to change our end of year location. Berwick Camp had been already booked. Where to plan the tramp? A brilliant choice. From the Hall, up Friends Hill to the stile and across the poled route to the Chain Hills road end for morning tea. It was the first time this reporter remembers doing the route UP from ‘Friends’ to “Chain’. He discovered how much easier it is doing the reverse route DOWN. The trampers among us were not disappointed either. Bravo, leaders. Our shared lunch was  another successful end-of-year treat. Thanks to Bruce for leading us in a sing-a-long. Happy holidays. – Ian.
29. 28/3/2012. Hikers. Chain Hills. Leader: Graham.
28. 23/11/2011. Hikers. Fairfield circuit, Fairfield. Leaders: Graham, Wendy.
27. 29/6/2011 Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
Start Carpark at Saddle Hill overbridge,
to end of Chain Hills road,
across farmland …
Single

“Single File please people.” (As if we could do anything else.)(Bob pic and caption)

Downhill

Pleasant downhill walking. (Bob pic and caption)

What

Lunch queue? A good spot actually with shelter, sun, and log seats laid on. (Bob pic and caption)

Fred

Fred jealously guards his chocolates. (Bob pic and caption)

… down to Friends’ Hill Road.
Good leadership – except that Quasimodi challenged for the leader’s role, …
Quasi

Quasimodo joins the group. (Bob pic and caption)

… the leader threw down the gauntlet (ie orange jerkin), and the usurper reigned, …

gauntlet

Quasimodo surges into the lead. (Bob pic and caption)

…  and misled the people at one point,
at which the the old guard led the errant followers correctly.
Along Gladstone Rd, and
up Quarry Rd to cars.
We started with 18 and with defections reduced to 6!!
A lovely walk. Great weather. – Bob.
26. 26/1/2011. Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
Some 18 of us (the number varied a little at points in the walk) set out from the bridge carpark on Saddle Hill on a fine and calm morning, continued up Chain Hills Road with morning tea at the “potato planter” (pictured),

Morning tea by the potato planter. (Bob pic and caption)

Ditto. (Bob pic and caption)

across a small piece of farmland by the reservoir (where there was the possibility of a confrontation with a cattle beast

Does he want to have a beef with us? (Bob pic and caption)

– but avoided because of the amiable nature of all on two or four feet ) and so onto Flower St, Fairfield, and past several novel garden ornaments, one of which is pictured.

Neill admonishes the little people. (Bob pic and caption)

Lunch stop was at the park with shelter from the hall wall against the strengthening wind, and chocolates from Fred, and the last part of the round-trip was up the old main road (Morris Rd) in gathering drizzle. A frequent topic of conversation was the ailments (and recovery) of various people present or absent, and the name of Don who used to come out with us but whom we haven’t seen for some time and whose name eluded several. [Donny Hunter? – Ed] ( I am reliably informed that there are no longer “senior moments”, but rather “intellectual pauses”.) Two new faces, Jim and Betty, came to ‘try us out’. Thanks to Frank and Leslie for leadership. – Bob M
25. 9/6/2010 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.

I guess that the residents themselves are their best critics. (Bill pic and caption)

24. 22/4/2009 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
23. 28/5/2008. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley
22. 23/1/2008. Hikers. Chain Hills to Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
21. 27/9/2006. Hikers. Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Eleanor W, Dot T.
20. 17/8/2005. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Leaders: Margaret S, Carmel.
19. 28/7/2004 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hills, Fairfield. From over-bridge. Leaders: Les W, Ray, Mary M.
Dunedin from Mount Grand

Dunedin from Mount Grand

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

18. 16/7/2003. Hikers. Overhead Bridge, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
17. 19/2/2003. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Trampers. Leaders: Donny, Graham.
16. 19/6/2002 Alt. Winter walk from Fairfield Tavern. road walk. Leaders: Joyce S, Eleanor
15. 29/5/2002. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Wendy, Graham.
14. 23/5/2001 Friends Hill. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary M, Val
13. 26/7/2000. Fairfield via Flower Street from carpark. Leaders: Lesley and Frank, Margaret D.
12. 24/5/2000 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hill Circuit. Leaders: Ronny, Irene, Hazel
11. 17/5/2000. Chain Hills – Circuit. From Fairfield Tavern. Leaders: Donny, Irene, Hazel
10. 10/6/1998. Wingatui, Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Peg C, Molly.
9. 1/3/1998 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Margaret D, Lance, Lois
8. 25/6/1997. Maurice Road, Fairfield, Chain Hills. Leaders: Betty B, Judith D, Mary Y.
7. 20/11/1996. Friends Hill and beyond. Meet at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B, Judith D.
6. 1/11/1996 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B
5. 19/6/1996. Chain Hills – Fairfield Tavern for lunch – Return Main Road. No fare. (Alternative to Pole Line) Leaders: Daphne, Evelyn M, Colleen.
4. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Medium. Leaders: Bob Q, Dot and Nelson, Molly.
3. 16/9/1992. Wingatui Friends Hill Rd Halfway Bush Rd Three Mile Hill Rd Dalziel Rd Brinsdon Rd return
2. 6/5/1992. Walk from Glasgow Street car park, Saddle Hill, Chain Hills, Wingatui. Easy. Leaders: Jack M, W Bathgate,
1. 9/8/1989. Wingatui Racecourse. Over the Hill. Easy+ Leaders: Betty, Molly, Ria.

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Jun 13 2018

Doctors Point area tramps

Published by under Beach,Hikers and tagged: , , ,

Distance from car-park to Waitati: 34 km.
Distance from car-park to Doctors Point: 38 km.
20. 13/6/2018. Hikers. Opeke Track and Orokonui Estuary Track. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.

This area is a popular one for the hikers. Especially at this time of the year when weather can be somewhat inclement. This Wednesday was one of those days. Dull and overcast, threatening rain. However, 27 turned out and once again enjoyed a pleasant relatively easy walk. The rain did start after lunch but was really only a misty-like drizzle, so not too unpleasant. We parked at Blacks Bridge as usual and had our morning tea before we started as it was well after 10am! Walked down Doctors Point Rd to the far end of the Opeke Track then back along the track, enjoying the views and scenery as we went. Were a bit early at the favourite lunch stop but decided just to have an early, leisurely lunch break anyway.

Then it was back along the road, in the the rain, to Chelivode St. and the start of the Estuary Track. We didn’t waste much time walking this track back to the cars as we were getting rather wet. We still enjoyed the bush, birds and views along the way though and everyone said they’d had a good day out in spite of the weather.

Adjourned to Blue Skin Café for after-hike refreshments and chat. – Bev, & Lesley

19. 2017 Jul 26. Hikers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Urupa. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
23 hikers reported for duty at the Doctor’s Point carpark on a calm winter’s morning.

The tide was still going out as we made our way along Canoe Beach, through the caves

Clive pic.

 to our morning tea stop at the bottom of Mapoutahi Pa.

Our pathway to Purakaunui Beach was almost blocked by a large tree which had fallen due to the recent floods.
Then, as we headed along the track towards Osborne Road we encountered deep water which made us retrace our steps and walk along the beach.

After a pleasant beach walk,we made our way through the trees to the Maori cemetery.

Clive pic.

We then retraced our steps back to Mapoutahi,where we planned to have lunch. This plan was quickly abandoned,as the incoming tide was threatening our route back to the cars.

Clive pic.

We eventually had lunch on the beach near Doctor’s Point.
 Time and tide wait for no Hikers!!! – Peter B.
18. 2017 Jun 21. Hikers. Orokonui Estuary & Opeke Tracks. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
On a cold, frosty but rather dank morning 27 keen hikers parked their cars at the parking/picnic area on Orokonui Rd., where the Estuary track starts. From there we walked the short distance back. to the Waitati Cemetery where we had morning tea.

Clive pic.

Quite a few people hadn’t been there before so were interested to have a look around the graves. As it was rather cold though we didn’t linger too long. On down Orokonui Rd. till we reached the little bridge crossing the Waitati river which brought us out onto Killarney St. at the end of which was a new bit of track with some board walk coming out onto Doctors Point Rd. From there it was along the road till we reached the far end of Opeke track. By this time we were all feeling somewhat warmer after a reasonably brisk walk. Then it was down onto the Opeke track. This is a very attractive and interesting walk which gives pleasure to the many people who use it. Locals and visitors alike. Near the end of this track is a short detour into an area that has some seats and great views across Blueskin Bay to Warrington and the other side of STH 1. Ideal for our lunch stop.

Wednesday’s walk was the nicest walk I have done. The plantings of native bush out there is so beautiful and the track was great as well. (Eleanor W pic and comment.)

We had a fairly leisurely lunch and then it was off again

At The cove was the royal blueskin Bay yacht club HQ just below the nesting tree of the Royal spoonbills. (Clive pic and caption.)

Clive pic.

to the end of the Opeke track and back onto Doctors Point Rd. The walk along the road helped to warm us up again as it had got a bit chilly sitting at lunch time!. We turned up Chelivode St. and along to the other end of the Estuary track. This took us back to the car park and the end of what everyone agreed was a most enjoyable and ideal walk for a winter”s day. The Estuary track is a lovely track with bush and birds plus lovely views. We all felt it a suitable one to repeat yearly. The day finished off as usual with coffee break at Blueskin Café. Lesley & Bev

17. 2016 Aug 31. E. Hikers. Orokonui Inlet Track via Orokonui Ecosanctuary exclosure fence lower gate. E. Leaders: Leslie and Bev.
Hikers' route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The "55.55' is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Hikers’ route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The “55.55′ is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Cars at tramp start.

Cars at tramp start.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

View from further up along fence.

View from further up along fence.

16. 2015 Jul 22. Hikers. Opeke and Orokonui Inlet track and back blocks of Waitati. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

What to start off with? Well, two things, actually. We are suffering a barrage of birthdays presently. Adrienne had a big one last Wednesday, Dorothy anticipates a bigger one next week and Ian a small one a few days ago. And the other? Maybe a record? A full twenty of the twenty-four hikers of the day socialised for coffee later. A beautiful Birthday Card, crafted by Pam and signed by all present, was presented to Dorothy, who responded with a most pretty speech.
Tramp matters. The day was calm and got really warm.
Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all.

Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all. (John pic)

Many who hadn’t been on the last visit to Opeke were struck with the embellishments added to the trackside. The CAR, and small limestone carvings to mention only two. We had parked at the bridge and road-walked between Opeke and the Orokonui Inlet Track.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch. (John pic)

Two birthdays

Two birthdays (John pic)

The track crowns the inlet’s head and finishes off along the Orokonui Road. We took the foot bridge across the Waitati Stream to skirt a back-blocks or two …

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye (john pic)

… before emerging onto the Doctors Point road and returning to the cars. Lesley and Bev had picked on doing this trek again, foregoing the earlier swap plan of exploring the Old Waitati Road area due to his colder shadiness under the hill. So thanks to Bev and Lesley for opening this newer area to even more Hikers. – Ian.

15. 2015 Apr 15. Hikers. Orokonui, Estuary and Opeke Track. E. Leaders: Bev and Lesley.

*** THE POEM ***

OROKONUI ESTUARY WITH THANKS TO LESLIE AND BOB

‘Twas a cold and windy morning – the sane ones stayed in bed.

But fourteen hardy hikers, bravely out were led.

They travelled to Waitati, the river was quite high –

They didn’t fancy wet feet, I can’t imagine why.

Instead, the estuary beckoned, with better shelter there.

With coats and hats and gloves on, they didn’t have a care.

 

The track was easy walking, through bush and flax and trees.

They lingered over morning tea, sheltered from the breeze.

A grassy bank was found for lunch, it wasn’t even wet.

John took lots of photos, you’ll see them on the net.

Leslie found a bird’s nest, she took it home to keep.

(I hope the birdies last night, did find somewhere to sleep).

 

On to Blueskin they did go, for coffee and a talk,

Joined by Jim and Betty, who didn’t do the walk.

Plans were laid for Luxmore, a short two weeks away,

With satisfaction they went home – It was a lovely day.

– Judy

***  THE REPORT ***

(Sorry, no route map. It seems a bug got into my application. Ian.)
On a day when only heroes and the mad go out, we found the Waitati Stream at the foot of the Waitati Valley Road too full to attempt the intended crossing. So leader Leslie, who with Bev had already recceed  the above  Orokonui Estuary walk set for later in the programme took fourteen of us on a route more suited to the day. We parked at the Estuary bridge and set off, well-clad in storm gear, to the Opeke track’s northern entrance for morning tea at the lovely setting of table and seating near its entrance. Fortunately although windy, (and here we were well sheltered) the day was dry.
Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa at the table and seats by the Opeke track.  (John pic)

We completed the Opeke circuit – for the first time in this reporter’s experience – in an anticlockwise direction. It’s so revealing viewing stuff when going in the opposite direction. As well, quite a number of improvements were there to be discovered, not least an old wreck of a car…

What's this alongside the track? (John pic)

What’s this alongside the track? (John pic)

…tied down and waiting to be wreathed in nature’s verdure – apparently!

Trekking back from Opeke, we turned off just short of the bridge up Chelivode street, passed a hay-baled house, and turned down a newly-made track to skirt the side of the Orokonui Estuary.

Track (John pic)

Track (John pic)

The track wound up, down and around through bush and paddock to emerge at the head of the estuary to cross swampy ground…

Solid (John pic)

A walkway across swamp, solidly built to last a lifetime.  (John pic)

…to reach the back yard of a number of farm sheds accessed from Orokonui Road. The track diverted down around a paddock or two to soon parallel the Orokonui Road on one side, and a heavily swollen Waitati Stream on the other.

Waitati Stream

Waitati Stream (John pic)

We lunched on a now sunny bank, still clad however in our parka-covered woolly underlays.

Lunch

Lunch. (John pic)

Further along,…

The nest referred toby Judy in her poem. (John pic)

The nest referred to by Judy in her poem. (John pic)

..and we crossed the stream via the Erne Street footbridge to walk along Killarney Street and turn into Foyle Street. Here we came across a garaged honesty stall featuring jams and sauces…

Garage (John pic)

Garage (John pic)

…and lingered a while. Then it was out onto Doctors Point Road, back to the cars and to resort to the Blueskin Nursery cafe,…

Coffee (John pic)

Coffee at Blueskin. (John pic)

…- all 14 of us, augmented by Jim and Betty who turned up.

Thank you to Lesley and Bev, ably supported by back-marker Bob keeping us safely together, for devising such an appropriate alternative for such a challenging day. – Ian.

14. 2015 Jan 21. Hikers. Doctors Point. Mapoutahi Pa, Forestry and Urupu, return. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Jim and Betty, who had been allocated leadership the last three visits to Doctor’s Point, gave the trip an original twist, – by dint of three recces to get matters precisely aligned to the tide. They led 29 of us to the Mapoutahi Pa site for the tea break.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site. (John pic)

Via the beach beyond the peninsula we turned off into the FWD through the sandhills, past the cliffs and on to the beginnings of the road proper, at the corner of the forestry. Here Jim opened the gate and led us past the following sign.

Urupu notice

Purakaunui Urupu notice at forestry’s entrance.

Another FWD track led us a considerable distance through the forest to terminate at a historic Maori graveyard.

A Urupu site

The Urupu site (John pic)

Betty and Jim then led us on through the forest by a route that they had previously explored and marked (well done!) to take us out to the inlet’s entrance, where there was quite a cold wind persuading several to don more protective garments.

Panorama

Panorama  of Potato Point and Purakauni. (John pic)

Only a little way down towards the beach Jim let us into a well-sheltered spot amongst Marram Grass for lunch, where a warm sun persuaded garment-offing again.

Lunch

Lunch (John pic)

The return walk along the beach took us over the neck of Mapoutahi Pa peninsula to happily reveal that there was still a stretch of navigable beach at the bottle-neck by the rockfall not yet swallowed up by the incoming tide.

Returning through cave

Returning through the cave. Thought this photo worth displaying. (John pic)

A walk back to the cars ended a most satisfying day, with all of us congratulating and thanking Jim and Betty for the quality time they invested into their recce. Thanks to them here, too. – Ian.

13. 2014 Mar 19. Hikers/ Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, return. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

GPS of Route

GPS of Route

This must be our most popular tramp, as we schedule it about twice a year. This time Arthur and Barbara gave us the full Waitati to Mapoutahi Pa road and beach walk, with Opeke for morning tea in between. The very low tide gave us the largest beach expanse this reporter has ever seen. The sea mist spoilt views but cleared just enough for us to glimpse the rail tunnel from the peninsula. The near record of 30 of us included three new members and one visitor. Thank you Barbara and Arthur for your good careful leadership. – Ian.
12. 2013 Oct 9. Hikers. Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Purakaunui inlet, Mapoutahi Peninsula. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of routes. First Opeke Walk. Second Drs Point to Purakaunui Inlet mouth, return, 8.53 km total.

We parked the cars first at Michies Crossing, and walked across the line Continue Reading »

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May 30 2018

Orbells Crossing, Northern Lawsons Farm

Published by under Trampers

est. 50 km from car-park.

Topo map of area

9. 30/5/2018. Orbells Crossing – Mountain Road.(Lawsons Farm.)  M-H. Arthur.

Map of route, courtesy Art.

Frost to begin with, but a sunny day followed for 11 Trampers to enjoy their exercise in.

We drove up Mountain Road from the north end and parked up.

The air was cold, but a brisk downhill walk in the sunshine took us to the bank of the Waikouaiti River where we had our smoko stop.

All important smoko. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Following the river bank upstream we soon encountered a pine plantation where the track was becoming overgrown with blackberry and gorse. You would have expected that a consciention leader would have done some track clearing!

This was the only bad patch for the day, as we were were out on grazed paddocks from then on.

Passing the junction of the two branches of the Waikouaiti River, we continued up the south branch and soon came out on a lovely river flat. On leaving the river we had a long climb, with a reasonable gradient,

Onwards and upwards. (Phil pic and caption.)

to eventually find our lunch spot on the ridge top.

Lunch among the tussocks. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Lunch with a view – a little snow was on top of Lamb Hill, Mount Misery, (Bendoran Huts had been visible a few metres back). We were looking at Mount Watkins

Reflecting on Mt Watkins (Phil pic and caption.)

as we ate, and Maori Peak, Karitane, etc, further round.

A very slight south-east, but very chilly breeze was present, and we faced into it for the return journey. Following the ridge down, and then on a slippery (newly graded) track requiring care.

Heading back to cars. (Gordon pic and caption.)

In time we came to Mountain Road, which is the old wagon road from the early days of Otago, and eventually arrived back at our cars.

We had covered a distance of about 10.5 km. Our club had last tramped here in 2012, but none of our group had been here before.

A new tramp is always welcomed, and we had a great day in the sunshine, enjoyed by all.

Blueskin Nurseries enjoyed our patronage on the way home. The Hikers arrived in too. – Art.

8. 18/1/2012. Trampers. Orbells Crossing, Mountain Road Track. Medium.

 

Ken's GPS tracking of tramp

Ken’s GPS tracking of tramp

Three of us, & Fin the dog went on the tramp to Lawson’s Farm at the North end of the Silverpeaks, in the Waikouaiti River valley.

Morning Tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

It was a very warm day, so we took advantage of the shade where we could. As I was the only one who had been there before, I put the previous tramp from there onto my GPS, & we followed that route up to where we had previously had lunch, but as it was only 11:00am at this time, we just rested in the shade for 10 mins or so, …

Resting out of the hot sun. (Ken pic and caption)

View  from our resting place. (Ken pic and caption)

… before climbing the steep face up to the top paddock. Our lunch stop was by the Limestone rock formation, but this time, we sat down by the fence below them to keep out of the sun.

Lunch in the shade of the trees. (Ken pic and caption)

The after lunch climb up the vehicle track to the Old Mountain Track was next, & then just a leisurely walk along this back to the vehicle. – Ken.
7. 21/7/2010. Trampers. Orbells Crossing, Mountain Road Track. Medium. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.
Ken’s GPS tracking of the tramp goes anti-clockwise from top right where we parked the cars, across left alongside two large water tanks and a new building, then a zig-zag down to the river where we stopped for morning tea. Here we were amazed by evidence of a large flood that had tangled debris in bare willow-branches (not evident in the pic) well above our heads.

Morning Tea. (Keith pic)

Following Ken’s GPS tracking up the true right side of the river, and you come to the extreme left of the map where a mixture of tracking signals indicates our lunch-stop. As you can determine -click to enlarge the pic – from whether the tracking signals are behind or in front of each other, you will see that the track took us up and down several slopes. Lunch was on a ledge well above the river. A great view. The steep ridge showing in the pic’s background is what we c-l-i-m-b-e-d after lunch.

Lunch on ledge above Waikouaiti River. (Keith pic)

View looking back down the willow-lined river. (Keith pic)

A gentle descent across a newly-grassed field took us to a track down to a gully between two ridges, then up the gully to the remarkable set of unusual rocks. Beyond these, we climbed the steep slope up to the left to emerge eventually on the Mountain Road track. It was then only the case of following this back down to the the cars. Thanks to Ria and Hazel for a well-led tramp, enjoyed on a grand winter’s sunny day following a good frost. – Ian
6. 27/2/2008. Trampers. Orbells Crossing, south. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Hazel
Rocks pose. Doug M, Hazel, Leonie, Ria, Sabina, Ken, Tash, Who?

Rocks pose. Doug M, Hazel, Leonie, Ria, Sabina, Ken, Tash, Who?

A small but select group met at the turning to Buckland’s crossing on an overcast but warm day under the leadership of Ria and Hazel. The location of the tramp was down as Orbells crossing but there was some debate as to where this actually was. We parked in the middle of nowhere but Ria and Hazel soon had us over a couple of fences and striking across the countryside to a nice morning tea stop on the banks of the South branch of the Waikouaiti River where it was mentioned that a fishing rod would have been useful. The tramp continued along a very pleasant country track wending our way along hillsides and gullies until we stopped for lunch, looking back over to where we had walked earlier. To those with no sense of direction this was quite confusing as we seemed to do a very big figure of eight. After lunch the mystery trip continued, with Ria venturing into some uncharted territory along a gully. When the gully ran out it was a steep climb up to the top where we could easily see where we were again. One of the highlights of the day was seeing the unusual rocks just above the track,

Ria, Hazel

Ria, Hazel

Ria, Ian, Tash

Ria, Ian, Tash

weathered into all sorts of interesting shapes, colour and textures. All information about these rocks would be gratefully received. A very enjoyable day’s tramping. Many thanks to our adventurous leaders. – Tash

5. 9/5/2007. Lawson Farm from McGrath/Gilchrist Roads near Old Cherry Farm. Figure of Eight. No river. Leaders: George, Evelyn C.
4. 10/5/2006. Trampers. Orbells Crossing. Medium. Leaders: Ria, hazel.
3. 9/5/2001. Orbells Crossing. Medium. Leaders: Riaa L, Mary L, Ian.
2. 10/11/1993. Orbells Crossing. Round trip. Medium. Leaders: Mary Y, Peg C, Evelyn M, Wendy.
1. 17/4/1991 Cherry Farm, Merton. Ridge inland from Mt track.Leaders: G Haggie, B Harvey, R Heenan

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May 30 2018

Waikouaiti: Matanaka, Beach Walk

Published by under Hikers

Distance from car-park: 57.5 km.

10. 30/5/2018. Hikers. Hawkesbury Lagoon area. Leaders: Judy K and Elaine

After a frosty start in Mosgiel, 25 hikers parked at the end of Beach St, Waikouaiti and walked along to the river mouth, enjoying the views and watching the horses training on the beach. The track up through the pines was followed to a morning tea stop just before the Reserve, where a leisurely break was enjoyed in the sun.

Clive pic.

The walk into the Reserve …

Clive pic.

… showed us plenty of bird life – especially ducks, geese and swans. At the end of the first causeway we turned right to cross the little bridge to follow the track round the edge of the water, across a stile, up through the paddock, and across another stile to Dumbarton St.

We turned left here, and followed Dumbarton St to the T junction at the end, turning right into Nairn Stand then left into Inverary St, which took us to the northern entrance to the Reserve. Just before the bridge we made a right turn onto the causeway which was followed out into Scotia St. A left took us into Beach St, with a toilet stop at the Camp and so back to the cars.  Lunch was had on the grassy area just below the car park. 

Clive pic.

Some new signage in the Reserve, and good track surfaces, show that this special place is really being cared for.

After lunch the majority opted for a quick visit to Matanaka, which was new to about half of the group.

Clive pic.

Arriving at Blueskin Nurseries for the obligatory coffee stop, we found we had been pipped at the post by the trampers, who were cosily huddled inside.  The more intrepid hikers chose to brave the elements outside (well, most of them).  A great day out for the last 9 0’clock start of the season.

– Judy and Elaine

9. 30/11/2016. Hikers. Hawksbury Lagoon and beach. E. Leaders: Judy K and Jay.

Hawksbury Lagoon route map courtesy Ian.

Hawksbury Lagoon route map courtesy Ian.

A blustery sou-wester did not deter 30 hardy souls from the drive to Waikouaiti where we gathered at the end of Beach Rd.  Along the road to the pines we had the wind behind us so it didn’t feel too bad, and the walk through the pines brought us to a sunny spot for a leisurely morning tea break.  Then it was out into the open again, across the first causeway to the bridge, observing a variety of bird life on the way – mostly paradise ducks and their young, and plenty of black swans and cygnets …

Black Swan on nest. (Ian pic and caption.)

Black Swan on nest. (Ian pic and caption.)

Another black swan and nestlings. (Ian pic and caption.)

Another black swan and newly young. (Ian pic and caption.)

… learning foraging skills.

A short detour over the bridge to the right, and on round the inlet proved to be rather rough and overgrown, but provided an interesting diversion.  We went back to the bridge, turned right and then left, to cross the next causeway, with a brief stop to decide whether to pass the female swan sitting on an egg right in the middle of our path.  With some reluctance she let us by, with a blustery display of spread wings to protect her nest.  A little further on another nest with two eggs lay unprotected.

A brief rain squall caught us just before the end and we were pleased to find the shelter of the trees.  A gentle road walk followed, out to Beach Rd and back to the cars just before midday.  Lunch was had in a sheltered spot on the grass between the car park and beach.

After lunch 17 members opted for the beach walk, while some of the others headed for home and some up to Matanaka to explore.  The beach walkers …

Waikouaiti to Karitane beach walk route map, courtesy Ian.

Waikouaiti to Karitane beach walk route map, courtesy Ian. Only remembered to start app 1 km after leaving lunch spot!

… strode out into the head wind to reach the end of the spit in 45 minutes. Here we had quite a different view of Karitane.

The old Karitane wharf high and dry. (Ian pic and caption.)

The old Karitane wharf, but high and dry at low tide. (Ian pic and caption.)

New Karitane wharf, still high, but wet.

New Karitane wharf, also high, but wetter. (Ian pic and caption.)

The return walk with the wind at our backs was more pleasant, as was the coffee stop at Blueskin Nurseries. – Judy and Jay.

8. 4/11/2015. Hikers. A walk around Waikouaiti’s back streets. Leaders: Jan, Jay.
GPS of route

GPS of route

28 Hikers and Trampers parked at the car park down at the corner of Beach Street and Matanaka Road. We walked down to the beach and along to its northern end. We were struck by the damage heavy seas had made to the beach edge.

Devastated beach verge. (John pic)

Devastated beach verge. (John pic)

The Lagoon had completely sanded up.  We stopped for morning tea at the car park at the beach end. We walked back along the beach to reach the sanded-up outlet of the Hawksbury Lagoon Wildlife Refuge area and entered by the forest edge.

Up into the Lagoon (John pic)

Up into the Lagoon (John pic)

We followed the path up and across the lagoon onto the end of the Nairn Street track which led us out of the Lagoon where we turned right onto Inverary Street, which took us along the back of a long large building under repair which some thought might be Waikouaiti’s chicken farm, left down Cromaty Street, right on Clackmannan Street and a look-in passing the back gate of the Waikouaiti Racecourse.

Grandstand. (John pic)

Grandstand. (John pic)

Left along Edinburgh Street, left again along Glasgow Street and left along SH1 at its end. We stopped along the way to look into, and some to shop in, Beano’s Pies and Artisan Bakery.

Artisan Bakery (John pic)

Artisan Bakery (John pic)

A little further  up and across SH1 (opposite the end of Mount Street) into a park beside the Events Centre with seating to have lunch,

Lunch in gardens beside the East Otago Events Centre. (John pic)

Lunch in gardens beside the East Otago Events Centre. (John pic)

placed conveniently behind very new public toilets, with sliding doors operated from within by lighted buttons, ridged to the touch and promising to have locked the door only by faith.  Cross SH1 again at crest of the rise, a little further up and into Kildaire Street. At next crossing, right along Collins to its end and go down Henry Street to its end. Down Henry Street and left around corner at the bottom into Fell Street and right at its end out onto Beach Street with only a block further down it to arrive at the car park again.

Thanks to Jan and Jay for looking after us and taking us on a new and interesting back-streets-walk to open up a Waikouaiti few if any of us had known of before. Garden flowers and trees bright with colourful blooms

Colour in garden. (John pic)

Colour in garden. (John pic)

and houses new and old made interesting viewing. – Ian.

7. 31/10/2012. Hikers. Matanaka. Leaders: Fred, Judy.
6. 17/10/2012. Hikers. Matanaka. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
5. 28/3/2012. Trampers. Matanaka, Cornish Point. Easy.

We clockwised the Lagoon loop and antied the other. GPS courtesy Ken.

We set off from the cars directly across Hawksbury Lagoon

Looking back on sharp straight ledges

Lovely old stable at Matanaka

4. 10/3/2010. Hikers. Matanaka. Coast Walk. Leaders: Barbara, Molly.

3. 6/5/2009 Both. Waikouaiti. Beach walk: Waikouaiti – Karitane. Easy+. Leaders: Lesley S, Bill H, Bill M, Pat.

We parked on Beach Road between the tavern and camping ground and walked to the north end of the beach where we had morning tea.
Tea Break. Waikouaiti beach

Tea Break. Waikouaiti beach. Bill, Evelyn, Bob, Who? Chris, Peter, Lex, Bev, Elaine, Pat, Lesley, Doug, Wendy, Lesley, Neil, Fred, Barbara, Ken, Bob

Then followed the nice long flat beach walk to the Karitane spit, admiring along the way the distant view of Huriawa Peninsula and a bunch of OGHS girls practising their surf canoeing skills under their coach’s supervision.
Walking to Karitane

Beach walk to Karitane

Wave and Karitane peninsula

Wave and the Karitane Huriawa peninsula

OGHS Coach and canoer

OGHS Coach and canoer

We rounded the spit to lunch on its landward side to admire the settlement of houses and the two (cray-fishing – Ken thought they might be) boats and the splendid view up the river of Mount Watkins.

Lunch at Karitane

Lunch at Karitane. Bill, Pat, Doug, Peter, Who? Angela, Neil, Lex, Wendy, Barbara, Who? Lesley, Margaret, Bev, Joyce, Elaine, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob,

Fishing boat at Karitane

Mt Watkins from Karitane

Mt Watkins from Karitane

After the leisurely lunch, it was a leisurely strung-out amble back along the beach to the cars. A good day and thanks to Bill H and his team for this variation on the usual Matanaka walk. – Ian

2. 9/4/2008 Leaders:

Trotting horses being exercised along the beach

What a glorious day for hiking it was and 11 hikers were really looking forward to their day when we parked our cars in Beach St, Waikouaiti, and set off to the beach. We walked a short distance along Beach St, then turned right into Fell Rd and from there went into the Forest where we sat in a lovely patch of sun and had our morning tea. Then off down to the beach. Couldn’t have had a more perfect day for walking along the firm sand, lapping up the sun and really soaking up the beautiful views. Great to see several lots of horses being exercised along the beach. Some trotting behind a vehicle, attached to a cart, others with riders in sulkies. At the end of the beach it was up the hill to Matanaka. A fascinating and very interesting place to visit. We spent a bit of time looking in the old school house and

The schoolhouse

The schoolhouse

Coming away

Coming away

inspecting the other old buildings which are all very well maintained and looked after. Then it was a leisurely lunch, sitting in the sun and taking in the view, really making the most of a super day. Then it was back down the hill and along Matanaka Rd. and then Matanaka Dr. to the back of the Motor camp which we walked through back to our cars. We all agreed we had had a fabulous day. – Bev

1. 17/10/2007. Matanaka, Cornish Head. Medium. Leaders: Graham, Glenice
Tea break in pines. Graham, Ken, Lex, Hazel, George

Tea break in pines. Graham, Ken, Lex, Hazel, George

Down to skirt bottom of steep face. Glenice, Hazel, Doug, Pat, Bill, Graham

Down to skirt bottom of steep face. Glenice, Hazel, Doug, Pat, Bill, Graham

Down round point. Lex, Who?, Pat, Ken, Graham, Doug M, Glenice

Down round point. Lex, Who?, Pat, Ken, Graham, Doug M, Glenice

Swans

Swans

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May 23 2018

Silverstream Water-Race, Racemans, Weir

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 40 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Silverstream Weir. Racemans. Winefields. Year Round”
No. 107 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Whare Flat – Silverstream Weir Year Round “
Origins and History of Racemans Water-race and Weir

19. 23/5/2018. Racemans to he Top Weir. Leader: Arthur.
Due to weather concerns we trmped up the Silverstream instead of the tramp on the programme.

It was raining lightly as we began our walk from the car ark by the Pump Shed.
The moisture desisted in a while, but skiffy showers passed over at times.

The “Hump” Track in from the Pump Shed was quite wet and muddy, and had slumped in one place on the stream bank.

From the swing bidge we climbed up to the Tunnel Track, and turned left. At the appropriate time (10 a.m.) we stopped trackside for smoko.

Around to McCraes Weir to climb the rope, and continued to eventually follow Racemans Track.

The tracks themselves were generally in good condition, although there were muddy patches at times with only one really bad patch to contend with.

We reached to top weir at 12-15,

At the weir – still very misty. (Margreet pic and caption.)

and after inspecting it, retreated a short distance to eat our sandwiches.

A half hour passed quickly, and then it was back down Racemans

River crossing. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Stopping for a catch up. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Ferns spectacular beside the track. (Margreet pic and caption.)

… to its beginning, taking the short route back. Over the swing bridge, and wading the ford (quite shallow) we were back at the cars around 2-45.

All had enjoyed the day’s tramp, which was of a reasonable distance – one member had been suffering “cabin fever”, but all were glad to have had their day out in the bush.

On returning to Mosgiel, 9 of the 12 who had been out adjourned for refreshments, as is the usual custom. – Art.

18. 3/9/2014. Both. Pump House to Weir. E+ Leaders: Judy, Ian.

Route

Route

(I took no pics. Photos please!) There were 30 of us out. We avoided the McRaes Weir track because some of the hikers can now no longer cope with the rope-assisted climb out of the McRae’s Stream.
From the pump house we took the track on the true left, thus avoiding the wetting of the road ford right at the start of the tramp. Of course this takes us steeply up and over and steeply down, but we all emerged safely by the swing bridge. The 4WD took us on beyond the old weir onto the board walk and up the seemingly never ending ascent of the Racemans track up to the levelness of the water race track itself where it emerges from the McRaes Track. We stopped for morning tea, letting seven of the trampers head off at their own pace to the upper weir.
Our remaining group of 23 took its time waiting out regroupings as we each negotiated wash-out bottlenecks on the way. The day was pleasant. The track otherwise level, pleasant and with varied aspects from bush to fallen tree clearances to slips.
But slips and washouts there were. Till finally an extremely muddy four metre boot-covering piece of slosh put most off from going any further. We were now only one kilometre short of the weir, so eight undaunted males slopped through and on to reach the weir. En route, they encountered the seven trampers returning to lunch back down the track with the remaining hikers. At the weir, Jim discovered Betty’s lunch was in his pack so we all accompanied him back to rendezvous with the others. Upon arrival, we found all had already lunched and were ready to move back. However Betty and Elaine elected to remain and enjoy a further leisurely lunch break, lolling in the lovely sunshine. …

“On the way back on Wednesday, we took the track that goes over to Powder creek, walked along past the entrance to Powder Ridge track, then back across the weir & onto the 4WD track again. This made a good detour, that some had not done before. The ladies got their feet wet, but the guys managed to stay dry.” – Ken
… Setting off again, we caught up with the hikers again at the swing bridge where it was obvious they intended returning via road and ford, the much easier if wetter alternative to the other route. And so back to the cars and some of the remaining trampers who were tied to hikers’ cars. A lovely day out. – Ian.

17. 23/1/2013. Trampers.
There were 4 of us today, we walked along the Tunnels/ Racemans track for 8km, had lunch at a nice spot, & then returned by the route that goes down to the weir just above the pump house, then back up onto the Tunnels track & back to the cars. so we did 14.3km in 3h 26m @ 4.2km/h. – Ken.
16. 9/5/2012. Trampers. Pump House to Weir. abt 15 km return.
A promised wet day nudged the three trampers who turned up at the car-park away from the scheduled Lawsons Farm to the Whare Flat tramps.
We parked at the Pump House, crossed the swing bridge and elected to do the loop track. This had been magnificently cleared.

Doug on cleared Loop Track

We passed the Powder Ridge track without being tempted to climb any part of it.

Sign

The end of the Loop Track led to a crossing of the Silverstream on some very slippery stones, followed by a long ascending track up to the Racemans.

Silverstream Crossing at end of Loop Track.

We passed the entrances to Coal Creek and Upper Coal tracks and on to somewhere short of the first of the two slips before the magnificent track-clearing gave way to a more usual narrow track. We reached the weir at 11.00 a.m., collected up an empty beer bottle, the only insult to the lovely surrounds and made our way back down the Racemans, stopping en route for lunch at noon.
The weather. There was no need for parkas at all! The intermittant very light drizzle was shrugged off by the sheltering bush.
We returned via McRaes Weir and further along took the straight steep track which emerges at the end of the board-walk of the lower track.
Back over the swing-bridge and we stopped to photo the new deer-fenced-off property on the north side of the Chalkies entrance.- Ian

New (to us) deer-fenced property. (The cross marks the grave of an obviously loved dog.)

Entrance to the house and buildings

15, 22/12/2010. Trampers. Tunnels to Weir. 3 with a visitor.
14. 4/10/2010 Recce. Tunnels to Weir. Ken, Ian.

GPS tracking of Tunnels to Weir, return, courtesy Ken.

We reconnoitred the Tunnels to Racemans, then on impulse, detoured up to the weir

Silverstream weir. (Ken pic)

before returning to complete the  round trip recce in preparation for the Hiker’s trip on the 6th. Turned out we did 18km in all. Whew!  Thanks to the DCC who had done a marvellous job of clearing the track almost all the way up to the weir. Also for a new track across the old slip. P.S. Les Murcott’s team had done a marvellous job with steps and rail around another large slip near the beginning of the Tunnels entrance up by the old school house.- Ian
14. 14/10/2009. Hikers. Whare Flat, Silverstream Weir. Medium. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn.
13. 8/10/2008. Hikers. Whare Flat, Racemans. Easy. Leaders: Neil, Tom
12. 19/10/2005 Leaders: Nancy, Eleanor B

11. 10/11/2004 Leaders: Bob H, Nancy

Group

The broken Silverstream Weir. Lance, Lois, Ann, Who? Dot B, Who? Pat, Bill, Sabina

10. 9/7/2003. Hikers. Racemans to Weir. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret.
9. 7/11/2001 Leaders: Bob H, Winifred, George
8. 10/10/2001. Racemans Track. Leaders: Ray and Diana, Les W.
7. 17/11/1999. Whare Flat, Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Margaret D, Judy C, Eleanor.
6. 25/11/1998. Silverstream, Weir – Racemans. Leaders: Peg C, Judy C, Eleanor.
5. 13/5/1998. Whare Flat to Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Judy , Eleanor.
4. 12/2/1997. Whare Flat to Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Evelyn M, Jack and Rosemary.
3. 31/7/1996. Whare Flat Water-Race. Silverstream. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Eleanor, Betty B.
2. 22/11/1995. Whare Flat – Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Margaret D, Colleen, Evelyn M.
1. 22/7/1992 Silverstream Weir from the Pumphouse. Two parties – Easy or average+. Leaders: Margaret S, Ivan & Bev, Nel

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May 23 2018

St Clair Beach Walks

Published by under Beach,Year round

14. 23/5/2014. Hikers. St Clair street walk. E-M. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

A small group of around 14 hikers left the carpark in the rain bound for St Clair. It was raining hard on the motorway and it looked like it was going to be a trip into St Clair for a coffee only. However, the rain stopped when we arrived at St Clair beach where we parked our cars!

We then walked around a couple of streets to admire some lovely old homes along the way. We walked back onto Forbury Road for a couple of blocks before ascending the steps beside Frances Hodgkins Village where we stopped for morning tea on a small reserve – some sitting on the steps (in the sunshine I might add) and Bev was able to point out her new abode.

We continued up the steps after the morning tea break onto Easter Crescent and upwards to Middleton Road, turning left past the golf course and onto the reserve at the end of the new subdivision to view the cliffs

Noi pic.

on one side of the ocean and could only catch a glimpse of Cargills Castle

Jan pic.

to our left as a new house was being erected. We did a small circuit around the subdivision and then on down the hill back to St Clair beach where we ate our lunch on the steps and bench seats watching the waves crashing in. As it was a cold day we decided to finish our walk and headed back out to Mosgiel for a coffee etc at Blend to warm ourselves up. Our walk being 9ks approx.

Jan, Jay & Jenny

13. 30/4/2014. Hikers. St Clair – St Kilda. Easy. Leaders: Liz and Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route

This reporter was new to this particular hike and was most impressed with the clever planning of a satisfying route. 35 of us set out from our cars parked in Albert St, St Clair. We walked up it to turn right into Beach St, left into Sandringham St and right into Norfolk St to reach the foot of Jacobs Ladder. How many steps? 250? Well, MANY! And relentlessly steep as well (a red spot on the map, at abt 500 mtrs indicates our slower progress. We all eventually made it up to Ravenswood Rd where we had to negotiate a multi-holed footpath being prepared for broadband fibreglass cable. The views of suburb, beach and sea were rewarding. We carried on down, (1 km mark) crossed to briefly climb Cliffs Rd alongside its steep roadside banks and interesting variety of houses to finally emerge at its end by the beachfront and to turn (2 km) via Second Beach Rd (where did that name come from??) to morning-tea at its track’s end, in lovely sunshine.
Cuppa

Morning tea at Second Beach (John pic)

Back to St Clair (3 km) beach, or rather the sandhills track above it, before descending to walk along St Kilda beach (4, 5 & 6 kms) to its terminus at Lawyers Head, where we lunched.
Lunch

Lunch at end of St Kilda Beach.

After lunch, we struggled up a soft sandhill track nearby to reach the road above.
View from Lunch

Panorama of view from John Wilson Drive immediately above lunch stop (John – from 4 [slightly obvious!] pics)

We returned along the drive. (7 & 8 [hidden behind ‘5] kms) …
Race Course

Panorama of Forbury Race Course from John Wilson Drive. (John pic)

… to re-group at the St Kilda children’s playground. From there we climbed up to Kettle Park Road to descend again to cross Kettle Park behind the impressively large rear of the indoor Ice Rink. We turned down Moana Rua Rd, crossed Victoria Road to go down Moreau St (was it?) (9 km) to turn left into Richardson St (was it?) (10 km) and make our way back to cross Forbury Road and reach Albert St again. 10.5 km all told. Not too bad.
Then, under Elaine’s bad growing influence, a large number of us resorted to the Salt Cafe for the customary leisurely and companionable coffee or what have you before returning to the cars. Thanks, Liz and Dawn. You done good. – Ian.
12. 9/5/2012. Hikers. St Clair beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Betty and Jim.
11. 27/7/2011. Hikers. St Clair. John Wilson Drive  Lawyers Head and Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
10. 24/3/2010. Hikers. St Clair. Beach Walk. Lawyers Head. Easy. Leaders: Elaine and Jean.
9. 29/7/2009. Hikers. St Clair. Beach Walk. Lawyers Head. Easy. Leaders: Les and Margaret
8. 28/1/2009. St Clair Beach Walk. Leaders: Lance and Lois
7. 11/10/2006. St Clair – Lawyers Head beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Jim and Thelma
6. 31/8/2005. Hikers. St Clair: beach walk to Tomahawk/Lawyers Head Leaders: Chris, Jean.
5. 23/8/2000. St Clair – Tomahawk – Smaills Beach. Leaders:  Betty B, Eleanor B, Evelyn M
4. 5/4/2000 St Clair – Kew. Street walk Leaders: Colleen, Bev H
3. 12/5/1999. St Clair: beach walk to Tomahawk/Lawyers Head Leaders: Daphne, Margaret, Betty
2. 12/3/1997. St. Clair to Tomahawk Beach. Leaders: Denise, Margaret D, Jean.
1. 15/11/1995. Beach Walk – St Clair to Tomahawk. Leaders: Peg A, Peggy M.

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May 16 2018

Daphne/Margaret Road, Kathleen Road

Wenita permit.
Distance from car park: 21 km.

13. 16/5/2018. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Jim and Betty.

pine needle carpeted walk into the forest. (Clive pic and caption.)

On the way to the top. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch on Big Stone Rd. (Phil pic and caption.)

Homeward bound along Big Stone Road. (Clive pic and caption.)

Conditions were a pleasant cool day for the hike in the Allanton Block of Wenita Forrest south of Brighton. The majority of 22 hikers stopped off at the Brighton Cafe for refreshments on the return trip to Mosgiel.

It was a successful late change to the planned hike.

Betty & Jim

12. 17/6/2015. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Liz and Dot.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce. 12.2 km. [N.B. Bruce has commented on the interesting difference between the 2012 (q.v. below) and 2015 Google maps. – Ed.]

The Google map for yesterday was taken in 2015 and was a little different from that from Ken’s report in 2012 with imagery taken on 17 Sept 2011.

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers, courtesy Ian.

About twenty Hikers did the now more customary route of climbing the Daphne Road’s gentler but longer route and descending by Kathleen Roads shorter but steeper. We morning-teaed in the sunny spot at the foot of Daphne Road where the Club has always stopped, and lunched …

Lunch on a sunny level.

Lunch on a sunny level. (Looking back along the road).(Ian pic and caption.)

… on a level stretch of the road, but still some distance from the top. Older members, presumably familiar with the route found they had failed to recollect the many gully dips on the road. They also appreciatively noticed the rubbish collection by the top gate had been cleared. …W-e-l-l perhaps not all!

Made for each other.

Made for each other. (Ian pic and caption.)

Reaching the top of Kathleen  Road, a substantial number struggled around and under the closed and apparently locked gate before Les noticed that it was not locked at all. … Sigh.

It was yet another good-weather Wednesday, tempting some to to wonder whether a Higher Power must look after the Club. (Well, it was colder on Tuesday and Thursday promised snow.) Admittedly a cold breeze had driven us into woollen hat and gloves when we emerged from our cars, but this eased in the shelter of the forest and in the patches of sun the trees permitted us from time to time. It was a great Winter’s day tramp and a great location – a metalled road rather than a sloshy paddock or slippery track. (Pity the poor trampers! – see their report.)

Mention must be made of the occasional great views of the coast and down gullies that we stopped to enjoy from time to time.

A misty vista in the 'dista'

A misty vista in the ‘dista’, looking up the coast from Kathleen Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

It was further remarked that tramps like this get us to see the other sides of properties that mere car travellers never get to appreciate.

So, thank you leaders, for a well-reconnoitered and led tramp. We were well looked after, with thoughtful stops for regrouping. – Ian.

11. 13/2/2013. Hikers. McLeods Farm. Leaders: Wendy and Peter.
10. 22/8/2012. Trampers. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We did 11.7 km at 4.7 km/h.

9. 4/7/2012. Both. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km. Leaders: George, Lex.

Morning Tea at bottom of Daphne climb. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at the top of Daphne where joins Big Stone

8. 6/8/2008. Both. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot M, Chris.
7. 15/3/2006. Hikers. Margaret Road, McLeods Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Dot T
6. 29/6/2005. Hikers. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. (Brighton). Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
5. 25/7/2001. Alt. Margaret Road, Katherine Road, Kuri Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Chris H
4. 18/2/1998.
3. 14/5/1997. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road via McLeods to Coast Road. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, George. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road to McLeods. Leaders: Ray and Diana.
2. 10/7/1996. Margaret Road, Big Stone Road, McLeods. Average. Leaders: Graham, Eric and Dot.
1. 30/11/1994 Margaret Road, Wenita Forestry, Big Stone Road. Medium. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Joan H, George
 
 
 

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May 15 2018

Middlemarch area tramps

Published by under Uncategorized

[Rock and Pillar via Six Mile Creek This climbs 3300 feet up the eastern face from Glencreag Station up a leading ridge south of Six Mile Creek. This is the most direct approach.]

[Rock and Pillar via spur south of Lug Creek. Information: Climbs 3000 feet up the eastern face of a well-graded vehicle track up a leading spur south of Lug Creek. Average time to Leaning Lodge is 3 hours on foot.
9.5km north of the Middlemarch store on SH87, just before Lug Creek, is a farm entrance (RAPID 7219 – no DoC sign). A short way up the driveway is a DoC car park. There is public access up the vehicle track to the conservation area boundary. The track is now a recreation reserve administered by DoC.
Easiest route to Big Hut from Leaning Lodge (foot only – unmarked – good visibility essential) is another 45+ minutes climbing gently southwards to cross a steep gully and then climb a gentle shelf to above the eastern basins. Sidle several hundred metres past the lower prominent rock tors before gently descending to Big Hut once it becomes visible. Route very wind and cloud-prone. Ice axe and crampons may be necessary to traverse steep snow slopes near Leaning Lodge.]

7. 25/5/2018. Sutton Hut. Biking/Walking. Leader: Eleanor.

Tuesday 15 May.  Leader Arthur
6 keen trampers arrived at Sutton Lodge to a rather chilly welcome, even though Warden Melinda had heaters and hot water turned on.  After unpacking we enjoyed smoko, reading the O.D.T. and lunch.
Early afternoon we set off walking the long straight Kidds Road for approx. 3 km to reach the Sutton Salt Lake loop track. (The only Inland salt lake in N.Z).  Was glorious walking round in brilliant sunshine looking at spectacular Tors, Lake Reflections, views of the Rock and Pillar Range and surrounding Countryside.  Ducks lifted off the lake, however, 3 swans were happy to stay put.

Swans. (Helen pic and caption.)

The loop took about an hour, then back to the Lodge we went.  Soon after the 7th member arrived after playing a round of golf.
Was most enjoyable sitting round the open fire chatting in the lounge, soon to be followed by a delicious dinner and desert.

Wednesday 16 May. Leader Arthur
A clear morning dawned.  Today is the big hike!  Due to recovering from injury, 1 member stayed behind.  2 other members drove up and joined her for coffee and a look and walk around the Salt Lake.  6 members left the Wandle Road car park at 8.55am, which sits at approx. 330 metres.  We headed up, up and up some more on a 4 wheel drive track on our way to Leaning Lodge Hut, which sits at approx. 1220 metres, about 9 km away.
The original hut was part of a failed attempt to build a ski field on the Rock&Pillar Range by Otago Ski Club in the 1950’s.  It was bought in the 1970s by Otago Tramping and Mountaineering Club, for many years it was used for Snow Craft Training.  The hut got its name from the rather alarming angles the floors were on!  The leaning Lodge Trust was formed in 2006 with intention of either bringing hut up to standard, or replacing, which they have.  The new hut was completed in 2013, sleeps 8, doesn’t have a fire or water tank.  Sadly, as of April 2017 the hut closed after discussions with D.C.C. and D.O.C.
Smoko was a welcome break with great views over Strath Taieri.  Then it was onwards and upwards along the many zig zags till we had a breather at the giant rock beside the track, knowing it wasn’t too far till the track forks to the left into the hut (no signpost). 2 of the group were happy to lunch at the hut(locked), then walk down, down, down to the cars.  They took car keys so they could leave car at the end of our track.  It was lovely walking amongst the many schist tors, rocky pillars, sub alpine shrub lands and snow tussock.  1 of the remaining 4 walked the 1/4 hour in to have a look at Leaning Lodge Hut.  Meanwhile, we were looking up to the big square rock (visible from highway 87) that was to be our lunch stop.  We arrived at 12:15pm, put on hats and gloves enjoyed lunch–very chilly breeze at this height!  before another bit of a climb to the SUMMIT ROCK at 1450 meters,

Rock and Pillar summitted!(Art pic and caption.)

which gave us an outstanding vista of surrounding Mountain Ranges.  Also, a great place for photo shots!
We had finished climbing, so now it was downhill  for us to the Big Hut, which was reached in about 15 mins.  By now fog was swirling around us.
BIg Hut Ski Lodge (locked) A spacious 70 bunk Lodge was opened in 1946 by the Otago Ski Club.  A crawler tractor and trailer hauled 30 tons of building material 3200 feet up the steep eastern face of the range.  For many years this Big Hut, as it was known provided the venue for large weekend parties of ski enthusiasts until easier access slopes on Coronet Peak became irresistible during the 1950s.  Now owned by Rock and Pillar Trust, sleeps 16 and doesn’t have heating.  Inside the hut a lot of local history can be read.
We followed snow poles down, down and down some more

Descendiing in tussock. (Art pic and caption.)

on a very narrow track for quite a long time, till in the distance the road and farm shed were spotted.  Soon after, probably about 2 km away the 2 cars were driving towards the shed, so we knew the end was near.  Finally, we arrived

At bottom of Big Hutt track. (Art pic and caption.)

at that red car and headed back to Sutton.  What a great day tramping we had!
How grateful we were to have the fire going and hot drinks ready by our left behind member.  Another very tasty dinner and desert was enjoyed, with not as much chat as the night before!

Thursday 17 May.  Leader Theresa
Another clear morning greeted us-even though Rock and Pillar Range was coated in snow.  We enjoyed free range eggs with our breakfast.  Quickly everyone got into action and tidied the Lodge ($12.50 a day).  Then we drove to the site of the Red Bridge,

Wrecked Sutton Bridge. (Art pic and caption.)

that was washed away by the 2017 July flood.  Next we drove and parked at Sheep Wash Creek and climbed Smooth Cone–the visual symmetry of this small Cone

Climbing Smooth Cone. (Art pic and caption.)

topped by a cluster of Basalt Boulder

Smooth Cone. (Helen pic and caption.)

is the same from all angles.  The large lone Radiata PIne Tree was planted on 8 November 1918, 4 days before the signing of the Armistice.  I hope I look as good when I am 100!!  Was a lovely spot to have smoko looking out over Strath Taieri.
We then went back, picked up gear and stopped not far past Sutton , climbed through fence and enjoyed lunch in the sunshine.

Taieri Pet. (Art pic and caption.)

A most enjoyable tramp was had by us all.  Maybe we could look at a combined trip sometime?

– Cheers, Eleanore.

6. 28/3/2018. Redan Crater/Taieri Ridge (Dry Ridge). M. Leader: Theresa.

On a sunny day that got hotter as the tramp progressed, 13 people enjoyed the day in the Strath Taieri.
Leave Mosgiel and go highway 87 to Middlemarch. At the northern end of the township turn right. Go east, cross the Taieri river bridge and take the first left on Hartfield road. Continue up the road, pass the Renwick (the land owner) homestead on the left then park up at the first gate on your right. Cross paddocks…

and they are off…to the Crater (on the horizon). (Phil pic and caption.)

…and continue to the top on a 4WD track. At the top while we had lunch there were views to the East of the Waikouaiti hills and the Nenthorn and Moonlight valleys. South we could see Saddle Hill – well half of it.

Still on  the top, follow the track for about 20 mins then head NW down towards the crater. This is a very obvious crater rim.

Nearly there… (Phil pic and caption.)

To view it from the  highway on the Rock & Pillar side looking towards the Taieri Ridge you should be able to pick it out. Lots of rock outcrops can also be seen but the crater rim is a stand-out example of the volcanic action in the area.

After a safe walk inside the crater…

– Redan Crater…and bubbling pool?,(Phil pic and caption.)

… it was down and back to the cars. There was a gully to negotiate…

Following sheep and goat tracks will get us there! (Phil pic and caption.)

…before we rejoined the track we took on the way up.

Coffee at the Kissing Gate in the outside seating was the usual debrief…

Enjoying the KissMeKate cafe. (Phil pic and caption.)

…with lots of laughs and good company. – Theresa.

5. 27/4/2016. Taieri Ridge, Redan Crater. M. Leader: Arthur H.

The day dawned fine and sunny. Even better, it was a Wednesday –  and the day for our tramp up onto Taieri Ridge. Perfect.

12 Trampers left Mosgiel at 9.05 a.m. in 3 cars. A brief pit-stop was made at Middlemarch and to reassemble the convoy. We parked on the roadside at 10.10 a.m. and sat in the sunshine to partake of morning tea.

The Start. (Helen pic and caption)

It is some 6 km to the top of Taieri Ridge, uphill all the way.

Across several paddocks above the road and then up a 4WD track through the rocks and tussock.

Back to Rock and Pillar Range (Helen pic and caption)

The grade is a little variable, but good all the way. Beautiful country to walk through.

We stopped for lunch on top, just after noon.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption)

We had good views in the direction of Nenthorn, and both Saddle Hill and Maungatua were visible away in the distance to the right. To the left the valley pointed the way to Moonlight and Macraes. Neither could be seen however.

We had just resumed our walk along the top when a tiny orange piglet shot across in front of us. He was obviously in a hurry as he didn’t stop to say hello. From lunch-stop we had a 20 minute walk before turning downhill to the Redan Crater. We sidled round the highest remaining piece of the ridge and gazed down into the crater where a few sheep grazed.

Rim View. (Helen pic and caption.)

It is a few hundred metres in diameter – I forgot to take my tape measure so can’t be more specific. Sorry.

The Redan Crater is about 20 million years old, the result of volcanic action. There are other volcanic sites in the area, but this one is the best example of a volcanic crater in Otago.

We walked through the center …

Helen and Theresa walking inside the crater. (Margreet pic and caption)

… and out the other side, and down the ridge. Following the sheep tracks showed us the way to cross two deep gullies. Across a fence and then uphill briefly, when the day became noticeable hotter.

Soon we were back to the 4WD track and followed it back down. We arrived back at the cars at 2.55 p.m., having travelled 14.6 km.

The coffeeholics were in dire need of a “fix”, so a stop was made at Middlemarch to alleviate the problem. Showing normal good social manners, the rest of us accompanied them.

Coffee to end day. (Helen pic and caption)

And so 12 happy trampers returned to Mosgiel. It had been a good day! – Arthur.

 30-31/3/2016. Trampers. Leaning Lodge.

We had 6 trampers keen to do the overnight trip to Leaning Lodge on the Rock & Pillar range. This made the travel arrangements, & the journey up
the hill to the hut quite easy. We had the loan of Ian Heb’s trailer, & Neil’s 4WD Ford ute, with his quad bike on the back.
This allowed everybody to travel to the start of the track in comfort, then we hooked the trailer onto the back of the quad bike, loaded all the packs & other gear onto it, & the back of the ute, put 4 people in or on the ute, & I drove the quad bike with Ian hanging on for grim death sitting on the rear platform. We had morning tea at this point, & then began the drive up the hill.

1 Ready to set off up to hut (Ken pic and caption)

Ready to set off up to hut (Ken pic and caption)

it’s about a 7km climb up the hill to the parking place by the hut, & takes quite a while due to the roughness of the track, but we all made it safely without mishap. it was then a case of ferrying all the gear down to the hut, & getting things set up in there, after which we had lunch while discussing what to do for the rest of the day, as the weather was really good.
it was decided that we would walk along to Big Hut via the highest point on the range, to take advantage of the views available from such a high point. [1457mtrs]. We walked up the road to the tops, where we discovered that there was a 4WD track leading all the way along the tops, & this went very close to the high point. There are the remains of a trig station [Trig H] on the very top which is easy to access. After spending some time here looking & taking photos, …

View from Summit Trig (Ken pic and caption)

… we carried on towards Big Hut, & were surprised to see a DOC sign pointing the way to the hut. From this sign it’s only a short distance down to the hut, …

Approaching Big Hut from above (Ken pic and caption)

 … where we had a rest, while everybody examined the info on the walls inside, & marvelled over the solar heating system on the North facing side of the hut.

We then retraced our steps back to Leaning Lodge, …

Bit of humour (Ken pic and caption)

… & got things organised for the evening meal, which basically meant boiling plenty of water for the freeze dried food everybody had, & then boiling even more water for tea/coffee afterwards, plus some more for doing a few dishes.
Neil rigged up his lighting system [a 12v battery plus lead, & bulb with
a shade] so we had a good amount of light when it got dark. We made use
of this by reading some of the magazines left in the hut, & Ian gave us
a run down on how to map read. We were all in bed by about 9:45, & were
serenaded with snoring by one member who will remain nameless!!! After a
cool night, which saw the fog surround the hut, we woke to a clear
morning, with the fog having descended down to cover the valley floor,

Middlemarch is under there somewhere (Ken pic and caption)

& the sun starting to light up our side of the valley.
Breakfast was taken at a leisurely pace while we discussed what the day’s
plans were, packed everything up, & carried it back up to the vehicles.
As we had gone to Big Hut the day before, we decided to drive to the ‘tops’ road, & walk along in the opposite direction to view some more of the amazing rock [tors] formations that exist up there. We stopped for morning tea at a suitable tor that gave us shelter from the slight cool breeze that was blowing, & then walked a few kilometers further, before turning & going back to our morning tea spot for lunch.

Arthur taking notes, with our route home in background (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was back to the vehicles, & after securing everything, we set off back down to the car park at the bottom of the track, where the quad bike was loaded onto the back of the ute again, the trailer hooked up to the ute, &packs etc. loaded into the car ready for the drive home.
Of course we had to keep up the coffee club tradition, so a stop at the
Kissing Gate Cafe was in order before the drive back to Mosgiel.
We all had a great time, the weather was superb, & the company great, the hut is nice & comfortable, with double glazing, & insulation, so a successful trip.

Walked [over two days] 20km
Ave 4.5km/h
climbed 521mtrs
max elev. 1457mtrs – Ken.

18/2/2015. Leaning Lodge. Trampers.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leaning Lodge. (Ken pic and caption)

With an 8:30 start, eight trampers turned up for our assault on Leaning Lodge. We drove to Middlemarch, & then along Highway 87 towards where the Rail Trail crosses it. As there is no signposting for the track up to Leaning Lodge we had to keep a sharp eye out for the turn off.
After parking in the large carpark paddock, we loaded up the packs & set off up the track, which is a not too steep, zig zag 4WD track, that goes all the way up to the hut & beyond. It is a relentless climb of 9km with hardly any level spots to stop & rest, so we found a place to have morning tea, & then continued climbing.

About 2kms from the hut some of the party decided they would stop for lunch, [we didn’t know then that it was another 2k to go] but 3 of us went on determined to get to the hut for lunch.

Leaning Lodge. (Ken pic and caption)

The hut comes into view about 1km before you actually get to it, so it’s like a beacon drawing you on for the last bit of the climb. Then you have to go DOWN some quite steep steps to get to it, & after spending the best part of 3 hrs climbing, going down steep steps seems really foreign to the body.
However, the 3 of us made it safely, & had lunch in the hut.

 

Lunch inside Leaning Lodge (Ken pic and caption)

Leaning Lodge with track leading to it (Ken pic and caption)

Zoomed in shot of the Lodge (Ken pic and caption)

As you may know, this hut is only one year old, [to replace the old Leaning Lodge on the same site] so it’s in very good, clean condition. It has a wonderful view…

View from hut (Ken pic and caption)

…down into the highway 87 valley, will sleep 12 people, has a long drop loo, no water supply, but two sinks in a stainless steel bench, with drains to an outside sinkhole.
As it was the day before my birthday, I carried a bottle of wine wrapped in newspaper to keep it cold, to share with the others at lunchtime, but with only the three of us, & one person declining to partake, the level in the bottle didn’t drop very far, so I was resigned to having to take it all the way back down again!!
George also kindly arrived at the carpark early to present us with some cake & chocolates to celebrate his 25th wedding anniversary.
While we were having lunch, we saw two others walking along the 4WD track towards the hut, but they then turned around & went back again. We later learned that they had just come up to see the hut after their lunch, but decided to not go all the way to it.
After lunch we climbed the steps back up to the 4WD track & proceeded to walk back down the mountain., where we came upon two of our group resting in the shade of a big rock cluster. it was here that we learnt of one group member who had taken the wrong turn, & was last seen heading up the 4WD track to the mountain tops, which was away above the hut site. To make matters worse this person [who shall remain nameless] left their pack behind, which contained their water supply, & a cell phone, so when I rang the number, it didn’t get answered. By this time everybody had climbed high enough to at least view the hut, without actually going to it, so we just had to wait around for the errant tramper to return, which happily happened after about 1/2 an hour wait.
We then started the long walk down to the cars. This was rather hot going, as by this time of day the temperature was quite high, my wrist watch temperature gauge said 34°C at one stage, but from past experience, as I’m wearing it, it reads about 7°C too high, but even so, it was very hot work, & quite a few ran out of water before we got back down, so they were thankful for a stream near the bottom of the track. We were glad of the early start, which allowed us to climb in the cooler morning conditions.
We picked up the last member of our group, found lying in the shade near the cars, packed up, & drove back to Middlemarch hoping that the coffee shop would still be open, but as it was well after 4pm this was not to be, so we carried on home, arriving at the Mosgiel carpark about 5:30pm.
We all agreed that the trip was worthwhile, & the weather was superb all day, with just a very gentle breeze at times. – Ken.

23/10/2013. Trampers. Rock and Pillar – Big Hut.

GPS

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Distance 10.5 km; Moving time 3 hr 45 mins; Stopped time 1 hr 37 mins; Ave 2.8 km/h; Climbed 973 mtrs; Max Elevation 1337 mtrs.

As this was a new tramp for most, we left early to make sure we had plenty of time. We arrived at the start of the track to find a really nice looking day, so as the signs at the bottom say, we “set off slowly, & then eased up” as the grade got steeper. You have to realise that this is a 3000ft [970mtr] climb, so haste was never on the cards, especially for us 4 old farts that made the trip. We had a couple of stops on the way up to enjoy the views,

 

Snowcave

Snow-cave near the top with a stream running through it (Ken pic and caption)

but we could also see some clouds that looked a bit threatening, so we pushed on up to Big Hut at almost the top of the range.

Ian approaching Big Hut. (Ken pic and caption)

Ian approaching Big Hut. (Ken pic and caption)

After a good look around, we had lunch,…

Lunch in Big Hut. (Keith pic)

Lunch in Big Hut. (Keith pic)

… & because we could see the occasional wisp of cloud going past the windows, we didn’t dally too long before heading back down the mountain. The air temperature had dropped markedly since our arrival, so we made fast progress down to warmer conditions. We stopped 3 – 4 times on the way down to give our screaming thighs some respite from the continual down hill pounding. One stop in particular was very enjoyable, as both the temperature, & the views, along with the comfort of the tall tussock were hard to leave. We arrived back at the car, & it was a bit of a struggle for some to fold themselves into the seats, due to stiffness setting in. A stop at the ‘Kissing Gate’ cafe for a well deserved coffee was appreciated by all, & we all said it had been a good tramp. We arrived home at about 4 pm, so it wasn’t as long a day as we thought it might have been before we set out. It took us 2 3/4 hrs to go up, which was within the recommended times of 2 – 3 hrs. So we felt really good about that. – Ken.

4a. 9/11/2008 Sutton Camp. Leaders: Bill and Pat. (See Sutton camp post)
The Youth Adventure Trust/Rotary camp, based on the former School House, Hall and Cottage complex at Sutton was ideal and 19 of us enjoyed a very pleasant weekend stay, due in no small part to the organising and ‘recceing’ of Bill and Pat. – Thank you! The highlight was the tramp up to the Redan Crater.

Crater on Taieri Ridge.

Crater viewed from side. (Bill pic).

with 18 of us reaching the highest point of the tramp and 13 of us making it on back down to the Crater.

Group pic on Redan Crater NE rim. Ria, Joyce, Evelyn, Leonie, Ian, Doug, George, Bill, Molly, Graham, Bev, Lesley, Bob. (Bill pic)

There were many rock formations to wonder at on the way.

Rock seal? (Bill pic)

Monster Owl Rock. (Elaine pic)

Another Rock (Bill pic).

And yet another. (Bill pic).

Another one still?

Surely this is the last. Is that an eye, a face? (Bill pic).

Maybe this is the last, then. (Bill pic).

Goats climbing Crater slope.

A magnificent achievement, if a bit long and tiring for some. The day was beautifully sunny with an early morning tempering wind preventing us for overheating. The more adventurous headed back by going over and down from the crater with the rest retracing the more prudent longer but gully-free track back.

Sunset at Sutton. (Bill pic and caption.)

4b. 9/11/2008. Rock and Pillar via spur south of Lug Creek – attempt! Leaders: Ian, Leonie.
The Sunday proved more problematic with an overcast sky, but nine of us attempted the three-hour 4WD track which turned off the highway 9.5km north of Middlemarch (RAPID 7291 – no DoC sign) and led up the ridge leading to Leaning Lodge. But we had made it only a little way up before we experienced the WIND. We snatched as much shelter as we could find for an early morning tea…

Windy tea break. Bev, George, Ria. (Ian pic and caption.)

… but had climbed only a little bit further before several of us wanted to turn back, with the remainder following suit only a little later when they could no longer keep their feet as the northerly only increased in strength. Prudence triumphed over ambition. But we vowed we would return some time in the future as the gentle gradient of the zig-zag route was a gift of a climb.
4c. Sutton Salt Lake.
The other trip was to the Sutton Salt Lake, within a comfortable walking distance from the camp. And it was as wonderful as it ever was.

Sutton Salt Lake view point. Bill H, Lesley S, Pat. (Elaine pic).

Lake. Graham, Leonie. (Ian pic and caption.)

Group photo, Sutton. (Elaine pic).

Enjoyment of the weekend was so high that there was discussion of options for another camp some time in the autumn. – Ian Camp Contact:  03-464 3473

 

3. 28/5/2003.Crater and Lake day trips:  Leaders: Bob, Arthur H, Val and Denise

 

Morning Tea out of the strong wind.

Long steady climb. Graham. (Ian pic and caption.)

Down Into Crater. Doug recognisable. (Ian pic and caption.)

Crater heart. Arthur, Lex recognisable. (Ian pic and caption.)

Salt Lake entrance. (Ian pic and caption.)

Close-up of lake. (Ian pic and caption.)

2. 14/11/1990 Leaders: Bob H, Betty B.

1. 23/11/1988 Bus Trip. The Redan, an extinct volcanic crater on Mr R Renwick’s property, Middlemarch. Leaders: Bob & Audrey, Jack M

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May 09 2018

McKendry Road, Roseburn, Woolshed Road, Horsehoof Station.

Published by under Trampers

Location: 20 km.
12. 9/5/2018. Trampers. McKendry Road to Maungatuas tramp. Leader: Jill.

On a glorious May morning 13 trampers parked in Horsehoof Station’s paddock at the top of McKendry Road – and immediately began our ascent of “the Hill”.

Start. (Gordon pic.)

Gaining height quickly we were afforded great views over the Taieri.

Smoko break next. (Gordon pic.)

Morning tea was a welcome break from the climb – and time to take in the vista to Saddle Hill and the sea beyond.

Our climb continued before we turned  left on to a track that took us down through a lovely beech filled gully and over a pretty stream.

Native bush. (Gordon pic.)

(Don’t think we need to include the photo of Margreet & the gorse bush!)

Then it was onward and upward and upward through native tussock country.

Long slog to lunch stop. (Gordon pic.)

We had lunch at the top corner of Horsehoof – on the  boundary with the Maungatua conservation area.

Finally, LUNCH Break. (Gordon pic.)

We headed  back down along farm tracks,

All downhill from Woolshed Road back to the cars. (Clive pic.)

making a round trip of just over 16 km. – Jill.

11. 15/2/2012. Trampers. McKendry Road, Woolshed Road, Maungatua.

GPS record of route (Courtesy Ken). Squiggly bit is recces in Roseburn from this and the prior tramp. Its tail at the top is the previous recce.

Interesting macrocarpa near Roseburn entrance


10. 28/7/2010. Trampers. McKendry Road, Roseburn, Woolshed Road. Medium.
 Leaders: Doug, Sabina.
We parked the cars under some Gum trees, & walked the short distance to the start of the climb up the “Old Coach Rd” to the top of the Maungatuas.

Climbing ‘The Old Coach Rd’. (Ken pic and caption)

This track was very hard going due to the damage done to it by cattle.

Muddy condition of ‘Old Coach Road’. (Ken pic and caption)

We stopped for morning tea part way up, then continued on for some distance, until deciding to go back down, as it was getting quite windy, & cold, with frequent light showers. We went back down to the Roseburn house, found a spot to have lunch,

Lunch. (Ken pic and caption)

View from lunch spot. (Ken pic and caption)

View from lunch spot (2). (Ken pic and caption)

View from lunch spot by house. (Ken pic and caption)

& then went exploring, to find a better way to the top. After exploring a number of tracks, & even although the farmer had told Doug & Sabina that there was no way up now because of overgrown tracks, we found a way up through an old logging site which would take us right to the top.

Close-up of correct track. (Ken pic and caption)

Correct track to top. (Ken pic and caption)

From there, it was back to the cars, & home again. – Ken.
9. 21/11/2007. Trampers. McKendry Road, Roseburn, Woolshed Road return. Medium. Leaders: George, Glenice

A hot day with some early steep climbing, but not before George and Glenis led 10 of us down through Roseburn farm homestead to see a dozen or so alpacas. Great.

Alpacas on Roseburn

Alpacas on Roseburn

Alpacas up close

Alpacas up close

Climbing out, we stopped for morning tea with a grand view from the shelter of pines

Cuppa time. Wendy, Ria, Hazel.

Cuppa time. Wendy, Ria, Hazel.

before emerging into paddocks exposed to a hot sun. It was then just continual climbing until we emerged at last onto Woolshed Road, a 4WD track along the top joining McKendry Road along the back with Horsehoof Station. It was still a bit early for lunch, so George led us down a 4WD track turn-off that headed towards Maungatua, to lunch under silver beech trees hugging a Woodside-bound stream. The trees provided a leisurely lunch- time shelter and rest.

Lunch

Lunch. George, Lex, Pat, Wendy.

Lunch snooze. Bill.

Lunch snooze. Bill.

Climbing back out, we followed the Woolshed- McKendry road down, down, down, enjoying great views of Outram and the Taieri Plain on the way, to reach the cars again near Roseburn Farm. An enjoyable first real sunny day in a long time. – Ian

8. 28/6/2006. Trampers. Horsehoof to Maungauas from McKendry Road. Medium+.
7. 18/6/2003. Trampers. McKendry Road to Maungatuas, returning by farm. Medium. Leaders Shirley McN, Bill and Pat.
6. 27/6/2001. Horsehoof Station from McKendry Road. Medium+. Leaders: Claude, Bill and Pat.
5. 19/4/2000. McKendry Road, Horsehoof Station. Leaders: Graham, Bill H, Molly.
4. 10/2/1999. Horsehoof Station via McKendry Road. Leaders: Graham, Shirley McN, Wendy
3. 23/4/1997. McKendry Road via Horsehoof Station. Leaders: Les and Margaret, George.
2. 23/8/1995 McKendry Road, Maungatua, return by Roseburn property, Horsehoof Station. Medium. Leaders: Les W, Ray, Jack M, Peter R
1. 26/8/1992 McKendry Road to Maungatuas, return by Roseburn property, Horsehoof Station. Leaders: George, Les W, Peg Al, Peggy M..

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May 09 2018

Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards, McArthny, Varleys Hills

Published by under Trampers

Distance Portobello from car-park: 32 km.

Map of area

10. 9/5/2018. Hikers. Varleys Hill. M. Leaders: Pam and Jay.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Adrienne W pic.

Lunching on top of Varleys hill. (Ian pic.)

9. 10/1/2018. Trampers. Varleys Hill. M. Leader: Janine.

While the weather report was forecasting showers, my barometer just continued to climb towards ‘dry’ – so we had another rain free day which provided ideal conditions for our first tramp of the year .An eager 15 individuals set off from Portobello across farmland where we stopped for morning tea at an old milking shed site, allowing those mechanically minded to study remains.

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continuing on we passed both live bunnies and dead ones! Then ventured back onto a gravel road leading us to Papanui Inlet,

Towards Papanui Inlet. (Helen pic and caption.)

such a busy piece of road – we stepped aside for one car! We detoured from the road into private farmland and began the uphill climb through the bush protected by a  QE2 covenant.

The traditional stone walls in this area are always amazing but the stone fortress around the top of Varleys Hill never ceases to astound all and constantly query ‘who and why?’ But dispite rigorous research into the history of this block of land and it’s history, present owners have been unable to answer these questions.

After lunch within this fortress overlooking the amazing views of Harbour Cone, Papanui Inlet. Hoopers Inlet and the Pacific ocean, most tried to detach bidi-bids from backpacks, socks, jerseys, gaiters etc. This proved a futile exercise as the tramp down the other side

Pretty Ragwort. (Helen pic and caption.)

of Varleys Hill proved to be a further tangle of this weed and most were unable to rid themselves of this attachment untill we reached the Hoopers Inlet Hall.

After another short road walk we cimbed up and over the ‘Leith’Track (I think thats what the sign referred to} back to Portobello.A lovely walk in mostly warm overcast conditions – covering just over 10 km – and finishing up at MacAndrew Bay for leisurely coffee/ ice cream and conversation. – Janine.

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8. 8/2/2017. Hikers. Portobello, Sheppards Road, Varleys Hill, Leith Track. M. Pam and Dawn.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

We parked the cars in Allans Beach Road.  33 people set off and 3 people went as far as they could cope and went back to Portobello for lunch.   We walked from Allans Beach Road to Hoopers Inlet and turned into Sheppard Rd where we  had morning tea on side of road.  We then walked along Sheppard Rd turning right at Papanui Inlet Road.   At Parkers property, 150 Papanui Rd, we walked up their driveway to start of track up to Varleys Hill.

Varleys Hill driveway. (Clive pic and caption.)

Quite a steep climb up to top where there was a lot of very large stones forming a circle.   We had lunch there …

Lunch among Varleys Hill biddibids. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and enjoyed  magnificent views of sea and hills.

Adrienne pic.

After lunch we went down through the track (heaps of biddi biddis that we had ben warned about) …

Finding the path. (Clive pic and caption.)

… to Hoopers Inlet Hall, where some group photos were taken.

Obligatory photo at Hoopers Inlet Hall. (Ian pic and caption.)

21 people went back to Portobello via the Leith track and 9 people chose to return walking back via Allans Beach Road.  We arrived back at Portobello at 2.30 where we enjoyed a coffee at the lovely café.   A very enjoyable day. – Dawn

7. 9/3/2016. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium. Leader: -.

Once again we had a very nice day for our tramp around Clarks – Varleys Hill at Portobello. And it was another opportunity to show this area to some who had not been there before.
This is not a long tramp, so the pace for the day was a bit slower than we normally travel at, but it does give time to absorb the scenery.
We had to fill-in a form for Brendon at the first gate, but after discussing this with him over the phone when I was seeking permission, it was no problem, & only took a minute to fill out the necessary bits. We then had morning tea in the normal place by the willows, & made our way up the hill past the “twisted” tree, & through the hard to open gate [ which thankfully was already open] at the top of the hill.

Scene of Portobello from Clarks Hill (Helen pic)

Scene of Portobello from Sheppards Hill (Helen pic)

On reaching Weir Rd. we travelled down here to Papanui Inlet, & along the road to the private driveway leading up to Varleys Hill. Here we stopped to retrieve an information sheet from the letterbox, that the owners had left for us. This sheet describes the work they have carried out, & some history of the property. I will forward this sheet to Ian for possible addition to the website.

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, Page 1

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, Page 1

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, page 2

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, page 2

Some made hard work of the climb up to the top “ring of stone” where we had lunch among the bidi bids !!

Lunch on Varleys (Helen pic)

Lunch on Varleys (Helen pic)

Hoopers Inlet from Varleys Hill (Helen pic)

Hoopers Inlet from Varleys Hill (Helen pic)

Then it was off down the other side of the hill following a very indistinct track, to the turn off through the bush, which leads down to the Hoopers Inlet Hall.
Another lengthy road walk followed, till we reached Leith track end which goes over the hill back to Portobello. We stopped at the top of this before going down to the cars.

Once back at the cars, it was decide to continue the “coffee club” tradition, by calling in at the Macandrew Bay cafe for a chat, before moving off home.

The day was enjoyed by all, & we only had one problem with one member using new boots, & getting a blister on a heel, which was ably seen to by our nursing member.

Walked 9.6km
4km/h
climbed 376mtrs. – Ken.

6. 23/4/2014. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium.
The tramp around Clarks, Varley Hill area is one I have now done quite a few times, but always enjoy, especially when the other members of the party have never been there before, which was the case on this occasion.
The weather was not looking good when I got up in the morning, it was raining gently, but as the day progressed it got somewhat better, & we had a fine day for our walk, with hardly any wind, & mild temperatures. The grass in the farm paddocks was a bit wet, but not too long so we all stayed dry the whole day.
We had morning tea in the willows on the first farm, & lunch at the top of Varleys Hill…

Lunch on Varleys Hill (Ken pic)

Lunch on Varleys Hill (Ken pic)

… in the ring of rocks, after having a good chat with the lady of the property before we climbed up through the bush to the top. Lunch was a bit early at 11: 40, but that gave use the option of getting back to the car early, or just loafing around to fill in the time. As it turned out, we did a bit of both, before we took off down the hill to the Hoopers Inlet Hall. Then it was the lengthy walk around the road to the track leading up & over the hill, back to Portobello, which we reached at about 12:50pm. This allowed us [ the No 2 coffee club ] to stop at MacAndrew Bay for our ‘fix’ & a chat before heading home. – Ken

5. 25/5/2011. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium.

GPS of clockwise-tramped route, courtesy Ken. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards, Varley Hills and Leith track over saddle back to Portobello.

Looking over to Quarantine Point – again (v. below)

Mount Charles from Weir Road

A break on way

Returning from viewing plaque

Closer look at the letter boxes

4. 16/6/2010. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium. Leader: George

Looking out over Quarantine Point from Clarks Hill

Descent from Varleys Hill ending at Hoopers Inlet Hall

New plaque at Sheppards Road corner

Track sign of route over saddle to Portebello

Still going? Shed in Hereweka Street.

A local told us distant object on hill was a Buddhist Temple

3. 25/3/2009. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards, McArthny and Varleys Hills. Medium. Leaders: George, Lex
A pleasant, mild, windless day with clear views to both sides of the peninsula were ideal for the 6 who set out to conquer Varley’s Hill, etc.  We parked in the centre of Portobello and then followed Harington Pt Rd for a short distance before ascending lush paddocks (with a few good mushrooms) to skirt the slopes of Clarks and Sheppards Hills which provided good views to Port Chalmers at the morning tea stop.
Tea break. Sheppards Hill

Tea Break. Lex, Sabina, Ria, George

We crossed Weir Rd at its summit and headed towards McArthny Hill.  Inadvertent deviation led us to short-circuit the circumnavigation of said hill, (in other words, we took a shortcut) and leader George directed our paths east around the hill and down to Dick Rd on the Papanui Inlet.
Gate

Gate. Sabina, George, Ria, Lex

Turning right, we passed the Sheppard Rd turnoff, with George trying the mudflats as the tide was well out,
but soon becoming “an old stick-in-the-mud”, according to Bob.  We turned off into the driveway up to Varleys Farm.
Track

Varley’s Farm driveway. Ria, Sabina, Lex, George.

At the farmhouse, we had another debate about the route, which led to some getting to the summit easily and others, “biddibid and bracken bushbashing” to reach it. At the top is NZ’s own ‘stone circle’ a dry stone wall with a ‘gateway’. One imagines it would have been used as a sheep pen, but over lunch, the talk was of ancient barrows and tombs and mysterious rituals. The plaque on one of the stones stating it was a QE II National Trust Protected Open Space added no further explanation.
Varley's Hill

Papanui Inlet and Sandymount from Varley’s Hill

Stone wall

Lunch on Varley’s Hill. Ken, George, Ria, Sabina, Lex

A pleasant descent on the other side of the hill
Cone

Harbour Cone & reflection coming down from Varley Hill

(past a mysterious, bush-surrounded, irregularly-constructed platform that no one could explain) towards Hoopers Inlet Hall led us to Allans Beach Rd, passing the other end of Sheppard Rd and thence into Hooper’s Inlet Rd.
To conclude the tramp, we turned into a farm road by some picturesque letterboxes,
Boxes

Picturesque letter boxes and thence right again onto Leith Track (an old road perhaps an extension of Hereweka St) which took us over the hill to join the top end of Hereweka St again and so down to the cars.

Some great views, good terrain and interesting and varied scenes along the way.
Building

Scene en route

Thanks to George for getting the landowners’ permissions, and the leadership from Lex and George.  Bob M
2. 25/6/2008 Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Leader: George
The scheduled tramp for the Hindon Pipe Line was cancelled due to 13cm of frozen snow in the area. Instead, under George’s leadership (co-leader Ria was too ill to come on the day), a small band of 5 trampers met at the foot of Hereweka St, Portobello for a previously perforce cancelled tramp. Here conditions were much milder than those up at the Pipe Line would have been, but there was still a cold northerly wind to wrap up against. We set off along the Harington Pt Rd for a short distance before turning up through a gate to skirt the slopes of Clarks and Sheppards Hills. A track further up led us through several gates. En route, we paused to admire the deeply furrowed trunk of a Ngaio tree, looking for all the world like a mass of thick entwining vines.
Plaited Ngaio trunk

Plaited Ngaio trunk

We eventually arrived at the summit of Weir Rd where McArthny Hill loomed directly ahead of us. George elected, for time’s and effort’s sake, to bypass that part of the tramp and take us down to Dick Rd on the Papanui Inlet. Turning right, we passed the Sheppard Rd turnoff and a short distance ahead reached the steep driveway up to Varleys Farm. We bypassed the farm up a track on the left stepped where necessary to reach the summit of Varleys Hill. Here we found a circular dry stone wall with a plaque on one of the stones stating it was a QE II National Trust Protected Open Space. We late lunched sheltered by wall and bush, enjoying spendid views all around.
Harbour Cone from Varley Hill

Harbour Cone from Varley Hill

Descending the other side of the hill we found ourselves at the Hoopers Inlet Hall
Hoopers Inlet Hall. George, Ian, Lex, Ken.

Hoopers Inlet Hall. George, Ian, Lex, Ken.

where we set off to walk along the Allans Beach Rd, passing the other end of Sheppard Rd.
It was here the highlight of the day occurred.
A cheeky grin (?) from a tagged seal.

A cheeky grin (?) from a tagged seal.

A frolicsome young seal swam up to us, reaching the stone wall of the road and looking right up at us. We remained there, fascinated at its twistings and turnings, for a considerable time.
It capped off its performance by steaming away across the water at a great speed, the water parting and streaming away on either side.
To conclude the tramp, we turned into a track roughly paralleling the sealed road turn-off to Portobello and on its left, which took us over the hill to join the top end of Hereweka St again and so down to the cars, passing a surprisingly well equipped Village Tourist Park and a sleek coastguard rescue vessel.

A great introduction to some Peninsula hills our club hasn’t experienced before. Thanks to George for getting the landowners’ permissions at a moments’s notice and providing this excellent alterative for the day. – Ian

1. 25/4/2008. Trampers. Portobello, Varleys Hill. Easy. Leaders: George, Ria.

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May 02 2018

Taieri Ferry and Finlayson Roads, Bells farm, Kennedys, Millennium.

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Read “Taieri River Geology” for some background information.
“Legends of the Lower Taieri” includes a section about John Bull if you persist in reading down far enough.

Wardells’ White House 25 km from car park.

13. 2/5/2018. Both. Millennium Track. Leader: Eleanor.

Trampers: Millennium/John Bull Tracks. M.

38 fit looking Trampers/Hikers and Ramblers  assembled at the car park for the combined tramp along to John Bull Gully and Taieri Mouth.  The day was calm and mild (after a lot of rain over the weekend).  On arrival at the White House at roads end, quite a lot of jostling of cars was necessary for the drivers to find a spot to park.

All of us set off along the very brown looking river bank for a short walk into the Picnic spot

Morning smoko. (Gordon pic and caption.)

where we had smoko.  The 25 Hikers were going onto John Bull Gully and the 13 Trampers were heading to Taieri Mouth and back.

We set off at 10:15 am  and after a short climb, the track levelled and wound along the bush covered banks of the river.  We then crossed a small spur which is where the 2 tracks meet.  After climbing into a gully with large tree ferns, the track emerged at the high point, with a welcome seat

½ way. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and good views.

View from the top. (Phil pic and caption.)

2 of our party were quite happy to sit and chat, so enjoyed the sun waiting 2 hours for our return.  Along the next section the native bush is slowly overtaking the gorse.  Another climb around Governors Point, where we got great views up and down the gorge.  By now it is downhill to the board walk across Muddy Gully, then finally the welcome sight of the bridge …

Nearly there. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and cribs come into view.

An enjoyable lunch and catchup was had at the picnic tables.

Cafe Taieri Mouth. (Phil pic and caption.)

A Kingfisher was spotted on the power lines near Jay’s crib.

Half an hour later we headed off back the way we came.   Was surprising the track was so dry, considering recent rain.  Quite a lot of bird song heard, also, a little Robin was spotted.

We walked 18.6 km’s.  Similar times of 2 1/4 hours each way.  Was a first for some trampers to do the return trip.  Followed by a very welcome hot drink at Wal’s @ 4pm by a few of us.  Ending a great tramp with great company. – Eleanore

Hikers. Millennium Track. E. Sub-Group Leaders: Bob, Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Supplementary Report. From the Picnic Spot, 22 Hikers, leaving 3 Ramblers behind to plan their own trip, eventually stirred themselves to trace the Trampers’ steps up to the regular winding-down-in (to gullies) and up-out (around ridges) Millennium Track to John Bull Gully

Ian explains about the old track out of John Bull Gully. (Clive pic and caption.)

– for an early lunch there, overflowing the two  eight-seater picnic tables in the process.

Shortly after our arrival, an informal small sub-group from among the Otago Tramping and Mountaineering Club, whom we had earlier met at the car park arrived, full of praise for our website which they regularly used for excursion ideas. They found their own spot seated among some obliging rocks.

The sun shone, the slight wind dropped, we leisured,

We leisured. (Ian pic and caption.)

and eventually stirred, to make our way back to the car park, there to find the Ramblers happily sunning themselves by the river.

We can echo the Trampers’ report on the state of the track. How surprisingly dry it was {mostly} and how wide and well kept too. A pity the occasional thoughtfully placed resting seat along its way has been denied its  river view by the relentlessly growing native bush.

A pleasant fulfilling walk topped off …

Relaxing coffee chat. (Ian pic and caption.)

… with a relaxing coffee chat. – Ian.

12. 23/8/2017.Trampers. Millennium Track, Kennedys, Bells. M. Leader: Arthur.

Galloway Road tracks map. (Map courtesy Arthur.)

Only 8 trampers were out today to enjoy the good weather and the  tramp. The Taieri Ferry Bridge was closed for ongoing (all winter, so far) repairs, so we travelled to the south end of the flood free highway before turning back onto Taieri Ferry Road.

Parking at the usual parking area, it was 10 am as we began walking. The low lying bits of the track were quite wet and muddy, as expected.

Looking at the damage from the rain. (Helen pic and caption.)

After 15 minutes we came to the picnic area on the riverbank for our smoko stop. It was about low tide and the river was very low.

Following the Millennium Track again, a side trip to the river was made at John Bull Gully where two DOC workers were cutting the grass around the picnic area. They had arrived by boat, which was sensible.

At John Bull gully where some maintenance was being done. They traveled by boat. (Helen pic and caption.)

From John Bull Gully it is rather a good uphill grunt for some way, but eventually the highest point of the track was gained – a 5 minute stop being taken here at the observation seat to admire the views.

View from the seat. Magic. (Helen pic and caption.)

We turned off the Millennium Track now, uphill beside the gorse, and then through the pine trees to reach the end of the deer fenced lane on the Kennedy Farm. It was up slope all the way but the lane took us up to Finlayson Road. It was 12.30 pm now, so was time for the lunch stop. High cloud was making the sunshine a bit weak, but with almost no breeze, so it was a pleasant, high up spot for the occasion.

We had to follow Finlayson Road towards Waihola before turning onto Galloway Road and followed it down to its end. We were high up here giving us very good views to enjoy.

The last leg was down through a recent logged forestry block.

Down through the felled forestry and lots of sticky mud. (Helen pic and caption.)

The going was good at first, but further down a digger rowing up the “slash” had left the dozed dirt track in rather a mess. But by taking care we negotiated this area safely. It was about 200 metres down through the standing pine trees to get to the bottom, where we emerged back at the carpark.

Today’s tramp was 12.7 km, and all were happy. On returning to Mosgiel THE BLEND coffee shop enjoyed our patronage.

It had been another good day’s social tramp for our group. Thanks to all. – Art.

11. 23/7/2014. Trampers. Millennium Track, Kennedys, Bells.

GPS

GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 13.4 km; moving ave 4.5 km/hr; moving time 2 hr 44 min; climbed 530 m.

Ignore the missing piece of track on the Google Earth view, as I forgot to reset the GPS before we started off.
With the day looking promising weather wise, 4 set off to walk the Millennium Track from Henley , then up through Kennedys property, & back down one of the ridges onto the river road again. We stopped at the Taieri Scenic Reserve picnic table for morning tea, & then went on to John Bull Gully, where we had a short rest before tackling the steep climb up to the seat on the John Bull track, & over the fence behind here to walk up past Kennedys house & onto Finlayson Rd. where we stopped for lunch in the shelter of some flax bushes.

Neil enjoying his cuppa at lunchtime.

Neil enjoying his cuppa at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

Arthur and Ian at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

Arthur and Ian at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

It was then a short walk along to the turn off onto Galloway Rd. We walked the full length of Galloway Rd. & climbed the fence into a very wet & sloppy grassed paddock, which was quite steep in places, but luckily nobody fell over. All this area was new to everybody on the tramp, so it was a case of following our instincts to find the way back to the cars, which was accomplished without any trouble.

10. 11/7/2012. Millennium, John Bull, Kennedy’s Farm, Finlayson Road, Galloway Road, Bell’s Farm ridge, Ferry Road. 12 km.

Kms indications 1 & 2 are Millennium, 3-4 is thru John Bull Gully, 5 is up Kennedys Farm, 6 is Finalyson Rd turning off into Galloway Rd, 7-10 is down ridge, 10 to end  is Ferry Road. (Phone died before completing circui!)

Seven of us enjoyed a good winter tramp, warm in the sun and calm, even on the top. Went down the same ridge on Bells Farm that we did last time. Note: the way to find it (better than last time!) is to turn down 4WD track adjacent to a large corrugated shed part-way down Galloway Rd before the road swings away over to the right. The track skirts the top of a gully before emerging onto the ridge. Then just follow your nose down.
We elected to do this ridge rather than the even better one at the end of Galloway road as the leasee had reported he was running bulls in a paddock near the bottom of the ridge! – Ian

9. 17/6/2009 Trampers Taieri Ferry Road, Millennium, Kennedys, Finlayson Road, Bells Farm. Leaders: George, Bill M
It was only at the carpark that we were sure that frosty road conditions were going to turn out safe enough for setting out. Four of us in Bill’s car met George at Wardells cottage. George had planned a clockwise walk this time, starting on the Millennium Track. We stopped off soon at the track turn-off to the river for morning tea.
Cuppa on Millenniu. Lex, George, Bill

Cuppa on Millennium. Doug, Lex, George, Bill

Snow on the track was more obvious as we ascended to the seat on the John Bull where we planned to turn off up to Kennedys farm.

Pause at seat on John Bull. Bill, George, Doug, Lex.

Pause at seat on John Bull. Bill, George, Doug.

As we got up near the house snow (and a chilly breeze) was at its thickest.

Snow thicker here. Doug.

Snow thicker here. Doug, George, Lex, Bill.

At this point George had already determined to ask at the house where we might lunch in a bit of shelter. “Boots off and come inside!” was the response, providing a lunch stop in the most civilised of surroundings.
A long time after, we (reluctantly?) resumed the tramp. Snow had been graded off Finlayson Road and only semi-melted slush was left. We turned down Galloway Road, but had gone only a short distance before George decided it was time to turn off to to descend a ridge. After descending the ridge for a considerable distance we were bushed out by heavy scrub and had to return up far enough to try another next-door ridge. This gave clear access to the marshy flats below.

Going down farm ridge.

Returning down farm ridge. Doug, Lex, Bill, George.

Matters got a little dodgy at the ridge’s base but we soon got onto a squelchy paddock yielding to a less squelchy track that led out alongside a drain to Ferry Road.
A final walk along the road back down to the cars ended a most enjoyable walk out on the snow.
I now realise there are at least three navigable ridges between Finlayson and Ferry Roads, although George seems to have done them all some time in the past. There was the one we did 7 years ago, the one we did today and a further one from the foot of Galloway Road that Bill recalled Mr Kennedy advising we take but which George must have failed to pick up on. – Ian.

7. 12/4/2006. Trampers. Henley, Waihola Road, Millennium Track. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Dot B.
6. 12/1/2005. Trampers. Wardells, Waihola Road, Millennium Track. Leaders: George, Bob H.
5. 31/7/2002 Taieri Ferry to Waihola Road and Bells farm. Kennedys, Millennium. Bell Farm. Seek permission. Lambing Aug to Oct. Cars park halfway down Taieri Ferry Road, end of forest. Up hill till lunch time. Wenita permit.  Wenita Map. Leaders: George, Bob H, Colleen
4. 13/11/1996. Henley Ferry to Waihola Road and return. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Bev McI.
3. 21/8/1996. Taieri Ferry to Waihola Road and Bell’s Farm. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Bev McI
2. 15/3/1995. Between Galloway Road and Waihola Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Margaret and Les.
1. 6 Apr 1994 John Bull track, over paddock to Finlayson Road, back on John Bull Track. Leaders: Les S, Bill H, Doug & Ngaire.

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Apr 18 2018

Deep Stream, Rocklands Station. Welshs Road. Lawlors Old Farm.

Published by under Hikers

Background Information to Deep Stream project
No. 60 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lawlor Farm”
Closed for lambing Sept-Nov.
50 km from car park.
Seek permissions.

14. 18/4/2018. Trampers. Welshs Road, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leader: Keith and Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

It was a beautiful autumn day as 14 trampers travelled for about 40 minutes, out past Clarks Junction to Welshs Road.

The cars were parked by the woolshed near Deep Stream on Steve Nichol’s farm. We all had to sign the visitors book on arrival, for “elf and safety” reasons.

The sun was lovely, but the breeze was decidedly cool, as we made our start.

To be different, the leaders had planned on a clockwise circuit, and also climbing uphill through the paddocks to extend the distance.

The steeper beginning warmed all the participants nicely, before having morning tea in the head of a gully – somewhat sheltered from the breeze.

Morning tea towards Deep Stream. (Phil pic and caption.)

Continuing up through the paddocks the scenery was magnificent wherever we looked. At the highest point of our day we came back to Welshs Road. The wind was keen here, but there was a good view over to the Lammermoors – the “ship at anchor” was visible.

Now it was downhill all the way to Deep Stream, road at first and then following the farm’s boundary fence.

The “Te Papanui Conservation Park” was just over the fence which we had to climb through at the last. The views looking down in to Deep Stream were great as we descended to the weir.

Time for some photographs …

The weir! (Phil pic and caption.)

… before walking the 4W.D. road above the stream.

Follow the leader. (Phil pic and caption.)

Near the mouth of Deep Creek we stopped for an early lunch on a long table thoughtfully provided. A nice spot in the sunshine, and ideal for the occasion.

….and if one should accidentally fall there would be…….sitting on the wall! (Phil pic and caption.)

The 4W.D. road was up and down a bit, but took us back to the cars, after having walked 9.8 km.

All agreed that the walk down through the Deep Stream gorge, below the weir, was the highlight of the day. It had been another very successful and happy day’s tramp for our group.

And so back to Outram, to stop at a the ‘Goat’ for water, food, tea, coffee, hot chocolate, cold beverage, etc (tick the boxes applicable please). – Art.

13. 17/2/2016. Hikers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leaders: Bob and Peter.

GPS of route alongside Deep Stream.

GPS of route alongside Deep Stream.

The leaders considerately stopped the cars about 3k short of the old farm house to give some level walking to those who didn’t wish to tackle, beyond there, the climbs over the three steep ridges on the way into the weir. (As matters turned out, they did tackle a further climb or two after all.) We all stopped first, a kilometer or so along the road, for a cuppa.

Hikers. Cuppa. A km or two from the cars.

Hikers. Cuppa. A km or two from the cars.

Eight of us went on  to reach reached the barb-wired locked gate, (some getting further)!

A nostalgic shot (yet once again, couldn't resist it) of the 'confluential' point where the Deep Creek tributary enters Deep Stream.

En route, a nostalgic shot (yet once again, couldn’t resist it) of the ‘confluential’ point where the Deep Creek tributary enters Deep Stream.

En route, (whoops, too many ‘en routes’), we passed a couple of bee hive sets of frames, with Betty getting stung several times from one of them. Happily Lester was there to help remove the bees and their stings.

On our return, we stopped in the a patch of shade for lunch.

The leaders (& Doug) lunching in the shade.

The leaders (& Doug) lunching in the shade.

The day grew warmer but fortunately not nearly as exceptionally hot as it was a fortnight ago. We enjoyed a brief cooling passing shower when getting close to the cars on our return.

The ridges are getting higher and steeper than ever to climb over and the tramp extension by the extra three or so kilometres gap between cars and house wearied this reporter a bit but for the others it was a breeze. A good day out. A good reminder of a tramp the club has enjoyed many times before. – Ian.
12. 23/4/2014. Hikers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS

GPS of route. The tail with “2” in it was a false uphill recce with none of the necessary downhill bits one or two of us had remembered.

A good memory is an attribute we came to wish we collectively had more of. Driving down Welshs Road, we  made two false stops before plucking up enough courage to take our cars yet further on to the actual Holiday Camp yards. (However, from recollection (what’s that again??) the “Both” 8/2009 group [indicated below] walked virtually the length of Welshs Rd just to reach the HP, well-notified on its gate).

Neat Caption (John pic)

Neat Caption editing, John! (John pic)

Well, we eventually made it there by car and walked on and up a bit to stop for our morning cuppa.

After that stop, taken briefly because of a strong cold wind at the time, memory let us down again. A few recalled the road had several ups and downs in  it, but the road that we then took led us only up and up and up. After some confused conferring, with nervous hope of finding the right way, we retraced our steps back down the way we had come, to a gate just adjacent to our morning tea stop. Soon the reassuring ups and downs emerged, and a morning tea spot taken on an earlier tramp confirmed we we on track. (See Trampers 11/2009 for the morning tea break pics)

However the earlier uphill foray had served to discourage four of our 22-strong group from further uphill struggles and they returned to the cars. That was too bad. But eighteen still persisted.

The stream views were most rewarding. The view of the Deep Creek (exit/entrance?? – well, confluence, then) into Deep Stream looked better from an angle different from that of a pic below taken on an earlier trip.

 

Confluence

A more picturesque view of Deep Creek debouching into Deep Stream. (See “Deep Creek Tributary” below for the other one)

A locked gate (part of which can be seen at the right in the pic below) just prior to the weir proved a further deterrent, and only five persisted beyond it. On rejoining the other twelve they found them already getting into their lunch. It was the right time too.

Lunch

Lunch by the locked gate. (John pic)

We straggled back to the cars in a long drawn out string of ones and twos, but all eventually made it, to unsurprisingly  find the earlier four long gone.

Then it was only for a dwindling ten (did Elaine deliberately hide herself behind Pat?) of us to reunite at the No 8 w Herbs cafe for a drink of …

Cafe

After tramp coffee at Outram.

… – you’ve guessed it – coffee, not to mention a tasty treat of chips and dips, courtesy Elaine. – Ian

11. 26/2/2014. Trampers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir.
GPS of route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We only walked 7.6 km; 1 hr 57 mins moving time, 3.9 km/hr; climbed 318 mtrs; max elevation 544 mtrs.

This was a tramp that most of the 9 that turned up had never done before.
We walked up the gorge all the while looking down to Deep Stream to see if we could find a more interesting walk than on the road with it’s quite steep climbs. Once again most of the ones who are going on the Motatapu trip next week were carrying their big packs with some weight in them.
We found some nice rocks to sit on for morning tea …
Morning tea breakHeb

Morning tea break. (Heb pic and caption)

… at the top of one of the hills we had to climb, so we got a good view of the countryside. Then it was further into the gorge, until we arrived at the weir.
The weir. (Heb pic and caption)

The weir. (Heb pic and caption)

After a look around there, & a drink to freshen up …
Topping up the fluids at the weir. (Heb pic and caption)

Topping up the fluids at the weir. (Heb pic and caption)

… it was decided that we would go up the steep road opposite to where we were sitting, & walk back through the paddocks. George & Rea both remembered doing this in earlier times, so we set off, & headed away from the gorge up into the paddocks where we split up a bit & had lunch in two groups. Then it was down a gravel road that George assured us we would find, & back a short distance to the cars. The stream looked inviting, as it was a reasonably hot day, without a cloud in the sky, but nobody was game to get wet !!
After examining some peoples’ packs, & the way they were wearing them, we had an adjustment session to see if we could improve the fit for one member of the group, & I’ll also be looking at mine before next week, as it seems to be sitting too low on my hips.
We are becoming the Coffee Club No. 2 as we once again called into Outram for a chat over a cuppa on the way home, although Rea, & Hazel walked  all the way around to the Berry Farm shop for a Yoghurt Ice Cream !!
Everyone agreed that it was a good walk with interesting scenery along the way. – Ken.
10. 25/11/2009. Trampers, with a lot of Hikers! Deep Stream Holidays.  Pipeline Road. Deep Stream Weir. Easy+. Leaders: Bill and Pat.
It was 10.00 a.m. before our cars reached the Deep Stream Holidays Park. So we walked on along the pipeline road before stopping for a delayed morning tea in a sheltered corner of the road.
cuppa

We stopped for a late cuppa.

Other group at tea break

Other group at tea break. (Bill pic)

The road wound on up and down as the pipeline followed up beside the stream.
road

The road stretched on.

A point of interest was to see the Deep Creek confluence point with Deep Stream.
Deep Creek tributary.

Deep Creek tributary.

Eventually we arrived at the weir.
Weir. (Ken pic).

Weir. (Ken pic).

We climbed the steps from the weir to the road above. Some of us found a way up to the rock looming behind.
Steps up from the weir.

Steps up from the weir. (Ken pic).

From the rock buttress, we had a grand view of weir and dam.
dam

View of dam from the rock buttress. (Ken pic)

On the way back, Bill pointed out a rock wall built by Chinese goldminers to divert the stream.
wall

Old diverting wall from Chinese goldmining days.

9. 5/8/2009 Both. Welshs Road, Deep Stream, Lawlors Old Farm now Deep Stream Holidays. Easy+. Leaders: George, Bev.

click to enlarge

RomdalesB4

Romdales. Where there’s a wool…. (Bruce pic and caption)

RomdalesAftr

….there’s away (Bruce pic and caption!)

Climbing Welsh Road by Deep Stream. (Bill pic). Molly

Climbing Welsh Road by Deep Stream. (Bill pic). Molly

Another view of Deep Stream

Another view of Deep Stream. (Bill pic)

Deep Stream above the weir. (Bruce pic and caption)

Deep Stream above the weir. (Bruce pic and caption)

In holiday mood.

In holiday mood. (Bruce pic and caption). Evelyn, Pat, Bev, Molly, Fred, Bill, George

Pot of Gold

If we just keep straight ahead we should hit a pot of gold (Bruce pic and caption)

8. 14/4/2004 Hikers. Deep Stream. Lawlors Old Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Joyce , Jim & Thelma
7. 15/5/2002 Alt. Deep Stream, Lawlors Old Farm. Easy. Leader: Mary L, Margaret and Les.
6. 23/9/1998. Lawlor Farm, Deep Stream. Leaders: Mary L, Sabina.
5. 25/9/1996. Deep Stream from Rocklands Station to Dam. Leaders: Jack M, Diana and Ray
4. 10/5/1995 Lawlor Farm. Medium. Leaders: Peg C, Mary L, Sabina, Diana W
3. 2/12/1992 Welsh Road, Deep Stream, Lawlors Farm. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A, Peg C, Peg M
2. 25/4/1990 Welsh Road, Deep Stream. Great tramping area. Easy+. Only one small hill. Leaders: Mary Y, Diana B, Hugh D, Betty B
1. 1/2/1989 Deep Stream. Rocklands Station. A long but not difficult walk. Follow pipeline to dam. Leaders: Daphne, Denise, Mary

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Apr 18 2018

Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream

No. 89 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Outram Glen – Lee Stream Year Round”

11. 18/4/2018. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. H. Leaders: Clive and Jim.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to switch app on only at morning tea stop, so total distance more like 9 km.

26 Hikers and Ramblers set out from Outram Glen scenic reserve alongside the Taieri River to Lee Stream.   This was our first visit since the storm last year caused a lot of damage to the track and trail.   Repairs are on going, apparent from the pile of gravel on the track and washouts still to be repaired on the trail.   Several trees still block the trail.

We arrived at the end of the track about 10.15am and had morning tea on the rock strewn beach beside the river.

Morning tea at the end of the track. (Clive pic and caption.)

Several ramblers and a couple of the hikers then turned back to the start.   An intrepid 19 hikers continued over the trail, followed by fantails and tom tits to Lee Stream.   There seemed to be more hills to climb and they seemed steeper.   Maybe that’s an age thing!

Arriving at Lee Stream around lunch time we picked spots out of the wind to have lunch.

Lunch at Lee Stream – not quite there. (Clive pic and caption.)

It was pointed out by a senior hiker that we hadn’t actually reached Lee Stream and should continue to the stream.   Walking a further 100 meters got us there. (see photo)

Lee Stream. (Clive pic and caption.

Lunch of others at Lee Stream. (Ian panorama pic and caption.)

The return journey took longer than normal and unfortunately one member suffered a wound to her calf muscle on a broken bush stump whilst trying to cross a washout.

A tired crew arrived back at the carpark after 3.30pm.   It was intended to visit a local coffee shop, but when we got there it was closing,.so 2 cups of coffee next time!  Happy Tramping.  – Clive

10. 9/11/2006. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jennifer and Dorothy S.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Total elevation of 433m the product of  ALL the UPS on the track, – the by-product of all the downs!

Morning tea by the Taieri. (Ian pic and caption.)

Morning tea by the Taieri. Threatening rain cautioned some to don parkas but there were hot sunny periods in the day as well.  (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream “beach” at the confluence of the stream with the Taieri River. (Ian pic and caption.)

9. 10/8/2016. Hikers. Outram, Historical Park and Museum, Outram Glen. E. Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Nike GPS Route Map

Nike GPS Route Map

A good frost today but lovely and sunny for our hike around Outram

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

which was varied with a visit to the Museum,

Museum

Waiting in the sun outside the Museum to regroup.

Vintage Park and then onto the Glen track.

Wheelbarrow

Standing aside to allow a motorised tracked wheelbarrow returning empty from delivering gravel to resurface the track. A sunny spot. (Liz pic.)

Frost (Liz pic.)

And a shaded spot. Frost. (Liz pic.)

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point.

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point of the Outram Glen – Lee Stream Track.

We numbered 25 and finished off with the Local Coffee Shop.
It was a wee bit different owing to the unknown conditions from the nasty weather three days earlier but as usual the company was good and we achieved our goals thanks to everybody. – Liz and Alex.

8. 26/3/2014. Hikers. Taieri Musem, Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of track to Lee Stream

GPS of track to Lee Stream

We were met with a surprise variation to simply walking the Outram Glen track. The leaders took us first up to the Taieri Historical Museum via an interesting side track shortly up the George King Memorial Drive by the bridge over Traquair/Whare Creek. We were seduced by the machinery museum building at the top of the property with its wonderful variety of early Taieri farming implements. They found it hard to drag us away.
We made our way down the driveway this time, and past a surprising number of cars to the track beginning. Time had passed so the leaders made our cuppa stop at the crest of the track’s large rise just past the entrance and in a nice sunny spot.
Then on we went till we reached the great set of steps that took us up from the river side to the high undulating bush track, or more officially, ‘route’. From the top of the steps on to the end of the route was a long series of regrouping pauses, where the more able waited for the less able to catch up. But get to the end we did.
A note to the side: On our way to the start of the track, we noticed Bob’s ute had joined our parked cars while we were up at the Museum. Some knew that he did have a prior commitment and must have presumed he would have caught up with us somewhere on the track but knew nothing of the leaders’ plan to visit the museum first. Eventually we did meet him, towards the end of the track, returning. It was all just too sad a misunderstanding.
We discovered the reason for the group of cars at the start when we reached the end. By the Lee Stream mouth was a large group of young St Mary’s School pupils being instructed on safety measures pertaining to launching inflatable rafts drawn up nearby.

Launching

Launching the rafts

There were eight rafts in all, four setting out at a time to practise the art of paddling in the stiller waters upstream before heading off down over the first set of rapids below.
Afloat

The paddling rehearsal before negotiating the first rapids

By this time we had finished our lunch and just prior to entering the bush track again, were surprised again to see the rafts anchored against a cliff on the opposite side of the river, and each pupil being required to leap off a ledge in the cliff into the water, resurface, and to drift with their life jackets down to and be helped back into their rafts immediately downstream. They did this wonderfully, some choosing a yet higher ledge to leap from. Bravo.
We seemed to make much faster return time down the track than when earlier coming up, and were regaled from time to time by excited shouts and screams below us as the rafters made their way downriver.
As we neared the end, it was just a case of now of negotiating the rise at whose summit we had earlier in the day had our cuppa, (it’s steeper and more laborious on the up-track side of the rise and this reporter, at the tired end of the tramp, hates it) and we were back at the cars and en route to home.
Thanks to Betty and Jim for their imaginative planning of the day and careful looking after us. – Ian.
7. 5/10/2011. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Leader: George.
Lambing got in the way of the programmed Lee Stream ramble. The Outram Glen walk was a most successful replacement. 20 of us went. The first bit’s nice and flat in general. We stopped early for morning tea by the river. A cold wind drove us back up to shelter in the approach track.

Down-track view.

Up-track view.

Beyond the sign indicating the more difficult part of the track was the (never less) challenging (never-ending as well) set of steps. They are now well-worn but still very serviceable. We all made the ascent at our individual rates of speed. Beyond that, the various ups and downs are still well serviced by the sets of stone steps. They have stood the test of time and are firmly embedded. Well made. We all made our way to the Lee Stream confluence with the Taieri, some arriving earlier, others later. Again an early lunch enjoyed with the warmth of sun and calm, and cooler bits of  breeze. But still comfortable enough.

Some of us at lunch.

The confluence of the two streams at lunchtime.

Again, we wandered back each at our own pace. A pleasant day, sheltered by bush from the coolish wind. – Ian
6. 3/9/2008. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Easy. Leaders: Evelyn and Bob.

Nineteen of us walked the riverwalk from Outram Glen to Lee Stream. The weather was threatening but we had just a little rain, and with no wind and a mild temperature it was an enjoyable 12 kilometre expedition. Many of us had not seen the Taieri River so brown and surging for a long time.
The track in the upper reaches was quite slippery so we needed to watch our feet. Some birdsong from bellbird and fantail was appreciated as was the presence of wood pigeons. We had lunch at Lee Stream where a number could remember past picnics beneath willow trees.
Congratulations to Evelyn and Bob for leading the group. Evelyn did a stalwart job in trying to keep the group together, trying to both race ahead to hold back the fast movers and take care to see the rear guard were still with us. She even managed to end up with one more tramper at the finish than she had at the start. Well done Evelyn!
Bob provided us with some drama by taking a tumble. However he bounced back and even did it again to keep the medics on their toes. He finished the tramp in fine fettle and good humour, leading the bulk of the group on the homeward stretch. We hope the scratches and bruises do not cause too much discomfort.
George celebrated his 80th birthday and first great grandchild by handing out beautiful chocolates to all.
Altogether it was a satisfying day with a return to home base before the southerly caught up with us. – Marjorie

5. 6/6/2007 Ian, Doug M, Eleanor B, Joyce S

4. 3/5/2006. Both. Outram Glen. Leaders: Ian, Doug, Les & Margaret S, Bev H
3. 9/2/2005. Both. Outram Glen. Leader: Nancy
2. 19/8/1998. Outram Bridge, Taieri Gorge. Leaders: Nelson and Dot.
1. 25/3/1992. Outram Bridge – Taieri Gorge. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Doreen, Molly

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Apr 11 2018

Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Rongomai

Published by under Trampers

Location: 37 km.
From Evansdale Glen. Route. DOC. Stream crossings. Preferably February when water most likely to be low.
Track up Careys Creek alone: an easy walk.
Click information on the Seacliff Dam, historical creek track and pipeline.

13. 11/4/2018. Trampers. Evansdale Glen –Rongomai/Honeycomb. M. Leader: Dave.

How could 5 trampers’ turn down coffee out with Margreet and Neil and Jill’s fresh hot muffins on a cold wet morning?

Well they did! It was off to Evansdale Glen with a little snow on the side of the motorway on the way. The weather cleared a bit as we started. The creek was up after the rain so it was wet socks and boots as we made our first crossing of Careys creek.

Just out of the car and into it…brrrrr. (Phil pic and caption.)

The discussion then started on having waterproofing on the inside of boots? We were sheltered in the gorge of the creek. The bird song was very pleasant – bellbirds, tuis, fantails and the odd wood pigeon.

Trying to get heat to the feet! (Phil pic and caption.)

  At the Honey  comb/ Rongomai intersection we decided to take the Rongomai track just to guage how slippery it might be. The track was a little steep to start with.  As we followed the well-defined track we walked through very attractive areas of quite big Kanuka with smaller plants of Lancewood, Mapau, Broad leaf and the odd small Totara.

Because of the wetness of the track, we took the connecting track to the honey comb track. This was pleasant with the many ferns green and lush. We then followed up to the top of the honeycomb track to meet Semple road.

Standing on the ‘snowline’. (Phil pic and caption.)

Skyline from the top of the Honeycomb Track. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch was had in the shelter of trees and a disused gravel pit at the top.

We then followed back down the Rongomai to Careys creek again – illusion the creek seemed to be higher!  The leader who shall be nameless slipped on the slippery rocks and got wet!  Phil to the rescue. Thanks Phil.

The discussion continued on the design of new boots, with a special one way valve and pump to eject the water from within them .  Arthur gave us a demonstration.  He is now applying for a special patent for boots with these features.

Afternoon tea started with a taste of blackberries on the side of the track, followed by coffee at Blueskin Bay Nurseries and Café. – Dave

12. 17/8/2016. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Honeycomb, Rongomai. M. Leader: A Heenan.
Seven Trampers were delighted to discover that some thoughtful person had placed stepping stones to allow us to cross Careys Creek with dry feet, at the beginning of our day’s tramp. The second crossing also had the stones.
It was cold walking up the Careys Creek track in the shade, and with evidence that the frost had not thawed for some days in parts.
We stopped at the first sunny spot that was encountered to have our morning tea. It was only a very tiny spot, just adequate but welcome for our purpose.
Continuing on up this very good track, we eventually came to the junction.

A year ago our group did the circuit in a clockwise direction, so to be different (I like being different), we went up the Rongomai Track.

Up the Rongomai. (Margreet pic.)

Up the Rongomai. (Margreet pic.)

This is always a good dry track, if an energetic climb at the lower end.

Turning left we followed “the old nature trail”, the cross track to Honeycomb. This track generally follows the contour, but goes up and down continually, with a number of well placed steps in places. In one place, a large fallen tree proved a little awkward to climb through carefully. Considerable bird song was noted here – Bellbirds and Tuis, etc, and several pigeons were seen. A little Tomtit had kept just in front of us for a short distance, as close as two metres to me.

Coming to the Honeycomb track, we turned left again and following it for a short distance, found our lunch spot bathed in sunshine.

Lunch in the sun. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch in the sun. (Margreet pic.)

The Honeycomb Track was drier than expected and we made good progress going down, only the last 200 metres or so needing extra care – steeper and wetter here.
Following Careys Creek now, the track was quite wet in places and the air noticeably much colder in the gully.

There are five river crossings along here on the way back to the Rongomai junction.

Care had to be exercised at the crossings as the rocks were just a little slippy. …

One of the crossings. (Margreet pic.)

One of the crossings. (Margreet pic.)

… One member narrowly avoided disaster.

Back at the junction. (Margreet pic.)

Back at the junction. (Margreet pic.)

Around a further hour’s tramp returned the group to the cars, having covered 12.4 km.
Some members of the group wanted to stop at “Blueskin Nurseries” on the way home. In my simplicity(?) I presumed that the lovely spring-like afternoons of the previous days had brought out the ‘gardening desire’ in some. But the plants and flowers were ignored, the group heading indoors. I tagged along to see what the score was.
I soon found that the score was:- 3 coffees, 2 hot chocolates, 1 tea and 1 juice! Discussion followed, and as noted on previous occasions, has a tendency to include food. Today such culinary delights as lamb shanks, pork bellies, pumpkins, sweet breads and tripe were avidly mentioned.
Personally I avoid tripe myself, although some may suspect that what I write here is a load of tripe(?).
Eventually seven happy Trampers returned to Mosgiel after enjoying a day’s exercise in the sunshine and fresh air. We couldn’t have had a better day out. – Arthur.
11. 12/8/2015. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Honeycomb, Rongomai.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Evansdale Glen Honeycomb joining track Rongomai (Ken pic and caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Evansdale Glen Honeycomb joining track Rongomai (Ken pic and caption). Walked 12.4km; 4km/h; 3hr 20m moving; climbed 253m; max height 340m.

Today’s tramp was to Evansdale Glen, then up Honeycomb, & back down Rongomai tracks.Now normally this is not a problem, BUT there was still a lot of snow on Flagstaff, &  around my place on the hill, so I was sceptical about our chances of getting up Honeycomb very far. However, after a bit of a conference among the 7 trampers at the carpark, we decided to go & see what was in store for us. As we got over to the other side of the Northern Motorway, it was a different world, no snow, & everything looked really normal.
The walk along to Honeycomb was accomplished with only one member getting wet feet, from the many creek crossings. The track was quite wet & muddy in places, & Honeycomb looked a bit slippery as well. However, we all made it up the steep climb without to much drama, but a few rest periods, & arrived at the junction of the joining track that goes across to Rongomai, where we had another short rest. We then headed off along here to hopefully find a sunny lunch spot on the road at the top end of Rongomai, before the track proper starts into the bush. So we stopped for lunch…

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

…in a quite sheltered spot just before entering the bush, but if we had gone a little further, we would’ve found an even better spot!!
After lunch we made our way down to the creek at the bottom of the ridge, & back out to the cars. The day was enjoyed by all, especially the ones who had not been in there before.
An incident free day, with good weather conditions, life is good !! – Ken

10. 16/10/2013. Trampers. Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Mountain Road, Rongomai. Medium.

GPS

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Honeycomb and Rongomai from Evansdale. Distance: 11.8km; time: 3hr 3mins; ave: 3.9 km/hr; climbed: 507mtrs; max elevation: 378mtrs.

 

We parked at Evansdale Glen, walked up the Careys Creek track to the bottom of Honeycomb track, stopping off on the way to have morning tea at one of the drier spots we found. The grass on the track looked like it had been covered with a frost, & the whole track was quite wet, but not as wet as one team member got after slipping on some rocks while crossing one of the numerous creek crossings. Honeycomb is quite steep, as one member found, when the plant he was clutching pulled out of the ground, & he was sent tumbling downhill for a couple of meters, before a handy tree arrested his fall. So there were numerous halts to regroup & get our breathing under control. It does get less steep for the last 1/4 – 1/3 of the climb, & some good views are obtained. We had lunch at the top of Honeycomb …

Lunch

Lunch at top of Honeycomb track

…  then walked the couple of hundred mtrs. along to the top of Rongamai track, which is now just a forestry rd. This goes down past the shortcut track which goes back across to Honeycomb, & continues for some distance beyond there. It eventually reverts into the original Rongomai track, which follows a ridge, & then as it gets to the toe of the ridge, it steepens greatly, until the valley floor is reached. From here, it is just a reverse walk along the Careys Creek track back to Evansdale Glen.
A good day, with basically no wind, even at Mountain Rd. end, & all 4 of us said it was a good walk, which had never been done by 3 of the party.

9. 18/3/2009. Trampers. Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Mountain Road, Rongomai. Medium. Leaders: Sabina, Ian

It was half a tramp, half a blackberry-plucking expedition as Hazel discretely filled a bag for next weekend’s blackberry crumble. Careys creek showed signs of a flood in recent past weeks but its level was down to a tolerable crossing and re-crossing shallowness. A notable hurdle was Bill’s aptly-dubbed “Beaver Dam” at the second crossing which we made by precariously struggling over small and large fallen branches.

The first pic shows Rongomai Ridge ahead of us.

click to enlarge

Rongomai Ridge from Careys Creek

Rongomai Ridge showing ahead

A little while later we reached the junction heralding the beginning of the loop we had decided upon doing clockwise.

The next pic shows the beginning of the steep climb out of Careys Creek up the beginning of the Honeycomb track, a climb during which at least two of the seven strong group vowed that this was their last tramp here.

Start of Honeycomb steep climb from Careys Creek at Double Hill route sign. Bill's gaiters.

Start of Honeycomb steep climb from Careys Creek at Double Hill route sign. Bill – well, his boots and gaiters.

We made it across the ridge at the top of the climb and then on further up to the Mountain Road exit. A short walk up the road and it was into and down the Rongomai with a large expanse of clear-felled forest to the left.

Back down to Careys Creek and the blackberry plucking continued with George assisting Hazel, with his long picking-pauses on the trip back filling a hefty bag of berries.

The high-light/low-light of the tramp towards its end was Hazel wrenching an ankle, which proved to be a broken fibula at the ankle on inspection the following day, leading to six weeks in plaster. However she bravely continued to limp along with the benefit of two trekking poles, even to the extent of four of us tackling an exploratory Beaver Dam by-pass track on the creek’s true right, a rather hair-raising steep up and down track in places, never to be repeated again.

Best wishes for a p-a-t-i-e-n-t recovery, Hazel. You have joined the recovering-ranks of Tash (ankle broken in three places), and Ken (two broken wrists). Best wishes to you all. Although only you Hazel can claim to have suffered your mishap on a tramp. How you made it back to the cars the rest of us will never understand. – Ian

8. 25/10/2006 Leaders: Peter B, Nelson

7. 16/11/2005. Trampers. Honeycomb, Rongomai. Medium. Bob H, Ian.
[There have also  been six earlier circuits of Honeycome-Rongomai tracks made from Mountain Road but I have managed to lose any record of them!]

 

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