Aug 16 2018

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2018

Winter Start Time: 9.30 a.m.

22 August.
Trampers: Signal Hill area. M. $5.00. Neil and Margreet.
Hikers: Ross Creek trails. E-M. $4.00. Clive. Harbour Cone M-H. $7.00. Jim and Betty.

23 August: All. AGM. 1.30 p.m. Mosgiel Presbyterian Church Hall. Church Street.

29 August.
Trampers: Michelle Farm. M. $3.00. Keith.
Hikers: Mopanui. M-H. $7.00. Dave G.

Spring Start Time: 9.00 a.m.

5 September.
Both: Brighton area. E. $40. Alex and Liz. George’s 90th. Potluck. Bowling Club. Continue Reading »

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Aug 15 2018

Post Office Creek, Reid’s Station

Published by under Trampers,Year round

 No. 27 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mahinerangi – Post Office Creek. J Shaw. Year round.”
Impassable gorse-infestation beyond old Waipori School building (aft 2008).
33 km from car park.
16. 15/8/2018. Trampers. Verterburn Station. Leader: Jill.

11 trampers enjoyed a beautiful day on Andrew Reid’s property.  We parked at the woolshed and headed downhill before walking along a water race created by gold miners, to a now empty dam.

10409112nd—Quick stop morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

On old water race above Post Office Creek. (Phil pic and caption.)

We marvelled at how this race had been dug into the hillsides – and can barely imagine the living conditions of the early miners, one must certainly hope their toiling brought rewards!!  There were a few fences to climb

Another Bloody fence. (Gordon pic and caption.)

but we were rewarded with nice views over Post Office Creek and then Lake Mahinerangi.

Surveying the Post Office Creek arm of Lake Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

We then walked away from the lake, across a dam, and through paddocks up to the farm boundary with DCC forestry.  Lunch was eaten in the shelter of the trees.

A very welcome lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Then a few more ups and downs but we basically walked through the paddocks beside Mahinerangi Road back  to our cars.
A most enjoyable day.

Distance walked 15.5 km. – Jill.

15. 17/1/2018. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Leader: Jill.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

13 trampers met at Reid’s woolshed on Mahinerangi Road.  We walked down the hill to Post Office creek, and had morning tea at the “camp” before taking the track through gold mine sluicings to the top end of Lake Mahinerangi – a very low lake today!  After viewing the old Waipori school (which had been moved to this site to use as a musterer’s hut before Waipori village was drowned) …

School inspection. The “old” Waipori School moved to Post Office Creek before the raising  of Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

… we backtracked about 1 km and shortly after went up a very steep stock lane …

Onwards and upwards to the trig. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and lunched by the trig there, enjoying expansive views of the area.

Trig A4GT -618 m altitude. (Phil pic and caption.)

We continued up the farm track towards the back of the Maungatuas – the intention had been to look over to Waihola, but it was decided that was a bit far on this occasion!  It was an easy return down hill to the bridge over Post Office creek – and to our cars.

 

Jill proudly displaying the new charging station for e bike travellers. (Phil pic and caption.)

An 18.5 km tramp enjoyed by all. – Jill.

14. 7/5/2014. Both. Reid homestead, Verter Burn to Post Office Creek and old school buildings. Leaders: Ken and Peter.

GPS

iPhone GPS distance: 12.1 km. Garmin stats: We walked 12.9km; Moving ave 4.3km/hr; Moving time 2h 58mins; Climbed 342mtrs; Max elevation 572mtrs. Allow a further km or two for the pedometer distance recorders, and then pick the figure that suits you!

21 of us parked in the Reid’s homestead backyard and made our way through one or two fences down to a bridge over the Verter Burn (near ‘1’ on the map) for morning tea.

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

We followed a road on the stream’s true left, which begs the question as to where originated the pond with its beautiful reflection on our left. (About ‘2’ on map.)

Reflection

Reflection

Between 3 and 4 on the map, is where we approached the Verter Burn ford, into which we were to plunge later, but at this stage we swung off to our left to make our way through early gold-sluiced cliffs (8/4 on map) to finally cross the Post Office Creek and arrive at (5) the former Waipori School building (as reported to the writer) of the one-time but now submerged Waipori Township.

 

Waipori Township

The Township of Waipori. The valley is now flooded and the town site is inundated. Photograph taken in 1890 by Charles Kerr.

We climbed the steep hill alongside the Post Office Creek’s true left to skirt on our right a forestry of densely branched trees  (larches? [and unpruned!] with a scattering of eucalypt among them) for a lunch where the forestry road levelled out at the top (6).

Then it was back down to the school building and out to the aforementioned ford, which this time we crossed with variously successful attempts in keeping feet dry, (but mostly wet).

Beyond that, was the further challenge of the BIG CLIMB, of un-fond older members’ memory. A taranaki gate at its top was new to us, but Neil successfully unscrambled its complexity. Three more paddocks and gates took us out to the Mahinerangi Road ( 11) and along it to the homestead (12.1) again.

At Outram, the majority of the (now well-established) coffee club socialised at the Wobbly Goat, …

 

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

although some betook themselves to the No 8 w Herbs cafe across the road. And that’s it. – Ian.

13. 28/11/2007. Trampers. Post Office Creek, fishermen huts return. Skyline track was closed on the day. Working on roads, trees. Easy. Leaders: Bill & Pat.
The day was fine and not too hot for
13 of us to tramp the Lake Mahinerangi water-race track to the fishermen huts. We had morning tea at the Post Office Creek Old School.
Tea Break

Tea Break. Hazel, Wendy, Doug, George, Ken, Shirley, Pat, Joyce, Arthur L

Immediately beyond that, the leaders had found for us the clearest approach to the larch forest that borders the lake, the tussock and bog being now badly infested with gorse. A leisurely lunch in the sun at the fishing huts and the return back. The Verter Burn barring the way in and out, as always, inspired a variety of creative crossing techniques, from direct plunging through the water boots and all, to bare feet, to plastic bags over boots and even to gumboots carried in.
Crossing

Crossing techniques. Abe (bare feet), Peter, Pat (getting plastic bags), Doug (bags), Barbara and Wendy (boots on rocks), Arthur (gumboots)

The long hill climb back out of the Verter Burn gets no easier with age, but all agreed it was another good day out. – Ian

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

12. 8/11/2006. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Doug M
11. 18/5/2005. Both. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Doug J, Bill M, Joyce S, Lesley G
10. 29/10/2003 Forestry roads return. Leaders:
Hut

Crib by the ford. Bob Peter Arthur Barbara Who? Molly

Crss

Crossing Verter Burn. Peter Who? Molly

gate

The gate beyond Verter Burn.

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

Art

Lunch stop. Arthur & Barbara on a tea break on forestry road back out.

9. 25/4/2002 Leaders: Joyce S Shirley, Wendy B
8. 30/1/2002. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce, Bob H, Donny.
7. 25/4/2001. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Shirley McN, Wendy.
6. 5/4/2000. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Bill McL, Nancy.
5. 26/5/1999. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Nancy, Patricia.
4. 26/8/1998. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Pat.
3. 4/2/1998. Post Office Creek to Huts and return from Robert Reids. Leaders: Denise, Ria L, Nel K.
2. 30/4/1997. Post Office Breek (sic) to huts round trip. (Robert Reids). Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H.
1. 8/4/1992. Post Office Creek – off Mahinerangi Road. Average. Leaders: Hartmann, Ted, Barbara M, Mary M

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Aug 15 2018

Woodhaugh Gardens and Leith

Published by under Hikers,Year round

19 km from car park.
7. 15/8/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Edinburgh stone memorial. (Clive pic and caption.)

 

Calm day on the harbour. (Clive pic and caption.)

Après déjeuner scene, Upper Garden. (Ian pic and caption.)

Nancy Syme fountain, Botanic Garden. (Lester told of Nancy Syme long time Mosgiel resident who dontated the fountain. (Clive pic and caption.)

6. 28/6/2017. Hikers. Leith walk Mouth to Woodhaugh. E. Leaders: Jan Y and Jan B.

Calm yachts where parked cars. (Ian pic and caption.

Albatross wing bridge. Wired head and body difficult to discern. (Ian pic and caption.)

Woodhaugh lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Grafitti on lower Leith concrete way. (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 25/6/2008. Hikers. Woodhaugh – Botanic Gardens. Easy. Leaders: Marjorie, Carmel.
4. 17/7/2002. Alt. Bullock Track – Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders:Denise, Shirley R, Bev McI
3. 12/9/2001. Alt. Bullock Track, Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders: Arthur & Barbara L, Winifred
2. 27/10/1999. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Betty.
1. 15/5/1996. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. (Alternative to Quoin Point.) Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

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Aug 08 2018

Grahams Bush/Old Rd Car Park, Organ Pipes, Buttars Peak, Mount Cargill.

Published by under Trampers

Click Grahams Bush history for background information.
Click Mount Cargill history for background information.
No. 19 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sawyers Bay – Grahams Bush. M Deuchrass. Summer.”
Sawyers Bay Road 28 km from car park.

12. 8/8/2018. Hikers. Mount Cargill from Old Road. M. Leaders; Phil and Raewyn.

24 intrepid hikers drove to the Organ Pipes track carpark on Mt Cargill.

Mt Cargill Road carpark. (Clive pic and caption.)

  A few ‘Oh dears’ were voiced when the steps at the beginning of the track were first seen, but taking it slowly we finally reached the morning tea stop, 15 minutes in.  Then it was onwards and upwards again with those jolly steps appearing around every corner.  Soon though we came across the pile of rubble which was once the Organ Pipes formation, and taking turns, everyone viewed the last remaining pipes standing.

New organ pipe evolving at the Organ Pipes site. (Phil pic and caption.)

  After a slippery boardwalk, the track evened out and it was a pleasant walk through the bush up to the turnoff to Buttars Peak.  Eight adventurers climbed to the top for a ‘wow’ moment,

Buttars Peak….Harbour Cone will be nothing after this. (Phil pic and caption.)

while the rest of us waited and waved from below.  Onwards around the base of the transmitter tower and the final ascent to the top – Oh no, those darn steps were back again with a vengeance.  Determinedly we all made it to the top for lunch…

Mt Cargill at the top. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch….listening in for contact from the galaxies. (Phil pic and caption.)

…and the 360 degree views over Dunedin, the Peninsula & Blueskin Bay.  The cool breeze that whipped up soon had us on the return trip and facing all those steps in the opposite direction.  Our ‘Ramblers 3’ joined us for morning tea, and did really well to continue upwards to have their lunch by the organ pipes rubble.  Well done ladies.  A great day followed by coffee at the Plaza Café. – Raewyn.

11. 18/10/2017. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast. M. Leader: Helen.

Only eight trampers today. Lots away. Started at Hall Road in Sawyers Bay. Parked cars at the start of the Grahams Track. Lovely walk up through bush and also some muddy areas. Had our morning tea stop on this section of the tramp. Up the steep steps to the Mount Cargill Road.

(Margreet pic.)

Across that and up to the Organ Pipes most which have fallen down now.

Organ Pipes. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continued on up to the top of Mount Cargill going past Buttars Hill. Had our lunch up there in the shelter as was quite windy on the top. Down we went again after conversations with other hikers and workman on our way down to the road. From there we decided to walk

View from road. Roseneath Quarantine Island and Portobello. (Helen pic and caption.)

in a large loop back to Sawyers Bay and cars. Distance was 16.5kms. Coffee at Blackstone in Mosgiel. A very enjoyabld day with lots of chatting. – Helen

10. 10/6/2015. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast.M.
We had a good turnout of 10 trampers for todays assault on Grahams Bush — Organ Pipes, & track up to the transmitter mast on top of Mt. Cargill.
We had morning tea break at the junction of the private road, & the left turn onto the track. I should’ve waited till a bit later as once into the bush the ground was nearly dry, whereas where we stopped was quite wet.
We made good time up to the road at the top of the Grahams Bush track, & after a short rest stop where we learnt that a couple from the Czech Republic had their car broken into, in the Organ Pipes car park, & a backpack stolen, which contained their passports along with other items, we carried on up to the Organ Pipes.
Those that had not been there before, or for a long time took the opportunity to view the tumbled down remains of the once great landmark, before we set off for the junction with the track leading up to the transmitter mast. We found a reasonably sheltered spot among the bush edge to sit down for lunch,
Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

before going up the rough track [in places] with the big steps up to the top, where it was very windy.
After having a good look around up here, & admiring the great view, we started to retrace our steps back down & along the Organ pipes track to the Mt. Cargill Rd. I was very pleased to see that the boardwalks that I built in the mid ’90’s are still like new after nearly 20 yrs.
Once at the road, two of the women members decided that they would walk back via the road down into Sawyers Bay, instead of negotiating the Grahams Bush track in reverse direction.
The walk back out to the cars was uneventful, with everybody making it safely.
A good workout for the lungs, & legs, with almost 1 KM climbed, but I didn’t hear any complaints, so I guess they all enjoyed the day.
Walked 11.6km @ 3.6km/hr.; moving time 3h 15min; Climbed 891mtrs. – Ken.
9. 9/2/2011. Hikers. Old Mt Cargill Rd car park, Organ Pipes, Mt Cargill, return. Leaders: Bev. and Lesley.
The title of the walk was “Tracks and Trails” – which allowed our leaders licence to take us anywhere. And so the 15 of us climbed to the organ pipes and continued past Butter’s (DOC signboard) or Buttar’s (expert Lex who remembers the family farming there from when he lived in Leith Valley) Peak and on to Mount Cargill …

And so on the Mt Cargill. (Bob pic and caption)

View back to the harbour mouth. (Bob pic and caption)

… where we lunched in the lee of a now keen southwester with a great view overlooking Pigeon Flat and the Waitati area. We then met up with the upward track again and returned.
Morning tea was at Hard Rock Café as Bob called it – that huge boulder decked with drips from the night’s rain sparkling in the sunlight. See if you can identify the drips in the photo!!

Identify the drips. (Bob pic and caption)

The Organ Pipes don’t impress as much these days as I can remember them doing from years ago before earthquakes tumbled many of them down. There are still a few standing tall but most are the ‘dis-organ-ised’ pipes now. (See below under the 6 Nov 08 entry for an “Organ Pipes” pic  of the ‘few standing tall.’ – Ian.)

Identify the dominos. (Bob pic and caption)

The track to them climbs up steps composed largely of fallen columns. After passing a track junction to the Mt Cargill Walk, you find a scree slide of columns where there was once a viewing platform. There is a good view of the Organ Pipes from here.
Wikipedia says of them, “… a prominent formation of columnar jointed basalt known as the Organ Pipes. Similar outcrops are found elsewhere in the Dunedin area, at Blackhead near Waldronville and at Second  Beach, Saint Clair. A second point of interest is the small temperate cloud forest which dominates the vegetation of the upper slopes. Though not a true cloud forest, in that it is not tropical, it bears many of the hallmarks of true cloud forest, with abundant moss and fern cover under thick low canopy. The cloud forest is protected within a 1.8 square kilometre reserve, which includes the peak of the mountain as well as several secondary peaks.”
The Organ Pipes rock formation was formed by the cooling of lava that flowed across Mount Cargill during the last period of volcanic activity in the Dunedin area. The hot lava cooling against the cold rock caused powerful expansions and contractions. When the volcanic ock cooled at the time, it cracked along long joints and consequently looks much like organ pipes standing up – that is, when they were standing up!!

Well, after all that, there was one still standing. (Bob pic and caption)

Which craggy protuberance is George? (Bob pic and caption)

Some of us simulated the domino collapse of the pipes, namely Bob who
slipped on a wet boardwalk and catapulted into Lesley who lost her
glasses in the process. Fortunately they were recovered !! Whew.
A good day’s outing. Bob
8. 11/6/2008. Trampers. Grahams Bush, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes, with Mount Cargill option for some. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Leonie

Tea Break

Organ Pipes

Buttars Peak summit

Buttars Peak summit

Trampers met at the top of Sawyers Bay Hall Road to walk from sea level to the “Top of the World” on yet another
glorious Wednesday. The tramping gods were certainly on our side as there was not a cloud in the sky as we started our ascent. The track is well maintained and a flat benched in track all the way which made for easy walking. Parts of the walk were in beautiful bush but every so often we would come to a clearing where we could look back over the harbour,

and enjoy glorious views while we got our breath back. Morning tea on the track a short way into Grahams Bush to give us sustenance for the hill climb and then onwards and upwards. Eventually we came to the road after ascending a steep flight of steps. Then over the road and up another flight of steps. During our lunch stop Evelyn entertained us with her story of the TV being blown by a gust of wind from its place in the wall into the conversation pit.

Sounded amazing. Lots of discussion about chloresterol levels and how to control them while some of us ate cheese (the bad boy) for lunch. Nearing the top there is a branch off the track which we followed to ascend Buttar’s Peak with its rugged basaltic columns. Sitting up there was like being on top of the world with uninterrupted views all along the coast from north to south with the harbour below with its picture-perfect reflections

Harbour from Buttars Peak

Harbour from Buttars Peak

and then over to the peninsula and all its magic beaches. That view has stayed with me since and hopefully for ever! After scrambling down from the peak the track divided and one group went back down and to the cars while the others went on to ascend Mount Cargill which was just in front of us.

Mt Cargill from Buttars Peak

Mt Cargill from Buttars Peak

A wonderful day and a good introduction for a visitor, and a few others who hadn’t tramped for a while. – Tash.

7. 23/8/2006. Grahams Bush, Mount Zion, Buttars Peak Organ Pipes round trip. Medium. Leaders: Jacqui, Doug J.

6. 21/4/2004 Leaders: Barbara M, Evelyn C
Enjoying the view. Glenice, Tom.

Enjoying the view. Glenice, Tom, etc.

The Buttars Peak scramble.

The Buttars Peak scramble.

5. 9/10/2002. Grahams Bush – Mount Zion. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Barbara McC, Sandra P.
4. 22/8/2001. Grahams Bush – Mount Cargill. Easy. Leaders: Graham, Bill H, Lesley S.
3. 9/11/1988 Grahams Bush to Organ Pipes. A good tramp with native bush and lovely views. Leaders: Mary Y, Peg A, Betty
2. 29/11/1995. Alternative to Hindon Pipeline: Grahams Bush – Organ Pipes. Leaders: Diana, Jack M, Les W.
1. 9/11/1989. Graham’s Bush to Organpipes. A good tramp with native bush and lovely views. Cars meet at Hall Road. Leaders: Mary Y, Peggy A, Betty B.

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Aug 08 2018

Purakaunui

Published by under Beach,Trampers,Year round

No. 97 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Purekanui & Canoe Beach Year Round”

Meet Dn cars at Pt Chalmers. Park at Jetty. 39 km
At LOW TIDE it is possible to walk along the shore to Doctor’s Point.
Also pleasant stroll 1 km down southeastern end to mouth of inlet with scattered cribs.

15. 8/8/2018. Trampers. Purakaunui/Canoe Beach. Leaders: Jill and Judy D.

Another mild winter’s day spent in the Purakaunui area. We had to change plans as high tide was approx 12 md and we had  planned to walk from Doctors Point to Canoe beach before climbing the Mckessar track back to the cars.
Never mind, we parked at the Purakaunui domain

A quick morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and walked along the inlet track, passing the cutest little 140 year old holiday home on the seaward side of the track.  Not sure what will happen with the effects of global warming??

Onwards towards the open sea along another track where the amenities board have put in a couple of seats to enjoy the  view out to sea

Walking around the bay. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and up the north coast.

Back along the short track and up the road above the holiday homes scattered amongst the bush. There was continual birdsong along our way which was so pleasant. The inlet was very calm reflecting the quaint colorful boat sheds.

Some of the boat sheds in the bay. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We shifted along to Osborne where we walked out to the beach and up to the old maori pa Mapoutahi where we had a leisurely lunch with uninterrupted views.

Lunch Maori Point. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Out to canoe beach and back to Puraukanui beach to the cars.
We were very fortunate to see several Kingfishers, some diving, some Rosellas and even an Eagle sitting on some scrub out in the inlet.
It was decided to have coffee at Orokonui Sanctuary again with pleasant views. 12 trampers and about 8 kms travelled! A relaxing day had by all. – Jill.

14. 24/2/2016. Hikers. Beach, Caves, Spit, Urupu. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

GPS of Hikers' route.

GPS route map of Hikers’ tramp.

A turnout of 24 walkers enjoyed extremely good weather. Leaders were Betty & Jim Finnie.

On the day the planned section of the walk from Mapoutahi Pa site …

Cuppa stop on the Mapoutahi Pa peninsula.

Cuppa stop on the Mapoutahi Pa peninsula. Evidence of a new sandbar is visible at top of photo.

Just managed to catch the railcar before it got right into the tunnel.

Just managed to catch the railcar before it got right into the tunnel.

… to Doctors Point had to be curtailed due to the sea’s erosion of sand at the boulder pile. It appears that this had occurred in the last approximately 10 days.

After a short delay, seven of the more adventurous walkers made the difficult crossing of the boulder pile to inspect the caves while the balance of the walkers started into the remainder of the planned walk.

There was a regrouping for lunch part way along the Purakanui beach.

Following lunch on sand spit.

Getting up after a lazy lunch on sand spit.

The walk continued along the beach after an extended lunch …

View down sandspit. Potato Point

View down sandspit. Potato Point.

… and followed the inlet into the pine trees to the fenced Maori cemetery.

From the cemetery it was along the vehicle track back to the car park. – Jim and Betty.

13. 5/8/2015 Both. Purakaunui, Purakaunui Urupu, Doctors Point. Moderate. Leaders: Judy, Bob.
Purakanui Maori graves beach caves

GPS of route courtesy Ken. Purakanui Maori graves beach caves. (Ken pic and caption.) Walked 18km; 4.9km/h; 3hr 40min moving; climbed 260m.

Today was a joint tramp with the hikers, so we all drove to Purakanui & parked down by the old garage at the far end. Here, Judy, the leader on the day, suggested that as it was already late, the trampers carry on with what they had planned, & not worry about walking with the hikers. So we took off along the waterside track, & stopped at the picnic spot for a very late morning tea break.

The group at morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

The group at morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was on around the rest of the bay, & into the pine forest on the other side, to try & find the Maori graves in there. Now I have walked past, & driven past this point many times without realising there were any grave sites in amongst these trees, until about a year ago, when they were mentioned to me. I think most, or all of the other 7 trampers with me didn’t know about them either. So it was good to find the site & have a look at the few headstones there.

Headstone with nice inscription

Headstone with nice inscription (Ken pic and caption)

Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

More Maori Graves

More Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

We then went onto the old PA site, had a quick look around, before settling down for lunch. Then it was a quick dash along the beach to the caves on the way to Doctors Point, & back again, before the tide forced a return route over the large rocks halfway along the beach.
All that remained was the long road walk, & the bayside track, back to the cars. – Ken.

Mopanui Reflection

Mopanui Reflection

Someone's dream cottage

Someone’s dream cottage (John pic)

A quirky letter box

A quirky letter box (John pic)

Hikers grouped at the plantation entrance

Hikers grouped at the plantation entrance (John pic)

Urupu Sign

Urupu Sign (John pic)

Lunch at the Cemetery

Lunch at the Cemetery (John pic)

Memorial

Memorial. “In Memory of Richard Driver, Late Gunner, N.Z. Permanent Artillery. Died April 6th 1887, Aged 27 Years. Erected By His Comrades.” (John pic)

Occasion? Location?

Coffee at Careys Bay Hotel. (John pic)

12. 27/5/2009 Hikers. Purakaunui, Canoe Beach. Medium-. Leaders: Lex, Fred, Elaine

Flooded beach access road deterred Hikers from attempting to reach Canoe Beach.
11. 16/4/2008. Hikers. Purakaunui, Canoe Beach. Easy. Park at Picnic Ground. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
10. 26/9/2007 Trampers. Purakaunui Circuit. Moderate. Leaders: Shirley, Helen.
8 trampers met at the wharf at Purakaunui and welcomed Peter back into the fold after his long holiday in Australia. The day started out as rather cold and dreary but soon picked up after morning tea in the park at the head of Purakaunui Inlet. We wound our way around the inlet and over the causeway where the kingfishers love to fish. We tramped around the other side of the inlet all the way to Canoe Bay over the steps at the end of Purakaunui beach.
Canoe Beach group. Pat, Peter, Tash, Leoni, Lex

Canoe Beach group. Pat, Peter, Tash, Leoni, Lex

Canoe Beach Trio. Lex, Pat, Abe

Canoe Beach Trio. Lex, Pat, Abe

 Lunch in the sun sitting on the most beautiful beach in the world, before climbing on to the old pa site, Mapoutahi, with views in every direction.
Railway tunnel shot from Mapoutahi Peninsula

Railway tunnel shot from Mapoutahi Peninsula

We admired all the different colours of the flowering currants along the sandy path leading back to the track and talked to a chattering and busy Tui on the way back. The tide had come in since the morning and we kept to the path all the way rather than cutting across the tidal flats. A magic place to spend the day! – Tash
9. 5/4/2006. All. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Leaders: Doug M, Bob H, Anne R, Eleanor W.
8. 15/9/2004. Both. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Glenys P, Bev H, Les and Margaret.
7. 6/11/2002. All. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Betty, Colleen.
6. 1/8/2001. Combined. Purekanui – Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Bev H.
5. 3/11/1999. Purakanui – Canoe Beach. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Chris.
4. 22/7/1998. Purakanui, Goat Island. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire.
3. 6/8/1997. Purakanui area. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Barbara McC.
2. 1/11/1995. Purakanui – Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Chris, Joan H.
1. 15/11/1989 Purakanui and Doctors Point. Interesting ancient Maori redoubt. Average+. Leaders: Dorothy W, Eric & Dot

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Aug 01 2018

Moeraki.

4. 2018-08-01. All. Bus trip. Moeraki. Leaders: Adrienne and Bev.

Report Combined Bus Trip – Moeraki 1/8/18

45 outdoor seekers got on the bus at Mosgiel to head to Moeraki for the club’s annual combined bus trip.

We started at the lookout at Moeraki …

Debussing at Moeraki. (Clive pic and caption.)

Where we are going… (Clive pic and caption.)

… and wandered down the Millennium track with great views of the sea and Moeraki Bay.  The first seal sighting included a baby seal which was eagerly photographed.  A Crested shag was also seen. It was a short wander down to the surrounds of the famous Fleur’s Restaurant.  Here morning tea was partaken …

Morning tea at Fleur’s Restaurant. (Clive pic and caption.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

… with lovely views of the fishing boats (known for catching blue cod) in the bay. It was a cool start but gradually the cloud cleared and the sun warmed us up.

The track followed the shoreline through trees and shrubs. On one part of the track the big slump in Moeraki was very evident which has affected some roads and properties.

We then walked down onto the beach, the tide being low, and some walkers seeing what seemed like a leopard seal. It was a pleasant walk 2km up the beach to the Moeraki Boulders.  According to Maori legend the boulders represent eel baskets and food that was spilled from the loss of Arai-te-uru, one of the large canoes that came from distant Hawaiki. The Boulders are concretions consisting of mud , fine silt and clay , cemented by calcite. 

After a number of photographs …

Dave I’ll just move this boulder, (Clive pic and caption.)

Oops…… (Clive pic and caption.)

… some of the group headed up to Hampden beach. Erosion by the sea was very evident along the low cliffs.

Lunch was had along the beach some near the boulders …

Adi pic.

…and others at the picnic tables at Hampden Beach.

The trampers lunch at Hampden. (Clive pic and caption.)

The lure of big double icecreams at the store was too much for some.

Well deserved treat!!! (Dave pic and caption.)

They were sampled with smiles as we walked back.

We all met up at the Boulders’ carpark around 2pm and then headed down to Shag point.  The drive in was past icon kiwi cribs, some originally belonging to coal miners of the past, to the boat ramp.  We had a wander around the area seeing more lazing seals. There was an old coal mine that used to operate in the cliffs. This was where, years ago, Mollie went to the local school at the age of 5. At that time when the mine was operating the school had a roll of 80.  10 years later when she left the school, it only had 18 students.  The mine closed in the early 70’s and had shafts running underground beneath the sea as well as inland.

It was then back on the bus, with a group of great people for the trip home. Some feeling very relaxed after some good sea air!!

Thanks to President Jill for her superb organisation.

Dave M

3. 15/12/1997. Tenth Anniversary Dinner, Moeraki. People pics.

(Click to enlarge)

bus

Sylvia Williams, Win Gibson, Audrey Heenan, Les Smith, Nancy Strang, Margaret Deuchrass, Margaret Smith, Who? Mary Maxwell, Les Wiffin, Peg Chisholm, Les Winefield, Mavis Winefield, Bev McIntosh, Barbara McCCabe, Don McCabe?

Eric

Eric Bennett, Bev Harvey, Joan Hobbs, Elizabeth Haggie, Dot Bennett, George Haggie

 

 

 

Mavis

Murray and Eleanor Watt, Ngaire and Doug Moir

Nancy

Sylvia William, Nancy Strang, Margaret Deuchrass, Peg Chisholm, Frank Weedon, Win Gibson, Shirley, Ngaire Moir

Margaret and the two Bevs

Margaret Smith, Bev McIntosh, Bev Harvey

Wndy

Les and Margaret Smith, Wendy Bathgate

Eleanor Watt, Les and Margaret Smith, Bev Harvey

Geo

George Haggie, Mavis Winefield, Les Winefield, Eric Bennett.

Dot

Dot Bennett, Joan Hobbs, Colleen Gamble

Bab

Barbara McCabe, Cath and Lex Donaldson

Ndl

Nelson and Dot Taiaroa

Murray

Murray and Eleanor Watt

Maru

Les Wiffin, Mary Maxwell

Bob

Bob and Audrey Heenan

Ray

Bev and Ray Harvey

Bev and Ivan

Bev and Ivan McIntosh

 

 

Ptr

Peter Bathgate

 

2. Friday 22/9/1992 – Sunday 23/9/1992. Moeraki Motor Camp. 23 attended. Leaders: Bob & Audrey

1. 22-23/9/1989. Moeraki Motor Camp. Leaders:  Bob & Audrey. 24 attended this weekend camp. Everyone had a great time and Audrey and Bob were thanked for a job well done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One response so far

Jul 25 2018

Government Track and beyond

Published by under Trampers

32 km from carpark.
2.5+ hours from road to pole-line and Styx Road.
No. 22 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Government Track Waipori Rd. Year Round.”
Link:  DCC: Mountain biking on Government Track
Link: DCC: Government Track map.
[DCC brochure extract: Government Track. 4 hr 30 min, 17 km (return).
The track entrance is 5 km down Waipori Falls Rd on the right; parking is 100 m further on the left. Traversing the slopes of the beech-and mānuka-forested Waipori Valley south of Dunedin, the Government Track was built in the 1860s to provide access to the central goldfields. For mountain bikers there is an option of riding up and returning the same way. Alternatively, once at the top follow the pylon track left and steeply down into Waipori township, then follow the road back to the start.]

27. 2018-07-25. Trampers. Government Track. Leader: Sue.

Still quite cool. (Gordon pic and caption.)

A rocky slip. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Another obstacle. (Gordon pic and caption.)

A well deserved late lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

26. 30/8/2017. Trampers. Government Track. M. Leader: Dave.

14 keen  trampers met at the carpark near the start of the Government track on Waipori Road.  We soon started on the track noting the 4 twisted manuka trunks at the side of the track.  The track has a gentle grade and is 8.5km long.

The reason for the gentle grade and generous width of this track lies in its origin as the original “road” from Berwick through to the Waipori gold fields. Over 20 men were employed during the 1860’s to form this publicly-funded work, which was never much more than a bridle track unsuitable for wheeled traffic. When completed, it provided a cheaper alternative route to bring in supplies (horse drawn) from Dunedin, which previously had to be carted round via Lawrence.

Morning tea was had over the style, up the ridge, in the sun and on time at 10am!

(Margreet pic.)

We continued up the track which is through native bush, mainly manuka, kanuka and silver beech

(Margreet pic.)

. There were occasional views out to the Waipori valley and surrounding hills. A number of big tree trunks lying over the track were either scrambled under or over. There was plenty of talking and hilarity on this trip which was great!

Lunch break was at the top of the track, again in the sun.

(Margreet pic.)

We then continued along the forestry road and stopped at the highest point (580 metres) where there were great views all around,

(Phil pic.)

particularly Maungatuas, Lammerlaws and Rock and Pillar range.  Moving on to the top of the kowhai spur we stopped to get panoramic views of the Taieri plain, very clear because of the fine day. The kowhai spur is aptly named as it is steep and feet can move to the front of your boots! The next break was at a farmer’s workers hut

(Margreet pic.)

before heading down the ridge, through some bush and back on to the bottom of the Government track.  A number of birds were heard and sighted including kereru (wood pigeon) and bellbirds. On getting back to the cars we found we had covered 18.5km. A fair walk!

It was then off to the wobbly goat (with some wobbly legs) in Outram for a well, deserved coffee and more chit chat.

A great group to be with – Dave M.

25. 23/11/2016. Hikers. Government Track. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

Route map courtesy Ian. (N.B.) Used shortcut route on return. Regular route a bit longer.)

Route map, Government Track, courtesy Ian. (N.B. Used old shortcut route on return. Regular route a bit longer.)

The party consisted of 23 people.

The weather’s appearance was indifferent.  But the Government track up the Waipori Gorge afforded good shelter in the bush.  The condition of the track was excellent [thanks to track-clearing by the leaders on their recce, especially on the zig-zag beginning – ed.] and this track has a very moderate consistent gradient.  The return was a slight downhill grade & a total of approximately 9.5 kms was covered. Lunch stop …

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch on Government Track. (Ian pic and caption.)

… was brief as there was drizzle approaching.   On the return to the car park some hikers took an old short cut which gave them a minute advantage.

Hot drinks were enjoyed at the Wobbly Goat in Outram, …

Last of the Summer Wine. (Adrienne pic.)

Last of the Summer Wine. (Adrienne pic.)

… before returning to Mosgiel. – Betty and Jim.

 24. 17/2/2016. Trampers. Government Track. Leader: Various.
At the car park, Bush Road, we looked towards the silver peaks. It was raining. We were told the wind was 50k plus, so we changed our mind and decided on the Government Track.
Arrived at the lower Waipori car park. In front of us was bright blackberries. To the left a tree full of apples, and a deafening sound of crickets.
Five of us set off up Government Track. Morning tea at the grass clearing. No wind, little sun.

At the top of the Government Track, we had lunch in the sun.

Lunch in the sun. (Helen pic)

Lunch in the sun. (Helen pic)

After lunch, walked along …

Along the pole line (Helen pic)

Along the pole line (Helen pic)

… and down the pole line to the hut.

Down the pole line to the hut (Heb pic and caption)

Down the pole line to the hut. (Heb pic and caption)

Turned right, found a tape marker which led us over and down to the style on the track just below where we had morning tea. Carried on down the track to the car park.
Heard lots of wood pigeons and bellbirds. A great day’s tramp. About 17k, and quite warm temperatures. – Heb.

23. 21/10/2015 Hikers. Government Track. Leaders: Betty and Jim.
22. 27/5/2015. Trampers. Government Track, return part Kowhai Spur.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Government Track-part of Kowhai Spur (Ken pic and caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Government Track-part of Kowhai Spur. Walked 17.1 km; ave 4.4 km/hr; moving time 3hr.54min; climbed 480mtrs. (Ken pic and caption)

The day looked suspect, with some light drizzle, but the turn out at the carpark was very good, & we had 6 members on our adventure for the day. We motored out to the carpark at the Government Track where it was cold & still drizzling, so it was on with the rain jackets before we set off. Once into the bush, the rain became a non issue, but everybody kept their jackets on to combat the cold.
We had a short stop for morning tea,
1. Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic)

1. Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic)

then pushed on towards the very muddy part of the track, just before the open grassed area, where we hoped that our planned route would bring us back to on the return journey. The track was in excellent condition, as it had just been cleared, apart from some large trees down across the upper part, which we had to crawl under.We stopped just short of the top for lunch, as there was a cool wind blowing, & the bush gave us shelter. Then it was onto the Poleline track…
2. Looking back along Poleline track. (Ken pic and caption)

2. Looking back along Poleline track. (Ken pic and caption)

…which had some snow remnants lying on it.
3. Trudging through the snow grass. (Ken pic and caption)

3. Trudging through the snow grass. (Ken pic and caption)

We estimated the distance to the top of Kowhai Spur to be about 1Km, but were surprised to find it was actually over 2kms, but when we got to the top & looked down on the amazing views of the Taieri & surrounds,
4. View from top of Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

4. View from top of Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

5. another view from top. (Ken pic and caption)

5. another view from top. (Ken pic and caption)

it was worth the trudge through the snow. We made our way down the steep track till we came to the hut on the true right of the spur,
6. Hut where we turned off Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

6. Hut where we turned off Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

where we left the spur, & went down through a very steep paddock heading back to the Government Track. This part of the trip was quite hard, due to the steepness, & the muddy tracks formed by cattle movement. However, we were soon within sight of the Government Track, & didn’t even have to climb a fence to get back onto it. We came out at the first fence with a stile over it, [the boundary of the privately owned land] on the uphill side of the grassed area. Then it was a brisk walk back to the cars, & the trip home, punctuated with a stop at Outram…
7. Latest Cafe footwear fashion. (Ken pic and caption)

7. Latest Cafe footwear fashion. (Ken pic and caption)

8. Trampers coffee club. (Ken pic and caption)

8. Trampers coffee club. (Ken pic and caption)

…for the “Trampers Coffee Club”. – Ken.
21. 12/6/2013. Trampers. Government Track. Styx Rd return.
6 trampers ventured out for the walk up Government Track today. We stopped at a “dry area” for morning tea, at about 10am, then carried on to the top at Styx Rd. where we had lunch in the sun. The sign at the bottom had said 2 1/2 hrs to the top, & that’s very much what it took us.
Lunch

Lunch at top of Government Track. (Ken pic and caption)

After lunch we had a discussion on whether we tried Kowhai Spur, or just go back down the way we had come. The unknown condition of Kowhai Spur [very steep & slippery] meant that the decision was made to go back the way we had come, so we set off, & arrived back at the cars at 3:00pm.
Thanks to the earlier start time of 9:00 instead of 9:30, we were able to complete this 18.5km walk before it got too cold in the afternoon, & it gave us a time buffer if somebody had injured themselves.
We walked 18.5km
moving time 4hr 15mins
climbed 364mtrs
– Ken.
20. 3/10/2012. Both. Government Track. Leaders: Graham, Judy.
There were 17 of us, (but one turned back before the paddock). We did between 8-10 km in total, getting up to the beech section for lunch (much further than the Hikers did last time). The wind across the farm paddock was as severe as the last time the Trampers had done it. Several in the group were doing the track for their first time and were equally amazed at the ease of the gradient, and appalled at the muddy section just prior to the paddock. (They didn’t know how much better the present marked route was than some earlier routes through the slough.) This, and some other tricky bits took careful negotiating for those unsteady on their feet.
Four of the Trampers left early and did the whole track. Ken’s GPS record shows that they did 18.2 km at 4.4km/hr average. Moving time was only 4hrs 9min.Total ascent was 523 mtrs. They took an extended lunch break, making stopped time 1hr 19min. – Ian.
19. 6/4/2011. Both. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret.
There is no comment from the hikers on this one, so here is a report from the trampers.
It mitigated against the intended ‘bothness’, but the leaders generously permitted three appreciative trampers to set off to do the whole track. The sign posts indicate 2.5 hours up and 2 hours down. The trampers almost made the 2 hours down but fell well short of the time up. 19 km there and back!
When we arrived at the ‘paddock’, the predicted wind was there in full force and it was a real battle to make our way across and around its slope and back into the shelter of the bush. The sloppy muddy gully just below the paddock gets no better as time goes by, despite the many attempts to re-route the track to avoid it.

GPS of Government Track from the road to the Pole Line. Courtesy Ken. Depicts how close Kowhai Spur is to the track. The multitude of gullies traversed by the track are clearly depicted. 19 km ret.

The track was well-cleared and the gradient as usual beautifully steady.

A shot of beech trees taken looking across one of the upper gullies.

Track disappearing up into the gully. Taken from the same spot as the one above.

The above pic shows only a modest amount of pig rooting. It was much worse in other places with us having to tread a new path amongst the upturned soil.
Temperatures were cooler up at the Pole Line so we retreated from it back from the gusty wind into the shelter of the manuka bush to munch a quick lunch. There was nothing tempting us to linger long.
Doug set a good pace on the return trip and the clear track allowed us to step it out with a good swing.
Back at the exposed paddock, we found the wind had lost none of its force, but fortunately it was a tail-wind this time. Then it was the atrocious gully again. The paddock and its gully had to be the worst features of the tramp. – Ian
18. 3/2/2010. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Neil, Lex.
Location: 30 km.
17. 9/9/2009 Government Track, return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Ian, Sabina.
Starting Government track. George

Beginning Government track. George, Susan

A bit further along the track. Susan, Sabina

A bit further along the track. Susan, Sabina, Glenice

Morning tea on the paddock.

Morning tea on the paddock. Susan, Ken, George, Glenice, Sabina

Through the silver beech section. Ken.

Through the silver beech section. Ken, George, Susan, Glenice, Sabina

Lunch at the pole line. George, Glenice

Lunch at the pole line. George, Glenice

Lunch on other side of track. Sabina, Susan

Lunch on other side of track. Sabina (showing her colourful hat), Susan

DOC sign pointing back down the track.

DOC sign indicating back down the track.

Start Kowhai Spur. Ken.

View from top of Kowhai Spur. Waipori Lake and Taieri River gorge beyond. Ken Susan, George, Glenice, Sabina.

Further down.

Shaws Hill road and ridge from a little further down Kowhai Spur. Sabina, Susan detectable.

Rest by former hut site. Glenice, Sabina

Preparing to rest near site of former hut which had been moved up the hill behind camera.. Glenice, Sabina

16. 17/9/2008 Waipori Gorge Area, 1860s Government Track, Waipori Leaders: Bill H, Peter B
The 'disturbed' kanuka

The ‘disturbed’ kanuka

The ‘disturbed’ kanuka

The programme said ‘Waipori’, but it really meant Bill H’s traditional walk up the “Gummint Track”. As a past long-serving employee in the area (both on a farm and in electricity supply) he was the ideal leader.  As slips had made the upper reaches of the track difficult, the 15 of us began walking from the end of the seal up the Waipori road, then crossing farmland and having morning tea beside the river. After that we were following the route taken by early prospectors up the steady incline of the old 1860s Government standardised track for drays and horses to the Central Otago Goldfields. After an initial 3-minute climb, the track maintains a remarkably consistent, gentle gradient considering theodolites were not used and the construction teams used handtools!  The day was calm and mild, and spring growth was evident in the lovely mixed broadleaf forest, with signs of fuschia flowers and kowhai. The track was carpeted with innumerable ’skellingtons’ of fuschia leaves (the fuschia is one of the few deciduous NZ trees) which made it soft and springy and patterned.There were also Kanuka, Matai, Totara and juvenile Lancewood. At one point there were 4 Kanuka alongside the track that must have had a disturbed childhood as they all had right-angle bends in them! The sound of the river gradually receded, and at lunchtime we came out onto cleared farmland with cattle and a good view up the gorge to look at while we ate. We returned by the same route.  There was some birdlife to remark upon– paradise ducks, bellbirds, warblers- but the most remarkable was at a willow tree on the river flat in which Arthur counted 13 wood pigeons, all greedily gorging great gulps of green tips.  A very pleasant walk of about 16km through lovely local terrain.  – Bob

15. 12/12/2007. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Bill H

Resting among the trees

Only seven hikers took advantage of the ideal place to be on a very warm & humid day, the lovely bush of the Government Track in the Waipori area. It is a lovely place for a hike. Beautiful bush and beech forest. Lots of birds singing in the trees and great views of surrounding bush and road to Waipori Falls. The track is not too difficult and although you go fairly high it is a relatively gentle climb most of the way. With only a small number we took our time and lapped up the cool and pleasant conditions of the track. Morning tea sitting by the track just after 10am, and then, about 12noon, 5 of us decided we would stop for lunch. Two of the group thought they’d like a bit more of a challenge so went further up the track and had lunch before heading back. Those of us in the larger group found a really lovely spot in the beech forest to sit, chat and enjoy our lunch break. Then it was back down the track, (down hill all the way!) to the cars. All agreed we had had a very enjoyable days hiking. – Bev.

14. 29/11/2006. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
13. 5/7/2006. Both. Government Track. Leaders: (Easy+): Doug M, Bob H; (Easy):  Arthur & Barbara
12. 21/9/2005 Arthur & Barbara, Bill H, Lance & Lois
11. 22/9/2004. Hikers. Government Track, return. Easy. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Frank and Lesley.
10. 26/5/2004 Lesley S, Irene, Les W, Mary M, Ray
9. 22/10/2003. Both. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Helen S, Kerri; Hikers: Mary M, Barbara L.
8. 13/2/2002. Combined. Government Track. Leaders:
7. 6/12/2000. Government Track. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Mary Y.
13/9/2000 Bill H, Bill & Pat
6. 7/7/1999. Government Track. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Ray.
5. 7/10/1998. Government Track. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
4. 16/7/1997. Government Track. Leaders: Hugh, Bill H, Lesley S
3. 23/10/1996. Hikers. Government Track, Waipori. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Ted.
2. 14/12/1994. Government Track. Easy. This is a morning walk only, and as it is our last official tramp for the year, please bring some finger food to share for lunch, to be eater at the picnic ground. Leaders: Denise, Mary Y, Les and Mavis.
1. 13/3/1991 Government Track, Waipori Gorge, return Kowhai Spur. Nice bush and tussock walk. Average+. Leaders: Denise, Hugh and Judith, Ria de J

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Jul 25 2018

Street Walk: Town Belt areas.

Published by under Hikers

6. 2018-07-25. Hikers. Town Belt Ramble/bus ride. leaders: Dawn and Pam.
28 hikers left Southern cemetery…

Up hill from the oval. (Clive pic and caption.)

…and walked up Maitland Street to steps that led to Eglington Road.  Morning tea stop was at the Petanque grounds, above Zingari Rugby club.

Morning tea at the Petanque Club.(Clive pic and caption.)

We meandered through Queens drive and several side tracks,

Our leader and the view. (Clive pic and caption.)

arriving at Olveston to have lunch in their lovely grounds. Then walked through to the bullock track down to Malvern St…

Downhill to the bus stop. (Clive pic and caption.)

…and caught the bus from George Street back to our cars.  Had coffee at Kensington Hotel. A pleasant day was had by all. – Dawn.

5. 14/9/2016. Bullock Track, Town Belt, Ross Creek. E+. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.
Tangled route

Tangled route map.

22 happy hikers left cars at the bottom of the Bullock Track in Malvern St and crawled slowly up the trail to Stonelaw Terrace and around to Cosy Dell for a welcome morning tea stop. Leader Pam had access to the tennis club, with seating and toilets available.  Such luxury!
Cuppa

Cuppa at Cosy Dell Tennis Club grounds.

It was a beautiful sunny morning and we (mal)lingered for a while before raising the energy to proceed.
On round the Town Belt, down into Park St, a false start up the wrong set of Kyber Pass steps (ha ha to those in front!) then round Queens Drive and back up past Prospect Park into Cannington Rd and Pilkington St for an early lunch (nice seats again!) beside John McGlashan College.
Lunch

Lunch beside John McGlashan recreation field.

Looking up towards Flagstaff and Swampy, we wondered if we might sight the trampers, but no luck.  We guessed they were lunching further over, out of sight.

After lunch the trail took us back to Cannington Rd …

Mock assistance

Mock assistance back onto Cannington Road.

…  and onto the Ross Creek Track and a steepish descent through the bush to the pumping station.
Impressive waterfall

Interesting waterfall. (Ross Creek Reservoir overflow?) Taken across Ross Creek while gradually ascending creek’s true right track.

Down Ross Creek with steep cliffs on the right, bubbling brook and beautiful bird song, to the Leith and the wander back to the cars.  A coffee stop at the botanic gardens was enjoyed by all 22 and we were home early enough for a nana nap before dinner. – Judy.

4. 29/3/2015. Amenities Society Town Belt Traverse.
Elaine reports that some of the Club  went on the walk.
“It was a very good trip. Weather was fine and we had a good group. Someone said 600 people did the trip.” Elaine met up and went with Jim and Betty.
She reports on the bus ride back to the Oval. She “was so AMAZED … the bus driver … got out of his seat and helped mothers with prams. … believe it or not  the prams were in the bus. Also, and a lady with a walking frame – he helped in and her frame.” This led Elaine  to reflect: “I can get the bus when I get my walking frame, or if I have a baby I can get on the bus, baby and pram.”
“We did not win any prizes this year. It was a lot of fun.” – Ian.
3. 20/8/2014. Queens Drive. Leaders: Elaine, Fred.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Southern Cemetery, Eglington Rd, path to Maitland St (1km), Upper Stafford St, Alva St (2km), cross Serpentine Av, Jubilee Park Mountain Bike Circuit up to park, cross Maori Rd, steps up to Queens Dr. (3km), cross Rattray St (4km), cross Stuart St, Olveston (5km), Littlebourne Rd, q’s Dr., pat Drivers Rd, Q’s Dr. (6km), Prospect Pk (7km), Bullock Track, Duke St (7.61km)

The Town Belt Walk.

The town Belt walk was enjoyed by appprox 28 hikers on Wed 20th August.
Everyone met at the Southern Cemetery (1858) by the old morgue (1908).

It was a calm Dunedin day as we made our way up thru some very old grave sites and skirted around
to Steep St path. (Was this a street in the early days?)
We approached Maitland St which looked very steep but as we all took it fairly slowly everyone managed it.

Cuppa

Cuppa

Crossing High St was a mission for some. Some of us went to the crossing which proved a very safe option.
Passing High St School, which is now closed, it was interesting to read on a notice that 26 houses are to be built.
We followed the town belt as best we could, passing thru  Robin Hood Park and Littlebourne Grounds, skirted around the back of Otago Boys’ High School and again crossed a busy road – Stuart St – but this had lights so all was well.
We stopped for lunch at Olveston House which was built and owned by David Theomin in 1904.
We ate our lunch outside in the grounds where we had permission …

Lunch

Lunch

Last of the summer wine

Last of the summer wine?

… and admired the house and grounds.

Continuing on to Queens Drive we arrived at the Bullock Track (a track that was formed in the early days of Dunedin to take the cattle to the works).
This track was all down hill on to Malvern St, Duke St, and we made our way to a DCC bus stop. 26 of us all hopped on a bus, free for all of us, as it was before 3pm. Back to our cars which we had left at the south end of Princes St.    23 of us then went for coffee

Coffee

Coffee

at the Kensington pub which has been there since the 1890s. The Mine Host made us all very welcome.

Thanks to FRED for his great skills in leading us thru the belt and for the CHOCS once again.
There is a heap of info on Google if any one wants to find out about the town belt, Olveston, and any of the grounds like Robin Hood. Also the Dunedin Amenities Soc. have a wonderful web page as well. Worth having a look. – Elaine.

2. 15/1/2014. Start of year. Both. Combined streets and bush. Leaders: Pam, Pat R.
(Distance of Duke St from Car Park: 19 km.)
There were 20 of us out for our first tramp of the new year. Pam and Jill had recced the route only the Saturday before after find the scheduled Government Track had been closed due to fallen trees, as yet uncleared. We parked in Duke St and went up the Bullock Track by way of the gravelled route, taking our time to gather alongside Prospect Park under some tree shade while Pam gave us the history of the Bullock Track, originally a route from Leith Valley to Burnside Freezing Works for the poor bullocks. And initial date of 1803 was amended to 1903 after not sounding quite right.
Pam led us across Highgate into Queens Drive which we followed for a short distance before descending a track through the bush to arrive at the Cosy Dell Buckingham Tennis Club where we morning teaed (to coin a word), thanks to Pam being a member and having the key to let us in to the seating. That would be about the one km mark on the route map, perhaps the orange spot beyond the “1”. (Orange means slow or stopped, yellow means a little [perhaps not much] faster.)
Morning Tea

Pam addresses the Morning Tea group

And what a beautiful spot it was. Four courts, beautifully green with their artificial turf, surrounded by lovely bush. From there we made our way down some frighteningly steep steps onto Queen Street, up Park St into Heriot Row and up 103 steps, as counted by diligent Dawn onto Duchess Ave and out briefly onto Drivers Road. Then via Chamberlain St, Henry St and Stonelaw Tce, back to the corner of Prospect Park where we had emerged from the Bullock Track earlier. (Route detail here subject to revision.) But now it was straight along Cannington Rd to reach the John McGlashan Sports Field for an early leisurely lunch on seating aligning a running track that was in the process of having the lanes repainted. Here we were entertained by a father and his two little pre-school sons practising some very competent cricket with bat, ball and wickets.

Lunch

Fred distributing his luncheon lolly largess.

After lunch, we resumed our way along Cannington Rd, to turn off abruptly at its end down one of what turned out to be many confusing Ross Creek  Reservoir tracks, before, eventually, yes, e-v-e-n–t-u-a-l-l-y emerging onto Woodhaugh St, running alongside the Leith, and turning at the bridge along Malvern St back to the cars.  Well  done, Pam and Jill for the recce, and Pat doing a sterling job as back marker. – Ian.
1. 8/6/2011. Hikers. Street Walk: Town Belt. Leaders: Beverley, Chris.

We went anticlockwise round the ‘course’. (Bob pic and caption)

Town Belt walk 1. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 2. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 3. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 4. (Bob pic)

 

27/8/2008 Town Belt. Leaders: Carmel, Evelyn
Down from Maori Hill

Down from Maori Hill

Again we were blessed with another fine and pleasant Wed. Because the Pineapple track/Ben Rudd area, where we were supposed to hike, was very wet and muddy our leaders opted to take us on a ‘Street Walk’. This proved to be a good choice and the 11 of us that went had a very enjoyable day out. We started up at the Highgate bus terminus and then went down till we got to the Town Belt which we walked along via Queens drive. Lovely views,
A good view

A good view

interesting scenery and houses to look at made for a relaxed and pleasurable outing. Morning tea and lunch enjoyed sitting in the sun.
Restful surroundings

Restful surroundings

Our walked finished along Highgate, back to the cars. Thanks to our leaders for coming up with a very acceptable replacement. Bev.

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Jul 18 2018

Allans Beach

27 km from car-park.

5. 18 July 2018. Hikers. Allans Beach. E. Bruce and Marjorie

28 hikers set off from the car park at the end of the Allans Beach road by crossing the style at approximately 11 am and had morning tea

Morning tea in the sand dunes. (Clive pic and caption.)

near the end of the track to the beach, reached by crossing a second style. Our transit time from 9.30 am at the Bush Road car park was longer than usual because of the work associated with the widening of the road from Broad Bay to Portobello with fill from the Clearwater quarry near the south side of Papanui Inlet. The fill is transported in large truck trailer units and for safety the Allans Beach road is one way during the week at present (apart from for residents) from Allans Beach to Portobello. We were not aware of this when we did the recce on Saturday 7 July. The route that remained open to Allans Beach, which most of us followed, was proceeding through Portobello on the Harrington Point road and turning right, after 1.3 km, into Weir Road, right onto the Papanui Inlet road and then taking the second road on the road that passes between Papanui Inlet and Hooper’s Inlet, and between Gearys Hill and Mount Charles, to join the Allans Beach Road. Most of us also explored Sheppard Road between Papanui Inlet and Hoopers Inlet to find that it was one way and did not allow a left turn into Allans Beach road.  The entrance to the Clearwater quarry is on the Papanui Inlet road about 0.8 km past Sheppard road between Varleys Hill and Gearys Hill. 

We proceeded to explore the northeast end of the beach until we reached the rocks and then turned to travel southwest along the beach

A sunny walk along the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

and around the corner to the right to have lunch at 12.15 near the north end of the first bay on the right.

Some of the group made their leisurely way back after lunch while the main group proceeded around the shoreline until 1.10 pm to the fence which comes to within 1 m of the water just around the point where the inlet shoreline turns from north to north east. 

A 1-year-old sea lion appeared to observe our arrival at the fence area and flapped its way across a boggy area from about 150 m away to the east, wriggled through a fence and swam down the channel to stop adjacent to our party to observe us.

a sea lion poses for everyone. (Clive pic and caption.)

We had endeavoured to remain a safe distance from the wildlife, which a regular observer of the wild life informed us later was 20 m, but this young sea lion proceeded to emerge from the water opposite us a distance of less than 20 m and display some sea lion dentition. We retreated appropriately in the face of this gesture and proceeded to retrace our steps to the end of the beach near the outlet, pausing to watch a mother-child pair

Mother and calf in the sand dunes. (Clive pic and caption.)

approximately 3 m into the sand dunes from the inlet, about 300 m from the fence. Some other sea lions were observed on the shore on the opposite side of the inlet

We proceeded north east up the beach for about 100 m to approximately 25 m past a pine tree in the dunes to a track whose entrance was marked by an upright post and a surf board shaped portion of boat. 

We followed the track through the sand hills, past a grassy clearing, with tree segment seats arranged around the inverted remnants of a copper, and through an open gate into a paddock with approximately 100 cows on the grass whom we passed on the left between the grassy and boggy areas.

When we reached a fence we turned right for about 100 m past a circular water trough to open a gate on the left. We proceeded to follow the track past the farm house of Christine and Sam Neill who had kindly given permission for us to traverse their property.  We opened two gates to cross the drive way to the farm house, passed the cattle yards on the left, went through another gate and were reunited with our cars by opening the gate leading to the cars, about 80 from our first style, at 2.15 pm.  

The group that returned earlier arrived shortly before the main group via the beach or past the cattle. The distance travelled was approximately 8 km and the route was similar to that shown in the map for March 2016. The weather was relatively calm, cloudy and reasonably comfortable for walking. Low tide was at approximately 2 pm, about 30 minutes before low tide in Dunedin. (The tide at Taiaroa Head is approximately 13 minutes before Port Chalmers which is approximately 14 minutes before Dunedin). 

Afternoon coffee was at Nichols. The Allans Beach has the possible disadvantage of being at some distance from Mosgiel but offers a soft terrain to walk on, some variety between beach and farm walking, flattish terrain and, potentially, glimpses of wild life.

Bruce and Marjorie

4. 23/3/2016. Hikers. Allans Beach. E. Leaders: Bruce, Marjorie.

Mar 23 Allans Beach route. (Bruce pic and caption)

Mar 23 Allans Beach route. (Bruce pic and caption)

Allans Beach tramp report 23 March 2016

Twenty-two hikers set off from the car park at the end of Allans Beach road at 9.40 am. Low tide at Dunedin was 11 am and at Allans Beach (between Taiaroa Head and St Clair) approximately 10.30 am. We went over the stile and down the track to the beach before turning left and proceeding to the end of the beach …

At eastern end of Allans Beach (Bruce pic and caption)

At eastern end of Allans Beach (Bruce pic and caption)

… where we observed a couple of sea lions

Sea lion eastern end of beach (Bruce pic and caption)

Sea lion eastern end of beach (Bruce pic and caption)

before returning a little to have morning tea at the base of the rocky cliff, where a sign indicated that no dogs were allowed.

Morning tea break. (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Bruce pic and caption)

After morning tea we went to the other end of the beach and looked at the channel with the outgoing tide running quite swiftly.

We then went up the left bank of Hoopers Inlet walking on quite firm sand and seeing a few more sea lions.

Sea lion left bank of inlet (Bruce pic and caption)

Sea lion left bank of inlet (Bruce pic and caption)

We stopped at the fence which stretched to within a metre of the water’s edge and then returned to have lunch in the shelter of the lupins.

Lunch break (Bruce pic and caption)

Lunch break (Bruce pic and caption)

After lunch we returned to the beach and took a track into the sand dunes about 150 m from the end of the beach. The track came out on the farm of Sam and Christine Neill and we went across the farm, past the house, through two gates on the road leading to the house, and back along the paddock to the stile by the carpark, reaching this at 1.30 pm. Distance covered approximately 8.5 km. Morning tea was designated for the Portobello Café but we ended up at the Penguin Café, Portobello.

It would have been difficult to walk along the edge of the inlet on the sand unless the tide was reasonably low.

–  Bruce and Marjorie

3. 11/1/2012. All. Allans Beach. Leader: Fred.

GPS of Allans Beach Walk, courtesy Ken.

View of the fog that was around all day. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch 2. (Ken pic and caption) (Lex at left, sitting)

Diamond Wedding.

Rocks at nth end of beach. (Ken pic and caption)

Displeased boss of the beach. (Ken pic and caption)

Busy as main street. (Ken pic and caption)

2. 20/4/2011. Hikers. Allans Beach. Leaders: Molly, Graham.
1. 29/9/1999. Allans Beach. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Peggy M.

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Jul 18 2018

Sandymount – Sandfly Bay Tramps

No. 24 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lovers Leap – The Chasm – Sandfly Bay. N Strang. Farm. Year Round.”
No. 73 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sandymount – Lovers Leap. Year Round”
29 km from car-park.
See Sandymount for area background information.
Sandymount closed for lambing Aug-Oct. Track unformed in places, grassy, slippery when wet. (See also article on pingao planting.)
21. 2018-07-18. Trampers. Sandymount. Leader: Phil.

Eager anticipation of another day ‘just like yesterday’ saw 12 keen trampers travel to the Sandymount carpark, to be greeted by great views to all points of the compass.  People could be seen walking and congregating down below  at the N end of Allans Beach – could it be the Hikers and could they see us?  One of the day’s and life’s enduring questions!

Despite promises of a morning tea at Lovers Leap we ascended the steep track to the Trig and view point, made more challenging by sand; the view point ( and much of the track overall) had been cleared and tidied since the recce.  View shafts abounded including to the Lammerlaws, Silverpeaks, Saddle Hill and the Kakanui and beyond…aah all was well with the world.

Morning tea at Trig. ( Phil pic and caption)

We then retraced our steps back to the carpark and followed the start of the track through the avenue of Macrocarpa

Macrocarpa in stone. (Phil pic and caption.)

and followed the markers down to the lookout over the Chasm which was not unlike ‘staring into the Abyss’.

One was left wondering how and when the volcanic basalt collapsed into the sea to create the formation since formed 10-13 million years ago.

Moving onto Lovers Leap vertigo again made it’s presence felt across the group.

Lovers a leaping. (Phil pic and caption.)

and we pondered another of life’s mysteries such as how could the farmer get his ploughing equipment to the pastures far below?

We then completed the loop track of Sandymount and started our descent down the long sand dune towards Sandfly Bay (made a wildlife refuge in 1908); some ‘young at hearts’ (Guess who?) needed to try sliding on plastic down …

Some wanted to slide down. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… the dunes, but with no success, due to the laws of physics, lack of suitable toboggans but probably more importantly the shape of the protagonists’ backsides that were no good for backsliding! (oh dear)

We approached the beach with some caution due to the strong smells and compressed grasses, and yes we were proved right with 20 sea lions, large and small scattered along the beach.

Three is company. (Phil pic snd caption)

Lunch was taken on a well placed grouping of logs, and then circumventing the wildlife we set off down the beach (where the sand was not flying) finally turning inland and tip-toing across the stream a few times ( with Dave demonstrating how to walk on water) we crossed and ascended farmland to Ridge Road.

On Ridge Road. Phil caption; Gordon pic.)

From here we completed the round trip UP the roads back to the carpark …

Trump’s Toupee hung out to dry? (Phil pic and caption.)

… where it was agreed coffee should be taken at Nicolls; and lo and behold to be greeted there by the large contingent of Hikers – who the barista informed the writer must have been the fast pack! – Phil

20. 15/6/2016. Trampers. Ridge Road. Farmland, Bay, Sand-hills, Sandymount and road return. M. Leader: Jill.
On a pristine winter’s morning 11 eager trampers left from the cars on Ridge Rd and traversed through farmlands to Sandfly Bay. Here we had a later morning tea on the beach listening to a very noisy sea.
We progressed along the beach giving wide berth to 5 sea lions 2 of them were a sandy colour and we wondered if they were the youngsters.

White seal. (Helen pic and caption.)

White seal. (Helen pic and caption.)

Went to a locked up viewing hide before plodding our way through sand-hills, sand-hills and more sand-hills till we finally climbed through coastal scrub emerging at the Sandymount car park. From the car park we had a very panoramic view of the Otago Harbour, Hoopers, and Papanui Inlets that were surrounded with Harbour Cone and Mt Charles with Allans Beach at its base. Lunch

Helen & Judy. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Helen & Judy. (Margreet pic and caption.)

was sheltered at the entrance to the macrocarpa  avenue of trees

Beautiful canopy of trees. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beautiful canopy of trees. (Helen pic and caption.)

which we walked through after lunch to view both Lovers Leap

Lovers Leap platform. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lovers Leap platform. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lovers leap. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lovers leap. (Helen pic and caption.)

and the Chasm. Venturing around Sandymount we finally spotted the trig just above us on the track where some wandered  up but the scrub was rather high blocking the view which was better at a lower level. The final stage of our trip was on the Sandymount road back to the cars. We covered 11kms and felt we deserved liquid refreshments at the St Clair salt pool cafe enjoying the last of the winter sun. – Jill.

19. 28/1/2015. Hikers. Lovers Leap, The Chasm. Leaders: George, Alex.
Hikers Sandymount Route

Hikers Sandymount Route – anticlockwise from car-park. But application stopped working at the Chasm. W-h-y??? Bother, bother!!

Thirty-nine of us, yes THIRTY-NINE (did include a number of school children due back at school the following Monday) turned up at the Sandymount car park for what was promised to be a shorter walk with not too much climbing. George and Alex had recceed a round trip clockwise, deciding to lead us in an anti-clockwise direction on the day. So we set off.

New (well, to the writer at least) signs at the first junction indicated that Lovers Leap was via Sandymount Hill,

Signs like this have proliferated around Sandymount now.

Signs like this have proliferated around Sandymount now. (John pic)

the other sign indicated Sandfly Bay. BUT! The writer has never climbed the hill before, as on previous occasions we have always gone on round and past the entrance to the fence-lined Sandfly Bay track, a MUCH less hilly route. Had George forgotten that? I DID query George’s choice of the hill option, but didn’t press the matter.

So it was up, up a track that got quite steep in places. However all made it, even the hiker who had requested assurance of not too much climbing. (He’s not coming out next week, when we do the Leith Saddle track, which except for one wee saddle, is all climb.)

The hill summit rewarded us with the foggy view  we had expected, but it was good to stop here for the morning cuppa.

Cuppa time

Cuppa time (John pic)

Steeply down the other side, sidle further round the hill, soon to arrive at Lovers Leap. (I wonder if they really do, or is it their personal possession. It’s fun omitting the apostrophe [before or after the ‘s’?] to allow for the ambiguity.)

Lovers Leap

Lovers Leap. Some of the 39 plus fog.

We pushed on. Bit of a climb till we reached the open gate giving entrance down through paddock, new style and paddock to the Chasm. Too much of a drop for some to even go near the viewing platform.

Back up onto the track, further around, past the sheep shed and a stop for an early lunch

Lunch. (John pic))

Lunch panorama.. (John pic))

at the beginning of the impressive double macrocarpa-lined avenue.

Then through the avenue, and, for some never here before, the shock of the cars’ sudden appearance at the avenue’s end.

There were some sheltered areas and some areas exposed to the cold wind that never stopped blowing.

Elaine had designated Nichols Cafe again for the last cuppa, and 25 of us adjourned there for coffee and company.

Coffee at Nichols. 25 of us.

Panorama of coffee at Nichols. Some of the 25. Remainder still to arrive.

Thanks to George and Alex for leading a record number of us, (39!!) with nary a one missing or going over the edge. – Ian.

18. 31/7/2013. Trampers. Ridge Road, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay.
We were all expecting it to be a bit windy on the coast, but when we got there it was very mild, & dead calm, so off with some clothing was in order. We had all forgotten how far the road walk from Ridge Rd to Sandy Mt. Rd was, but undeterred we pressed on to a morning break at the normal place in the paddock on the LH side of the road.
pack

Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

From there it was a leisurely walk around the Chasm & Lovers Leap viewing platforms, to marvel at the very flat sea conditions. The inlets were like a mirror, it was so calm.
Then off up the climb to the top of the track, where we had lunch at the top of the sandhills, before the easy conditions of the downhill slide onto Sandfly Bay, where we did the obligatory side trip to the viewing hide, only to discover that there are now two hides there, one of which is locked, & is for the tourist operators use only. We did see a sample of the wildlife that inhabits this coastline, one of them didn’t bother with us at all,
Grandad snoozing

Grandad snoozing. (Ken pic and caption)

but the other one was a bit wary of the strange quartet walking past.
Why are you annoying me?

Why are you annoying me? (Ken pic and  caption)

We all enjoyed the walk, although it wasn’t a very long day, as we arrived back at the car around 2:30pm. Distance – 10km, @ 4km/h. – Ken

17. 18/4/2012. Trampers. Ridge Road, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Cars parked half-way along left of route. Long sand-hill descent clearly depicted.

There were 12 of us. A record in recent memory.

Morning Tea, sheltered from the wind. (Ken pic.)

Lunch spot at the top of the lovely long sand-hill descent. (Ken pic)

16. 7/7/2010. Both. Sandymount, Sandfly Bay return, Lovers Leap, The Chasm. Medium. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Look at those five animals lined up at a trough. (Joyce caption, Bill pic) 7/7/2010

New signs at Sandfly Bay track turn-off 7/7/2010

Picturesque grove (from south side) 7/7/2010

The Chasm 7/7/2010

15. 13/8/2008 Trampers. Sandymount summit, Lovers Leap, Chasm, Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Tash, Pat.

Large sandhill. Pat Leonie Ken Tash. 13/8/2008

A wonderful tramp on the peninsula… A small but enthusiastic group of 5 parked our cars at the end of Ridge Road, and then walked back up to the junction, where we turned up towards Sandymount. Near the top we had morning tea in a sheltered spot whose first discovery was attributed to George. At the carpark at the top, the gate to the left said “track closed”, so we took the track to the right instead and made our way back round to Lovers Leap. The views were amazing and as 4 of them stood on the platform, there was much discussion as to who would do the “Leap”. There were no volunteers so we retraced our steps and ended up above Sandfly Bay. Here we had our lunch with beautiful views in all directions. We discussed the fact that lunch stops are a very important part of the tramp and that that spot is often what we remember. And then down, down ,down the wonderful sand hills that looked like scenes from Lawrence of Arabia. Running down like kids… A quick visit to the Penguin hide and then onto the beach where some very large sea lions were lolling about on the sand. Two large ones emerged glistening black from the sea, reminiscent of when the first creatures left the sea to live on the land all those millennia ago. Near the end of the beach we came to a stream where Leonie suggested we sit and take in the great surroundings we were in, with powerful waves in the background crashing onto the beach amidst a surge of foam.

Leonie, Pat, Tash on Log

Leonie, Pat, Tash on Log 13/8/2008

And then after some cunning navigating by Ian we were onto a poled track through a farm, up a small hill and back at the gate, beyond which magically were our cars. I wouldn’t have missed it for the world. – Tash

14. 14/3/2007. Trampers. Sandymount, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Bruce & Marjorie, Doug M
13. 6/7/2005. Trampers. Sandfly Bay, Lovers Leap, Chasm. Leaders: Bob H, Ian, Frank
12. 6/7/2005. Hikers. Sandymount, Sandfly Bay. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Grove of trees and ongaonga

Grove of trees and ongaonga

Belted Galloway cattle beast. Who?, George, Hazel

Belted Galloway cattle beast. Who?, George, Hazel

11. 17/3/2004 Trampers: Ridge Road, Sandymount, Sandfly Bay Leader: Ria L
LL

Lovers Leap

VP

L-Leap Platform. Bill, Pat, Ria, George

V

L/Leap Platform. Ria, George, Glenice, Doug M

S

Sandhills at top. Ria, Glenice

10. 17/3/2004 Hikers: Sandfly Bay, Sandymount, Ridge Road. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
9. 20/8/2003. Hikers. Ridge Road to Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Anne R.
8. 27/2/2002. Sandfly Bay – Lovers Leap – Chasm. Leaders: Bob H, Shirley McN, Ria L
7. 29/8/2001. Lovers Leap – Chasm – Sandfly Bay. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Ian, Elaine.
6. 29/3/2000. Sandy Mount, Lovers Leap, Lime Kilns. Leaders: Chris, Jean, Ngaire.
5. 25/8/1999. Sandfly Bay. Leaders: Doug and Myrie, Irene.
4. 10/3/1993. New Track – Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Bev H, Les and Margaret, Ivan and Bev.
3. 16/10/1991. Sandfly Bay. Seals Sand and sun. Average. Leaders: Betty, Wendy, Shirley, Mary McG.
2. 17/7/1991 Lovers’ Leap – The Chasm – Sandfly Bay. Easy. Merle H, Diana B, Nancy, Pam M
1. 27/11/1996. Sandy Mount Road – Lime Kilns – Lovers Leap.Leaders: Chris, Jean, Ria H.
 
 
 

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Jul 11 2018

Frasers Gully

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 92 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Frasers Gully – Brockville Rd Year Round”

16 km from car park.

27. 2018-07-11. Hikers. Fraser Road Dalzier Road round trip. M. Leades: Jay and Jan B.

Map of route, courtesy Ian.

23 Hikers gathered in lovely sunny weather in Frasers Road . From there we trudged up the steep zigzag track …

Up the zig zag track beside Fraser’s Gully Track. (Clive pic and caption.)

… which took 30 minutes with many stops on the way to admire the city views or so was the excuse to
have a breather. At the top we stopped for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

… and then followed the track up to Mooltan Street. From Mooltan Street we turned into Ashmore Street until we reached Taieri Road.  From there we made our way along Dalziel Road to Townleys Road for our lunch stop. The weather by this time took a change and it was very windy and cold so we didn’t dally too long.

A cold place sheltered from the wind for lunch. (Clive pic and caption.)

After lunch we made our way down Brockville Road, with the weather improving again, admiring the lovely city and beach scapes. We turned into Glenross and went through a lovely park and over a quaint little bridge …

Across the bridge in Fraser’s Gully. (Clive pic and caption.)

… that then took us back to our cars in Frasers Road. A very pleasant ten and a half km walk with plenty of variety. We had coffee at Sunnyvale Stadium. – Jay and Jan

26. 12/10/2016. Both. Frasers Gully area. E+.  Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Route Map

Route Map, Roslyn-Frasers Gully Recreational Reserve: 1. Fresh Choice; 2 Ann St; 3. Falcon St; 4. Frasers Rd return; 5.  side track Frasers Road to grassy Tilburn St; 6. Tilburn St; 7. different return track Tilburn St to Frasers Road; 8. side track Frasers Road across to  Glenross St; 9. Glenross St; 10. Brockville Rd; 11, Kaikorai Vly Rd; 12. Falcon St; 13. Ann St; 14. Fresh Choice. – Ian.

Frasers Gully walk was enjoyed by Trampers and hikers together owing to Trampers leader away.

Frasers Gully "Road".

Frasers Gully “Road”. (Liz pic.)

Barred

A forceful “Barred!” near the top . (Helen pic.)

Weather held off, however some of the track was a little bit slippery but support from all concerned worked well.It was interesting that one track was a new experience for some old members which made it even more enjoyable.

Lunching on the flat. (Helen pic)

Lunching on the flat. (Helen pic)

Steep climb ahead.

Steep climb ahead. “Why do we do this?” (Ian pic and caption.)

Plodding up Falcon Street steps. (Keith pic and caption.)

Plodding up Falcon Street steps. (Keith pic and caption.)

You'll reach the top eventually. (Helen pic.)

One step at a time will get you to the top e…vent…ual…ly. (Helen pic.)

The walk was not long but seemed to be accepted by all concerned. Coffee to follow at Roslyn worked out well which had a good attendance of 24.

Coffee. (Helen pic.)

“We’re not sitting with that lot over there.” (Helen pic.)

The total numbers to start the walk was 32, with the main group leaving from Fresh Choice Roslyn car park.  (Permission to park there was appreciated.) – Liz and Alexander.

25. 18/2/2015. Hikers. Frasers Gully Area. Leaders: Bev and Adrienne.

GPS of route

GPS of route. Kms: 1. Frasers Rd Gully. 2. Brinsdon Rd Cnr. 3-4. Brinsdon & Halfway Bush Rds. 5. Three Mile Hill Rd. 6. Taieri Rd. 7. Ashmore and Mooltan Sts. 8. Track rejoining Frasers Gully nr its foot.

Bev and Adrienne led us through two of Dunedin’s Recreational Areas, up through the Frasers Gully and the down through the Tilburn Street reserve, the latter incorporating a very steep track, entailing an unavoidable recce UP it to ascertain its top entrance off Mooltan Street, imperceptible between two properties.

Anyway, for 27 Hikers, it was up the Frasers Gully ‘road’ as it says on the map

Up the Frasers Gully track.

Up the Frasers Gully track. (John pic)

and along Dalziel Rd to stop for morning tea in welcome shade at the corner of Brinsdon Road (2 km on map).

Cuppa

Cuppa time panorama

Then it was on up the road to join with Halfway Bush Road.

Ascending Brinsdon

Ascending Brinsdon Road (John pic)

Along Halfway Bush Road, down Three Mile Hill Road and surprise: around the corner by Ashburn Hall and onto Taieri Road and behold: a new (to this reporter) lovely grass-mown reserve. (Nr 6 km point on map.) Time for lunch.

Lunch panorama

Lunch panorama (John pic)

A little further on, a turn into Ashmore Street and further on still the bus stop.

Bus stop

“Room for one more” (John pic)

On, into Mooltan Street, around and the insignificant grass strip between two properties that would take us into the Tilburn “Street” Reserve. Well, paper-street, then. This took us around below the back of Moultan Street’s properties for some distance before plunging into some bush and out again into the scene below.

Steep down

Steep down

And was it steep, with careful shuffling by the more cautious. Zig-zags back and forth eventually landed us out on the flat of the Frasers Gully track within sight of the cars.

Thanks to Bev and Adrienne for a well-planned walk through two of Dunedin’s reserves bringing the bush into the town, and interspersed with welcome shady stops on a hot day. – Ian.

24. 5/6/2013 Both. Frasers Gully. Leaders: Evelyn and Fred.

Frasers Gully

Frasers Gully. 8km as crow flies, 9km with ups and downs. Cars parked at Ashmore St.

Friends Hill

Lunch finished. Top of Friends Hill.

Apple

Judy feeds apple to horse with very fashionable cover. At Halfway Bush Road exit.

23. 26/9/2012 Hikers. Frasers Gully Leader Evelyn
16 of us met at Frasers Road. Heading on up towards the start of the Frasers Gully track at 9.26 a.m. the word “Earthquake” was called out we stopped looked at each other and decided the ground wasn’t shaking so didn’t rush out to the field and “Drop, Cover and Hold On”, as workman were using machinery on the field, and decided we were more likely to get hit by a machine than a falling tree so carried on. We passed the newly opened up track going up to Mooltan Street which we would come back down on the way home. This track has been there for many years but had become quite overgrown and hard to find but after the tree felling took place it has been opened up resurfaced with gravel and had many plants and shrubs planted up both sides making it a very pleasant walk up the hill.
We stopped for morning tea about 20mins up the track at a clearing, but by the time we had finished it was starting to rain lightly but on and up we carried on. Alas the rain decided to get heavier the further we went but we were reasonably sheltered by the trees on the track but eventually had to stop and put on rain-gear. When we reached the top of the track it was raining quite heavily and didn’t look like stopping so a decision was made to go back down the track with the shelter of the trees (instead of carrying on as planned up past the water treatment station to the top for lunch then back along Halfway Bush Road down Three Mile Hill Rd around Ashmore & Mooltan Street and back down the new track to Frasers Gully).
When we did get back to Frasers Gully the rain had stopped so we decided to go up the new track for a bit to see the view, some of us found it quite steep going so came back down and had an early lunch while some of the others carried on to Mooltan Street then carried on around the road and came back down a clearing further on to meet up with us all at the bottom then back to the cars. Distance travelled was aprox. 8 km.
A good walk was had by all even though we didn’t cover the original distance.
22. 16/7/2011. Hikers. Frasers Gully. E. Leaders: Bev, Chris.
21. 18/11/2009. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Mount Grand Water Treatment Station, Brockville, Dalziel Road. Leader: Evelyn.

Dalziel

Dalziel Road. Evelyn, Bill, Bev. (Elaine pic)

Garden enhancement?

Garden enhancement? (Elaine pic)

20. 25/3/2009 Hikers Frasers Gully,Townley Rd E+ 30km ret. Leaders: Les & Margaret, Bev H

19. 16/7/2008 Frasers Gully

Fraser's Gully

Frasers Gully

Those who assembled at the car park on a cold and foggy morning all went on the hikers walk today. This began at Townleys Road on Kaikorai Valley Road and, thanks to Peter’s detour, took us along the recently-established Stream track as far as Donald St. Very picturesque and a worthwhile addition to the Dunedin walking landscape. 5km along KV Road we turned into Ellis Park and had morning tea on the steps of the changing rooms.

Morning Tea

Morning Tea

The next section of the walk up Fraser’s Gully follows a vigorous and attractive Kaikorai Stream as it foams and musically cascades over weirs and rocks overhung by beautiful bush. The wide, well-gravelled track winds through stands of fuschia and broadleaf trees and under the occasional old totara, and slowly climbs to the road. The fog still wrapped the heights but warblers’ song penetrated. Very picturesque. You can tell that the writer has never been there before and really appreciated the opportunity! At the top we were still in a shroud of mist as we skirted the invisible reservoir at the Mt Grand Water Treatment Station.

Lunch in the mist

Lunch in the mist

Our lunch stop was roadside in an avenue of ‘grand’ old pines on Dalziel Rd. Bob sneaked a swing on the neighbouring property – he thought the owners wouldn’t detect him in the fog. Then on down Townleys Rd, at times quite steeply, the cool mist growing even cooler, until back to the start some 12km later. Thanks to Neil for not losing any of us (well, we did find Joyce again after not too long!) – Bob

18. 16/7/2008. Hikers. Frasers Gully from Townley Road. Easy+. Leaders: Neil, Ray.
17. 9/5/2007. Townley Road, Frasers Gully. Easy+. Leaders:

16. 10/1/2007. All. Frasers Gully far end, Dalziel Road. Easy+. Leaders: Lex, Bob H, Joyce, Eleanor B.
15. 19/4/2006. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Townley Road. Easy+. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Peter.
14. 9/3/2005 Mary M, Les W, Ray
13. 23/7/2003. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Townley Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris.
12. 31/7/2002. Alt. Frasers Gully – Townley Road. Leaders: Les W, Mary M.
11. 21/3/2002 Betty B, Denise
10. 19/9/2001. Alt. Frasers Gully. Leaders: Jean, Mavis, Denis.
9. 21/3/2001. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Leaders: Mavis, Betty, Denise
8. 28/6/2000 Frasers Gully – Brockville Road. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary L, Eleanor
7. 31/3/1999. Frasers Gully – Brockville Road. Leaders: Margaret D, Betty, Peg C.
27/5/1998. Frasers Gully, Brockville. Leaders: Les and Mavis.
6. 16/7/1997. Frasers Gully, Brockville. Leaders: Judith D, Denise, Jack M
5. 14/9/1994. Frasers Gully, Circle Hill, Southern Reservoir.Medium. Leaders: Eric and Dot, Peggy A, Chris.
4. 24/3/1993. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Return via Townley Road. Long, but easy. Leaders: Evelyn M, Wendy, Eric and Dorothy.
3. 11/9/1991. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Native Bush. Good views. Easy. Leaders: Margaret S, Bev H, Bev McI, Janice.
2. 28/3/1990. Brockville from Frasers Road. Interesting tramp. Leaders:  Nancy, Norman, Peg M
1. 24/5/1989 Fraser’s Gully into Brockville Road. Unusual views. Meet at Ellis Park sports ground. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, George

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Jul 11 2018

Broad Bay, Turnbulls Bay, Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill, Broad Bay

Published by under Trampers

No. 49 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill Larnach Castle – Farm”

Location: 32 km.

Trampers park cars at Broad Bay. DCC Public Land; Hikers park at top of Bacon Street.

16. 2018-07-11. Trampers. Harbour Cone. E-M. Leader: Arthur.

A very pleasant sunny mid-winter’s day arrived for our weekly outing.

The cars parked at the Broad Bay Boating Club and 13 trampers went off walking along the harbour side to Bacon Street.

Morning tea was taken in the dry area under some large pine trees,

Morning tea break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

near the beginning of the walking track.

We followed on up the old Bacon street walking rack to the road.

Heading up start of track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After crossing over (why did the chicken cross the road?) we found that the stone ruins of the old Allen House had been fenced off. Some timber framing, also new, was obviously in place to support the stone wall and prevent it toppling over.

From the ruins it was uphill all the way, but in time we picked our way through the rocks onto the summit of Harbour Cone. But the effort had been worth it as the scenery was magnificent.

View from summit. (Gordon pic and caption.)

The sunshine, and lack of any breeze allowed us to enjoy our time on top.

A cool breeze arrived just as we began the descent.

Heading back. (Gordon pic and caption.)

At 12 noon we found a sheltered spot (out of that breeze) to partake of the contents of our lunch boxes, and with a view looking out over Hoopers Inlet and surrounds.

After lunch we soon crossed back over Highcliff Road, down hill in the paddocks for a little, before the steep little climb up towards the castle. Everyone needed a breather then, but the hard work was all over.

It was easy now to follow the contour before descending on Camp Road (unformed), but still with interesting views of the harbour and environs. We arrived back at the cars at 1-45 pm after an enjoyable tramp in superb mid-winter conditions – the northerly wind had increased during the afternoon. Our group of 12, plus 1 guest (Eleanor’s daughter) had walked just over 10 km.

We drove back to Macandrew Bay and were shocked to find the coffee shop had closed down! After discussion we returned to Mosgiel and took our custom to the Blackstone Cafe, for our debriefing.

Coffee at Blackstone. (Helen pic and caption.)

Several had intended having an ice-cream at Macandrew Bay (another shop) but didn’t, in sympathy with the coffee drinkers, and so missed out entirely at Mosgiel – their sacrifice should not be forgotten!.

Thanks to all. – Art.

(15) 21/3/2018. Hikers. Bacon Street only.

The planned tramp to Harbour Cone had 22 trampers depart from Mosgiel in light rain.  During the drive to the start point the rain intensified, and it became a simple decision to abandon the tramp.  A coffee stop was suggested for the return trip to Mosgiel …

Coffee at the Good Oil. (Ian pic and caption.)

… which was attended by 19 of the party. -Cheers Jim.

14. 9/11/2016. Trampers. Harbour Cone.E+. Leader: Arthur.

The early rain cleared before assembly time at the car park and conditions were looking good. Ten eager trampers travelled in three cars to park by the Broad Bay Boating Club. The sky was brighter in the vicinity compared to the cloud down on the hilltops back in the city direction. A northeast wind to start with, which later turned southwest.

As an experiment we had decided to do this (circuit) tramp anticlockwise. The club had previously only ever gone clockwise. A short road walk back took us to Camp Road. The ascent was variable, with some easier gradients in between the steeper ones.

Morning tea was taken after 30 minutes with the worst behind us. From there the view was excellent and we could look across to Harbour Cone which seemed a long way off.

We continued uphill, gently now, past the two decrepit old buildings where “elf and safety” signs warning of the hazard they presented were noted. A little further and we turned left towards Harbour Cone, down hill. Funny, but it didn’t seem that steep going down as it had climbing up that part on a previous occasion. And then up a little took us to join the uphill paddock track from Bacon Street. Easier going for a while got us to Highcliff Road, with a stile on each side to climb over. And then climbing some more.

A brief rest stop on Rocky Knob gave us good views, especially over Hoopers Inlet. On  a bit, before descending a little to view the ruins at Nyhon Farm (there is a sign at the site now).

From then on it was uphill all the way to the summit. Comments such as “don’t look up”, “take short steps”, and “just keep putting one foot in front of the other” were heard. All good advice.

The cool (but not cold) wind was behind us as we climbed, and helped push us up, at least psychologically. In a short time we were picking our way through the rocks and came to the trig station on top.

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

The 360 degree views available to us were just a tad hazy, but the Mt Cargill mast stayed hidden in the clouds. What a great place to be! Not far below us, to the east of north, the white buddhist shrine stood out clearly in the sunshine. It was only 11.40 but on the summit was the only place to have lunch, even if a little early. Just over the brow it was sunny and nicely sheltered for this important ritual.

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Thirty minutes for lunch and then it was downhill all the way.

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

We descended to the ruins of the Allen Farm

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

(no sign seen here), crossed the road, before going down the old track to Bacon Street.

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

A walk back around the harbourside took us back to the cars at 1.00 p.m. The day’s distance was 8.25 km, not long perhaps, but we had quite a bit of uphill work. The summit of Harbour Cone is 315 metres by the way.

Several commented that doing an anticlockwise circuit had worked very well and it gave us the opportunity to have our lunch on the summit.

On the way home two cars stopped at Macandrew Bay to allow their occupants to visit the coffee shop. Another very enjoyable day’s tramp out on the fresh air over. – Art.

13. 22/7/2015 Trampers. Harbour Cone

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken.

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 10km; 3.6km/h ave; 2h 45min moving; total ascent 586m; max height 358m.

I must be getting old, I put the group wrong on where we were starting the tramp from, I had it in my mind that we were going to Portobello — how wrong was I !!! I apologise for the mix up !
Anyway, after we arrived at Bacon St. we parked up & made ready for the days exercise. 10 trampers, some new to the group set off, & we stopped at the normal spot under the Macrocarpas just past the top end of Bacon street, where the ground is dry, for morning tea. For today’s tramp, I had decided that we would go up the marked track in the paddocks, instead of climbing up the fence line track. This was a new way for all of us, which made it more interesting.
As we made our way up, I could see that it was going to be a longer walk going this way up to Harbour Cone, than the fence line track would be. However the gradient is much more gentle.
We all made it to the top of Harbour Cone, some in better condition than others !! So we spent some time up there admiring the views,…

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

… & resting up before carefully negotiating the boulders on the way back down.
Now, there was a water trough down near the bottom where you go through the gate by the stone wall in the next paddock, this water trough is fed by a pipe running down the hillside from above, & it is constantly overflowing, with the ground around & below it VERY WET, So, what does one member do — he walks down through the wet patch & promptly falls on his butt, then after standing up, he repeats this, just for good measure, & to make sure he was well covered in mud.!!! He arrived at the lunch stop by the stone wall looking very muddy & wet.
After lunch, we retraced our steps down into the valley, then up the other side to the Camp Rd. track below Larnachs Castle. This climb was almost the last straw for a couple in the group, but with some help everybody made it up there, & we had a lengthy rest break here for them to regain some energy, before setting off down Camp Rd.
When we reached the car park with the toilet in it at broad Bay [ where we should’ve stopped originally !!] I suggested that anybody who wanted to wait there could do so, & we would pick them up on the way back from getting the cars. this suggestion was eagerly pounced upon by 6 members of the group. [ now if we had parked there in the morning, all party members would’ve had to walk the full distance, so my mistake let them off the hook !]
The other 4 of us walked back to the cars, & then returned to pick up the ‘survivors’, & then we headed off to Macandrew Bay coffee shop for a chat session, & to keep up the ‘Trampers Coffee Club’ tradition.
I hope this trip which is really quite hard, doesn’t put off the new members we had on this tramp, as most of our tramps are not this steep. So hope to see you all again next week for our assault on Swampy summit.

12. 12/2/2014. Hikers. Harbour Cone from Bacon Street in Turnbull Bay. Leaders: Dorothy and Chris.

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Discretion being the better part of valour, the leaders spurned the steep fence track, choosing instead the much more graduated DCC yellow poled line one to the right, despite its many fence stiles. We had our cuppa amongst the clump of macrocarpa trees, (a point where a side track leads off to the right, through a gully and steeply up to underneath Larnachs Castle). But after our stop, we carried on up and across Highcliff Road to turn left and further up to Rocky Knob. Here the leaders and one or two others forewent the option of going further, allowing a hardy 12 to go over and across the next paddock, down through the gate by a stone wall and on up endlessly, it seemed, to the rocky-strewn summit of Harbour Cone.

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone.

We returned down to lunch on the stone wall before going on to join the others on Rocky Knob. Then it was just simply to retrace our steps back down to the cars. Threatening rain on a couple of occasions failed to eventuate. The day was lovely and calm and not too hot. A perfect and satisfying tramp, well-planned by the leaders. – Ian.

11. 21/8/2013 Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

Anti-clockwise GPS of route, courtesy Ken, (omitting Harbour Cone climb).

Stone walls of old settlement, adjoining Highcliff Road and below Harbour Cone.

After Harbour Cone climb, we went round via Rocky Knob and under Lanarch Castle. Half of us chose to go partly by Highcliff Road and then contour round Peggys Hill, the other half to follow the track poles over paddocks, deeply down through a gully and then very STEEPLY up to meet the others under the north side of Larnach Castle, where we lunched. – Ian

Heads from lunch spot on north slop under Lanarch Castle, just above derelict sheds of Lanarch’s old Model Farm.

Panorama video clip from north slope below Lanarch Castle

Hedge invariably beautifully trimmed

Hoopers Inlet to Highcliff Rd. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Hoopers Inlet Road. 2.20 ret. Route. Manager: DCC CAM
Very steep track. Suitable for experienced and agile parties only.

10. 28/4/2010. Trampers. Harbour Cone from Hoopers Inlet Track and Nyhon Track. Hard. Leader: Ian

The day was fine. A week of wet weather had stymied any recce, so this was it. Thanks to Antony Hamel’s description and map in his book Tracks and Trails around Dunedin, the leader was confident we could readily find our way. Not. First mistake up the Nyhon track was to turn right at the first stile. (It should have been the second). However, an inviting gully presented itself, so this was the route up, we thought. Not. It was very steep but we made it to what we first thought must be Rocky Knob, even if it looked a little different from what some of us remembered it as.

Hoopers Inlet from first knoll. (Ken pic.)

Morning tea in the sun on the knoll was very pleasant. But confusingly, a small distance away was another knoll, slightly higher.

Second knoll across from first knoll. Doug. (Ken pic.)

This too, when reached, didn’t quite match up to our recollections. It was only when we had made our way through an old homestead macrocarpa-surrounded block of stone walls

Interesting remains.

and up a further rise that we realised where we really were.  There, down a slope to our left was the obvious vehicle track that descends from the true Rocky Knob. An easy walk up, and we were there.

From there it was over well-remembered ground

Rocky Knob behind us.

to then grind our way up to Harbour Cone.

The long climb up.

A short stop to admire the view and then back down again, across to Rocky Knob, and down the vehicle track to zigzag  into the gully below the knob – the gully we should have taken on the way up. There we stopped for lunch.

About to stop for lunch. Beyond, track angles up hillside.

and were met by Ken who had more adventurously taken the original steep descent down through the bush.

Overlooking steep marked descent, adventurously taken by Ken from Rocky Knob.

He had made it all right, but not without entangling a hand in some vicious bush lawyer.
After lunch, accompanied by the squawks of a complaining bellbird, we made our way down through some bush, and across some marshy reeds on a narrow netting-covered boardwalk.

But then, surprise. Markers took us up steeply to hug a fence line over a rise to descend further along, now very steeply and to the marshland again.

The steep fence line track. Wasn’t there another way?

Another board, bridging a stream, stile to climb and we were out into a grass paddock again.

Before us loomed the Nyhon Track climbing (plenty of steepness again) up over a hill. We had plenty of time available so we decided to follow it across to Sandymount Road. It was muddy and slippery but we made it. (Was this now the fourth or fifth hill we had climbed that day?)  At the top we decided to carry on to Sandymount Road rather than retrace our steps back down again) and do a round trip. At the road,

Nyhon Track sign on Sandymount Road. (Ken pic.)

we carried on down and back across to Hoopers Inlet and the cars. It had been a good hard day, but all seemed to have enjoyed it, even a visitor who had learnt about us and had seen the website. And there were nine of us too. We had done good, to quote a client’s words to his barrister. – Ian

9. 8/12/2010. Hikers. Harbour Cone. Leaders: B Harvey, C Hughes.

8. 15/7/2009. Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

We were immediately into macrocarpas and elected to stop here for our morning tea.

Cuppa under macrocarpas.

Cuppa under macrocarpas. Pat, Bill, Hazel, Doug, Arthur, Ria, George.

Despite DCC-inserted yellow-topped poles leading off up a valley, we stuck to the original public walkway taking us directly up the steep hill to the macrocarpas on Highcliff Road. Across the road and past the building ruins we turned our attention to the relentlessly steep ascent of Harbour Cone. The polled track took us straight up and through the boulders at the rocky top to the trig.

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Amongst the wonderful views was the sight of two strange monuments in a property above Portobello as seen in the following pic.

Strange

Strange structures above Portobello. Viewed from top of Harbour Cone.

Returning down the south side of Harbour Cone we stopped for lunch in the saddle between the Cone and Rocky Knob. Then it was up a stone-walled track to the Knob. A virtual former cliff-face track led down to Hoopers Inlet, although now a new polled track made an easier descent around a farm track to the left, but that was not the way we were going today. We stopped to enjoy the sights of Sandymount, Hoopers Inlet and Varleys Hill but it was too windy to tarry.

Varleys Hill

Varleys Hill viewed from top of Rocky Knob. (Bill pic)

Going on down and back to Highcliff Road, most elected to go on up the road to enjoy a more level approach to Camp Road while four hardier (stupid?) ones took the yellowed poles track on across the road, down through a deep gully and then very steeply up to join the others where Camp Road enters the trees under Lanarchs Castle. Here we could take in another wonderful number of views.

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

The poled track took us around a contour under the Castle to eventually go steeply down into Broad Bay and so back to the cars. – Ian.

7. 30/11/2007. Broad Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill. Leaders: George
6. 11/7/2007. Trampers. Park Broad Bay Boat Club. Turnbull Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill. Leaders: George, Glenis
5. 2/12/1998. Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill – Larnach Castle. Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.
4. 23/7/1997. Broad Bay, Peggys Hill, Larnach Castle Road. Leaders: Doug J, Irene, Jack R
3. 8/6/1994. Harbour Coone. Peggy Hill. Leaders: Jack R, Bob H, Barbara, Peg C
2. 29/1/1992. Harbour Cone. – A good warm up to start the year. Average+. Leaders: Jack R, Ted, Betty B, Jean A, Peter R

1. 21/12/1988 Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.

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Jul 04 2018

Midwinter Dinner Occasions

Published by under Midwinter Dinners

5. 2018-07-04. Midwinter dinner. Weavers. Sub-division street walk. Leaders: Jan Y and Peter.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

On the walk.(Helen pic and csption.)

Lunch.(Helen pic and caption.)

4. 2/7/2014. Midwinter Dinner. Southern Sports Bar and Grill. Leaders: Elaine and Eric.

GPS

GPS of route, omitting section from the tavern to the Southern Cemetery, where I remembered to switch it on. In all, about 3.5 km walked, fastest 4.6 km/hr; slowest 4.2 km/hr.

A dozen of us parked in the Southern Tavern’s car park. Dunedin’s coastal breeze was an unwelcome replacement of Mosgiel’s calm. It was a woollen gloves and hat day with windbreakers essential. We walked along the oval to the cemetery. The task then was to hunt for the grave of Eric’s GGGrandfather, which Eric had identified online from the DCC cemetery plots location maps. Fortunately the grass paths were firm. We walked much the length of the cemetery north to south, but at last located it.

Eric

Eric standing by his GGGrandfather’s grave’s fallen headstone in Southern Cemetery.

We stopped for a sort of tea break nearby. Well, it was only sort of. In fact Elaine had thermos flasks of mulled wine and was soon filling plastic beakers she handed out. She followed this with a quiz on facts related to the cemetery, rewarding answers nearest to the correct one with fluorescent beanies and other gifts, donated by sponsors she had hunted out. Bravo, Elaine.

The route map traces the ensuing walk around the old Carisbrook. At The Glen, we stopped to admire the architecture of the South Road underpass at the Glen. An excellent finish.

On, under the highway, and surprise, and at the top of Burns Street, we met up with the Blind Walkers, who also were off to their Midwinter Dinner. Down Burns St, along Neville St and then Wilkie Rd onto Andersons Bay Rd and back to the Southern Tavern, where eventually about 50 of us sat down to an excellent meal. A well planned walk and event. Thanks to Elaine and Eric for the surprise sponsored gifts too. – Ian.

3. 3/7/2013. Midwinter Dinner. Portobello Hotel. Leaders: Elaine and Eric.

Per ODT only edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

Per ODT 10/7/2013 online edition

2. 20/6/2012. Midwinter Occasion. Waihola walk and meal at Waihola Cafe and Bar. Leader: Fred

Pause on the road. (Bob pic)

Cemetery (Bob pic)

Chris’ grandiose sundae (Bob pic and caption)

Central tables. (Bob pic)

Couple of side tables (Bob pic)

22/6/2011 Duufa’s on Factory Road, Mosgiel. Leader: Joyce
Joyce led 10 of the club on a 10 km street walk from the car park incorporating new houses at the top of Kinmont Park in the east and Wingatui Road to the north, getting us to the restaurant just a little after noon. It was a cold woollen-hat start and a warm sun-hat finish. Thanks, Joyce.

 

Regarding the meal: Only 34 out of 40 starters turned up. Fortunately Duufa’s were flexible. The food was delicious and beautifully presented and the price very reasonable, but the wait for it was interminable. We we there from lunch time to afternoon tea time! – Ian
1. 23/6/2010. Tunnel Beach and Mid-winter dinner at Green Island Royal Tavern. Leaders: Bill and Pat.
A dozen walked the walk. Two score talked the talk at the mid-winter dinner.
Thanks to our President and his Lady for excellent organisation. – Ian

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Jun 27 2018

Skyline from Bull Ring

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

Location: 15 km from car park.
Flagstaff name
4. 27/6/2018. Trampers. Skyline from Bull Ring. Leader: Helen.A group of 10 keen trampers left the carpark driving to the Bull Ring.

Moving out. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Walking up to the Flagstaff lookout on what was an early bullock and stock route.As was the case prior year 1850, mist covered the lookout making it easy to get lost. Donations then, were called for and allowing flagstaffs to be erected hence the current name.

Such was the case in chilly conditions today. The normally spectacular views were poor. Morning tea was under the north side of the lookout.

Out of the wind for smoko. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We continued past  the Pineapple Flagstaff  intersection and in muddy conditions towards Swampy Summit, passing 4 runners and a mountain biker. Lunch was just after noon and behind the Aircraft Navigation Building.

Lunch at Swampy Summit. (Gordon pic and caption.)

As conditions were cool we had a shortish lunch and returned the same way. We spoke with a man and 2 dogs on the lookout for a wallaby seen in the area yesterday.

The cloud had lifted enough to get most of the 360 degree views passing the lookout.

Barr Stadium. (Gordon pic and caption.)

It was a cool but enjoyable tramp covering 13 to 14 kms overall.

Afternoon tea was taken at Blackstone Cafe. Phil M

3. 29/3/2017. Trampers. M. Leaders: Jill and Jan R.

We had brilliant sunshine and little breeze all day. From the Bull Ring, we went up the “Pineapple Track” to have our morning tea on “Flagstaff” summit. Superb views from here …

Morning Tea with view. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… but  by far the most interesting was the massive bank of sea fog which extended as far as the eye could see – north and south along the coast, and out to sea. The fog was moving up the Otago Harbour, almost to the city and entirely covering the Peninsula. The bank of fog was of interest all day to us, as it ebbed and flowed.

Fog on Peninsula. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Continuing along the “Pineapple Track” for a while it was rather concerning to see gorse and broom encroaching somewhat  over the track for some distance.

Turning off to the left we reached the “Swampy Ridge Track”, to follow it out and back for the rest of the day.

We met a lady with 2 dogs who had just come up “McQuilkans Track”, and it was gratifying to hear of our club members’ track clearing efforts being appreciated. We don’t know how many people use the tracks we clear, though.

After a time, and a couple of good uphill pulls we cam to the top end of “Porkies Track”. It was here that our newest member elected to stop, to be collected on our return journey.

The rest of the group continued on to Swampy Summit, to have our lunch on the roadside …

Lunch. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… beside the Aviation VOR beacon (a.k.a. “The Flying Saucer”.)

Judy’s dance troup. (Arthur pic and caption.)

We had superb views inland in the clear air into the Silver Peaks, Rock and Pillar, Lammermoors and Wind Farm, Maungatua and the Taieri Plain. A piece of wedding cake to have with our lunch was a special treat.

Lunch over, the homeward trip began – retracing our steps, and collecting new member at “Porkies” (he must have had a good nap in the sun).

The breeze died away, and the heat rose as the sun beat down on us. Some rest stops were needed, but eventually we were back at the “Bull Ring” with empty (or near empty) water bottles.

On returning to Mosgiel we visited the Blackstone for a little while. 9 Trampers were out today to enjoy or 15 km walk. – Art.

2. 2/3/2016. Both. Bull Ring to Leith Saddle via Transmitter Tower. Leaders: Jill, Janice.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Ignore straight line. Forgot to turn off in time. Distance measured by others up to 9.5km.

21 of us set off from the bullring across the Pineapple Track, up to Swampy Summit, then down the Leith Saddle track. The day was perfect, sunny but not too hot, with no wind to speak of. The views were superb, …

Mosgiel

Pearl of the Plain.

… firstly overlooking Dunedin, …

Dunedin

Dunedin’s beautiful setting.

Morning Tea. Guess where?

Morning Tea. Guess where!

… then from Swampy down the Leith Saddle Track great views to the north west of the Silverpeaks and Blueskin Bay areas.

Blueskin Bay from Swampy (Helen Pic.)

Blueskin Bay from Swampy (Helen Pic.)

The track up to Swampy was a bit steep in places, and some of us found it a bit of a struggle, but there was a sense of accomplishment when we reached the top. Had lunch at the summit by the transmitter tower, then made our way down to the Northern Motorway where we were picked up by a couple of shuttle buses and taken back to the cars. Part of the descent track from Swampy is quite scoured out and care was needed getting down the wooden steps, but generally the tracks are in very good condition We allowed 5 hours for this traverse, and everyone comfortably completed it well within this time. – Janice.

1. 14/9/2005. Skyline from Bull Ring. Leaders: Molly, Lesley S

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Jun 27 2018

Taieri Ramble

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27/6/2018 Outram Ramble E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy

Route Map, courtesy Ian. Allanton Rd, Granton Rd, Loan Metal Rd, Beehive Rd, Hickeys Rd, Nichols Rd, Beehive Rd, Janefield Homestead, Nichols Rd, Allanton Rd.

27/5/2015. Momona Environs. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

GPS of Momona route

GPS of Momona route

23  of  us started from Momona Hall

Start. (John pic)

Start. (John pic)

at the intersection of Centre Road and Nichols/Bruce Roads. Some distance south (approx) along Centre Road we turned aside into what Peter told us was the original route of the road to emerge back a little further on. Towards the corner we cut through a lane to emerge on Millers Road (kms 1 & 2) which we followed down past some fattening turkeys

Turkeys. (John pic)

Turkeys for the table? (John pic)

to turn into Bremners Road (kms 3 & 4).

We stopped in a gateway for morning tea,  partly sheltered by a belt of trees. The small cold wind forced us into wind-breakers at this point.

Morning tea panorama (John pic)

Morning tea panorama (John pic)

From Bremners, we  turned down Lee Creek Road (km 5) and then along Granton Road. Next turn was into Beehive Road, (kms 8 & 9) our first road to take a more winding route, and this led us eventually to a turn into a paddock whose fence line led us across to the Janefield homestead, (km 10) where we lunched. This was just as well, for Lesley’s legs had started to go ‘rubbery’.

Panorama lunch (John pic)

Lunch panorama. (John pic)

This was Ian Bathgate’s property. Peter had been telling us about his Bathgate relatives’ history on the Taieri Plain.

The feature of Janefield was the huge barn loft where dances had been held in times past. Now it was just used for storage.

Barn loft (John pic)

A wing leading off from the large Barn loft (John pic)

As we turned the corner we were confronted by a large stock truck loading loin chops in their original form.

Lamb cutlets? (John pic)

Loin chops to be? (John pic)

The road out from Janefield came out on Nichols Road (kms 11 & 12) which by various twists and turns led us diagonally across the plain eventually back to our cars.

Thanks, Peter and Wendy. A good winter’s (well, weather-wise anyway) road walk – an alternative to what would have been a soggy farm walk to Weka Falls. And an original choice too. A new ‘first’ for the club through a bit of Bathgate family history! – Ian.

 

 

 

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