Dec 07 2018

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2018

Summer Start Time: 9.00 a.m.

12 December.
Both: Christmas Pot-Luck Luncheon.
Berwick Lodge. E. Peter and Wendy.

2019

9 January.
Both: Deep Creek Pipeline. Theresa and Clive.

16 January.
Trampers: Dark Horse Hut. M. $9.00. Janine.
Hikers: Grahams Bush and Junction Road. E. $7.00. Jan Y and Peter. Friends Hill and farm. M. $3.00. Jay and Jan B. Continue Reading »

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Nov 28 2018

Nicols Creek, Swampy, Pineapple Track, Moon Track, Booth Road

Published by under Trampers,Year round

(David Nicol was an early settler and dairy farmer. He reputedly bought land here in the hope that the railway line woould be routed north through Leith Valley.)

Click here for Antony Hamel’s YouTube video showing his exploration of the 5 falls of Nicols Creek.

Click here for an EXCELLENT MAP of Nicols Creek showing the location of The Basins (called the Cup and Saucer on the map), and the 5 waterfalls. (It also shows the Pepper Tree track location.)
Neighbours at War Click here for background and photos to the Finnerty Family and their house site on the Moon Track by Nicols Creek.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
No. 17 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Nicols Creek. D McCabe. Year Round”
 Nicols Creek circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group.
DCC land.
Booth Road 16.1 km from car park.
22. 28/11/2018. Trampers. Nicols Falls, Pepper Tree Track, and beyond circuit. M. Leader: Arthur.
A cool north-east breeze greeted us when we parked our cars at Booth Road to begin our tramp. The cloud was down on the higher hills, Mt. Cargill for example was hidden to us.
There were 7 in our group today, and we began with a one kilometre, or so, road walk before going up to Nicols Falls.

[And if you haven’t already done so, Art recommends you click here now for Antony Hamel’s YouTube video of the OTMC exploration of Nicols Creek’s 5 falls – Ed.]

Today’s circuit was to take in some of the older tracks, beginning with Nicols Falls. A short trip was made in to the glow-worms to familiarise all with their location.

We stopped to talk to two young Frenchmen who were returning from the falls. After crossing Nicols Creek we climbed up to have our smoko at Finnerty’s house site.

From here the old, original walking track was followed through the area now somewhat spoilt by cycle tracks.

A brief stop was made at the big macrocarpas to admire the rocks, then on up the Moon Track following the old cart track, and then the fence line further up.

Eventually we turned left onto the Nicols Creek track and followed it to find the junction with the Pepper Tree track, which took us to the Pineapple Track.

It was getting close to lunchtime now, so going up the Pineapple Track allowed us to lunch in the same spot as we had four weeks ago – only we sat on the other side of the track, as the breeze was from the opposite direction today.

It was all downhill in the afternoon. Going down we soon turned aside …

The intersection of the present pineapple track and the original. (Dave pic and caption.)

… to follow the Original Pineapple Track through the beautiful bush. Conditions underfoot were muddy, as they had been all day, so care was exercised by not hurrying.

The team down the original, well worn, Pineapple track. (Dave pic and caption.)

The old track is worn in places, by many feet and much water, to something resembling a trench. One was saying we were stuck in the groove!

At the bottom we followed McGouns Track to have a rest stop at the Forestry Plaque and seats,

At the cairn commemorating forestry in the Dunedin area. (Dave pic and caption.)

before finishing back at the cars at 2 p.m.

The sun was shining back in Mosgiel on our return, where we Blended in.

It had been an interesting and enjoyable day in the bush, with new (to most) tracks to enjoy. – Art.

21. 31/10/2018. Hikers. Moon – Nicols – Pepper Tree – Pineapple – circuit. M. Leaders: Ian and Jim.

Twenty-one Hikers plus two Ramblers parked at Booth Road. From there they walked down Islay Street to Leith Valley Road and up to Thomson’s Bridge over Nicols Creek. The two Ramblers left to trek on their own account further up Leith Valley Road, with the Hikers setting off up the Nicols Creek Track. A wee way up, we turned off to take the track on the right down to the 14.5 metres high first of the five Nicols Creek Falls for Morning Tea.

The promise of the day was to walk the old Moon Track that was there before the Mountain Bikers in 2006 carved it up almost beyond recognition. So after our cuppa, we crossed the creek to climb steeply up on the other side, first to pass by the empty Finnerty’s house site, of which there remains little indication except a flat area alongside the left of the track and a few bricks.

The going was easier now until reaching and crossing the first of the many zig-zag mountain bike tracks to wend our way through bush and over some other zig-zags up to the big boulder clump among some macrocarpas, where we stopped to briefly look around the area. Beyond here the track followed the the old fence through some bush, gorse and grass to come back on another “zig” of the trail. Avoiding the trail above us to the right we took the lower one along to where it dropped slightly to the left. Here we took the route straight ahead. We were back on the old track again. A bit along this one, it swung uphill to the right. Here was the almost straight up, but moderately graded, old cart track that returned us to the fence again, happily avoiding the steep hill on our right in the process.

Back alongside the fence again, was a grassy track which first dipped and then rose up and yet up to the corner of the fence’s paddock where there was a welcome table and plank seat to rest on and regroup. Going was now more level but muddier, not helped by the rain two nights ago, but eventually the track led out, over an old large log to the sign posts. One indicated yet father up to Swampy, another indicated our Nicols Creek Track route ahead, and the third back down the way we had come. But on it was the lettering: Moonlight!!! It’s Moon, not Moonlight. Where did the printing instructions get it wrong? Anyway, it was now lunchtime, which made for a leisurely stop.

The  old cart track, now well wooded in, led us along the the contour across the Nicols Creek headwater tributaries. Again there was that rain-worsened mud In places. A major creek crossing we encountered was through a steep-sided rocky ditch, with the climb-out on the further side one or two paces along a wet but fortunately not slippery rocky forty-five degrees slope and then into a brief dip with a steep drop below before clambering out onto the reassuringly safer part of the track again. We all made it across safely.

And then on, across another creek tributary, until we reaching on our right the Pepper Tree Track turn off. This was the junction we had come to a year ago from the other way, when we had climbed the  Nicols Creek track  from the other end. Well, on then, on the hew track, another creek crossing, and finally gradually up, out of the bush, into grassy area and out onto the Pineapple Track.

The intention here had been to complete the original track circuit by crossing over to where the old fence post on the edge of the bush indicated the entrance to the top of the old Pineapple Track. The bush is nice and open, although the track is steep and deeply clay-trenched in places, but today was out of consideration after all the rain we had had lately. The writer has fond memories of it being route to Flagstaff in his youth.

But back to the newer track opened in 1975, which we were now on. The cars were at its foot, on Booth Road, waiting to whisk us off to coffee at Sunnyvale. So down we went now, each at our own pace to the bottom. The old track had been a revelation to all but a few older hikers. The most ambitious one for them in a long while. Challenging? Yes. Regrets? No. Satisfying? Yes, – to the writer, especially. Now over to the club to keep this old track alive and back on the programme again. – Ian.

20. 11/10/2017. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Pepper Tree Track, Pineapple circuit. M. Leaders: Ian, Clive.
The programmed Deep Creek Tramp was out because of Lambing. Where to go instead? Well, Nicols Creek had not been programmed since 2004, (Except for one calendared for mid-winter but not carried out). So a last minute recce, relying on one old man’s 13-year-old-memory, (helped by an above-listed clickable excellent map q.v.), rediscovered the route, – a new tramp for most of the club’s current hikers. Contrary to last month’s Trampers’ route, ours was up the Nicols Creek true right side, uncomplicated by the newer Mountain Bikers’ zigzag track on the other side.
18 Hikers had turned up, after some unnecessary precautions taken by the leaders about helping drivers locate the parking spot.

We set off, and there we were, after first stepping out of the wide smoothy graded Glow-worm route, (nostalgically for the writer) on the old, steep, boulder- and root-strewn track, taking us up and yet up. But it wasn’t too long before we could gratefully turn off to the right and follow an easy side track taking us down to the first of the stream’s 5 waterfalls. We morning-teed there,…

Unpacking for tea break. (Ian pic and caption.)

…drinking in the scenery of this local rival to Fiordland’s fabled attractions. A 15 metre bush waterfall!

(Clive pic.)

Refreshed, we forewent the opportunity afforded to us by the track continuing on across the stream that would have led us up the further side and out into the zigzagged area. Such a venture to disentangle the original track from the new zigzags could wait another day.

So we returned back out to our original track, which was now taking an easier grade. Soon a fork ahead gave us an option of continuing ahead on the original track or swinging level and wide on a newer one to our left. We took the latter. Both would lead out into open grassland on our left, with our choice swinging out further before returning into the bush. Now it was just steady up and up and up, with many regrouping stops for rest and recovery, but there was plenty of day ahead of us, anyway. Eventually we were on a part of the track that was newer and wider, and that just alluringly continued on straight up. However, an old memory had prompted the writer, on the reece, to turn off this, when discovering an insignificant narrow side track on the right, which he recognised as the actual original track, the other newer one leading who knows where.

At this point, stern reminder to the writer! On realising an intended regrouping immediately following the turn-off was proving impracticable due to broom restricting vision, he neglected leaving a guide at the fork for any late-comers.  This oversight led to a potentially serious consequence, because a little further along the track, we noticed the absence of 3 of our number. Back-marker Clive went back and eventually found them, returning back down the newer track. They had become distanced from both us ahead and those yet further behind being looked after by Clive, and, seduced by the newer track, had carried on up it, failing to notice the side track’s orange marker, its significance. and with no guide there to prompt them.

Reunited again, we went on. Here, the writer’s memory failed him at a critical point. He was looking for yet another  fork, this time to the left, and in his mind had pictured it as an obvious T-junction, but which in reality was much less significant, and he led right past it! It was only when descending to cross one of Nicols tributary crossings that he realised his oversight. About turn! Retrace!

Back at the aforementioned junction, we lunched…

(Clive pic.)

.. and the leaders did a short reconnoiter of the turn-off and reassured themselves it was indeed the route they had planned.

Lunch consumed, legs rested, it was now Clive’s turn to take up the leadership. So it was along, through, and eventually up, out of the forest, past the bushes of the well-named Pepper Tree Track, across the grass…

(Clive pic.)

…and onto the wide well-paved Pineapple Track.

(Clive pic.)

All downhill now and out onto the Booth Road entrance. A few here opted to wait for Bob to drive back and pick them up. The rest of us carried on, down Islay Street, out onto Leith Valley Road, up past the Old School Building and around a last corner to the Nicols Creek Bridge and the cars. And  to the start of the afternoon’s rain! We had completed our 8 kilometre tramp in the dry.
A wet drive to Mosgiel and a coffee-break finish. And behold, just as we were draining our last mugs, in trooped the Trampers, who, poor things, unlike us, had had to finish their tramp in the wet! – Ian.
19. 27/9/2017. Nicols Creek, Pineapple. M. Leader: Jill.

15 trampers set off up the Switchback Nicols Creek Mountain bike track from Leith Valley on a mild overcast morning. Originally we were going to visit the waterfall but the track was suffering the effects of the recent stormy weather we’ve experienced. The MBT was of  a gentle gradient with some very narrow areas following washouts but generally in good condition. We walked through native bush and often accompanied with pleasant birdsong.

Note the rock that looks like a Kea!!!(Margreet pic and caption.)

Morning tea was in a open area a  with lovely vista over  Dunedin all looking pristine.This mountain bike track continued for approx 6 kms up,  round and round again, at 1 stage  passing through a glade of very gnarly old macrocarpa trees. .Eventually the mountain bike track disappeared and is being prepared for a further extension of same so very much like a mini river bed at present. There was much evidence of pig rooting at the higher end of the track. Eventually we traversed tussock land coming along the Moon track to Swampy ridge track. The sun came out to allow a pleasant lunch break…

Lunch on the tops. Swampy.(Helen pic and caption)

…before continuing in a southerly direction to the junction of the Flagstaff, Pineapple track. Down the Pineapple track provided us with again amazing vistas of Dunedin. 2pm saw us back at the cars having completed approx 14.5 kms. The day finished with our coffee fix

Coffee at Roslyn Fire Station.  (Helen pic and caption.)

(and a  big  thanks to Eleanor’s Uncle) at the Roslyn fire station. – Jill.

18. 22/4/2015. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track.
Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track

Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track. (GPS courtesy Ken)

A good turn out of eight trampers, including one new member, met up at the car park on Leith Valley Rd. to start the tramp up Nichols Creek. We walked up to where the glow worms hang out [pardon the pun], but of course there were none to be seen at that hour of the day, so we then went & had a look at the Nichols Falls, which were really quite spectacular, after all the recent rain.
1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind

1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind. (Ken pic and caption)

We crossed the creek here & made our way up the track on the other side, to find ourselves on the cycle tracks that had been made in this area.
The original idea was to go up Nichols Creek, onto Moon Track, then along to the pole line track, & back down there. After making our way up the numerous cycle tracks in the bush above Nichols creek, where none of us really knew where we were going, except we all agreed that UP was the correct way. We eventually found ourselves on what Dermot assured us was the Moon Track, which is badly overgrown, has lots of gorse, & has very deep ruts in it, many containing water, which caught a few members out, as it was very slippery, & easy to slide off the sides into these pools. 
On arriving at the top, at the junction with the Swampy Ridge Track, we had an early lunch, while I contemplated the weather over Swampy, where we would be going. It was completly covered in cloud, almost down to where we were sitting at times, & I decided that it wouldn’t be much fun going that way, so after a consultation, it was decided that we would go over to the Pineapple Track, & back down there. I think this was a good decision, as when we got down to McGouns Track, we went along there to the seating area with the monument, & had a lengthy break sitting in the sun.
3 Happy group relaxing in sun

3 Happy group relaxing in sun. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was back out to the road, & along to the cars.
A reasonable day, & a bit of a challenge in places.
 Walked 10.1 km
3.7km/hr
2 3/4 hr walking
Climbed 463mtrs. – Ken.
17. 22/8/2007. Trampers. Booth Road, Moon Track circuit. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Sabina.
16. 25/10/2006. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track. Medium. Leaders; Ian, Arthur H
15. 3/11/2004. Both. Nicols Creek, Basin. Leaders: Lex, Ria L, Val and Brian, Irene.
14. 24/9/2003. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, Skyline, Pineapple. From Booth Road. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Irene.
13. 27/11/2002. Both. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, to Skyline. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Ria L, Eleanor, Joyce.
12. 17/3/1999. Nicols Creek, Basins. Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
11. 20/2/2002. Alt. Nicols Creek – Moon Track to Skyline Track. Start Booth Road. Medium+. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
10. 27/1/1999. Pineapple Track – Swampy area. Leaders: Shirley R, Lance and Lois.
9. 28/5/1997. Leith Valley, Nicols Creek return Skyline. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Molly.
8. 9/10/1996. Nicols Creek, Basins from Booth Road. (Park Booth Road.) Average. Leaders: Jack R, Dot T, Patricia J.
7. 18/10/1995. Nicols Creek, Swampy. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Barbara McC, Mairie and Doug.
6. 6/7/1994. Nicols Creek/Moon Track, Alternative – Pineapple Track.  Medium. Leaders:Nancy, Bob H, Shirley R, Joyce.
5. 27/5/1992. Nicols Creek from Booth Road to Swampy Pineapple. Average. Leaders: Marie, Nel, Les W, Margaret D.
4. 3/7/1991. Pineapple Track carpark round snow trip. Wrap up well for this mountain trip. Average. Leaders: Jack M, Mary McG, Bev McI, Shirley.
3. 6/6/1990. Pineapple carpark round trip.Average+. Leaders: Marie, Mary McG, Shirley, Helen.
2. 17/3/1989 Barbara M, Irene, Sabina
1. 26/7/1989. Swampy round trip from Pineapple Track carpark. Average+. Great views. Leaders: Denise P, Mary McG, Peggy M.

 

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Nov 28 2018

Woodhaugh Gardens and Leith

Published by under Hikers,Year round

19 km from car park.

8. 28/11/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Judy and Elaine.

Nike map of route, courtesy Ian.

After an overdose of rain, 23 hikers and four ramblers abandoned the planned Flagstaff/Swampy hike in favour of the Botanic Gardens area.

We parked in the gardens car park and wandered by various paths to the Rhododendron dell for a leisurely morning tea. The sun shone and the birds sang.

(Judy K. pic.)

 Eventually we headed off over the road, into the northern cemetery where a successful search was made for Elaine’s ancestors.

(Judy K. pic.)

  Leaving them undisturbed we headed off down the hill, and the steps, to Logan Park and around to the stadium for lunch. (Quite a relief to have toilets available at both morning tea and lunch!)

Lunch time. (Adrienne M pic and caption.)

  The sun shone and a one-legged seagull enjoyed lots of titbits.  From here it was a stroll across the road into Anzac Ave, then across to follow the Leith up through the University

(Judy K. pic.) [Inserted only at Judy’s request. Ed.]

(Judy K. pic.)

and so back to the Gardens, coffee, and the cars.

Judy and Elaine

7. 15/8/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Edinburgh stone memorial. (Clive pic and caption.)

 

Calm day on the harbour. (Clive pic and caption.)

Après déjeuner scene, Upper Garden. (Ian pic and caption.)

Nancy Syme fountain, Botanic Garden. (Lester told of Nancy Syme long time Mosgiel resident who dontated the fountain. (Clive pic and caption.)

6. 28/6/2017. Hikers. Leith walk Mouth to Woodhaugh. E. Leaders: Jan Y and Jan B.

Calm yachts where parked cars. (Ian pic and caption.

Albatross wing bridge. Wired head and body difficult to discern. (Ian pic and caption.)

Woodhaugh lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Grafitti on lower Leith concrete way. (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 25/6/2008. Hikers. Woodhaugh – Botanic Gardens. Easy. Leaders: Marjorie, Carmel.
4. 17/7/2002. Alt. Bullock Track – Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders:Denise, Shirley R, Bev McI
3. 12/9/2001. Alt. Bullock Track, Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders: Arthur & Barbara L, Winifred
2. 27/10/1999. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Betty.
1. 15/5/1996. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. (Alternative to Quoin Point.) Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

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Nov 21 2018

Chain Hills-Friends Hill Tramps

Published by under Hikers

No. 102 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Friends Hill Chain Hills Year Round”
Saddle Hill Hotel

40. 21/11/2018. Trampers. Friends Hill and Pixie Patch. Leader: Janine.

After large amounts of heavy rain producing some minor flooding, turnout of enthusiastic trampers was a little sparse. Discussion of available, suitable options led 7 trampers to venture off from The Pixie Patch in Friends Hill under cloudy, indecisive weather conditions. Rocky, the dog, …

(Janine pic.)

… was left home as we headed off up the hill finding the gravel road in excellent condition despite the still considerable amounts of rainwater running down the drains. 100 metres on – a short stop to examine the very busy large breather holding connecting incoming water pipes from Deep stream and Silverstream – then running up the road to join us came Rocky!

Near the gate blocking traffic from throughfare to Dunedin we turned left climbing the fence to more views accross the Taieri

(Janine pic)

and examined all the ‘large puddles’ on the plains before us. Stepping along the track, originally designated as a road leading to numerous lifestyle blocks which never eventuated, Rocky had great delight when a rabbit ventured on that same path (it got away). It would seem this block of land is the home of broken dreams as the subdivision never went ahead, that owner declared bankrupcy, then a later owner had plans to make use of these extensive views and put in little home stay cottages. After making a start he also left the area uncompleted, so we trampers examined the start up of the first cottage with great despair at such great ideas being abandoned.

The plan was then to return to The Pixie Patch for morning coffee then head off over the newly logged area towards Chain Hills. On the way home Rocky was determined to get something in a woodpile so was left to bark and run round in circles while we walked a little quicker trying to ignore the thickening cloud. As we reached The Pixie Patch one member asked for a garden tour ‘quick’!!

(Janine pic.)

By the time we filed in for coffee it was decidedly damp and even Rocky came home thinking maybe there were biscuits too. No biscuits but we had plenty to talk about after our Hollyford trip and despite the offer to investigate the Chain Hills track/views all were happy to chat till lunchtime.

So we had a very social day, walked 2.5 km, had a coffee break, discussed tramps, trampers, budgies, books, painting, prices, but not world peace, then ate lunch. – Janine.

39. 17/10/2018. Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street. M. Leaders: Shona and Keith, Ian.

25 hikers and ramblers parked at the area  bounded by Coalstage Rd
and Morris Rd before walking single file across the motorway bridge
 then turning up onto Chain Hills Rd.
A stiff tail wind helped us up and down until we stoppped in a

sheltered hollow for an early morning tea.

Morning tea in a Chain Hills driveway (out of the wind). (Clive pic and caption.)

Continued on to turn right into Flower St, climbing over the high stiles

Crossing Stile in Style. (Clive pic and caption.)

and wandering downhill through the paddock and following Flower St,
before turning right into Martin’s Rd meeting up with the ramblers and

stopping for an early lunch at the skate board park at the Fairfield Hall.

Lunch at Fairfield Community Hall. (Clive pic and caption.)

 We straggled back from there back to the car park.
Distance 9.5kms – Leaders Shona Ian Keith

38. 13 Jun 2018. Trampers. Friends Hill circuit. Leader: Janene.

As I was quickly sweeping the outside doorway, 12 trampers arrived, enthusiastic about what I had in store.

The weather was cool (not cold) and clear as 13 trampers set off from The Pixie Patch, Friends Hill and crossed the road onto the start of the well known ‘Chain Hills’ walking track. After passing the water reservoir we turned left downhill and followed a track along the bottom gully, passing the entrance to the old railroad tunnel …

The old railway tunnel. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… before ever so elegantly scrambling over the barbwire fence (it had been lowered!) Now on Abbotsroyd Farm we all powered up a sizeable hill, the promise of a coffee break at the top deterring any breathless moments, to find a magnificent few of Abbotsford, Green Island, Saddle Hill and all surrounds. While on our refreshment break, the whistle blew and along came the Fonterra train passing along just below us.

So this is what’s on the other side of the hill. (Phil pic and caption.)

All that replenishing and the long downhill traverse with excellent footing saw us speedily depart Abbotsroyd and venture onto road-walking for a while. North Taieri Road then Abbotts Hill Road was a steady climb turning to a track then reaching the tarseal of Mount Grand Road.

Scotch mist o’er Abbotsroyd. (Phil pic and caption.)

The weather had started to slowly deteriorate with a misty fog surrounding us. From there the steady climb turned ’real grunty!’ Come on people – was a lovely avenue of huge old macrocarpa trees at the top and I did allow a lunch break there!

Lunch under the trees. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After lunch we continued, somewhere along the way the road changed from Mt Grand to Dalziel Road, and at the Mt Grand reservoir we turned into Brinsdon Road for more ‘gentle’ climbing, passing through the ‘no vehicles’ track on to Halfway Bush Road which also at some unknown point becomes Friends Hill! The downhill …

Heading back to the cars. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… was a little treacherous and all that mud sure stuck to the boots – and the promised views were detained in the fog – but we had no muddy bums and no complaints (that I heard). Probably because we had coffee and eats at the Pixie Patch afterwards, and everyone went in the front door after I swept the main doorway!!

13.3km covered in great company and I delivered some walnut cookies from afternoon tea to Abbotsroyd the next day. – Janine.

37. 17 Jan 2018. Hikers. Friends Hill Road. M. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Route Map, courtesy Ian, not including racecourse walk.(Ian pic and caption.)

We parked at the Wingatui Racecourse. From there 23 hikers set out in very pleasant temperatures for a trek up Friends Hill Road

Road (Clive pic and caption.)

to the top gate where we stopped for morning tea.

morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

We then set off for a walk round farmland with views over the  Taieri.  We made our way to a little cottage that was first built about 15 years ago as a B & B but was never completed inside.

A surprising substantial unfinished cottage. (Ian pic and caption.)

Unfortunately the door didn’t do its job properly so the starlings made good use of the free accommodation leaving behind a carpet of their own making!!!

From there we carried on this farmland which backs on to Invermay to a track through a stand of Manuka trees and then made our way to our lunch spot which was at the home of tramper, Janine Hearn who kindly said we could sit on her deck, enjoy the views and walkaround her lovely garden.

A friendly tramper who lives on Friends Hill said we could use her back garden for lunch – Thanks Janine. (Clive pic and caption.)

 After lunch we headed back to the cars and five of us did a circuit of the racecourse and the rest opted to go for coffee at Blackstone.  – Jay and Jan

36. 2 Aug 2017  Both. Fairfield to Friends Hill. M.  Leaders: Keith and Shona.

It was drizzly and cold as we gathered at the Bush Rd car park.

After considerable discussion 20 people caught the bus …

What does the Taieri Recreational Tramping Club do and a wet cold winters day – They catch a bus and head for the hills! (Clive pic and caption.)

… to Fairfield, where further discussion occurred before Keith led the group along and up Flower St to the morning tea stop in the trees.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to start it only at morning tea stop! so add 1 km from Flower St bus stop. Tunnel diversion for the “8” added 3 km. Do your own math for your total.

We headed up the track to Chain Hills Road where we met Janine and her little dog Rocky.

After about an hour we made it to the top of Chain Hills Road that was covered in mist with constant rain. (Clive pic and caption.)

By then the drizzle had eased and after the first downhill, …

Among the gum trees on the descent of Chain Hills. (Clive pic and caption.)

… 8 went [yet further! – Ed] down with Janine to inspect the Wingatui tunnel …

Eight of the more intrepid trampers branched off to view [& walk! – Ed] the old [800m – Ed.] railway tunnel [end to end, return! – Ed.].  Several found the novel way down [the first track – Ed.] by sitting down in the mud (unintentionally)! (Clive pic and caption.)

… and the rest negotiated the muddy track, climbed the stile and moved into Janine’s home to eat lunch. (Thanks, Janine.)

As we left, the 8 appeared [back up! – Ed.] over the stile and we all meandered back to Mosgiel, 7 having coffee at Blackstone.The remainder had disappeared (?) home for coffee, showers or even lunch for some. – Keith and Shona.

35. 19 Jul 2017. Trampers. Chain Hills. Leader: M. Helen.

A nice tramp today. Starting from Gladstone Rd and walking up hill over the top of the motorway. Turned onto Chain Hill Road. Found a nice spot for our morning tea on the top of a hill overlooking Mosgiel.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

View from top of inversion layer over Mosgiel. (Helen pic and caption.)

The 12 of us then proceeded along the ups and downs along to the end. Turning left over the stile and the down through the paddocks to Friends Hill Rd. Down to the racecourse where we sat in luxury in the grandstand for our lunch.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

Chen a leisurely walk along Gladstone Rd back to our cars. Coffee for 9 of us at Blackstone’s. Lovely day and a nice 12.2km tramp. – Helen.

34. 10/5/2017. Hikers. Friends Hill, Chain Hills, Gladstone Road. M. Clive, Jay and Jan.

Nike app route map, courtesy Ian.

Autumn on the Taieri.   One of those Southern days of sunshine found an intrepid band of hikers (16) setting out from Wingatui racecourse to walk up Friends Hill and then across country to Chain Hills Road.   The going to start with was steep and a challenge for some,  but then it came to the stile to get onto the public pathway to Chain Hills Road; the step up to stile was about a meter and made for more limber people.   Well all rose to the challenge and made it over the stile to the sheep pens at the top of the hill where we rested for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and watched the fog in the valley roll away.    By now the temperature had risen to the promised 17 degrees and jumpers and fleecy jacket were shed to climb the next couple of hills to Chain Hills Road.   It was then we found that the first stile was just a taster for the next two stiles that were very high and over barbed wire.    Some gentleman from years past laid down his coat so that the ladies did not snare their stocking on the barbed wire. [’twas the reporter! – Ed.]    We gained Chain Hills Road by 11 o’clock so it was a nice walk along the ridge line to arrive above Mosgiel just before midday and a spot to sit and eat lunch.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

A herd of friendly cows watched from across the road and then when they realized we were not there to feed them showed their opinion in that unique bovine manner – pats all round.

Thanks for the view too, Clive, as well as all the above. (Clive pic, Ian caption.)

The walk off Chain hills had the leader focused on road safety and the safest way to negotiate Morris Road (a busy road), down to Quarry Road.   Then it was along the flat back to Wingatui to pick up the cars for afternoon tea and Blackstones cafe.   I think we got a suntan on the way! – Clive.

33. 18/5/2016. Hikers. Flower Street, Friends Hill, Wingatui, Car Park. M. Leaders: Keith and Shona.
Hikers' Route.

Hikers’ Route. Morning Tea stop in rain at about 1 km. Lunch in sun at 6 km. Coffee at 10.6 km.

18 Went by bus from outside the Mosgiel Post Office, arriving Flower St, Fairfield about 9.30 a.m.

Wandered up to the top of Flower St to have morning tea in the gum trees, as there was still drizzly rain falling.

Rain eased and we progressed over the stile and up the grass track, exiting onto Chain Hills Rd. After turning right, followed it to the end. Negotiated the stile there safely and followed the fence line down, up, and around, …

Green Island(?) from Flower Street. (Sharyn pic.)

Green Island from a ‘down’ paddock. (Sharyn pic.)

Wingatui from Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

Wingatui from above Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

… eventually exiting onto Friends Hill Rd.

Walked to Wingatui Race Couse for lunch, where there were toilets and dry seats in the grandstand for the rain had stopped. Made our way down Wingatui Rd, through track, across Haggart Alexander Drive, down Green st to end at Blackstone Cafe for a coffee. – Shona and Keith.

32. 11/6/2014. Hikers. Chain Hills, Flower Street. M. Leaders: Pam, Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Cars parked foot of Coalstage Rd, Morris Rd overpass, Chain Hills Rd, Flower St, Kennedy Rd, Walkway, Main Rd, Park by Fairplay St, Main Rd, Saddleview Pl, Underpass, Saddle Hill Rd, Coalstage Rd again. Distance: 8.93 km; Fastest 4.78 kph; Slowest 3.73 kph.

Pam and Dawn led us, thirty strong this trip, on a route largely familiar to most, but a little less so to this reporter. We took the SH1 overpass, stretched out indian-file, making quite a picture no doubt to motorists passing underneath, to judge by the horn toots we got.
Bridge

Overpass. (John pic)

Down Morris Road to turn sharply up Chain Hills Road.

We ‘morning-teaed’ at the red spot on the map between kilometer marks two and three on the GPS map.
Panorama

The customary morning tea spot on Chain Hills Road. (John pic)

A little further on as we took the Chain Hills Road right fork taking us down to Fairfield. The top of Flower Street lay through private land, guarded by locked gates provided with not-very-accommodating styles.

Style queue

The style at the Flower Street top locked gate. (John pic)

Further down again (or was it higher up?) we came across this mock farmyard, complete with tractor, water wheel, cow, et al.

Glove

A rubber glove udder for a tinny cow. (John pic)

Down in the paved part of Flower Street we were taken with a letter box making industry operating out of a private property.

Letter Boxes to order

Letter Boxes made to order.

Then it was into Kennedy Road, out through a walkway to emerge on the Main Road and on to lunch at a park abutting Fairplay Street.
Collage

Collage of lunch groups (John collage)

From there it was further up the Main Road, then to be pleasantly surprised by the leaders taking us not via the customary Morris Road but by Saddleview Terrace and through the SH1 underpass and up, very steeply up, Saddle Hill Road to Coalstage Road. A short distance along and we stopped to admire Janice’s house and to farewell her down the driveway. Then it was just on down back to the cars.

A good day out, despite an icy edge to the light wind at times. Thank you, leaders. – Ian.
31. 12/3/2014. Hikers. Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
We parked our cars  up Quarry Rd to the right of the overbridge on the north side of the
Saddle Hill.
25 fit and healthy Hikers started up over the bridge and up Chains Hill Rd.
We were met early on by a very fit brown lab dog who followed us all the way …
Dog

Dog (Pic John)

… to the morning tea stop.

Morning tea

Morning tea. (John, pic.)

It sat down and waited while we ate and sipped our tea and water.

Continuing on, we arrived at the Chain Hills Rd end. I thought the dog would have gone home. The DOG sat down and waited till we all leaped over the stile (some climbed carefully).
The DOG then left and went home.
Lunch was at a cosy spot …

Sheltered lunch spot

Sheltered lunch spot (John, Panorama pic.)

… out of the wind.
Fred gave out chocs.
The ground was even and not at all muddy. The views are worth stopping for to catch a breath.
When we reached Gladstone Rd North, we walked to the Wingatui Hall where we had cunningly had a car parked for those who needed a lift back  to the cars up saddle hill. Several Hikers took up the offer and Fred transported them up to their cars. We continued down Gladstone Rd North to the z station, then up quarry rd back to the cars.
Several hikers took up the offer of going for coffee to Wals at the end of the day. (Can’t guess who. – Ed)
A very hot day enjoyed by all. – Elaine.
30. 11/12/2013. All.  Friends Hill, Chain Hills. End of Year finger-food lunch at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS of route

GPS of route from Friends Hill to Chains Hill road, return.

Our leaders had to change our end of year location. Berwick Camp had been already booked. Where to plan the tramp? A brilliant choice. From the Hall, up Friends Hill to the stile and across the poled route to the Chain Hills road end for morning tea. It was the first time this reporter remembers doing the route UP from ‘Friends’ to “Chain’. He discovered how much easier it is doing the reverse route DOWN. The trampers among us were not disappointed either. Bravo, leaders. Our shared lunch was  another successful end-of-year treat. Thanks to Bruce for leading us in a sing-a-long. Happy holidays. – Ian.
29. 28/3/2012. Hikers. Chain Hills. Leader: Graham.
28. 23/11/2011. Hikers. Fairfield circuit, Fairfield. Leaders: Graham, Wendy.
27. 29/6/2011 Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
Start Carpark at Saddle Hill overbridge,
to end of Chain Hills road,
across farmland …
Single

“Single File please people.” (As if we could do anything else.)(Bob pic and caption)

Downhill

Pleasant downhill walking. (Bob pic and caption)

What

Lunch queue? A good spot actually with shelter, sun, and log seats laid on. (Bob pic and caption)

Fred

Fred jealously guards his chocolates. (Bob pic and caption)

… down to Friends’ Hill Road.
Good leadership – except that Quasimodi challenged for the leader’s role, …
Quasi

Quasimodo joins the group. (Bob pic and caption)

… the leader threw down the gauntlet (ie orange jerkin), and the usurper reigned, …

gauntlet

Quasimodo surges into the lead. (Bob pic and caption)

…  and misled the people at one point,
at which the the old guard led the errant followers correctly.
Along Gladstone Rd, and
up Quarry Rd to cars.
We started with 18 and with defections reduced to 6!!
A lovely walk. Great weather. – Bob.
26. 26/1/2011. Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
Some 18 of us (the number varied a little at points in the walk) set out from the bridge carpark on Saddle Hill on a fine and calm morning, continued up Chain Hills Road with morning tea at the “potato planter” (pictured),

Morning tea by the potato planter. (Bob pic and caption)

Ditto. (Bob pic and caption)

across a small piece of farmland by the reservoir (where there was the possibility of a confrontation with a cattle beast

Does he want to have a beef with us? (Bob pic and caption)

– but avoided because of the amiable nature of all on two or four feet ) and so onto Flower St, Fairfield, and past several novel garden ornaments, one of which is pictured.

Neill admonishes the little people. (Bob pic and caption)

Lunch stop was at the park with shelter from the hall wall against the strengthening wind, and chocolates from Fred, and the last part of the round-trip was up the old main road (Morris Rd) in gathering drizzle. A frequent topic of conversation was the ailments (and recovery) of various people present or absent, and the name of Don who used to come out with us but whom we haven’t seen for some time and whose name eluded several. [Donny Hunter? – Ed] ( I am reliably informed that there are no longer “senior moments”, but rather “intellectual pauses”.) Two new faces, Jim and Betty, came to ‘try us out’. Thanks to Frank and Leslie for leadership. – Bob M
25. 9/6/2010 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.

I guess that the residents themselves are their best critics. (Bill pic and caption)

24. 22/4/2009 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
23. 28/5/2008. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley
22. 23/1/2008. Hikers. Chain Hills to Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
21. 27/9/2006. Hikers. Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Eleanor W, Dot T.
20. 17/8/2005. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Leaders: Margaret S, Carmel.
19. 28/7/2004 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hills, Fairfield. From over-bridge. Leaders: Les W, Ray, Mary M.
Dunedin from Mount Grand

Dunedin from Mount Grand

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

18. 16/7/2003. Hikers. Overhead Bridge, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
17. 19/2/2003. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Trampers. Leaders: Donny, Graham.
16. 19/6/2002 Alt. Winter walk from Fairfield Tavern. road walk. Leaders: Joyce S, Eleanor
15. 29/5/2002. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Wendy, Graham.
14. 23/5/2001 Friends Hill. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary M, Val
13. 26/7/2000. Fairfield via Flower Street from carpark. Leaders: Lesley and Frank, Margaret D.
12. 24/5/2000 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hill Circuit. Leaders: Ronny, Irene, Hazel
11. 17/5/2000. Chain Hills – Circuit. From Fairfield Tavern. Leaders: Donny, Irene, Hazel
10. 10/6/1998. Wingatui, Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Peg C, Molly.
9. 1/3/1998 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Margaret D, Lance, Lois
8. 25/6/1997. Maurice Road, Fairfield, Chain Hills. Leaders: Betty B, Judith D, Mary Y.
7. 20/11/1996. Friends Hill and beyond. Meet at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B, Judith D.
6. 1/11/1996 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B
5. 19/6/1996. Chain Hills – Fairfield Tavern for lunch – Return Main Road. No fare. (Alternative to Pole Line) Leaders: Daphne, Evelyn M, Colleen.
4. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Medium. Leaders: Bob Q, Dot and Nelson, Molly.
3. 16/9/1992. Wingatui Friends Hill Rd Halfway Bush Rd Three Mile Hill Rd Dalziel Rd Brinsdon Rd return
2. 6/5/1992. Walk from Glasgow Street car park, Saddle Hill, Chain Hills, Wingatui. Easy. Leaders: Jack M, W Bathgate,
1. 9/8/1989. Wingatui Racecourse. Over the Hill. Easy+ Leaders: Betty, Molly, Ria.

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Nov 21 2018

Ocean View

Published by under Hikers

No. 18 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps.”Ocean View – Saddle Hill. D Bennett. Farm. Lambing.”

21/11/2018. Hikers. Ocean View. Leaders: Bruce and Jan Y.

Hikers report

Wednesday 21 November 2018

Seventeen hikers set off at 9.30 am from the Brighton Surf Club car park down to the sea alongside the river which had a high flow due to the recent rain and had cut a 0.7 m bank in the sand. We then passed the area of pingao planting and went to the right of the Surf Club building to ascend the steps and continue along the footpath to the sidepath leading on the right to the small beach below.  Two blue penguin boxes were at the top of the steps. The far rocky cleft on the beach to the right was empty of penguins and the sea demonstrated how the force and volume of the waves can vary. The remains of a dead penguin were visible in the rocky niche closer to the stairs. As the tide was not out far enough to proceed north along the beach we re-ascended the stairs, continued along the footpath and went to the beach via the car park at the bottom of the hill, Kirkness Hill. We walked north along the beach. 

 Taylors Creek had a significant flow where it went out to the sea. After considering our options we took the plunge and went across the creek which was ankle deep in parts. 

About 250 metres south of the car park/freedom camping site at the entrance to Ocean View we observed how a dead seal was being buried naturally in the sand. 

We had morning tea at the car park at 10.45 and at 11 am  were joined by George, who had taken the bus to the Presbyterian Church on Brighton Road, and continued north along the beach for 30 minutes,

(Adrienne pic.)

making another creek crossing with ankle-deep water, to where some plastic debris in the form of a large pink float and a small blue float numbered 63238, attached to 40 metres of rope, were collected as part of a campaign to remove plastic from beaches. We then returned …

(Adrienne pic)

… to the car park to lunch there at 12 midday. After lunch we proceeded through 727 Brighton Road, depositing the rope and floats there, and turned to the right on the track which we followed until it came out on Brighton Road beside the clothing collection box. George caught the 10.20 am  bus opposite McColl Road back to Brighton.

We turned to the left on the footpath and proceeded to admire the work of the Third Little Pig in the form of two houses. We looked at the view of the sea from the landscaped part of the reserve just south of the row of tree stumps marking the edge of the reserve area near the second house which was the subject of a recent TV programme. Grand Design, shown at Grand Designs. On the website the house is described as being at Oceanside, Little Brighton.

After crossing the bridge over Taylors Creek, we turned to the left and followed a meandering track back to the Kirkness Hill carpark and then, via the footpath, back to the Surf Club carpark, arriving there at 1 pm. Refreshements were consumed at the Brighton Beach café which we left at 2 pm, just before the rain returned with a greater ferocity.

Distance cover 10.29 km. The weather was overcast, with a slight drizzle at times, no wind of note and a bearable temperature. It could have been worse. The participants may have had some cobwebs shaken off and no lasting damage was sustained by anyone. With Marjorie, who assisted with the planning, having to offer her apologies for not being able to attend on the day, my thanks to Jan Yardley and Alec Griffin for leading at the back.

Subsequent enquiries with the Vessels Registrar on FishServe revealed the rope and floats belonged to  a Carey’ Bay based fisherman Chris Cooper. I phoned him and he said he would be pleased to receive his floats back at the Fishermans Wharf, Carey’s Bay, but that I could keep the rope. I said I would deliver them at some stage in the forthcoming weeks. He thought the rope may have frayed on rocks near where the crayfish pot had  been set in the region of the Nuggets, south of Kaka Point. – Bruce.

10/4/2013. Hikers. (31). Ocean View Ramble. Easy. Leaders: Dorothy, Chris.
GPS

“GPS” of half of route. Began recording only at the top view. Total distance 9 km.

Dorothy led a large group on an excellently-planned route around, above and through the Ocean View settlement, Continue Reading »

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Nov 16 2018

Tramps Incorporating Three Kings

Published by under Hikers,Trampers,Year round

No. 26 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Wesleydale – Maungatua – via 3 Kings. L Wiffen. Year round.”

Abt 25 km from car park.

24. 14/11/2018. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Thirty of those who weren’t away at the Hollyford Camp turned out to tackle the 4WD track up to Three Kings. Three Ramblers, who have chosen for themselves the name “The Eighties Plus” dropped back to continue at their own pace, getting ultimately as far up as the last gate on the track. The rest, with occasional rest stops and regroupings,

Morning tea with views of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.)

Ian explaining part of the history of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.) [Pointing out the original route up from Wesleydale Camp. – Ed]

made it up the steadily graded track, overcoming the last very steep bits to reach the rocks high up on the Maungatua Range at its southern end by lunch time.

The day was fine and calm with only a little sharp wind up here persuading us to find our own sheltered but sunny spot for lunch. Quite a number of us were newer members and for many this was their first visit to these prominent rocks. Well done.

Lunch at Three Kings. (Ian pic and caption.)

Our leaders Ian and Doug. (Clive pic and caption.)

After a leisurely lunch, it was back down the track again, this time each at their own pace now that  it was a known route, and into the cars, to regather for coffee at Outram. A successful outing. – Ian and Doug.

23. 17/5/2017. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Route map courtesy Ian. Nike pp not turned until 1km into trip so add 1km to all distances. (Ian pic and caption.)

We navigated our cars to what for the Hikers was a new entry spot. Back in 2006 the Todd Group had denied us access through the paddock next to the old Wesleydale Camp which gave us access to a lovely track through the bush above it opening to gorse leading to the FWD track above. Now, back at the bottom of a big dip in  Heenan Road, there was an entry point to a parking spot up at the very bottom of that track, thanks to a hospitable owner’s permission.

Only 13 were able to turn out for the day. A first long-grassed paddock was the only steep effort, the track thereafter proving a delightfully modest steady gradient elevating us soon to impressive views over the Taieri plain. We stopped for morning tea at one such view,

Viewing the plain. (Ian pic and caption.)

but low cloud below us was  beginning to condense obscuring the former clear air.

Later, where we at last emerged from the bush part of the route, we stopped to point out to newer members the old way by which we used to reach this point. Beyond here, the track now steadily steepened the nearer we got to the Three Kings. We took it slowly, with frequent rests and regroupings. Until behold, there was a new track cut right across an extensive cleared area, changing the whole aspect of what we used to experience eleven and more years ago. The new track was even steeper, but at last all got there.

We hunkered down for lunch beneath the principle rock, sheltering from a brief but wetting rain shower.

Shelter for some. (Ian pic and caption.)

A clever perch. (Ian pic and caption.)

But that was it. The day remained calm, if cool. We returned back down the way we had come, all very pleased at having achieved our object. One older member expressed their delighted at achieving a return to the rocks after such a long absence, having given up all hope of ever making it again.

We stopped for coffee at George’s ‘hairy’ goat cafe, delighted to meet up there with the Trampers’ other half of the club, returned just before us.

A satisfying day. Roll on the wintry weekend ahead. – Ian.

22. 8/2/2017. Trampers. Maungatua Summit from Heenan Road. M. Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Tony. Trampers Maungatua trip.

I believe this tramp was a “first’ for the club. We have been up to the “3 Kings” area many times in the past, but today we continued on to the summit.

A small group out today, only 4 of our regulars, 1 potential member and  1 guest: 6 in total.

We left the cars parked up a farm drive off Heenan Road. Our tramp began at 9.00 a.m. on the uphill farm road which goes around the south end of Maungatua, and out towards Mahinerangi.

It was a fine day, sunny but with many clouds. A cool S.W. breeze kept the temperature down.

Morning tea was taken in the last available sheltered spot, the leader being rubbished for stopping 5 minutes early though!

Up a farm track and then in to the tussock taking us up more steeply to trig “F” at 702 metres, from where we could look down onto the “3 Kings“.

Onward on a farm track, before turning off into the tussock for the last 3.25 km, single file following the fence line.

Beautiful moss. (Helen pic and caption.)

The summit was reached at 12.05 p.m. for our lunch stop. Sitting down in the shelter of the vegetation was necessary to get out of the wind. The sunny periods were very welcome as we ate and rested.

Before taking our leave, the obligatory photo of the group at the summit marker post was taken.

Arthur Carol Neil Helen and Neil. (Helen pic and caption.)

Plaque on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Just at this time the red helicopter flew over us at low altitude, our waves being returned.

Red helicopter giving us a wave. (Helen pic and caption.)

No rescue needed today, though, thankfully.

After about 2 km on the return journey we took to the farm track for the remainder. It was somewhat easier going, and also gave a little variation from the inward track.

The wind had eased early afternoon, and then changed to a southerly breeze. Showers were visible in the Balclutha-Milton direction, but were then going out to sea and not towards us.

Lower down we stopped briefly to admire the view out over the lower Taieri Plain. The whole area was bathed in sunshine, and was a real picture. The views from the top of Maungatua had been spoiled a little by all the cloud shadows on the landscape.

Back at the cars at 3.00 p.m. it had been a neat 6 hours from go to whoa. A very satisfactory day’s tramp in the leader’s opinion. Total distance was 17 km, and an altitude climb of 800 metres.

The timing was absolutely perfect!

As we sat down after ordering our drinks at “The Hairy Goat” the rain arrived!

Thanks to all who participated in the day’s very successful tramp. – Art.

21. 22/10/2014. Trampers. Three Kings. M.
This weeks tramp was to the “Three Kings” at the south end of the Maungatua’s. Six trampers travelled to McLaren Rd, drove around past the Lavender farm to our parking place just inside the farm yard gate. Jill went & got the key for us, & then drove back home again, leaving us to find our way up to the tops. The walk was on farm 4WD tracks all the way up, with just a short walk through tussock to the Three Kings where we had lunch in the shelter from a strong cold wind. Then it was a quick retreat back down again out of the wind, & back to the cars. Walked 12km; 4.1 km/h ave; 3hrs moving; climbed 690m.
The view from the top was very good, but the cold wind didn’t make for pleasant viewing. We practised our Coffee Club by calling into the Outram coffee shop on the way home where a good chat session was had. – Ken

18/10/2006 Jeff Todd of Todd Group 477 8902 (10/06). Todd Group had bought Wesleydale and paddock and allowed it to be used for army live firing! Access through all this area denied.

20. 26/4/2006. Trampers. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Evelyn C, Sabina.
19. 24/8/2005. Both. Wesleydale, Three Kings and option of Trig. Leaders: Ria, Irene, Val and Brian, Eleanor B.
18. 19/11/2003. Both. Three Kings from Farm sheds. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Bill and Pat; Hikers: Les and Margaret, Carmel.
des

Down through Gorse. Wendy? Pat

Geo

George on rise, below Trig above Three Kings (19/11/2003)

17. 17/7/2002 Three Kings, Mill Creek, Kowhai. Spur Leaders: Bob H, Doug M, Wendy B
Long. Hard. Water. Steep down Kowhai Spur.
16. 10/7/2002. Wesleydale Methodist Youth Camp to 3 Kings. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Frank.
15. 22/11/2000 Leaders: Lex, Ian
14. 22/9/1999. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Lex, Bill H, Lesley S.
13. 12/8/1998. 3 Kings, Maungatua. Leaders: Irene, Shirley R.
12. 19/11/1997. Wesleydale to 3 Kings and Trig. Leaders Judith and Hugh, Ian.
11. 12/3/1997. Three Kings – Mill Creek Reserve – Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Graham, Barbara McC.
10. 1/5/1996. Duncan’s Farm Road and return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Les S, Graham S, Doug M
9. 3/4/1996 Three Kings from Heenan Road to McLaren Road Start past Little Creek. Medium.
Seek permissions
Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Nelson and Dot.
8. 20/4/1994. Three Kings. Medium. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ivan, Les W.
7. 6/10/1993. Mill Creek (back of the Maungatuas.) Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Ria L, Nel, Betty H.
6. 26/5/1993. Wesleydale Camp – uphill following 4WD track to Maungatuas. Great views. Medium. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Nola, Judith.
5. 9/9/1992. Wesleydale Camp to the Maungatuas. Follow 4WD Track. Average. Leaders: Joan, Betty, Jean, Diana.
4. 29/7/1992. Wesleydale Camp, up the hill following 4WD track to the Maungatuas. Lovely views. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Dave and Jean.
3. 23/10/1991. Maungatuas – Wesleydale to ‘3 Kings Rocks’. Steady up hill grade, but not a long tramp. Average+. Leaders: Nancy, Ray, Ted, Jack R.
2. 27/6/1990 Wesleydale to Three Kings. Average, if taken in easy stages. Don’t rush hill please. Leaders: George, Margaret D, Margaret B, Ria.
1. 8/3/1989. Three Kings. Good tramp up the Maungatuas. Great views of Lower Taieri. Leaders: Denise, George, Peggy.

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Nov 14 2018

Hollyford Camp

Published by under Uncategorized

12/11/2018. Hollyford Camp. M. Phil.
Trampers: 12-16 Nov: Hollyford Camp. M. Phil.

Hollyford Escapades:  12-16 November 2018

Planning to execution seemed to go very well as everyone was at Waihola early….. this being a trait that continued for every start during the week.

18 intrepid walkers in 6 cars set off and bang on time arrived at Cocoa’s Café at Mandeville airport for a necessary kick start to getting to Te Anau reasonably refreshed.  First stop was at the DOC I-site to get hut tickets and check the weather, then it was food and petrol top-ups plus a visit to the best public loos in the world for most – albeit some of us had to go back to the car to get the entry gold coin!

The clearing weather meant the drive up through Te Anau Downs and the Eglinton Valley was pretty well up to the Mercedes car advert standard, then after a brief stop at Knobs Flat we arrived at The Divide.  With clear tops on the Livingstone Range, it was decided to attack Key Summit,

At the Divide about to head up Key Summit . (Gordon pic and caption.)

initially via the Routeburn/Greenstone track, before branching off on the zig zags to the Summit and, for some, beyond the well known tourist look out.  The group split into 3 as each limit was reached; lovely views of Lake Marian, the Darrans, the Hollyford and also the Greenstone Caples were in view and appreciated.

On Key Summit looking to the Greenstone: McKellar Saddle ( and Caples). (Phil pic and caption.)

We finally descended in good time and once back in the cars, moved into the Hollyford proper.  Turning right into the Lower Hollyford Rd we stopped, read and discussed the memorial to Davey Gunn that celebrated his 56 mile journey over bush tracks from Big Bay to the Milford Rd in 23 hours to raise support for the injured in a plane crash there.  What the books don’t say is Davey had a cuppa then returned to Big Bay to carry on his guided trip… he had also cracked some ribs getting plane passengers from the crash in the surf….

Finally we arrived at Gunn’s Camp and settled in to our ‘little huts on the Prairie’…… followed by good craic and a variety of well cooked dinners.

We were at the Lake Marian track ahead of time on the Tuesday morning, everyone keen to get going.  Crossing the Hollyford River involved the first swing bridge for the week, then some time was taken on the Gantries overlooking the tumbling waters of Marian Creek;

Marian Creek cascading. (Phil pic and caption.)

from there it was a steady 2 hour walk up to the Lake, to be greeted by emerald clear water and towering peaks,

Lake Marian in all her glory. ( Phil pic and caption.)

capped off by some loud avalanches at the top of the valley (they resembled large waterfalls).  We stayed here for a good 40 minutes enjoying a very special environment, before returning.

  It was a sign of the nature of the track that the return time was also 2 hours……

After lunch, having ensured that no-one laid down on their bunk, we travelled up the Upper Hollyford and just before the Homer Tunnel, veered off to park in the Gertrude Valley carpark.  We then rambled a while to the base of the Saddle, enjoying the amphitheatre of surrounding peaks as well as the early celmisias, ourisias and Mt Cook lilies that were smiling back at us.

Gertrude Valley with Saddle behind. (Phil pic and caption.)

  Once back at the cars we returned to Camp, allowing for a short stop at Falls Creek where new carparks and Gantries have ensured another great stop on the Milford Rd.

The Camp was busier on the second night with the Stray Bus arrival, plus some trampers who had arrived from the Demon Trail, telling of tall stories and lots of trees over the track, and loads of hunters and jet boaters in the huts…

Wednesday dawned fine and we travelled to the road end, where we set off to enjoy the Hollyford Walk;

Heading off down the Hollyford Track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

guarded over by towering mountains named mostly after Ngatimamoe and Ngai Tahu chiefs intersprinkled with mountains named after bureaucrats, nieces and mothers;

Mt Karetai. (Phil pic and caption.)

we rambled through forest of Beech, Miro, Matai, Totara, Kamahi and Rimu, finally arriving at Hidden Falls Hut for lunch (having already stopped off at the Hidden Falls to get showered upon).

Lunch at Hidden Falls. (Phil pic and caption.)

  A few green hooded orchids spread throughout the moss and liverwort track edges.

Following lunch, 5 hikers turned right and returned to the road end by 4pm, whilst 13 trampers turned left and after 40 minutes begun the ascent of Little Homer Saddle;  through the forest gaps great views of Mts Madeline and Tutoko were enjoyed and after another 30 minutes we were at the top of the saddle;  whilst not high, the effort was considerable in the heat of the day…… a drop off to the Little Homer Falls

Little Homer Falls. (Gordon pic and caption.)

followed with tree falls along the way becoming a little harder to limbo under….. the Falls drew everyone to them and then after a well earned break we set off for Lake Alabaster through self pruning beech forest.  As we veered in to the Pyke Valley, we were greeted by tall straight Kahikatea.

Finally we emerged into a clearing where the Pyke Lodge of the Guided walk stood and gazed upon the majestic view of Mt. Madeline dominating the Hollyford skyline.

A further 20 minutes of tired tramping followed before we arrived at Lake Alabaster

First views of Lake Alabaster. (Gordon pic and caption.)

– 7.5 hours after we started, and according to GPS estimations some 2 kilometres longer than official publications credit, at just on 23 kilometres for the day!

Progressively the breezes dropped and shadows and mountain and forest reflections dominated the Lake,

The Darran Mountains and Mt Madeline reflections in Alabaster. (Phil pic and caption.)

interspersed with splashes of delight as keen trampers (some) had a ‘swim’ and dried off before the sand-flies could do damage.

A good spread of birdlife was enjoyed along the walks including tui, bellbird, grey warbler, (bush robin at Marian),shining cookoo, ruru (at night!), chaffinch and the melodious Kaka.  Masses of perching orchids (the bamboo – Earina mucronata) adorned tree branches around the shoreline.

We had the company of a small number of other trampers for the first night at Alabaster.

On the Thursday morning, helped by feedback from trampers off the ‘Demon Trail’, 10 decided to follow the dotted lines on the map along side the Lake up the Pyke Valley;  this in effect being a bush bash with the lapping levels of the Lake the easier going.  About half way along we stopped at a large flowing creek…. fishing and fossicking were undertaken, with not a lot of luck, though style was fine.

Returning through thick bush we stumbled upon a small ‘grave site’ and then returning to the hut we had a cuppa and lunch, before crossing the largest swing bridge in Fiordland over the Pyke River, to touch upon the Demon Trail.  A hundred metres of this was enough to convince us that we should save this for another time…..!

Our second night at Alabaster was a very social affair, with jet boaters …

What do jet boat drivers have that fellow walkers don’t? (Phil pic and caption.)

… and pack rafters arriving along with a range of trampers heading up or down the valleys from or to the Coast.  Deer had been shot, trout caught, a jet boat sunk and being expensively recovered with helicopters ….so much to catch up on….. and best of all, no news from the outside world!  Mattresses were spread throughout the common areas to accommodate all.

Notwithstanding the week of walking everyone was up and away at 6.50 am on the last morning, well before the official start time, as a slight rain began to fall…and fall….and fall.  At last we were experiencing a Fiordland shower… becoming so consistent and insistent that when the time came we made a detour to Hidden Falls Hut for an early brunch to recharge, before the last 2 hours trudge to the road end.  We took 1.5 hours off the incoming time, very commendable as we were going uphill all the way!  (but then apparently the GPS said the distance was shorter…) ah we are better off without these new contraptions!

After 6 hours tramping we quickly reorganised before driving to Gunn’s Camp where we checked for final messages from the Hikers, picked up belongings, then drove back to Te Anau and civilisation.  We caught up with the Hikers at a local Café which was being inundated by bus loads of tourists, they were swarming and biting better than sand-flies!

The Hikers meantime, had an enjoyable day trip to Milford Sound on the Thursday.  First stop was the well known Chasm, and then they made a call into the Milford Sound Lodge.  What used to be a backpackers hostel now has several new cabins and areas for motorhomes, all well laid out with the Cleddau River nearby.

Enjoying Milford Sound. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

  The coffee wasn’t bad either apparently!  On the way out they made a stop at the historic bridge over the Tutoko River and a lookout near the tunnel entrance.  Friday for them dawned with heavy rain so the decision was made to stay put, light the fire and relax in the common room awaiting the trampers return. By 1pm they decided to head for Te Anau for lunch and rendezvous there as originally planned.  

Overall

A most enjoyable 5 days of great company, tracks and views to click the camera at.  Four days of sunshine out of five is not a bad record in Fiordland terms. Next stop Martins and Big Bays?

Gunn’s Camp

Everyone felt at home here and the accommodation and facilities most appropriate for a stay.  It is a very good base for exploring northern Fiordland, whether sightseeing, fishing, hunting or walking and would save multiple trips to and from Te Anau – or to just step back in pace or in time.

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Nov 07 2018

Ross Creek and environs

No. 94 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Ross Creek – McGlashan College Year Round”

27. 7/11/208. Both. Hikers: Craigieburn and McGoun. Trampers: Craigieburn, Davies and Pineapple. Leaders: Pam, Dawn and Art.

Hikers’ route map, courtesy Ian.

The 44 setting out from Rockside Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

Trampers’ Report: The Hike leaders for the combined club day suggested that the Trampers could extend their walk, which we did.

Morning tea at the Byre. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Leaving the Hikers after the morning tea stop at Craigieburn, 12 Trampers look the shortest route to McGouns Road and on to find the bottom of Davies Track.

It was rather warm and humid as we climbed up through the second-growth bush, on the lower part of the track. The juice flowed very freely!

However, on reaching the older native bush the temperature dropped considerably, allowing all to enjoy this part of the track.

Trampers heading up Davies track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Above the bush line we emerged into the flax and tussock – the pigs had been busy up here. Davies Track is well maintained, other than the topmost part in the tussock where small gorse bushes will need to be dealt with at some time.

Trampers’ view from Pineapple track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

It had been an enjoyable (?) climb, but all were very glad to reach the top and emerge onto the Pineapple Track. Five minutes took us down to the junction with the track to Swampy Ridge, where we had our lunch.

Trampers’ lunch break on Pineapple track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

By the time the lunch half hour was over the wind was picking up, and the sky darkening. But it was downhill all the way now on the Pineapple Track and we made good time.

Hikers’ lunch in the shade at head of Booth Road after short-cutting from McGouns through the lower part of the original Pineapple to the water tank. (Ian pic and caption.)

After a while it came on to rain lightly, …

Trampers on way home in forest in the rain. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… but had stopped by the time we reached the bottom of the track.

A group of hikers was seen just in front, but they didn’t wait, disappearing down Tanner Road somewhere.

The Trampers returned to their cars via Craigieburn and the bush tracks to record a useful day’s work of about 10 km. – Art.

26. 24/10/2018. Hikers.Ross Creek Trails. E. Leaders: Clive and Doug.

26 Hikers set off from Malvern Street bridge along the Upper Leith walk. Many had done this walk before and were not sure what to expect.

Down the staircase in the bush. (Clive pic and caption.)

Firstly we had to cross School Creek as the track to the dam face was closed. Jumping across the stepping stones was tricky but no one took a spill. That was exhausting so we settled down for morning tea on the other side. We then continued up the stream to Burma Road. Lots of vehicles parked here for repairs to the dam.   Arriving at the side of the dam we could see the water level was very low. (It had been hoped to refill the dam by the end of October.)

The reservoir was very low. (Clive pic and caption.)

We continued up Burma Road to Wakari Road and then right to the junction of Tanner Road where we entered the track system again. It was a hot day reportedly 25 degrees, but under the canopy of trees and bush it was very pleasant. We looked at old stone remnants of building past and scaled the heights to the old byre.

A rest at the old byre. (Clive pic and caption.)

Bit of a rest here after that climb saw some breaking out the sandwiches, but a bit early for lunch. Downhill to the other side of the dam in time to sit down for lunch, if you could find a comfortable spot!

Lunch beside the dam. (Clive pic and caption.)

After lunch we made a loop of the dam, as the face was closed, arriving at a point on Burma Road we had been at earlier. Some opted for the down hill section back to the stream crossing. Those with a bit left in the tank headed uphill to Cannington Road before dropping down a steep slope to the creek. Total distance 9.1k.

All arrived back at the cars safely and then it was off to Croc-o-dile cafe in the Botanical Garden for afternoon tea. – Clive & Doug

25. 25/10/2017. Hikers. Ross Creek, Craigieburn, Cycle tracks, McGouns, Ross Creek. M. Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Route map courtesy Ian. It stopped recording 1.5 km before finish! (Ian pic and caption.)

(Clive pic.)

Morning tea. (Clive pic.)

Steep descent. (Clive pic.)

Did they really order that much?. (Clive pic.)

24. 24/4/2016. Hikers. Ross Creek, McGouns, Tanner Lookout, Craigieburn. M. Leaders: Dawn and Pam.
GPS of route. Failed to complete it at time; hence straight line indicating car travel to Plaza Cafe. We did just on 7 km, despite the '6' not showing. (Hidden by the "1"?) Distracted by Spittles' wonderful disbursement of blackboy peaches.

GPS of route. Failed to complete it at time; hence straight line indicating car travel to Plaza Cafe. We did just on 7 km, despite the ‘6’ not showing. (Hidden by the “1”?) Distracted by Spittles’ wonderful disbursement of blackboy peaches.

Panorama of some of the 26 hikers lunching.

Panorama of some of the 26 hikers lunching.

23. 20/1/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh Gardens, Ross Creek reservoir, Craigieburn, Tanner Lookout. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
GPS route map of Ross Creek tramp courtesy Bruce.

GPS route map of Ross Creek tramp courtesy Bruce. Distance covered 10.6 km, moving time 2 hours 55 minutes, moving average 3.6 km/hour, stopped time 1 hour 44 minutes, overall average 2.3 km/hour, and total ascent 221 m.

Twenty-two hikers departed at 9.30 am from the Gardens’ Carpark opposite Mecure/Leisure Lodge on a sunny calm day, in contrast to the previous drizzly afternoon. We turned to the left in the Gardens and followed the north perimeter with the themed borders to the main gate, crossed at the traffic lights to the north side of Bank Street and walked around to the Woodhaugh Gardens, past the mural of the Otago University Clocktower building with a portrait of the architect Maxwell Bury (1825–1912), painted under the Pine Hill Road bridge.

Clock tower mural under bridge. (Bruce pic and caption)

Clock tower mural under bridge. (Bruce pic and caption)

We kept to the left in the Woodhaugh Gardens circumnavigating the duck pond by proceeding along a bush track and stopped at 10. 00 am for morning tea near the paddling pool.

Morning tea at Woodhaugh (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh. (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh. (Bruce pic and caption)

We then followed the path near the right bank of the Leith to Malvern Street, crossing at the bridge and turning left opposite the building that was originally the Woodhaugh Hotel into Woodhaugh Street. We followed the track on the left on the left bank of the Leith Stream and passed an excavator at work clearing the boulder trap built in 1963. We ambled along the track up the valley past the New Zealand Motor Caravan Association’s property before crossing the foot bridge and continuing to the site of the disused Woodhaugh Quarry and the explosives store. Our path continued up the valley and along the true right side of the Ross Creek reservoir (facing down the valley) after which we crossed the bridge over Ross Creek and after proceeding about 300 m down the true left side of the reservoir took the track uphill on the left. Where this branched after another 100 m or so we turned to a relatively new and level track to the left which later passed close to some rimu trees before swinging right and coming out on the grassed area below the Craigieburn cow byre. After passing the byre and the left hand end of the stone wall further ahead we stopped at Tanner View at 11.40 am for lunch. After lunch we turned to the right on the track and then, at a sign, to the left passed the cobbled road to the little ruin.

Little ruin at Craigieburn. (Bruce pic and caption)

Little ruin at Craigieburn. (Bruce pic and caption)

From the ruin we took the track to the rimu forest eventually emerging at the bridge at the top of the Ross Creek reservoir that we had crossed earlier. We made our way down the left hand side of the reservoir and then followed our earlier route back to the gardens,

Group photo Woodhaugh Gardens. (Bruce pic and caption)

Group photo Woodhaugh Gardens. (Bruce pic and caption)

reaching Crocodile at 2.10 pm where many stopped for refreshments.

– Bruce and Marjorie

22. 25/3/2015. Hikers. Ross Creek and McGouns Track. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.
GPS of Hikers' route

GPS of Hikers’ route

The hike was planned well. First, we parked our cars at the beginning of Malvern Street. Pam and Dawn  then led us into the Upper Leith Walkway
Upper Leith Walkway (John pic)

Upper Leith Walkway recent sign. (John pic)

that runs alongside Woodhaugh Street till we came to and crossed the large footbridge onto the other side of the Leith and through the old quarry that lies under the cliffs that bound the north end of Maori Hill, where Braeview Crescent runs along their top. The path then twisted us up into Ross Creek, with cliffs now on our right marking the boundary of Rockside Road houses above. On and up until very steeply up to crest the big earth dam (that is scheduled to be reinforced some time) of Ross Creek Reservoir.
Plaque. Ross Creek Water Works. (Jphn pic)

Plaque. Ross Creek Water Works. (John pic)

Meantime the water level is kept remarkably low to relieve stress on the dam wall. Morning tea was up at the second part of the reservoir, which we found to be surprisingly set up for water polo, but absent any players.
Morning tea. (John pic.)

Taken by the morning tea stop. Unusual dewatered view of reservoir. (John pic.)

Then on up through the bush tracks. We passed through the Craigieburn area…
The Little Ruin. (John pic)

The Little Ruin. (John pic)

…to emerge at the intersection below Booth Road. This was an important regrouping point before Pam led us on through a gate…
A new McGouns Track sign. (John pic)

A new McGouns Track sign at entrance to McGouns Road. (John pic)

into McGouns Road leading to the start of the McGouns track. This took us across to the Pineapple Track and back down to Booth Road.
Back into the top of Ross Creek bush, but this time up to…
Tanners View sign. (John pic)

Tanners View sign. (John pic)

… the old cow byre …
Tanners View (John pic)

Old Cow Byre (John pic)

Lunch (John pic)

Lunch on old cow byre site. (John pic)

…for lunch.

After lunch it was simply back out and down through the Ross Creek environs to the cars.

Thanks to Pam and Dawn for a well planned hike. – Ian.
21. 12/6/2013. Hikers. Ross Creek and surrounds. Leaders: Lex and Fred.
Route

Route. 9.65km

We parked our cars at the north end of Burma Road. Lex led us through the bush to exit up on Tannock Road. Along a bit and down Leighton Road to  morning tea in the grassy reserve at the road’s end.
Then back along Tannock Road, (just past 1km on map) down through the bush and along the reservoir to the dam at its end. It was a shock to see how much the water had been lowered.
Low water

Low water in Ross Creek Reservoir.

Of course, because of the cracks that have been detected in the earth dam.

Looking down

Looking down the dam face to cleared bush below.

We crossed the dam, turned left and down to walk past the cleared bush site …

Looking up

Looking back up the face of the dam.

and on down to reach the junction of Rockside Road at its bottom and Malvern street. (2km mark on map)

Then it was to walk leisurely up Malvern Street, stopping for Lex to point out various interests on the way. What surprised ss was a string of tall posts diagonally across the Leith above the first set of houses we passed. We thought it might be to trap flood debris.

Just further up Lex pointed out a weir, immediately below which he used to swim in when a small boy. Ian and Lex talked about the Clark family house that used to be across the locked pedestrian bridge overlooking the weir.

Then it was yet further up to the old Jacksons’ beautiful stone house when Ian recalled, (as a boy in company with others) stealing  cream out of a jar left to cool in the clear cooling water of a ditch, replacing what was removed with water. Just a bit further up, at the foot of Fulton Rd was the house of the late artist Eana B Jeans with only the gate of Ian’s old home showing a sort distance up Fulton Road. On up, to turn from Malvern Street up to the left onto Islay Street, (Beyond 4km mark on map) upon which, in a sunny spot, we stopped for lunch, just above the road connecting across to Fulton Road. Ian and Lex recalled calling the three roads the steepy (Fulton), the toppy (Islay) and the greeny (the connecting less-used road, now (surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly) closed.

Lunch

Lunch on a bank in the sun on Islay Street.

At the top, opposite Lex’s childhood house we went over to the former plantation road (nr 5km mark on map) that led to the start of the McGoun Track and stopped to view the stone cairn 1996 Tannock memorial. Further on and up until we reached the top of the (comparatively) recent set of mountain bike tracks (2/3 of way to the 6km mark). These we took, zig-zagging down to reach the large car-park at the end of Wakari Road. (7m mark) It was here that one or two of our party of 17 elected to take a short cut down to the cars while Lex took the rest of us along Wakari Road, past the end of Polewarth Road to turn down Joshua Place (a bit before the 8km mark) and from the along to a track that led us back to Polewarth Road. This we turned down heading for Burma Road at its other end, until called back by some at the rear who had noticed a dog worrying a flock of sheep in a paddock. We cell-phoned the DCC to inform them of such, along with the dog’s registered number. – Good deed for the day. Then on down Polewarth Rd to join the Burma Rd (abt 9km mark) and along it back to the cars. Thanks to Lex and Fred for yet a further novel changed route – and the chocs! – Ian.

20. 24/10/2012. Hikers, Ross Creek. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

19. 30/5/2012. Hikers. Wakari Road. Cycle Tracks etc. Ross Creek. Leaders: Lex, Jill.

18. 25/5/2011. Hikers. Ross Creek area. E. Leaders: Lex, Molly
17. 21/7/2010. Hikers. Ross Creek area. New track. E. Leaders: Lex, Graham
16. 26/3/2008. Hikers. Ross Creek. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Jean.
In Ross Creek

In Ross Creek

As we’ve come to expect, Wed. was fine and 15 happy hikers parked by the Meter House, near the corner of Wakari & Burma Rds, ready to set off on the Ross Creek area and tracks.

Lex was our leader, and as he lived in that region from childhood he is very knowledgeable about the territory, which makes a popular walk even more interesting. We did various tracks through the lovely bush, stopping every now and then for Lex to tell us about some trees that had been planted and trialled, or other things of interest about that part. It was lovely to hear so many birds whistling and singing cheerily all round us. So often these days one is very disappointed at the lack of birdsong in a region where once you would have heard them. We arrived at Prospect Park

Lunch at Prospect Park

Lunch at Prospect Park

View from the Bullock Track

View from the Bullock Track

via bush and road and relaxed and soaked up the sun while enjoying our lunch. Then it was off down the Bullock Track to the lovely little trail along the Leith Stream through the old Woodhaugh Quarry area. From there it was back up one of the bush tracks to the cars. A lovely pleasant day out, as usual. – Bev Harvey

15. 26/3/2008 Leaders: Lex, Jean A

14. 14/11/2007 Trampers. Woodhaugh, Ross Creek, Davies, Flagstaff Track, Pineapple, Ross Creek return.

13. 21/2/2007. Hikers. Ross Creek, McGouns Track. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Dot B.
12. 14/7/2006. Ross Creek Reserve – Woodhaugh. Leaders: Doreen, Rosemary and Jack.
11. 28/9/2005. Hikers. Ross Creek. Leaders: Betty B, Nelson T
10. 13/10/2004 Ross Creek, Burma Road. Leaders: Lex, Doug M, Margaret D

Tree canopy

9. 2/10/2002. Combined. Ross Creek, Burma Road. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Doug M, Evelyn C.

8. 1/10/2001. Alt. Ross Creek – Cannington Road. Leaders: Joan H, Jean, Peggy M.
7. 18/4/2001. Ross Creek. Leaders: Bev and Ivan, Peggy M.
6. 24/11/1999. Ross Creek area. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Jean.
5. 8/9/1999. Rose Creek Reserve. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Jean.
4. 29/7/1998. Ross Creek, John McGlashan. Leaders: Ivan and Rosemary.
3. 19/11/1997. Ross Creek, School Creek from McGlashan College. Leaders: Bev and Ivan.
2. 7/8/1991. Ross Creek area from John McGlashan College. Easy. Leaders: Nel, Margaret B, Ivan, Margaret D.
1. 13/6/1990. Ross Creek and School Creek from John McGlashan College. Easy. Leaders: Margaret S, Joan, Jean and Jack.

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Oct 31 2018

Hermits Cave Silver Peaks Rocky Ridge Tramps

Published by under Trampers

Distance from car park: 41 km.
Click Silver Peaks Forest for background information on the area.

8. 31/10/2018. Trampers. Hermits Cave. Leader: Arthur.

The day dawned fine, with a smidgen of frost to sharpen the air. We had sunshine all day, with a few clouds and light winds at times – perfect conditions for our excursion into the Silver Peaks.

Leaving Mosgiel at 8.30 a.m., we began our tramp from the car park on Mountain Road at 9.20 a.m.

Smoko was trackside in the sunshine. Past Green Hut (site), up, along, and up, up, with an occasional brief rest/regrouping stop.

Approaching Pulpit Rock,

Heading to Pulpit Rock. (Gordon pic and caption.)

weed-eaters/chainsaws could be heard to our left. We soon spotted some of the Green Hut Track Clearing Group hard at work down on Long Ridge. You work is greatly appreciated chaps!

Several of our group took the opportunity to climb Pulpit Rock

Happy mountaineering trampers. (Gordon pic and caption.)

before we moved on.

Ready to move on. (Gordon pic and caption.)

The Pinnacle Rock pointed our way onto the Rocky Ridge, where the track was rough but easy to follow.

We stopped a half kilometre short, on a rocky knob to have lunch in the sunshine, while enjoying the terrific views. It was really special to be there!

While the others finished their lunch, the leader recced ahead to the Hermits Cave. The rest followed …

Hermit cave on the horizon. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… to inspect it and to make an entry in the Visitors Book. (The previous entry was back in July.)

Leaving Hermit Cave. (Gordon pic and caption.)

At 1.30 p.m. the return journey began. An occasional brief rest/regrouping stop was made, and eventually a happy but a little tired, group of Trampers ended. Their tramp ended  back at the cars at 4 p.m.

All had enjoyed their venture into the Silver Peaks, and the weather had suited us to perfection, couldn’t have been a better one.

There was a large variety of birdlife to be seen and heard today – two got a brief glimpse of a N.Z. Falcon along Rocky Ridge, and a Fern Bird flew across in front of us in the vicinity of Green Hill.

The “distance-meters” couldn’t agree, and ranged from 17 to 20 km for our day. Take your pick. An average of 4 k.p.h. was maintained by our group of 11.

We were back in Mosgiel before 5 p.m. and what a wonderful day it had been.

Thanks to all. – Art.

7. 22/2/2017. Trampers. Hermits Cave. Leader: Arthur.

7 keen trampers set out for a trip in to the Silverpeaks, leaving the cars on Mountain Road at 9.25 p.m.

The weather was perfect for the inward tramp, overcast with a slightly southwest breeze to keep the temperature down.

After 40 minutes we stopped for morning tea. Past Green Hut site we climbed through the bush before emerging into the open. Good views in all directions, upward, and then stopped briefly to admire Pulpit Rock.

pulpit. (Helen pic and caption.)

A little further and we turned on to the Rocky Ridge track. At 12.15 p.m. we were on the track just above the Hermits Cave, the leader descending to find A cave, but not the Hermits Cave he remembered!

No one else was keen after watching him toiling back up to the track, so there was nothing for it but to have our lunch.

All sat and enjoyed the view – what a great spot it was. We could see the “Devils Staircase” leading down to Jubilee Hut also visible.

Lunch above Hermits cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

Looking down to cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

As we prepared to leave, a fine drizzle arrived and cloud was forming immediately to the east of Rocky Ridge. Coats on, and in a few minutes it was raining. Within minutes all the trackside vegetation was wet for us to walk through, the breeze changing to easterly with it.

By the time we got back to Pulpit Rock we were completely surrounded by cloud – the Pulpit Rock loomed rather eerily through the mist as we passed.

The rain had eased by the time we were back down to Green Hut, and after an occasional brief rest stop, we were back at the cars in the mist at  3.05 p.m.

We had made good time all day, both going in and coming back. Keith recorded the distance at 16.6 km for the trip.

A recovery time was taken at Blueskin Bay on the way home. We found Dunedin and the Taieri bathed in sunshine – but we had been in a different world! – Art.

6. 19/9/2012. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Green Hut, Pulpit Rock.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.
18km 5hrs 34 moving time, stopped for 1hr 39min.
Total ascent 1051 mtrs. max elevation 754mtrs.
moving ave speed 3.2km/hr.
Mountain Road wasn’t bad, except for one deep corrugation.
And apart from the odd slushy patches on the track, its surface was largely dry with good grip. The weather was good but a strong breeze blustered us at exposed spots on the top ridges.
Seven of us went in, and seven came out, but it was a long day and the last 5 km out were a weary plod.
One of us developed an excruciating cramp on several occasions, necessitating quite a wee wait each time for the pain to recede.
A long day but not bad for a group including 3 in their 80s. – Ian.

Hermit’s Cave Bivvy. Pam’s proof positive for hubby.

Hermit’s Cave Bivvy. Pam insisted on Ian being in the pic too.

5. 23/2/2011. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Green Hut, Pulpit Rock.
 As the first track entrance sign round High Top has been removed, it is as well that the worst road holes beyond have been roughly filled to make the route in to the second entrace navigable.
The track in to the new sign shown below is just impossibly bad in wet weather. It has to be the most slippery and dangerous to be found anywhere. Apart from the Swampy Ridge Track indicated below, side track signs are now no longer there.)

The new sign at the foot of Green Ridge. No longer able to be rested upon!

New track sign opposite Possum Hut track turn-off. But no longer any indication of such.

Track sign by Pulpit Rock. No mention of Long Ridge.

Rocky Ridge ahead as we emerged from alongside Silver Peak No. 3.

The new Jubilee Hut (and out-house) clearly seen from Rocky Ridge.

Hermits Cave rather obscured by flax.

The roomy interior of the cave.

The small bivouac on the track right opposite Hermit’s Cave. Many going past don’t think to look down the hill to see the much roomier famous bivvy.

4. 11/10/2006. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Green Hut, Pulpit Rock. Leaders: Doug M, George
Claude, Ian, Doug, Lex Ria? Arthur, Evelyn

Claude, Ian, Doug, Lex Ria? Arthur, Evelyn

Jubilee

3. 26/11/2003. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Big Stream, Mount Allan. Hard. Leaders; George, Hazel.
Just past Poplar Hut turn-off. George, Doug J, Bob, Doug M, Hazel

Just past Poplar Hut turn-off. George, Doug J, Bob, Doug M, Hazel

Descending to Hermits Cave from off track. George, Arthur, Doug

Descending to Hermits Cave from off track. George, Arthur, Doug

Nearing cave. George, Arthur, Doug.

Nearing cave. George, Arthur, Doug.

Art and Doug

Arthur & Doug J at Cave

geo

George and Arthur at Cave

2. 29/1/2003. Trampers. Greeen Hut, Rocky Ridge, Hermits Cave. Hard. Leaders: George, Claude, Wendy.
Cave

Bob, Lex, Wendy, Ian, Doug M, Who?, Arthur

1. 9/3/1994 Hermits Cave, Silverpeaks. 3 alternative stages – long, medium, short. Leaders: George, Doug J, Jean A, Eleanor

 

The hermit.
An account by a long-standing OTMC member.
Nice guy. Working for L T Martins in fancy furniture. Small. Some hang-ups. Disagreement. Found out not to be a partner. “Little Ross” Adamson. Disappeared. Went all round South Island. Seen in a few different places.  Seen peering through window at Jubilee Hut. Caught some sheep. “Big Ross” Lake, a friend, and another male sought out Little Ross (with the knowledge of the police) and persuaded him to come out after two years. Police lenient. Lived normal life. Married. Children.

Another account. A leading light of the OTMC. Missing for 2 years. All over South Island. Silver Peaks for only the latter six months. Police brought him in when he started killing sheep. Account agrees it was indeed Jubilee Hut, not Green Hut as is commonly supposed, where he was seen.

A further comment by another: A little man – had a swelling on the side of his face which embarrassed him.  Quite withdrawn but had a great sense of humour when you got to know him.  An excellent bushman and a good teacher and leader in the hills. In the late sixties he worked for Valley Industries as a sheet metal worker and lived in a flat in (I think) Heriot Row – lived alone.  Lots of stories about his history.

 

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Oct 24 2018

Woodside Glen, plus to top of Maungatuas

Published by under Trampers,Year round

No. 30 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Woodside Glen to Maungatuas. E Blackburn, D McEwan. Summer”

Short and long options.

(Maungatua climb fairly steep. 5-7 hours. Heavy tussock on top.  Route only. Manager: DOC.)

11. 24/10/2018. Trampers.Woodside Glen to Maungatua. H. Leaders: Gordon and Art.

13 determined trampers left their cars at Woodside Glen, to begin their tramp.

Ready to cross. Gordon pic and caption.)

Once across the Lee Creek it was uphill all the way until we reached the tussock.

Other than a short distance at the bottom, the track was good and dry, and non slippery. We were in light bush, with some large and obviously very old Broadleaf trees to be seen. Mahoe (white wood) were there in abundance, and many other species.
A level area beside the track at the appropriate time was the smoko stop.

Onward, the track was ever upward, and the perspiration flowed freely. A couple of steeper and trickier bits were safely negotiated,

The last steep pinch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and in due course we all reached the first viewing point above the bush -and where the tussock began. Two of the group elected to wait here for our return.

Into the tussock now,

Traversing tussock country before the gale got up. (Phil pic and caption.)

the height of which reduces with altitude. We lost 5 more at the next rocky knob.

Lords and ladies surveying their domain…. (Phil pic and caption.) [[Ed: N.B. Not necessarily among the “lost 5”]

The remaining 6 trampers carried on for another 20 minutes before eating their lunch (10 minutes early) in the shelter of a rocky knob, with great views out over the Taieri Plain, and far away.

Last stop.Lunch & great views. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Shelter was absolutely necessary as it was quite windy up here.

Frequent clouds of pollen could be seen being blown out of the native bush, down in the Lee Creek area. Lots of pollen around this year.
As we packed up to begin the return, the wind was rising, becoming very strong and blustery. Hold onto your hat weather. At least one hat got blown away, but safely retrieved. It had cooled down too.
A fast return was made down through the beautiful tussock, which was waving in the wind.
Once back in the shelter of the bush the temperature rose notably, a bit hot in fact. Several clumps of the lovely white clematis could be seen as we reached the bush line.
Down, down, down now, all the way. We met two chaps coming up with a large number of dogs, out for exercise. Birdsong was heard all day in the bush and I heard my first Shining Cuckoo of the season.
No one was wasting any time for the descent, and the whole team were back together by the time we crossed Lee Creek again. It ended up a shorter day as we were back at the cars at 1-35.
A refreshment stop was made back in Outram.
Thanks to all. – Art.
10. 28/9/2016. Trampers. Woodside Glen to Maungatua. H. Leader: Arthur H.
Good weather had been ordered for this tramp, and it was delivered. The sky was partly cloudy with some wind from the west. (Down at Outram it was a northeaster.
Six trampers left Mosgiel with high expectations for the day’s adventure. We parked our cars at Woodside Glen, starting from there at 9.25 a.m. Only ten minutes or so brought us to Lee Creek which was a little tricky to cross. I think all made it with dry feet.
The work then began. It is a relentless climb upward through the bush, broken only very briefly by following an old water race. We had a good rest period at morning tea time though.
As the bush thinned out, a patch of low cloud was flowing down the gully to our right – coming in almost from the southwest. It didn’t affect us and soon cleared.
The track up through the bush was good and dry, thankfully, but would have been very slippery if wet.
The upper track had been well cleared as far as a rocky knob where the tussock began. We reached this position at 11.00 a.m., which was a good effort.

The westerly wind was cold here, but a brief stop to admire the view was made.

View of Saddle Hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

View of Saddle Hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

We were up in the tussock now (great) where the track is not well defined. Taking our time, as some found the tussock was a little slippery underfoot, we continued up the eastern spur of Maungatua.

A few minutes before 12 noon we reached a hugh knob from where the view was magnificent. This was our lunch spot…

Lunch Spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch Spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and in Antony Hamel’s book is marked as being at an altitude of 686 metres. (See his map on page 9.05).

The sky was rather hazy, with cloud down on the hills to the north and northeast – on Swampy, for example. But the climb had been well worth it for the view nevertheless.

Outram in distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

Outram in distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

No wind spoiled our lunch, which was quite a leisurely affair, stretching out to 45 minutes in fact – but don’t tell Neil! He would be horrified if he knew!
We began our return, taking care in the downhill slippery tussock. The trouble was that vegetation overhung the little used track and one could not see where one was putting one’s feet.

Out of the tussock and down…

Down, down and more down. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down, down and more down. (Helen pic and caption.)

…into the bush, where there are two or three difficult patches – not to be rushed.

Eventually we reached the creek, crossed without incident, and were back at the cars at 2.45.
The outward journey had been 2.25 hours moving, and a neat 2 hours returning. Distance? – From the map, an estimate of 7 km is all I can come up with.
The mandatory debriefing took place in Outram. All were enthusiastic about the day’s tramp and wanted it to be on our list of ones to do again in the future.
There is something special about being out in the tussock.
9. 23/10/2013. Hikers. Woodside area. Easy. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

Woodside Route

Woodside GPS of Route. 10.5km in all. (GPS recording started rather belatedly.)

We started from the West Taieri Cemetery and walked directly down Woodside Road to the intersection at the old Store and Post Office building, where we stopped for morning tea on an inviting lawn.

We then turned left and walked down McDonald Road past the grand Beardsmore property gates …

Gate

Gate

.. till we made a right turn up Mann Rd (3 km on route map) before returning the way we had come back to the old store corner.

Now a different route was to go left up Berwick Rd, right onto Helvellyn St and to almost complete the circumnavigation of the block, right again down Crossfeld St to then go left up Ravensburn Rd and finally left again via Mountain Rd into Woodside Glen. We entered the walking track alongside the Lee Creek (name?), finding it rather dangerously narrowed in places by slips, to discover it connecting with a newer, wider track further up which led eventually down to the Maungatua tops track stream crossing, where we lunched.  (6 km on route map). Three of our group ventured to rock-hop across the stream to lunch on the far side,…

Lunching across the stream.

Lunching across the stream.

… the rest judging the nearer side a safer spot.

Our return route to the Glen was by the safer new track which we found kept further up and more safely around the ridge (but made less  interesting by its divorce  from the stream) before descending to the Glen.

Here we met the group supporting blind trampers, who were just about to set off up the track, with much happy greeting exchanges. We went back out along Mountain Rd, down Ravensburn Rd to the old store again, to return back up Woodside Road to the cars.

Obviously a Woodside Glen walk needs a lot of road walk to fill out a decent day. Thanks to Barbara and Arthur for planning this well filling the day with much interest.  – Ian.

8. 30/4/2008. Hikers. Woodside Glen. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M.

7. 16/4/2008. Traquair/Whare Creek Track & Woodside Glen.

Viewing Traquair Creek

Viewing Traquair Creek

With inclement weather threatening the joy of a beach walk (Purakanui and Canoe beaches) and only 2 hikers along with 2 leaders, a decision was made to seek dry bush cover instead, and so we headed for the recently-upgraded Outram Glen walk. Neil B. diverted us however to a nearby track he had lately helped to clear  – the Whare (or Traquair) Creek track – starting at the Historical Museum. This turned out to be a great delight as it echoed with bird song and followed a dry-clad, benched course through both native and deciduous trees beside still waters and sometimes beside falling waters over large, mossy boulders.

Neil was an informative guide too, giving us the history of the track, showing us the site of the first flourmill in the country and noting features such as an underground water source, a high, man-made retaining wall, and origins of one of the first reticulated water supplies. We had morning tea back at the Museum and rewarded Neil for his services with freshly-picked mushrooms. We then proceeded to an ‘urban crawl’ through the streets of Outram, with a particular focus on new, spec houses. A decision to lunch at the West Taieri cemetery was thwarted by our driver whose momentum carried us on to Woodside Glen where we were

Lunching by Lee Stream

Lunching by Lee Stream

led up a different creek (Lee Creek) without a paddle, and took lunch beside the stream where the track crosses it. A nice spot indeed. Neil then took us on a ‘conducted tour’ of the once-thriving metropolis of Woodside, noting old shops, churches,

 

 

Old church?

Old church?

school and houses from one of which 2 sisters daily used to bike to the railway station and catch the train to Factory Road and thence to Mosgiel Woollen Mill to work. How times have changed!! So, we didn’t get to the beach or the river or the cemetery, but we did enjoy our varied walk. – Bob

6. 11/7/2007. Hikers. Woodside Glen. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M
5. 8/8/2001. Alt. Woodside Glen. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Mary Y.
4. 20/1/1999. Woodside Glen. Leaders: Joyce, Bev S, Les S.
3. 16/9/1998 Trampers. Woodside Glen to top of Maungatuas. Leaders: Bill H, Graham
2. 20/11/1996. Trampers. Woodside Glen to top of Maungatuas. Leaders: Jack R, George, Eleanor
1. 22/4/1992. Trampers. Woodside Glen Bush track leading to Maungtuas. Average+. Leaders: Bob H, Jack R, Doug & Ngaire
16 km from car park.

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Oct 17 2018

Craiglowan Falls

Published by under Trampers,Year round

9. 17/10/2018. Trampers. Steve Amies – Craig Lowan Falls. M. Dave.

13 keen trampers left their cars not far from the Whare flat school house and started on the Tunnel track.

Starting out on Tunnel track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

This track was fairly flat and one couldn’t help but marvel at the amount of work done by the early water race workers. After reaching McRaes Weir we turned up a somewhat steep track

Heading up to Steve Amies track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to reach the Steve Amies ridge.  The climb along the ridge was very pleasant, with manukas/kanukas dominant, with lush green undergrowth.
We stopped at the memorial Bryan Freeman seat – he used to be a good friend of Eleanor and her late husband.

The Bryan Freeman memorial seat- a good place for a break. (Dave pic and caption.)

Near the top of the track it was obvious the amount of tree planting and track maintenance that Steve Amies and his mates did many years ago.
We then walked down Rollinsons Road and entered the bush that leads to the Whare lake loop track.  It was in this area that a vote of thanks was passed to Arthur and Neil for the obvious work on track maintenance that they continually do (you no longer get your boots wet)!!!

Neil & Arthur’s Bridge. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After having lunch on Smithys’ track it was then down through the bush and back onto Rollinsons road. Round the corner and off the flagstaff – whare flat road we followed an un-named track through scrub up to a pine plantation on a ridge.  On the sides of the ridge were sycamore trees – a pest – but a pretty sight as the trees were coming into leaf. This improved track lead along the ridge finally ending high above McQuilkan’s creek.  Everyone talk care descending steeply down to the creek.
5 minutes up the creek we were at the Craig – Lowen falls – quite a sight!

Craig Lowen Falls. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Another half an hour down the streamwe were out in the open and back to the cars.

We covered 21,319 steps, 15.9km in 5.5hrs and gained a net height of 349 metres.
A good round trip!  Dave

8. 24/9/2014. Trampers. Craiglowan Falls. M.
Enter via MacQuilkin Road up from Whare Flat Schoolhouse.
Craiglowan route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Craiglowan-Bullring-Aquaduct. We walked 15km; ave 4.3km/h; moving time 3 h 30m; climbed 531m.

This week’s tramp was to Craiglowan Falls. We started off at the locked gate on McQuilkans Rd & followed the marked track across numerous creek crossings [where one member got her feet wet at the first crossing] & up over the large rocks just before reaching the falls. We had morning tea break in the bush above the falls, & then retraced our steps for a short distance back to where a side track led off up the LH side of the stream. (Ed note: This was our original, and only, route down to the falls.) We were not sure where this went, but decided to investigate it anyway, as it looked like it had just had some work done on it. I climbed steeply up until we came to some pine forest, & at this stage I was quite sure that it would come out on the Whare Flat-Flagstaff Rd via Sanitarium Rd, which proved to be correct.
At this time it was only about 11:30, so we decided to walk up to the Bull Ring, & go down Longridge Rd to join up with Smeatons Rd,[where stopped for lunch] …
Lunch on Smeatons Rd - Ken pic and caption.

Lunch on Smeatons Rd – Ken pic and caption.

… – McIntyres Rd, [so we could view the remains of Smeatons shack] then down to the Aquaduct. This proved to be more difficult then would seem, as there were a lot of big trees down over the track in places, which made it necessary to detour around them. From the Aquaduct, we walked around to join up with McIntyres Rd. again, & then crossing straight over here onto the next part of the track leading to Longridge Rd. then back to the car.
Some of the tracks were quite muddy & slippery, but all made it safely back, & enjoyed the day. it was new territory for some in the group, & for others it had been a long time since they were there.
7. 30/5/2012. Trampers. Falls, Goat Point, Smeatons Shack, Aqueduct, Longridge Road.
We reached the Falls OK, but stream crossing on wet rocks and climbing over mossy rocks proved rather dicey. (Note: This tramp best done in summer.)

Craiglowan Falls. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning Tea at Craiglowan Falls (Ken pic and caption)

A cautious descent on way back down over large mossy rocks.

Well, to this point, so far, so good. Back at the stream crossing down below the confluence, we failed  to locate the track up to Goat Point, despite knowing its general area. So we climbed in faith and hope. Finally we came across track markers, leading left and right. After exploring left, we went right, until they led relentlessly down. So we retraced back up because Ian had it fixed in his mind that we had to go up to reach the pine plantation. Mistake one.

Encouragingly however, Ken found a track indication on his GPS, and it did promise to reach a forest road. So we kept to this, despite no track appearing, only plenty of scratchy blackberry brambles. But we did reach the road, finally.

This we walked down until we reached a junction, with signs indicating that we were on Smeatons Road, crossed by McIntyre road. Hooray. McIntyre was what we had originally wanted. Ian felt we still had to go down so we turned left and down McIntyre road. Mistake two. We should have taken McIntyre road to the right. More of that later.

Anyway we made the long walk down McIntyre Road, left, to where the race crosses it, and turned right, along the race to lunch, as planned, at the Aqueduct.

Linzi at lunch.

Now, have a look at Ken’s GPS of our route. Click to enlarge. Start at the top, and follow to the right to reach Craiglowan Falls at the extreme right.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Start returning to the left a bit. The zigzag you see is where we starting climbing away from the stream. A further zigzag a little further along is where we started following the track markers. The little tail to the left there, is where we turned back, before going back up again. CRITICAL MISTAKE. Notice, however,  the short gap beyond to a tail coming up from below. This is the gap we should have traversed.

Now turn to page 8.07 of Antony Hamel’s Tracks and Trails, and find on the map of Flagstaff Forest at the top right, the circled number “seven”. See how it ascends first before turning right along a contour, below Goat Point and then DOWN to meet McIntyre road at its other end next to Smeatons Shack.

That tail from below is where Ken and Ian climbed up at lunch time to check where we should have come down. And lo and behold, we found not only Smeatons Shack but also the marked track next to it where we should have exited from. An aha moment. And it all became clear, as the GPS map confirms.
Ken and I returned back down the end of McIntyre Road to find the others had left, leaving Doug waiting for us. Of course we should have consulted with everyone to get mutual agreement with what we proposed to do and to arrange a meeting place should the others proposed not to wait. But in our excitement at solving the mystery, we had neglected to do so.
Anyway, going on out to the bottom of McIntyre Road at its other end, we didn’t know whether the others had simply turned down there and back along Long Ridge Road to the cars, or carried on along the race. In the absence of any indication, we set off along the race, as that had been the original intention of the tramp. We were relieved to catch up on them enough to see them further beyond us, but stopping to don parkas as the drizzling rain got heavier, lost sight of them again.
Emerging from the race end further up Long Ridge Road, we saw them again rounding a corner further down and caught up on them at the gate at the end. So all was well that ended well.
Quite an adventure and some interesting unplanned bush-bashing. A lesson in how bush conditions can change over two years and a reminder that our smaller numbers means that all our tramps now amount to a recce, – unlike the hikers, whose “reconnoiterers”  go through our experience and sort things out first. – Ian
6. 10/2/2010. Trampers. Falls, Goat Point, Smeaton Shack, Aquaduct, Longridge Road. Leaders: Ian, Sabina.
Down Whare Flat Road 1.5 km. Sanatorium Road second on left after Bullring. – Track no longer locatable from top by us.
It all got a bit complicated. First the leaders failed to find the track down from the Sanatorium Road extension track. Many, many fallen trees had obliterated all trace of the track where it first descends steeply down. Well, the leaders couldn’t find it anyway.
However the start of a new track closer in from the gate had been pointed out by a local landowner so that was followed on the day.
It was fairly well cleared but markers petered out down the middle of a steep bouldery stream (the McQuilkin way upstream from the falls?) so after a morning tea rest, we prudently retreated back up and began all over again, this time back at the old school-house. Up McQuilkin Road. Right-fork into bush and across the McQuilkin on a wire hand-hold. On up and eventually back across to the true right and to the stream junction. Interesting notice points to “Watar fall”. Up over the large rocks and now it was lunch-time at the falls.

Ken, Doug and George before Craiglowan Falls

Lunch at Craiglowan Falls. George, Ria, Hazel (hidden), Sabina, Ian, Doug. (Ken pic)

Back down and across to the true left but now up steeply to Goats Point. Across through the bush and down to Smeatons Shack on McIntyre Road.

Smeatons Shack. Ian, George. (Ken pic)

Down the road , down the track to emerge on the cleanly excavated concrete access race near the aqueduct. (Thanks, track clearers.)

Artistic shot through race gate. Doug, Ria, Ian. (Ken pic)

Rusted up flow meter. Ian. (Ken pic)

Aqueduct top. (Ken pic)

Aqueduct. Collapse section showing. Stone pillar. Ian, Doug, Ria, George. (Ken pic)

Then following out along the race to the other end of McIntyre Road, and across it to the far end of the race where the track comes out on Longridge Road. Down the road and back to the cars. What could have been a very short day comfortably filled out to be more satisfyingly longer. Must ask those landowners how that other track gets you to the falls. And must check out whether the old track is still navigable. – Ian
5. 3/8/2005. Both. School House, Craiglowan Falls, – Whare Flat. Leaders: Judy, Jacqui, Hazel
4. 6/8/2003. Both. Craiglowan Falls. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Hazel, Barbara L, Mary M.
3. 19/7/2003. Craiglowan Falls.
Craiglowan Falls

Craiglowan Falls

Craiglowan Falls. Ian

Craiglowan Falls. Ian

Upstream from top of Craiglowan Falls.

Upstream from top of Craiglowan Falls.

Overlooking top of Craiglowan Falls.

Overlooking top of Craiglowan Falls.

Old Aquaduct. Doug.

Old Aqueduct. Doug.

Top of old aquaduct.

Top of old aqueduct.

2. 30/8/2000 Craiglowan Falls, Whare Flat. Leaders: Mavis, Winifred, Val
1. 16/4/1997. Craig Lowan Falls from Bull Ring. Leaders:Hugh, Val, Judy C

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Oct 10 2018

Greengage Track

Published by under Trampers

3. 10/10/2018. Trampers. Greengage Circuit. Leaders: Arthur and Gordon.

Daylight arrived with a warm norwest breeze and a bright sky – but the forecast was not good.

Nine energetic trampers ceparted the car park at 8.30 a.m. for an early start. Passing through the locked gate on Rollinsons Road, we parked at the ‘elbow’ and began our tramp from there.

Going down the Rainguage Track for half an hour took us to the start of the Greengage Track, which we followed. Getting ever steeper took us to the stream …

Hiking down into Silverstream. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… at the bottom, which we crossed – this being part of the Silverstream.

Now for the best part of the day. We had a 30 metre rope

Waiting to climb out of S:stream. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to assist our climb out of the stream bed. The reward at the top was the smoko stop.

Waiting their turn on the rope. (Gordon pic and caption.)

From here it was the long climb up onto, …

Nearly there. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… and to the top of Green Ridge. It was rather tough going at first but the grade eased as we progress upward.

Heading up to Silver Peaks Track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Around 11.30 a.m. low cloud descended, with dampness in the air. Near the top of Green Ridge, a lunch halt was called in a cosy sheltered place.

A much needed lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After the welcome food and rest, it was only a few more minutes to the main Sliver Peaks Track. After the track we had been on, it was like a highway!

Turning right, (we turned right at every junction we came to today, except the first and the last ones), we followed it to “Sleepy Hollow“. After a brief rest stop, we were now on the Swampy Ridge Track, which had about 1 km of very muddy track to contend with.

By the time we reached Rollinsons Track, the rain was falling.

A little over half an hour would have us back at the cars, bu we were exposed, and out in the open now. It got colder too, and flurries of snowflakes were observed.

All arrived back at the cars in good condition and in a happy frame of mind. Warm but damp to some degree thoughts turned to home and hot showers, etc.

We had tramped about 15 km, in mostly good conditions, and with a very worthwhile tramp to our credit. Thanks to all. – Art.

2. 20/1/2016. Trampers. Greengage Track, anti-clockwise.
Ten hardy souls set off from sunny Mosgiel for a hard tramp. Travelled up past the scout camp and up to Rollinsons road where we parked our cars.
Within the first 10 mins on the Rollinsons track, some of us had wet feet. One can see why they call this area swampy. Lovely views as we went along our way.

Lovely views. (Helen pic)

Lovely views. (Helen pic)

Alas the fog came in and we could not see much. It was nice and warm though. Walked over swampy summit tramp.

Swampy Track. (Helen pic)

Swampy Track. (Helen pic)

Across to Green Hut? (Helen pic)

Across to Green Hut? (Helen pic)

Morning tea stop was about 5 mins from the Green hut.

Morning Tea Stop (Helen pic)

Morning Tea Stop (Helen pic)

Went onto the Green Hut track then Greengage track.  This track not used a lot.

Track not used a lot. (Helen pic)

Track not used a lot. (Helen pic)

Lunch on this track. Carried along then onto Raingage track and back up to the cars. Lots of quite hard walking up and down slippery hills. A few of us did some bum sliding in patches. Abseiling down about 20 meters and crossing a creek were part of our day. A few stiff bodies as we finished the walk.  Lovely to have our search and rescue team Dermot and Fin the dog with us.

Fin, the dog. (Helen pic)

Fin, the dog. (Helen pic)

A hard tramp but was very enjoyable. – Helen

1. 27/8/2014. Greengage Track.

Greengage Tramp. GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Greengage Tramp. GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 12.5 km; moving time 3 hrs 45 mins; Ave 3.3 km/hr; Climbed 780 mtrs. [That’s getting close to 1 km straight up !!]

On what turned out to be a very nice day for tramping, 4 of us set out to do a tramp on a newly opened track, namely Greengage track. This runs from Rain Gauge Spur track, over to Green Ridge track.
Having cajoled a key from the DCC for the locked gate on Rollinsons Rd. we parked up at the elbow, & made our way over to Raingauge Spur track. Then it was quite a lengthy walk down here, for about 3/4 hr [ including a morning tea stop] from the car before we got to the turn off onto Greengage track. As nobody had done this tramp before, we were all looking forward to it, but didn’t realise just how hard it would be. The track is quite steep, & drops all the way down into the valley, where you cross a stream [ part of the Silverstream headwaters] & clamber out the other side with the help of a rope, which has been thoughtfully put there. From here it is a steep climb nearly all the way up to Green Ridge track, where we arrived about 12:30, & then we walked along the short distance to the Green Hut site, where we had lunch, & a well deserved break.

Lunch stop at Green Hut site. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop at Green Hut site. (Ken pic and caption)

The return journey was supposed to retrace our steps, but I couldn’t face the prospect of climbing all the way back down into the valley, & then climbing all the way back up to the car, I put it to the others that we could take an easier way out via Green Ridge track, & then onto the Swampy Ridge track, then along Rollinsons Track back to the car, this was accepted without protest.
So after lunch we set off again, & turning onto the Swampy Ridge track, we soon discovered why it is called “Swampy” , as there were lots & lots of very wet muddy stretches, which were ankle deep in places. We eventually found the entrance to Rollinsons Track, & made our way cautiously along the first part of this, as markers were conspicuous by their absence. The last half was well marked, & the climb out to the car, up the very wet track [running water] was useful for cleaning our boots !!
This tramp is not recommended for unfit persons !! I was suitably shattered when we arrived back at the car. – Ken.

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Oct 10 2018

Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip

Published by under Trampers,Year round

click to enlarge
Cloud Forest and Escarpment

Map: Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Telegraph (Old Bridal) track to Pigeon Flat, Escarpment Track, Cowan Rd, Short Cut to Fox Rd, down to Sullivans Dam

8. 10/10/2018. Sullivans Dam. Cloud Forest, Transmission Line. Return. M. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.

Morning tea at Sullivan’s Dam. (Clive pic and caption.)

Up through the trees. (1) (Clive pic and caption.)

Up through the trees. (2) (Clive pic and caption.)

At the top before the rain set in. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch sheltering from the rain. (Clive pic and caption.)

7. 20/7/2016. Hikers. Sullivans Dam. Cloud Forest, Transmission Line, Round trip to Lookout and Leith Saddle. Return. M. Leaders: Pam, Ian.
22 Hikers turned up. 14 went to Transmission line, 11 did ‘Leith loop’ (a first for us). – Ian.
View of some of the stepping stone steps.

Some of the multiple ‘stepping stone’ steps – on one of the easier gradients. [Ed: Have seen such nowhere else.]

Lunch at Transmission line.

Lunch at Transmission line at top of Cloud Forest track.

Bluesman Bay view from Transmission Line lunch spot. (Adrienne pic.)

Blueskin Bay view from Transmission Line lunch spot. (Adrienne pic.)

Dunedin view from lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Dunedin view from lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Dam view from where? - Lookout? (Adrienne pic.)

Sullivan’s Dam view from  Lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Ends of track down from Lookout, on Leith Saddle end of Pigeon Flat Road. (Adrienne pic.)

Ends of track down from the Lookout Loop, on Leith Saddle end of Pigeon Flat Road. (Adrienne pic.)

6. 9/3/2011. Trampers. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip.

Pines up ahead, through which and around we have to go.

At the foot of a rocky bluff we had to climb around.

On the top of the bluff. (Apologies for badly aimed shot.)

It was an great tramp. Some challenges, like having to crawl on knees over the huge rocks, crawling under some gigantic fallen trees, going through bush so dense that we couldn’t see the ground, pushing our way through gorse and holding on to trees to swing through a few muddy patches. A couple of times there was some discussion on which way to go, but with our two awesome experienced leaders, Ian and Doug, we were soon headed in the correct direction.
A small problem for the ladies was some cattle in a paddock we had to go through, first Dawn was too nervous to move when the beasts started coming towards her, but Ian assured her they were only curious.   After waiting for Pam and Jill to appear, Ian decided to investigate, so he climbed back through the fence and went back up the paddock to find two more ladies nervous of the cattle.  He confidently escorted them down the rest of the way.
The tramp took 6 hours but didn’t seem that long with great company and the best escorts, it was a wonderful experience and I look forward to many more. – Dawn.

It was disappointing to find much of the Escarpment Track so overgrown. It had evidently not been tramped very often lately.

But thanks to those who have looked after the short-cut from Cowan Road through the trees down to Fox Road, and further on, to those who had trimmed back the gorse from the track down through the regenerating forestry. – Ian.

(5.) 12/8/2009 Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip. CANCELLED. BAD WEATHER. Leaders: Bill, Doug.

The following photos taken on RECCE!:

Sullivans Dam

Sullivans Dam. (Bill pic)

Blueskin Bay from Telegraph Track

Blueskin Bay from Telegraph Track. (Bill pic)

Track notice

Track notice. (Bill pic)

Boulders

Boulders recently climbed. (Bill pic). Doug.

Vert. Escarpment

Mud on Escarpment. (Bill pic). Doug.

4. 22/7/2009 Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests of Leith, Lookout, Leith Saddle, Pipe Line back to Dam. Leaders: L Gowans, B Harvey.
3. 18/7/2007 Leaders: Abe, Ian

From Sullivans Dam, we made our way through

Tea Break. Ian, George, Tash, Helen.

Cloud Forest, crossed Pole track, crossed Telegraph/Bridal Track, North face of Mt Cargill, down Cowan Road, Short-cut to cross Bridal Track,

Down Cowan Road. Keith, George, Arthur H, Glenice, Diane (obscured), Helen, Tash, Ian.

through cleared forestry,

Down through cleared forestry. Ian, Helen, Diane, Arthur, Keith, Tash

McCutcheon paddocks, up pipe line back to dam.

2. 30/11/2005. Trampers. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Escarpment, Cowan Road. Round trip Leaders: Bill & Pat, Bruce
1. 20/7/2005. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Escarpment, Cowan Road. Round trip. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Bruce.

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Oct 03 2018

Tunnel Beach

Published by under Hikers

No. 62 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Tunnel Beach. Farm”
Tunnel Beach.
See 1983 for an account of its opening.
Tramping Track managed by DOC. Tunnel Beach Road accessed from Blackhead Road.
Plenty of parking at end of Tunnel Beach Road. Distance from carpark:
Concord Tavern park for longer walk. Distance from carpark: 10 km.

3/10/2018. Both. Tunnel Beach from Kaikorai Estuary. M. Leader: Keith.

37 members set off on a combined walk from the Kaikoai estuary carpark at Waldronville …

Getting ready to move out, (Gordon pic and caption.)

… on a beautiful day and headed along the beach towards Blackhead.

Heading to Blackhead Quarry. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After smoko on the beach…

Great place to ponder after morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

…we headed up to Blackhead carpark.

Unfortunately some got hit by larger waves with one gentleman
falling over and getting quite wet , while others got wet up to their knees.
At Blackhead, 12 left, walking along the roads back to the estuary to fetch their cars while the rest walked up Blackhead Rd to Tunnel beach car park.

!8 walked down to the tunnel entrance for lunch,

Great spot for lunch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

the rest regrouping in the  carpark, much to the interest of a Chinese couple who snapped photos of the group having lunch.

Tunnel beach and carpark were very busy with lots of tourists. There was even a couple in their wedding finery taking selfies.

After the slog back up to the carpark and a breather, and a quick chat to those who had stayed, we set off walking down Green Island Bush Road

Heading back to Waldronville. (Gordon pic and caption.)

through Waldronville to the cars. Distance 15kms.

Hope everyone got home safely as it was impossible to keep an accurate count when there were so many people and several options for walking. – Keith

12. 16/11/2016. Trampers. Tunnel Beach. E+

Seven trampers decided to just do tunnel beach walk. Weather was not that good.  We all decided we had nothing to moan about after being unscathed from the earthquake. We saw a  beautiful beach and some stunning rock formations and colours.

Stunning rock formation. (Helen pic and caption.)

Stunning rock formation. (Helen pic and caption.) [Is there an eye, nose and mouth there? – Ed.]

Rocks out to sea. (Margreet pic.)

Rock stacks off the northern ends of the beach. (Margreet pic.)

Two waterfalls today.

One of the waterfalls. (Helen pic.)

One of the waterfalls. (Helen pic.)

The other waterfall. (Helen pic and caption.)

The other waterfall. (Helen pic and caption.)

Had morning tea down there in a cave entrance.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Also saw a lot of visiting tourists looking at our hidden attraction. – Helen.

11. 21/9/2016. Hikers. Tunnel Beach from Kaikorai Estuary. M. Leaders: Jan Y and Peter.

Nike app GPS of route.

Nike app GPS of route.  Kaikorai Estuary – Beach – Blackhead Rd – Tunnel Beach Rd – Tunnel Beach – Green Island Bush Rd – Blackhead Rd – Brighton Rd – Kaikorai Estuary.


24 hikers set off on a cool grey morning. Parked at the Waldronville estuary and walked through the dunes to the beach, then along the beach to Blackhead, stopping for morning tea halfway along the beach. 4 hikers walked back to the car park at this stage to drive to Tunnel Beach. The rest walked to the end of the beach, watching a couple of surfers at the end. Then up Blackhead Road which was reasonably busy, but not so many trucks as the day the leaders did the reccie. Headed down the track, which has been widened and upgraded. The sun came out at this stage, and the cliffs round Tunnel Beach looked quite spectacular and jackets came off. A group of hikers elected to just go part of the way down, as it is quite a steep track. The tide was out, and we picked our way across a large number of boulders at the foot of the tunnel …

Tunnel steps exit. (Adrienne pic.)

Tunnel steps exit. (Adrienne pic.)

… to the beach where we had lunch.

Lunch

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Mouth of a low-tide cave.

Mouth of a low-tide cave. (Ian pic and caption.)

Study in angles

Study in angles. (Ian pic and caption.)

Returned to the car park via Green Island Bush Road which had far less traffic. Great views across to Green Island and Saddle Hill from here. Then on to Brighton Road back to the car park, where the co-leader discovered that we had done around 15 ks, which was a bit of a surprise to her. Calculations had been a bit out. Well done to all those who completed the whole walk – quite good to get pushed out of your comfort zone occasionally. – Jan.

10. 1/12/2010. Both. Tunnel Beach from Concord Tavern. Leaders: Neil, Lex.

The peninsula in context. (Ian pic and caption.)

Vegetation on an oozing waterfall. (Ian pic and caption.)

Ants? on a rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

Low tide entry only for this cave. (Ian pic and caption.)

9. 10/12/2008 Hikers. Concord Tavern, Tunnel Beach, Green Island return. Leaders: Neil, Peter.
8. 15/11/2000. Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Joan H, Dot B, Chris.
7. 12/4/2000. Concord, Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Joan H, Dot B, Myrie.
6. 17/3/1999. Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Daphne, Bev McI, Shirley R.
5. 12/11/1997. Blackhead, Tunnel Beach. Park at Blackhead Quarry. Leaders: Dapne, Margaret D.
4. 1/11/1996 Blackhead, Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret D
3. 29/5/1996. Concord – Tunnel Beach. Average. (Alternative to Mt Charles.) Leaders: Margaret D, Chris, Joan H.
2. 29/5/1991 Concord – Tunnel Beach. Interesting coastline. Average. Leaders: Doug & Ngaire, Peg C, Joyce I, Penny & Peter
1. 17/3/1989 Concord Tavern, Tunnel Beach, Green Island return. Leaders: Daphne, Ivan, Peter

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Sep 26 2018

Taioma, Parera, Viaduct

No. 96 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Parera Taioma (Transrail & Wenita Year Round”

Wenita permit. Require 6 weeks notice, but less from us.

Taieri Gorge Railway. Phone 477 4449 for details.

14. 26/9/2018. Trampers. Taioma, Parera, Viaduct. Leader: Keith.

Eight trampers left the car park and drove to the carpark near the Wingatui viaduct.
A strong tail wind helped push us up the hill on the forestry road before we found a sheltered spot  for morning tea, behind a bank with sun and no wind.
We continued on up a long ridge before tracking off road through some newly planted pine trees until we reached the Taieri River.
Following the railway around to the Parera tunnel,

The Parera railway crossing. (Dave pic and caption.)

Old railway house well maintained. (Dave pic and caption.)

where we climbed up Bacon track and did some bush bashing to get past a washout,

Makin Bacon track. (Dave pic and caption.)

The team at the tunnel!. (Dave pic and caption.)

Jill sees the light at the end of the tunnel!. (Dave pic and caption.)

we followed the railway again, then onto  “Garraways” track where we had lunch then under the viaduct

(Janine pic.)

Railway viaduct – magnificent engineering! – pic.. (Dave pic and caption.)

and back to the vehicles.
Coffee for 6 at Blend. Distance 9.3 km. – Keith

13. 20/6/2018. Hikers. Wingatui Viaduct, Taioma. Leaders: Jenny, Shona.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Top of tunnel climb. A track washout stopped us getting very far down the other side. (Ian pic and caption.)

The tunnel we climbed over. (Ian pic and caption.)

lunching on a new breakout of portable seats. (Ian pic and caption.)

12. 12/4/2006. Hikers. Taioma, Viaduct, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Lesley G.
11. 5/10/2005. Both. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Doug J, Jacqui, Lesley G, Anne R
10. 1/9/2004. Both. Taioma, Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Molly

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

x

Lunch at Parera. Judy, Pat, Dorothy, Ria, George, Peter

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

9. 4/9/2002. Combined. Taioma, Wingatui Viaduct. Medium. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Wendy J.
8. 16/1/2002. Combined. Taioma – Parera. Medium. Leaders; Molly, Pat and Bill.
7. 8/11/2000. Taioma – Parera – Wingatui Viaduct. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Shirley McN.
6. 5/5/1999. Taioma – Parera – Viaduct. Leaders: George, Hazel, Ian.
5. 26/11/1997. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor, Ted.
4. 9/8/1995. Taioma. Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Bill and Lesley, Jack R.
3. 25/8/1993. Taioma, Viaduct to Parera, up the hill to Mount Allan Road and return. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Penny & Peter, Jack M
2. 14/10/1998. Hindon Railway Viaduct. Leaders: Hugh and Judith.
1. 20/4/1988 Taioma to Parera. Leaders: Bob H, Denise

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