Archive for the 'Trampers' Category

Oct 31 2018

Hermits Cave Silver Peaks Rocky Ridge Tramps

Published by under Trampers

Distance from car park: 41 km.
Click Silver Peaks Forest for background information on the area.

8. 31/10/2018. Trampers. Hermits Cave. Leader: Arthur.

The day dawned fine, with a smidgen of frost to sharpen the air. We had sunshine all day, with a few clouds and light winds at times – perfect conditions for our excursion into the Silver Peaks.

Leaving Mosgiel at 8.30 a.m., we began our tramp from the car park on Mountain Road at 9.20 a.m.

Smoko was trackside in the sunshine. Past Green Hut (site), up, along, and up, up, with an occasional brief rest/regrouping stop.

Approaching Pulpit Rock,

Heading to Pulpit Rock. (Gordon pic and caption.)

weed-eaters/chainsaws could be heard to our left. We soon spotted some of the Green Hut Track Clearing Group hard at work down on Long Ridge. You work is greatly appreciated chaps!

Several of our group took the opportunity to climb Pulpit Rock

Happy mountaineering trampers. (Gordon pic and caption.)

before we moved on.

Ready to move on. (Gordon pic and caption.)

The Pinnacle Rock pointed our way onto the Rocky Ridge, where the track was rough but easy to follow.

We stopped a half kilometre short, on a rocky knob to have lunch in the sunshine, while enjoying the terrific views. It was really special to be there!

While the others finished their lunch, the leader recced ahead to the Hermits Cave. The rest followed …

Hermit cave on the horizon. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… to inspect it and to make an entry in the Visitors Book. (The previous entry was back in July.)

Leaving Hermit Cave. (Gordon pic and caption.)

At 1.30 p.m. the return journey began. An occasional brief rest/regrouping stop was made, and eventually a happy but a little tired, group of Trampers ended. Their tramp ended  back at the cars at 4 p.m.

All had enjoyed their venture into the Silver Peaks, and the weather had suited us to perfection, couldn’t have been a better one.

There was a large variety of birdlife to be seen and heard today – two got a brief glimpse of a N.Z. Falcon along Rocky Ridge, and a Fern Bird flew across in front of us in the vicinity of Green Hill.

The “distance-meters” couldn’t agree, and ranged from 17 to 20 km for our day. Take your pick. An average of 4 k.p.h. was maintained by our group of 11.

We were back in Mosgiel before 5 p.m. and what a wonderful day it had been.

Thanks to all. – Art.

7. 22/2/2017. Trampers. Hermits Cave. Leader: Arthur.

7 keen trampers set out for a trip in to the Silverpeaks, leaving the cars on Mountain Road at 9.25 p.m.

The weather was perfect for the inward tramp, overcast with a slightly southwest breeze to keep the temperature down.

After 40 minutes we stopped for morning tea. Past Green Hut site we climbed through the bush before emerging into the open. Good views in all directions, upward, and then stopped briefly to admire Pulpit Rock.

pulpit. (Helen pic and caption.)

A little further and we turned on to the Rocky Ridge track. At 12.15 p.m. we were on the track just above the Hermits Cave, the leader descending to find A cave, but not the Hermits Cave he remembered!

No one else was keen after watching him toiling back up to the track, so there was nothing for it but to have our lunch.

All sat and enjoyed the view – what a great spot it was. We could see the “Devils Staircase” leading down to Jubilee Hut also visible.

Lunch above Hermits cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

Looking down to cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

As we prepared to leave, a fine drizzle arrived and cloud was forming immediately to the east of Rocky Ridge. Coats on, and in a few minutes it was raining. Within minutes all the trackside vegetation was wet for us to walk through, the breeze changing to easterly with it.

By the time we got back to Pulpit Rock we were completely surrounded by cloud – the Pulpit Rock loomed rather eerily through the mist as we passed.

The rain had eased by the time we were back down to Green Hut, and after an occasional brief rest stop, we were back at the cars in the mist at  3.05 p.m.

We had made good time all day, both going in and coming back. Keith recorded the distance at 16.6 km for the trip.

A recovery time was taken at Blueskin Bay on the way home. We found Dunedin and the Taieri bathed in sunshine – but we had been in a different world! – Art.

6. 19/9/2012. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Green Hut, Pulpit Rock.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.
18km 5hrs 34 moving time, stopped for 1hr 39min.
Total ascent 1051 mtrs. max elevation 754mtrs.
moving ave speed 3.2km/hr.
Mountain Road wasn’t bad, except for one deep corrugation.
And apart from the odd slushy patches on the track, its surface was largely dry with good grip. The weather was good but a strong breeze blustered us at exposed spots on the top ridges.
Seven of us went in, and seven came out, but it was a long day and the last 5 km out were a weary plod.
One of us developed an excruciating cramp on several occasions, necessitating quite a wee wait each time for the pain to recede.
A long day but not bad for a group including 3 in their 80s. – Ian.

Hermit’s Cave Bivvy. Pam’s proof positive for hubby.

Hermit’s Cave Bivvy. Pam insisted on Ian being in the pic too.

5. 23/2/2011. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Green Hut, Pulpit Rock.
 As the first track entrance sign round High Top has been removed, it is as well that the worst road holes beyond have been roughly filled to make the route in to the second entrace navigable.
The track in to the new sign shown below is just impossibly bad in wet weather. It has to be the most slippery and dangerous to be found anywhere. Apart from the Swampy Ridge Track indicated below, side track signs are now no longer there.)

The new sign at the foot of Green Ridge. No longer able to be rested upon!

New track sign opposite Possum Hut track turn-off. But no longer any indication of such.

Track sign by Pulpit Rock. No mention of Long Ridge.

Rocky Ridge ahead as we emerged from alongside Silver Peak No. 3.

The new Jubilee Hut (and out-house) clearly seen from Rocky Ridge.

Hermits Cave rather obscured by flax.

The roomy interior of the cave.

The small bivouac on the track right opposite Hermit’s Cave. Many going past don’t think to look down the hill to see the much roomier famous bivvy.

4. 11/10/2006. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Green Hut, Pulpit Rock. Leaders: Doug M, George
Claude, Ian, Doug, Lex Ria? Arthur, Evelyn

Claude, Ian, Doug, Lex Ria? Arthur, Evelyn

Jubilee

3. 26/11/2003. Trampers. Hermits Cave via Big Stream, Mount Allan. Hard. Leaders; George, Hazel.
Just past Poplar Hut turn-off. George, Doug J, Bob, Doug M, Hazel

Just past Poplar Hut turn-off. George, Doug J, Bob, Doug M, Hazel

Descending to Hermits Cave from off track. George, Arthur, Doug

Descending to Hermits Cave from off track. George, Arthur, Doug

Nearing cave. George, Arthur, Doug.

Nearing cave. George, Arthur, Doug.

Art and Doug

Arthur & Doug J at Cave

geo

George and Arthur at Cave

2. 29/1/2003. Trampers. Greeen Hut, Rocky Ridge, Hermits Cave. Hard. Leaders: George, Claude, Wendy.
Cave

Bob, Lex, Wendy, Ian, Doug M, Who?, Arthur

1. 9/3/1994 Hermits Cave, Silverpeaks. 3 alternative stages – long, medium, short. Leaders: George, Doug J, Jean A, Eleanor

 

The hermit.
An account by a long-standing OTMC member.
Nice guy. Working for L T Martins in fancy furniture. Small. Some hang-ups. Disagreement. Found out not to be a partner. “Little Ross” Adamson. Disappeared. Went all round South Island. Seen in a few different places.  Seen peering through window at Jubilee Hut. Caught some sheep. “Big Ross” Lake, a friend, and another male sought out Little Ross (with the knowledge of the police) and persuaded him to come out after two years. Police lenient. Lived normal life. Married. Children.

Another account. A leading light of the OTMC. Missing for 2 years. All over South Island. Silver Peaks for only the latter six months. Police brought him in when he started killing sheep. Account agrees it was indeed Jubilee Hut, not Green Hut as is commonly supposed, where he was seen.

A further comment by another: A little man – had a swelling on the side of his face which embarrassed him.  Quite withdrawn but had a great sense of humour when you got to know him.  An excellent bushman and a good teacher and leader in the hills. In the late sixties he worked for Valley Industries as a sheet metal worker and lived in a flat in (I think) Heriot Row – lived alone.  Lots of stories about his history.

 

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Oct 31 2018

Nicols Creek, Swampy, Pineapple Track, Moon Track, Booth Road

Published by under Trampers,Year round

(David Nicol was an early settler and dairy farmer. He reputedly bought land here in the hope that the railway line woould be routed north through Leith Valley.)
Click here for an EXCELLENT MAP of Nicols Creek showing the location of The Basins (called the Cup and Saucer on the map), and the 5 waterfalls. (It also shows the Pepper Tree track location.) Scroll further down below the map and click on a truncated-screen VIDEO OF ALL FIVE WATERFALLS! [click on “Youtube” here for full screen.] )
Click Neighbours at War for background and photos to the Finnerty Family and their house site on the Moon Track by Nicols Creek.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
No. 17 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Nicols Creek. D McCabe. Year Round”
 Nicols Creek circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group.
DCC land.
Booth Road 16.1 km from car park.
21. 31/10/2018. Hikers. Moon – Nicols – Pepper Tree – Pineapple – circuit. M. Leaders: Ian and Jim.

Twenty-one Hikers plus two Ramblers parked at Booth Road. From there they walked down Islay Street to Leith Valley Road and up to Thomson’s Bridge over Nicols Creek. The two Ramblers left to trek on their own account further up Leith Valley Road, with the Hikers setting off up the Nicols Creek Track. A wee way up, we turned off to take the track on the right down to the 14.5 metres high first of the five Nicols Creek Falls for Morning Tea.

The promise of the day was to walk the old Moon Track that was there before the Mountain Bikers in 2006 carved it up almost beyond recognition. So after our cuppa, we crossed the creek to climb steeply up on the other side, first to pass by the empty Finnerty’s house site, of which there remains little indication except a flat area alongside the left of the track and a few bricks.

The going was easier now until reaching and crossing the first of the many zig-zag mountain bike tracks to wend our way through bush and over some other zig-zags up to the big boulder clump among some macrocarpas, where we stopped to briefly look around the area. Beyond here the track followed the the old fence through some bush, gorse and grass to come back on another “zig” of the trail. Avoiding the trail above us to the right we took the lower one along to where it dropped slightly to the left. Here we took the route straight ahead. We were back on the old track again. A bit along this one, it swung uphill to the right. Here was the almost straight up, but moderately graded, old cart track that returned us to the fence again, happily avoiding the steep hill on our right in the process.

Back alongside the fence again, was a grassy track which first dipped and then rose up and yet up to the corner of the fence’s paddock where there was a welcome table and plank seat to rest on and regroup. Going was now more level but muddier, not helped by the rain two nights ago, but eventually the track led out, over an old large log to the sign posts. One indicated yet father up to Swampy, another indicated our Nicols Creek Track route ahead, and the third back down the way we had come. But on it was the lettering: Moonlight!!! It’s Moon, not Moonlight. Where did the printing instructions get it wrong? Anyway, it was now lunchtime, which made for a leisurely stop.

Lunch Stop. (Jan B. pic.)

The  old cart track, now well wooded in, led us along the the contour across the Nicols Creek headwater tributaries. Again there was that rain-worsened mud In places. A major creek crossing we encountered was through a steep-sided rocky ditch, with the climb-out on the further side one or two paces along a wet but fortunately not slippery rocky forty-five degrees slope and then into a brief dip with a steep drop below before clambering out onto the reassuringly safer part of the track again. We all made it across safely.

And then on, across another creek tributary, until we reaching on our right the Pepper Tree Track turn off. This was the junction we had come to a year ago from the other way, when we had climbed the  Nicols Creek track  from the other end. Well, on then, on the hew track, another creek crossing, and finally gradually up, out of the bush, into grassy area and out onto the Pineapple Track.

The intention here had been to complete the original track circuit by crossing over to where the old fence post on the edge of the bush indicated the entrance to the top of the old Pineapple Track. The bush is nice and open, although the track is steep and deeply clay-trenched in places, but today was out of consideration after all the rain we had had lately. The writer has fond memories of it being route to Flagstaff in his youth.

But back to the newer track opened in 1975, which we were now on. The cars were at its foot, on Booth Road, waiting to whisk us off to coffee at Sunnyvale. So down we went now, each at our own pace to the bottom. The old track had been a revelation to all but a few older hikers. The most ambitious one for them in a long while. Challenging? Yes. Regrets? No. Satisfying? Yes, – to the writer, especially. Now over to the club to keep this old track alive and back on the programme again. – Ian.

20. 11/10/2017. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Pepper Tree Track, Pineapple circuit. M. Leaders: Ian, Clive.
The programmed Deep Creek Tramp was out because of Lambing. Where to go instead? Well, Nicols Creek had not been programmed since 2004, (Except for one calendared for mid-winter but not carried out). So a last minute recce, relying on one old man’s 13-year-old-memory, (helped by an above-listed clickable excellent map q.v.), rediscovered the route, – a new tramp for most of the club’s current hikers. Contrary to last month’s Trampers’ route, ours was up the Nicols Creek true right side, uncomplicated by the newer Mountain Bikers’ zigzag track on the other side.
18 Hikers had turned up, after some unnecessary precautions taken by the leaders about helping drivers locate the parking spot.

We set off, and there we were, after first stepping out of the wide smoothy graded Glow-worm route, (nostalgically for the writer) on the old, steep, boulder- and root-strewn track, taking us up and yet up. But it wasn’t too long before we could gratefully turn off to the right and follow an easy side track taking us down to the first of the stream’s 5 waterfalls. We morning-teed there,…

Unpacking for tea break. (Ian pic and caption.)

…drinking in the scenery of this local rival to Fiordland’s fabled attractions. A 15 metre bush waterfall!

(Clive pic.)

Refreshed, we forewent the opportunity afforded to us by the track continuing on across the stream that would have led us up the further side and out into the zigzagged area. Such a venture to disentangle the original track from the new zigzags could wait another day.

So we returned back out to our original track, which was now taking an easier grade. Soon a fork ahead gave us an option of continuing ahead on the original track or swinging level and wide on a newer one to our left. We took the latter. Both would lead out into open grassland on our left, with our choice swinging out further before returning into the bush. Now it was just steady up and up and up, with many regrouping stops for rest and recovery, but there was plenty of day ahead of us, anyway. Eventually we were on a part of the track that was newer and wider, and that just alluringly continued on straight up. However, an old memory had prompted the writer, on the reece, to turn off this, when discovering an insignificant narrow side track on the right, which he recognised as the actual original track, the other newer one leading who knows where.

At this point, stern reminder to the writer! On realising an intended regrouping immediately following the turn-off was proving impracticable due to broom restricting vision, he neglected leaving a guide at the fork for any late-comers.  This oversight led to a potentially serious consequence, because a little further along the track, we noticed the absence of 3 of our number. Back-marker Clive went back and eventually found them, returning back down the newer track. They had become distanced from both us ahead and those yet further behind being looked after by Clive, and, seduced by the newer track, had carried on up it, failing to notice the side track’s orange marker, its significance. and with no guide there to prompt them.

Reunited again, we went on. Here, the writer’s memory failed him at a critical point. He was looking for yet another  fork, this time to the left, and in his mind had pictured it as an obvious T-junction, but which in reality was much less significant, and he led right past it! It was only when descending to cross one of Nicols tributary crossings that he realised his oversight. About turn! Retrace!

Back at the aforementioned junction, we lunched…

(Clive pic.)

.. and the leaders did a short reconnoiter of the turn-off and reassured themselves it was indeed the route they had planned.

Lunch consumed, legs rested, it was now Clive’s turn to take up the leadership. So it was along, through, and eventually up, out of the forest, past the bushes of the well-named Pepper Tree Track, across the grass…

(Clive pic.)

…and onto the wide well-paved Pineapple Track.

(Clive pic.)

All downhill now and out onto the Booth Road entrance. A few here opted to wait for Bob to drive back and pick them up. The rest of us carried on, down Islay Street, out onto Leith Valley Road, up past the Old School Building and around a last corner to the Nicols Creek Bridge and the cars. And  to the start of the afternoon’s rain! We had completed our 8 kilometre tramp in the dry.
A wet drive to Mosgiel and a coffee-break finish. And behold, just as we were draining our last mugs, in trooped the Trampers, who, poor things, unlike us, had had to finish their tramp in the wet! – Ian.
19. 27/9/2017. Nicols Creek, Pineapple. M. Leader: Jill.

15 trampers set off up the Switchback Nicols Creek Mountain bike track from Leith Valley on a mild overcast morning. Originally we were going to visit the waterfall but the track was suffering the effects of the recent stormy weather we’ve experienced. The MBT was of  a gentle gradient with some very narrow areas following washouts but generally in good condition. We walked through native bush and often accompanied with pleasant birdsong.

Note the rock that looks like a Kea!!!(Margreet pic and caption.)

Morning tea was in a open area a  with lovely vista over  Dunedin all looking pristine.This mountain bike track continued for approx 6 kms up,  round and round again, at 1 stage  passing through a glade of very gnarly old macrocarpa trees. .Eventually the mountain bike track disappeared and is being prepared for a further extension of same so very much like a mini river bed at present. There was much evidence of pig rooting at the higher end of the track. Eventually we traversed tussock land coming along the Moon track to Swampy ridge track. The sun came out to allow a pleasant lunch break…

Lunch on the tops. Swampy.(Helen pic and caption)

…before continuing in a southerly direction to the junction of the Flagstaff, Pineapple track. Down the Pineapple track provided us with again amazing vistas of Dunedin. 2pm saw us back at the cars having completed approx 14.5 kms. The day finished with our coffee fix

Coffee at Roslyn Fire Station.  (Helen pic and caption.)

(and a  big  thanks to Eleanor’s Uncle) at the Roslyn fire station. – Jill.

18. 22/4/2015. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track.
Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track

Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track. (GPS courtesy Ken)

A good turn out of eight trampers, including one new member, met up at the car park on Leith Valley Rd. to start the tramp up Nichols Creek. We walked up to where the glow worms hang out [pardon the pun], but of course there were none to be seen at that hour of the day, so we then went & had a look at the Nichols Falls, which were really quite spectacular, after all the recent rain.
1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind

1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind. (Ken pic and caption)

We crossed the creek here & made our way up the track on the other side, to find ourselves on the cycle tracks that had been made in this area.
The original idea was to go up Nichols Creek, onto Moon Track, then along to the pole line track, & back down there. After making our way up the numerous cycle tracks in the bush above Nichols creek, where none of us really knew where we were going, except we all agreed that UP was the correct way. We eventually found ourselves on what Dermot assured us was the Moon Track, which is badly overgrown, has lots of gorse, & has very deep ruts in it, many containing water, which caught a few members out, as it was very slippery, & easy to slide off the sides into these pools. 
On arriving at the top, at the junction with the Swampy Ridge Track, we had an early lunch, while I contemplated the weather over Swampy, where we would be going. It was completly covered in cloud, almost down to where we were sitting at times, & I decided that it wouldn’t be much fun going that way, so after a consultation, it was decided that we would go over to the Pineapple Track, & back down there. I think this was a good decision, as when we got down to McGouns Track, we went along there to the seating area with the monument, & had a lengthy break sitting in the sun.
3 Happy group relaxing in sun

3 Happy group relaxing in sun. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was back out to the road, & along to the cars.
A reasonable day, & a bit of a challenge in places.
 Walked 10.1 km
3.7km/hr
2 3/4 hr walking
Climbed 463mtrs. – Ken.
17. 22/8/2007. Trampers. Booth Road, Moon Track circuit. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Sabina.
16. 25/10/2006. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track. Medium. Leaders; Ian, Arthur H
15. 3/11/2004. Both. Nicols Creek, Basin. Leaders: Lex, Ria L, Val and Brian, Irene.
14. 24/9/2003. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, Skyline, Pineapple. From Booth Road. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Irene.
13. 27/11/2002. Both. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, to Skyline. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Ria L, Eleanor, Joyce.
12. 17/3/1999. Nicols Creek, Basins. Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
11. 20/2/2002. Alt. Nicols Creek – Moon Track to Skyline Track. Start Booth Road. Medium+. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
10. 27/1/1999. Pineapple Track – Swampy area. Leaders: Shirley R, Lance and Lois.
9. 28/5/1997. Leith Valley, Nicols Creek return Skyline. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Molly.
8. 9/10/1996. Nicols Creek, Basins from Booth Road. (Park Booth Road.) Average. Leaders: Jack R, Dot T, Patricia J.
7. 18/10/1995. Nicols Creek, Swampy. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Barbara McC, Mairie and Doug.
6. 6/7/1994. Nicols Creek/Moon Track, Alternative – Pineapple Track.  Medium. Leaders:Nancy, Bob H, Shirley R, Joyce.
5. 27/5/1992. Nicols Creek from Booth Road to Swampy Pineapple. Average. Leaders: Marie, Nel, Les W, Margaret D.
4. 3/7/1991. Pineapple Track carpark round snow trip. Wrap up well for this mountain trip. Average. Leaders: Jack M, Mary McG, Bev McI, Shirley.
3. 6/6/1990. Pineapple carpark round trip.Average+. Leaders: Marie, Mary McG, Shirley, Helen.
2. 17/3/1989 Barbara M, Irene, Sabina
1. 26/7/1989. Swampy round trip from Pineapple Track carpark. Average+. Great views. Leaders: Denise P, Mary McG, Peggy M.

 

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Oct 24 2018

Woodside Glen, plus to top of Maungatuas

Published by under Trampers,Year round

No. 30 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Woodside Glen to Maungatuas. E Blackburn, D McEwan. Summer”

Short and long options.

(Maungatua climb fairly steep. 5-7 hours. Heavy tussock on top.  Route only. Manager: DOC.)

11. 24/10/2018. Trampers.Woodside Glen to Maungatua. H. Leaders: Gordon and Art.

13 determined trampers left their cars at Woodside Glen, to begin their tramp.

Ready to cross. Gordon pic and caption.)

Once across the Lee Creek it was uphill all the way until we reached the tussock.

Other than a short distance at the bottom, the track was good and dry, and non slippery. We were in light bush, with some large and obviously very old Broadleaf trees to be seen. Mahoe (white wood) were there in abundance, and many other species.
A level area beside the track at the appropriate time was the smoko stop.

Onward, the track was ever upward, and the perspiration flowed freely. A couple of steeper and trickier bits were safely negotiated,

The last steep pinch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and in due course we all reached the first viewing point above the bush -and where the tussock began. Two of the group elected to wait here for our return.

Into the tussock now,

Traversing tussock country before the gale got up. (Phil pic and caption.)

the height of which reduces with altitude. We lost 5 more at the next rocky knob.

Lords and ladies surveying their domain…. (Phil pic and caption.) [[Ed: N.B. Not necessarily among the “lost 5”]

The remaining 6 trampers carried on for another 20 minutes before eating their lunch (10 minutes early) in the shelter of a rocky knob, with great views out over the Taieri Plain, and far away.

Last stop.Lunch & great views. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Shelter was absolutely necessary as it was quite windy up here.

Frequent clouds of pollen could be seen being blown out of the native bush, down in the Lee Creek area. Lots of pollen around this year.
As we packed up to begin the return, the wind was rising, becoming very strong and blustery. Hold onto your hat weather. At least one hat got blown away, but safely retrieved. It had cooled down too.
A fast return was made down through the beautiful tussock, which was waving in the wind.
Once back in the shelter of the bush the temperature rose notably, a bit hot in fact. Several clumps of the lovely white clematis could be seen as we reached the bush line.
Down, down, down now, all the way. We met two chaps coming up with a large number of dogs, out for exercise. Birdsong was heard all day in the bush and I heard my first Shining Cuckoo of the season.
No one was wasting any time for the descent, and the whole team were back together by the time we crossed Lee Creek again. It ended up a shorter day as we were back at the cars at 1-35.
A refreshment stop was made back in Outram.
Thanks to all. – Art.
10. 28/9/2016. Trampers. Woodside Glen to Maungatua. H. Leader: Arthur H.
Good weather had been ordered for this tramp, and it was delivered. The sky was partly cloudy with some wind from the west. (Down at Outram it was a northeaster.
Six trampers left Mosgiel with high expectations for the day’s adventure. We parked our cars at Woodside Glen, starting from there at 9.25 a.m. Only ten minutes or so brought us to Lee Creek which was a little tricky to cross. I think all made it with dry feet.
The work then began. It is a relentless climb upward through the bush, broken only very briefly by following an old water race. We had a good rest period at morning tea time though.
As the bush thinned out, a patch of low cloud was flowing down the gully to our right – coming in almost from the southwest. It didn’t affect us and soon cleared.
The track up through the bush was good and dry, thankfully, but would have been very slippery if wet.
The upper track had been well cleared as far as a rocky knob where the tussock began. We reached this position at 11.00 a.m., which was a good effort.

The westerly wind was cold here, but a brief stop to admire the view was made.

View of Saddle Hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

View of Saddle Hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

We were up in the tussock now (great) where the track is not well defined. Taking our time, as some found the tussock was a little slippery underfoot, we continued up the eastern spur of Maungatua.

A few minutes before 12 noon we reached a hugh knob from where the view was magnificent. This was our lunch spot…

Lunch Spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch Spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and in Antony Hamel’s book is marked as being at an altitude of 686 metres. (See his map on page 9.05).

The sky was rather hazy, with cloud down on the hills to the north and northeast – on Swampy, for example. But the climb had been well worth it for the view nevertheless.

Outram in distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

Outram in distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

No wind spoiled our lunch, which was quite a leisurely affair, stretching out to 45 minutes in fact – but don’t tell Neil! He would be horrified if he knew!
We began our return, taking care in the downhill slippery tussock. The trouble was that vegetation overhung the little used track and one could not see where one was putting one’s feet.

Out of the tussock and down…

Down, down and more down. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down, down and more down. (Helen pic and caption.)

…into the bush, where there are two or three difficult patches – not to be rushed.

Eventually we reached the creek, crossed without incident, and were back at the cars at 2.45.
The outward journey had been 2.25 hours moving, and a neat 2 hours returning. Distance? – From the map, an estimate of 7 km is all I can come up with.
The mandatory debriefing took place in Outram. All were enthusiastic about the day’s tramp and wanted it to be on our list of ones to do again in the future.
There is something special about being out in the tussock.
9. 23/10/2013. Hikers. Woodside area. Easy. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

Woodside Route

Woodside GPS of Route. 10.5km in all. (GPS recording started rather belatedly.)

We started from the West Taieri Cemetery and walked directly down Woodside Road to the intersection at the old Store and Post Office building, where we stopped for morning tea on an inviting lawn.

We then turned left and walked down McDonald Road past the grand Beardsmore property gates …

Gate

Gate

.. till we made a right turn up Mann Rd (3 km on route map) before returning the way we had come back to the old store corner.

Now a different route was to go left up Berwick Rd, right onto Helvellyn St and to almost complete the circumnavigation of the block, right again down Crossfeld St to then go left up Ravensburn Rd and finally left again via Mountain Rd into Woodside Glen. We entered the walking track alongside the Lee Creek (name?), finding it rather dangerously narrowed in places by slips, to discover it connecting with a newer, wider track further up which led eventually down to the Maungatua tops track stream crossing, where we lunched.  (6 km on route map). Three of our group ventured to rock-hop across the stream to lunch on the far side,…

Lunching across the stream.

Lunching across the stream.

… the rest judging the nearer side a safer spot.

Our return route to the Glen was by the safer new track which we found kept further up and more safely around the ridge (but made less  interesting by its divorce  from the stream) before descending to the Glen.

Here we met the group supporting blind trampers, who were just about to set off up the track, with much happy greeting exchanges. We went back out along Mountain Rd, down Ravensburn Rd to the old store again, to return back up Woodside Road to the cars.

Obviously a Woodside Glen walk needs a lot of road walk to fill out a decent day. Thanks to Barbara and Arthur for planning this well filling the day with much interest.  – Ian.

8. 30/4/2008. Hikers. Woodside Glen. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M.

7. 16/4/2008. Traquair/Whare Creek Track & Woodside Glen.

Viewing Traquair Creek

Viewing Traquair Creek

With inclement weather threatening the joy of a beach walk (Purakanui and Canoe beaches) and only 2 hikers along with 2 leaders, a decision was made to seek dry bush cover instead, and so we headed for the recently-upgraded Outram Glen walk. Neil B. diverted us however to a nearby track he had lately helped to clear  – the Whare (or Traquair) Creek track – starting at the Historical Museum. This turned out to be a great delight as it echoed with bird song and followed a dry-clad, benched course through both native and deciduous trees beside still waters and sometimes beside falling waters over large, mossy boulders.

Neil was an informative guide too, giving us the history of the track, showing us the site of the first flourmill in the country and noting features such as an underground water source, a high, man-made retaining wall, and origins of one of the first reticulated water supplies. We had morning tea back at the Museum and rewarded Neil for his services with freshly-picked mushrooms. We then proceeded to an ‘urban crawl’ through the streets of Outram, with a particular focus on new, spec houses. A decision to lunch at the West Taieri cemetery was thwarted by our driver whose momentum carried us on to Woodside Glen where we were

Lunching by Lee Stream

Lunching by Lee Stream

led up a different creek (Lee Creek) without a paddle, and took lunch beside the stream where the track crosses it. A nice spot indeed. Neil then took us on a ‘conducted tour’ of the once-thriving metropolis of Woodside, noting old shops, churches,

 

 

Old church?

Old church?

school and houses from one of which 2 sisters daily used to bike to the railway station and catch the train to Factory Road and thence to Mosgiel Woollen Mill to work. How times have changed!! So, we didn’t get to the beach or the river or the cemetery, but we did enjoy our varied walk. – Bob

6. 11/7/2007. Hikers. Woodside Glen. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M
5. 8/8/2001. Alt. Woodside Glen. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Mary Y.
4. 20/1/1999. Woodside Glen. Leaders: Joyce, Bev S, Les S.
3. 16/9/1998 Trampers. Woodside Glen to top of Maungatuas. Leaders: Bill H, Graham
2. 20/11/1996. Trampers. Woodside Glen to top of Maungatuas. Leaders: Jack R, George, Eleanor
1. 22/4/1992. Trampers. Woodside Glen Bush track leading to Maungtuas. Average+. Leaders: Bob H, Jack R, Doug & Ngaire
16 km from car park.

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Oct 17 2018

Craiglowan Falls

Published by under Trampers,Year round

9. 17/10/2018. Trampers. Steve Amies – Craig Lowan Falls. M. Dave.

13 keen trampers left their cars not far from the Whare flat school house and started on the Tunnel track.

Starting out on Tunnel track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

This track was fairly flat and one couldn’t help but marvel at the amount of work done by the early water race workers. After reaching McRaes Weir we turned up a somewhat steep track

Heading up to Steve Amies track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to reach the Steve Amies ridge.  The climb along the ridge was very pleasant, with manukas/kanukas dominant, with lush green undergrowth.
We stopped at the memorial Bryan Freeman seat – he used to be a good friend of Eleanor and her late husband.

The Bryan Freeman memorial seat- a good place for a break. (Dave pic and caption.)

Near the top of the track it was obvious the amount of tree planting and track maintenance that Steve Amies and his mates did many years ago.
We then walked down Rollinsons Road and entered the bush that leads to the Whare lake loop track.  It was in this area that a vote of thanks was passed to Arthur and Neil for the obvious work on track maintenance that they continually do (you no longer get your boots wet)!!!

Neil & Arthur’s Bridge. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After having lunch on Smithys’ track it was then down through the bush and back onto Rollinsons road. Round the corner and off the flagstaff – whare flat road we followed an un-named track through scrub up to a pine plantation on a ridge.  On the sides of the ridge were sycamore trees – a pest – but a pretty sight as the trees were coming into leaf. This improved track lead along the ridge finally ending high above McQuilkan’s creek.  Everyone talk care descending steeply down to the creek.
5 minutes up the creek we were at the Craig – Lowen falls – quite a sight!

Craig Lowen Falls. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Another half an hour down the streamwe were out in the open and back to the cars.

We covered 21,319 steps, 15.9km in 5.5hrs and gained a net height of 349 metres.
A good round trip!  Dave

8. 24/9/2014. Trampers. Craiglowan Falls. M.
Enter via MacQuilkin Road up from Whare Flat Schoolhouse.
Craiglowan route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Craiglowan-Bullring-Aquaduct. We walked 15km; ave 4.3km/h; moving time 3 h 30m; climbed 531m.

This week’s tramp was to Craiglowan Falls. We started off at the locked gate on McQuilkans Rd & followed the marked track across numerous creek crossings [where one member got her feet wet at the first crossing] & up over the large rocks just before reaching the falls. We had morning tea break in the bush above the falls, & then retraced our steps for a short distance back to where a side track led off up the LH side of the stream. (Ed note: This was our original, and only, route down to the falls.) We were not sure where this went, but decided to investigate it anyway, as it looked like it had just had some work done on it. I climbed steeply up until we came to some pine forest, & at this stage I was quite sure that it would come out on the Whare Flat-Flagstaff Rd via Sanitarium Rd, which proved to be correct.
At this time it was only about 11:30, so we decided to walk up to the Bull Ring, & go down Longridge Rd to join up with Smeatons Rd,[where stopped for lunch] …
Lunch on Smeatons Rd - Ken pic and caption.

Lunch on Smeatons Rd – Ken pic and caption.

… – McIntyres Rd, [so we could view the remains of Smeatons shack] then down to the Aquaduct. This proved to be more difficult then would seem, as there were a lot of big trees down over the track in places, which made it necessary to detour around them. From the Aquaduct, we walked around to join up with McIntyres Rd. again, & then crossing straight over here onto the next part of the track leading to Longridge Rd. then back to the car.
Some of the tracks were quite muddy & slippery, but all made it safely back, & enjoyed the day. it was new territory for some in the group, & for others it had been a long time since they were there.
7. 30/5/2012. Trampers. Falls, Goat Point, Smeatons Shack, Aqueduct, Longridge Road.
We reached the Falls OK, but stream crossing on wet rocks and climbing over mossy rocks proved rather dicey. (Note: This tramp best done in summer.)

Craiglowan Falls. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning Tea at Craiglowan Falls (Ken pic and caption)

A cautious descent on way back down over large mossy rocks.

Well, to this point, so far, so good. Back at the stream crossing down below the confluence, we failed  to locate the track up to Goat Point, despite knowing its general area. So we climbed in faith and hope. Finally we came across track markers, leading left and right. After exploring left, we went right, until they led relentlessly down. So we retraced back up because Ian had it fixed in his mind that we had to go up to reach the pine plantation. Mistake one.

Encouragingly however, Ken found a track indication on his GPS, and it did promise to reach a forest road. So we kept to this, despite no track appearing, only plenty of scratchy blackberry brambles. But we did reach the road, finally.

This we walked down until we reached a junction, with signs indicating that we were on Smeatons Road, crossed by McIntyre road. Hooray. McIntyre was what we had originally wanted. Ian felt we still had to go down so we turned left and down McIntyre road. Mistake two. We should have taken McIntyre road to the right. More of that later.

Anyway we made the long walk down McIntyre Road, left, to where the race crosses it, and turned right, along the race to lunch, as planned, at the Aqueduct.

Linzi at lunch.

Now, have a look at Ken’s GPS of our route. Click to enlarge. Start at the top, and follow to the right to reach Craiglowan Falls at the extreme right.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Start returning to the left a bit. The zigzag you see is where we starting climbing away from the stream. A further zigzag a little further along is where we started following the track markers. The little tail to the left there, is where we turned back, before going back up again. CRITICAL MISTAKE. Notice, however,  the short gap beyond to a tail coming up from below. This is the gap we should have traversed.

Now turn to page 8.07 of Antony Hamel’s Tracks and Trails, and find on the map of Flagstaff Forest at the top right, the circled number “seven”. See how it ascends first before turning right along a contour, below Goat Point and then DOWN to meet McIntyre road at its other end next to Smeatons Shack.

That tail from below is where Ken and Ian climbed up at lunch time to check where we should have come down. And lo and behold, we found not only Smeatons Shack but also the marked track next to it where we should have exited from. An aha moment. And it all became clear, as the GPS map confirms.
Ken and I returned back down the end of McIntyre Road to find the others had left, leaving Doug waiting for us. Of course we should have consulted with everyone to get mutual agreement with what we proposed to do and to arrange a meeting place should the others proposed not to wait. But in our excitement at solving the mystery, we had neglected to do so.
Anyway, going on out to the bottom of McIntyre Road at its other end, we didn’t know whether the others had simply turned down there and back along Long Ridge Road to the cars, or carried on along the race. In the absence of any indication, we set off along the race, as that had been the original intention of the tramp. We were relieved to catch up on them enough to see them further beyond us, but stopping to don parkas as the drizzling rain got heavier, lost sight of them again.
Emerging from the race end further up Long Ridge Road, we saw them again rounding a corner further down and caught up on them at the gate at the end. So all was well that ended well.
Quite an adventure and some interesting unplanned bush-bashing. A lesson in how bush conditions can change over two years and a reminder that our smaller numbers means that all our tramps now amount to a recce, – unlike the hikers, whose “reconnoiterers”  go through our experience and sort things out first. – Ian
6. 10/2/2010. Trampers. Falls, Goat Point, Smeaton Shack, Aquaduct, Longridge Road. Leaders: Ian, Sabina.
Down Whare Flat Road 1.5 km. Sanatorium Road second on left after Bullring. – Track no longer locatable from top by us.
It all got a bit complicated. First the leaders failed to find the track down from the Sanatorium Road extension track. Many, many fallen trees had obliterated all trace of the track where it first descends steeply down. Well, the leaders couldn’t find it anyway.
However the start of a new track closer in from the gate had been pointed out by a local landowner so that was followed on the day.
It was fairly well cleared but markers petered out down the middle of a steep bouldery stream (the McQuilkin way upstream from the falls?) so after a morning tea rest, we prudently retreated back up and began all over again, this time back at the old school-house. Up McQuilkin Road. Right-fork into bush and across the McQuilkin on a wire hand-hold. On up and eventually back across to the true right and to the stream junction. Interesting notice points to “Watar fall”. Up over the large rocks and now it was lunch-time at the falls.

Ken, Doug and George before Craiglowan Falls

Lunch at Craiglowan Falls. George, Ria, Hazel (hidden), Sabina, Ian, Doug. (Ken pic)

Back down and across to the true left but now up steeply to Goats Point. Across through the bush and down to Smeatons Shack on McIntyre Road.

Smeatons Shack. Ian, George. (Ken pic)

Down the road , down the track to emerge on the cleanly excavated concrete access race near the aqueduct. (Thanks, track clearers.)

Artistic shot through race gate. Doug, Ria, Ian. (Ken pic)

Rusted up flow meter. Ian. (Ken pic)

Aqueduct top. (Ken pic)

Aqueduct. Collapse section showing. Stone pillar. Ian, Doug, Ria, George. (Ken pic)

Then following out along the race to the other end of McIntyre Road, and across it to the far end of the race where the track comes out on Longridge Road. Down the road and back to the cars. What could have been a very short day comfortably filled out to be more satisfyingly longer. Must ask those landowners how that other track gets you to the falls. And must check out whether the old track is still navigable. – Ian
5. 3/8/2005. Both. School House, Craiglowan Falls, – Whare Flat. Leaders: Judy, Jacqui, Hazel
4. 6/8/2003. Both. Craiglowan Falls. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Hazel, Barbara L, Mary M.
3. 19/7/2003. Craiglowan Falls.
Craiglowan Falls

Craiglowan Falls

Craiglowan Falls. Ian

Craiglowan Falls. Ian

Upstream from top of Craiglowan Falls.

Upstream from top of Craiglowan Falls.

Overlooking top of Craiglowan Falls.

Overlooking top of Craiglowan Falls.

Old Aquaduct. Doug.

Old Aqueduct. Doug.

Top of old aquaduct.

Top of old aqueduct.

2. 30/8/2000 Craiglowan Falls, Whare Flat. Leaders: Mavis, Winifred, Val
1. 16/4/1997. Craig Lowan Falls from Bull Ring. Leaders:Hugh, Val, Judy C

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Oct 10 2018

Greengage Track

Published by under Trampers

3. 10/10/2018. Trampers. Greengage Circuit. Leaders: Arthur and Gordon.

Daylight arrived with a warm norwest breeze and a bright sky – but the forecast was not good.

Nine energetic trampers ceparted the car park at 8.30 a.m. for an early start. Passing through the locked gate on Rollinsons Road, we parked at the ‘elbow’ and began our tramp from there.

Going down the Rainguage Track for half an hour took us to the start of the Greengage Track, which we followed. Getting ever steeper took us to the stream …

Hiking down into Silverstream. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… at the bottom, which we crossed – this being part of the Silverstream.

Now for the best part of the day. We had a 30 metre rope

Waiting to climb out of S:stream. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to assist our climb out of the stream bed. The reward at the top was the smoko stop.

Waiting their turn on the rope. (Gordon pic and caption.)

From here it was the long climb up onto, …

Nearly there. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… and to the top of Green Ridge. It was rather tough going at first but the grade eased as we progress upward.

Heading up to Silver Peaks Track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Around 11.30 a.m. low cloud descended, with dampness in the air. Near the top of Green Ridge, a lunch halt was called in a cosy sheltered place.

A much needed lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After the welcome food and rest, it was only a few more minutes to the main Sliver Peaks Track. After the track we had been on, it was like a highway!

Turning right, (we turned right at every junction we came to today, except the first and the last ones), we followed it to “Sleepy Hollow“. After a brief rest stop, we were now on the Swampy Ridge Track, which had about 1 km of very muddy track to contend with.

By the time we reached Rollinsons Track, the rain was falling.

A little over half an hour would have us back at the cars, bu we were exposed, and out in the open now. It got colder too, and flurries of snowflakes were observed.

All arrived back at the cars in good condition and in a happy frame of mind. Warm but damp to some degree thoughts turned to home and hot showers, etc.

We had tramped about 15 km, in mostly good conditions, and with a very worthwhile tramp to our credit. Thanks to all. – Art.

2. 20/1/2016. Trampers. Greengage Track, anti-clockwise.
Ten hardy souls set off from sunny Mosgiel for a hard tramp. Travelled up past the scout camp and up to Rollinsons road where we parked our cars.
Within the first 10 mins on the Rollinsons track, some of us had wet feet. One can see why they call this area swampy. Lovely views as we went along our way.

Lovely views. (Helen pic)

Lovely views. (Helen pic)

Alas the fog came in and we could not see much. It was nice and warm though. Walked over swampy summit tramp.

Swampy Track. (Helen pic)

Swampy Track. (Helen pic)

Across to Green Hut? (Helen pic)

Across to Green Hut? (Helen pic)

Morning tea stop was about 5 mins from the Green hut.

Morning Tea Stop (Helen pic)

Morning Tea Stop (Helen pic)

Went onto the Green Hut track then Greengage track.  This track not used a lot.

Track not used a lot. (Helen pic)

Track not used a lot. (Helen pic)

Lunch on this track. Carried along then onto Raingage track and back up to the cars. Lots of quite hard walking up and down slippery hills. A few of us did some bum sliding in patches. Abseiling down about 20 meters and crossing a creek were part of our day. A few stiff bodies as we finished the walk.  Lovely to have our search and rescue team Dermot and Fin the dog with us.

Fin, the dog. (Helen pic)

Fin, the dog. (Helen pic)

A hard tramp but was very enjoyable. – Helen

1. 27/8/2014. Greengage Track.

Greengage Tramp. GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Greengage Tramp. GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 12.5 km; moving time 3 hrs 45 mins; Ave 3.3 km/hr; Climbed 780 mtrs. [That’s getting close to 1 km straight up !!]

On what turned out to be a very nice day for tramping, 4 of us set out to do a tramp on a newly opened track, namely Greengage track. This runs from Rain Gauge Spur track, over to Green Ridge track.
Having cajoled a key from the DCC for the locked gate on Rollinsons Rd. we parked up at the elbow, & made our way over to Raingauge Spur track. Then it was quite a lengthy walk down here, for about 3/4 hr [ including a morning tea stop] from the car before we got to the turn off onto Greengage track. As nobody had done this tramp before, we were all looking forward to it, but didn’t realise just how hard it would be. The track is quite steep, & drops all the way down into the valley, where you cross a stream [ part of the Silverstream headwaters] & clamber out the other side with the help of a rope, which has been thoughtfully put there. From here it is a steep climb nearly all the way up to Green Ridge track, where we arrived about 12:30, & then we walked along the short distance to the Green Hut site, where we had lunch, & a well deserved break.

Lunch stop at Green Hut site. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop at Green Hut site. (Ken pic and caption)

The return journey was supposed to retrace our steps, but I couldn’t face the prospect of climbing all the way back down into the valley, & then climbing all the way back up to the car, I put it to the others that we could take an easier way out via Green Ridge track, & then onto the Swampy Ridge track, then along Rollinsons Track back to the car, this was accepted without protest.
So after lunch we set off again, & turning onto the Swampy Ridge track, we soon discovered why it is called “Swampy” , as there were lots & lots of very wet muddy stretches, which were ankle deep in places. We eventually found the entrance to Rollinsons Track, & made our way cautiously along the first part of this, as markers were conspicuous by their absence. The last half was well marked, & the climb out to the car, up the very wet track [running water] was useful for cleaning our boots !!
This tramp is not recommended for unfit persons !! I was suitably shattered when we arrived back at the car. – Ken.

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Oct 10 2018

Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip

Published by under Trampers,Year round

click to enlarge
Cloud Forest and Escarpment

Map: Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Telegraph (Old Bridal) track to Pigeon Flat, Escarpment Track, Cowan Rd, Short Cut to Fox Rd, down to Sullivans Dam

8. 10/10/2018. Sullivans Dam. Cloud Forest, Transmission Line. Return. M. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.

Morning tea at Sullivan’s Dam. (Clive pic and caption.)

Up through the trees. (1) (Clive pic and caption.)

Up through the trees. (2) (Clive pic and caption.)

At the top before the rain set in. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch sheltering from the rain. (Clive pic and caption.)

7. 20/7/2016. Hikers. Sullivans Dam. Cloud Forest, Transmission Line, Round trip to Lookout and Leith Saddle. Return. M. Leaders: Pam, Ian.
22 Hikers turned up. 14 went to Transmission line, 11 did ‘Leith loop’ (a first for us). – Ian.
View of some of the stepping stone steps.

Some of the multiple ‘stepping stone’ steps – on one of the easier gradients. [Ed: Have seen such nowhere else.]

Lunch at Transmission line.

Lunch at Transmission line at top of Cloud Forest track.

Bluesman Bay view from Transmission Line lunch spot. (Adrienne pic.)

Blueskin Bay view from Transmission Line lunch spot. (Adrienne pic.)

Dunedin view from lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Dunedin view from lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Dam view from where? - Lookout? (Adrienne pic.)

Sullivan’s Dam view from  Lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Ends of track down from Lookout, on Leith Saddle end of Pigeon Flat Road. (Adrienne pic.)

Ends of track down from the Lookout Loop, on Leith Saddle end of Pigeon Flat Road. (Adrienne pic.)

6. 9/3/2011. Trampers. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip.

Pines up ahead, through which and around we have to go.

At the foot of a rocky bluff we had to climb around.

On the top of the bluff. (Apologies for badly aimed shot.)

It was an great tramp. Some challenges, like having to crawl on knees over the huge rocks, crawling under some gigantic fallen trees, going through bush so dense that we couldn’t see the ground, pushing our way through gorse and holding on to trees to swing through a few muddy patches. A couple of times there was some discussion on which way to go, but with our two awesome experienced leaders, Ian and Doug, we were soon headed in the correct direction.
A small problem for the ladies was some cattle in a paddock we had to go through, first Dawn was too nervous to move when the beasts started coming towards her, but Ian assured her they were only curious.   After waiting for Pam and Jill to appear, Ian decided to investigate, so he climbed back through the fence and went back up the paddock to find two more ladies nervous of the cattle.  He confidently escorted them down the rest of the way.
The tramp took 6 hours but didn’t seem that long with great company and the best escorts, it was a wonderful experience and I look forward to many more. – Dawn.

It was disappointing to find much of the Escarpment Track so overgrown. It had evidently not been tramped very often lately.

But thanks to those who have looked after the short-cut from Cowan Road through the trees down to Fox Road, and further on, to those who had trimmed back the gorse from the track down through the regenerating forestry. – Ian.

(5.) 12/8/2009 Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip. CANCELLED. BAD WEATHER. Leaders: Bill, Doug.

The following photos taken on RECCE!:

Sullivans Dam

Sullivans Dam. (Bill pic)

Blueskin Bay from Telegraph Track

Blueskin Bay from Telegraph Track. (Bill pic)

Track notice

Track notice. (Bill pic)

Boulders

Boulders recently climbed. (Bill pic). Doug.

Vert. Escarpment

Mud on Escarpment. (Bill pic). Doug.

4. 22/7/2009 Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests of Leith, Lookout, Leith Saddle, Pipe Line back to Dam. Leaders: L Gowans, B Harvey.
3. 18/7/2007 Leaders: Abe, Ian

From Sullivans Dam, we made our way through

Tea Break. Ian, George, Tash, Helen.

Cloud Forest, crossed Pole track, crossed Telegraph/Bridal Track, North face of Mt Cargill, down Cowan Road, Short-cut to cross Bridal Track,

Down Cowan Road. Keith, George, Arthur H, Glenice, Diane (obscured), Helen, Tash, Ian.

through cleared forestry,

Down through cleared forestry. Ian, Helen, Diane, Arthur, Keith, Tash

McCutcheon paddocks, up pipe line back to dam.

2. 30/11/2005. Trampers. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Escarpment, Cowan Road. Round trip Leaders: Bill & Pat, Bruce
1. 20/7/2005. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Escarpment, Cowan Road. Round trip. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Bruce.

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Sep 26 2018

Doctors Point, McKessar, Mopanui, Ridgeline

Published by under Beach,Trampers

8. 26/9/2018. Hikers. Mopanui Ridgeline Track. Leaders: Bob and Jan.

17 hardy hikers braved the elements & set out to walk the Mopanui Ridgeline Track (also known as White’s Track).   2 cars travelled up Mount Cargill Road into Mopanui Road where we commenced our hike.  2 cars drove around Doctors Point Road and parked up beside the railway line (our destination) then Bob drove the passengers up to Mopanui Road in his 12 seater to join the rest of the party and have our morning tea in a sheltered area before setting off.

It was a gusty wind that followed us down the track but we managed to keep on our feet and soon came to an area with a canopy of tall trees which was a welcome relief.

(Jan B. pic.)

We came out to a clearing again and it was a short walk down to the finish of the track where we had an early lunch in the shelter of the rock wall behind us.

(Jan B. pic.)

We climbed over the stile

(Jan B. pic.)

and made our way down the road, stopping to view Warrington beach and the township beyond

(Jan B. pic.)

then continued on down the road to our cars.  We transported the drivers who had their cars back up the hill and a few of us walked the 1k or so back to Blueskin Cafe for refreshments and a chat.
A good day out and no-one got blown away!!
– Jan & Bob

7. 25/5/2016. Trampers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Osborne Rd, Purakanui Station Rd, McKessar Rd, Deer Fence, White Rd, Doctors Point Rd. M. Leaders: Neil and Carole.

Wednesday 25th was the perfect day – light cloud, blue seas, 2kph breeze, when 10 trampers assembled at Orokonui (Waitati) junction and headed over to Doctors Point parking area at 9.45am.

The walk along the beach and through the arches (almost dry-footed) led us to the rocky foreshore.  However the tide being an hour off low-tide required boulder-hopping skills on the cliff side of the rocks to ensure dry feet….

Start and round rocks. (Helen pic and caption.)

Start and round rocks. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beyond the rocks we had morning tea under a lone pine tree and then moved on to circuit the Pa site and admire the view.

Beach from the Pa. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beach from the Pa. (Helen pic and caption.)

On to the beach, Osborne Road which we branched off to walk through the pines and view the old Maori Cemetery (Purakaunui Urupa) which a couple had not been to before. 35 minutes later we returned to the road following the estuary, turned into Purakanui Station Road and uphill to the railway line.

Lunchtime:  3 minutes on, no gorse, no blackberries in the middle of the walking track so a good place to sit!  (Not the railway track.)

Lunch up above railway line. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch up above railway line. (Helen pic and caption.)

We passed the old stone house relics at the lower end of McKessler track where someone was doing reparation work for the owner, Jill Hamel, an 84 year old archaeologist who lives in Anne Street, Roslyn.  (Neil rang and spoke to this lady!)

Continued up McKesslar track which ends at the road by the Orokonui predator fence and the drystone wall.

Beautiful rock wall up top of tramp. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beautiful rock wall up top of tramp. (Helen pic and caption.)

We followed the deer fence down, turned into ‘gorse alley’, bypassed an uncleared section by going through a paddock and then back onto the now excellent lower track.  Looking across the slightly misty tidal flats …

Moody view over Estuary. (Helen pic and caption.)

Moody view over Estuary. (Helen pic and caption.)

… and down to White Road brought us back to our cars at 3.00 pm after 14.5 kms. Pleasant tramping days tend to end at the local coffee shop and this was no exception.- Carole.

6. 9/10/2013. Trampers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Osborne Rd, Purakanui Station Rd, McKessar Rd, Deer Fence, White Rd, Doctors Point Rd. Medium.

GPS of McKessar route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, Osbourne, McKessar Track, Deer Fence, White Road.

I messed up with the GPS, as I forgot to turn it off when we got back to the car. However, we estimate that we walked approx 13km [as it was 8.? something to the top of McKessar Track, ] We climbed about 350mtrs to the highest point, which was the top of McKessar Track.

5 of us made our way along Doctor’s Point beach to the Mapoutahi Pa site, where we had morning tea just after 10am in the shelter of a large Macrocarpa tree. We then went & explored the Pa site for a while, before setting off along the Access Rd to Osbourne, where a climb up to the railway line set the blood circulating a bit faster.
The walk up McKessar Track was interesting, as it has been completely cleared, the water tables have been cleaned out, & gravel has been spread on some parts as well. During lunch break,…

Lunch at McKessar Track

Lunch at McKessar Track. (Ken pic and caption.)

… we had a visit from a man who works for the two women who own the land there, & he filled us in with quite a bit of knowledge on the area etc. We also had a discussion on which way to go down to Doctors Point again, either along the Orokonui fence, or down the deer fence. He was sure that the deer fence route was not available, but as I had rung Ian on his cell phone from our lunch spot, & he had told us to go down the deer fence, that is what we decided to do, & that worked out OK, with just a bit of gorse on the way down the 4WD track below the deer fence to negotiate. It was then just a walk along White Rd, & Doctors Point Rd back to the cars.
All agreed that it was a good day, especially after we stopped off at the Waitati Coffee shop for refreshments on the way home!- Ken

5. 21/3/2013. Ken and Ian found the gorse alongside the deer fence had been sprayed and passage was possible again. But ascent to Mopanui from McKessar Track, although the track is detectable at both ends has still a middle bit where we could not find a way through to the track on the other side! Perhaps two, one coming down from Mopanui and another up from McKessar, equipped with radio contact could find the way through, because that part must not be very extensive.

4. 27/5/2009 Trampers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Osborne Rd, Purakanui Station Rd, McKessar Rd, Mopanui, Mopanui Rd, White Rd, Doctors Point Rd. Medium+. Leader: Ian

The feeling was magical starting out on the beach on such a clear morning.
click to enlarge

Beach expanse. Doctors Point. Cave in distance.

Beach expanse. Doctors Point. Cave in distance. Beach expanse. Doctors Point. Cave in distance.

The tide was so far out it was easy to walk even round the outside of the caves, to stop for morning tea at the far end of Canoe Beach.

Morning Tea. Canoe Beach. Looking back at cave.

Morning Tea. Canoe Beach. Looking back at cave. Morning Tea. Canoe Beach. Looking back at cave.

We were shocked to find the road from the beach under so much flooding. After MUCH thought, there was nothing for it but to charge? through.

Ria carefully negotiating flooded road just up from beach.

Ria carefully negotiating flooded road just up from beach.

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Sep 19 2018

Tramps associated with Saddle Hill

[No. 7 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Creamery Rd. Ocean View. C Hughes. Farm. Lambing.”
Not during lambing September to October.
USE STILE AT END OF CREAMERY ROAD.
No. 84 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Taieri View (Blairs) (East Taieri) Farm”
No. 104 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Old Brighton Rd – Clevelands – Saddle Hill (See George Haggie) Farm”]

19/9/2018. Trampers. Saddle Hill circuit. Leader: Eleanor.

On a very warm spring morning 14 trampers set off from Quarry road and walked up Coal Stage and Saddle Hill roads then down McMaster road.  Enjoying a great display of Kowhai in full bloom, also a mix of blossom and animals along the way.  One member recalls riding horses as a girl on a property we passed.

Just the best Kowhai forest around. (Phil pic and caption.)

We enjoyed smoko break overlooking the ocean.  At this point with the sun shining brightly upon us, we decided to do an add on.

Welcome morning tea break after earlier start. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Turning onto Old Brighton road we headed to Fairfield, then crossed over to Flower street walked up the couple of hills crossing a stile into the water tank paddock.  Once again (on both sides of the rather steep stile) with more great views, lunch and chatting was enjoyed.

View of Kaikorai Valley from lunch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Donkeys on Chain Hill road. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We then walked along Chain Hill road and back down Quarry road to our cars.

View of Mosgiel from overbridge. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Blend was the chosen coffee shop, we enjoyed catching up with 2 members unable to tramp on the day.
We reckon we walked 15 km, give or take a little.
Great to be back out with such an enthusiastic group of friends.
– Cheers Eleanore

12/2/2017.

Route map

38. 6/4/2016. Both. A Circumnavigation of Saddle Hill, majoring on the seaward slopes. Leaders: Bob, Doug and Arthur.
The Hikers' easier route. The trampers took the beach.

The Hikers took the bus,  the Trampers, the beach.

Apr 6 Tramp Saddle Hill 2016. ... Distance not counting the bus travel 10.2 km. (Bruce pic and caption)

Apr 6 Tramp Saddle Hill 2016. … Distance not counting the bus travel 10.2 km. (Bruce pic and caption)

Trampers’ Report. Saddle Hill to the Sea. – Arthur.

Being the first Wednesday of the month, this was a combined operation. Together with the Hikers, our group parked beside the wool-shed on Saddle Hill Road, before walking through the “Saddle” and down through farmland on the other side. Special thanks to the landowners for giving us permission to do so. A suitable spot was found at 10 o’clock for morning tea.

The 27 of us at morning tea

All twenty-seven of us at morning tea, part-way down the slope.

The view from our morning tea spot

The view from our morning tea spot.

The two groups then split, with the Trampers forging ahead, as they had further to walk. We had 8 trampers now, and it was noticed that the 2 men were outnumbered by the ladies.

Continuing down through the sheep farm we climbed a style out on to Creamery Road. Going down the road now, we could view several lifestyle blocks with new houses on them. At the bottom of the hill a large contractor’s yard had obviously had much money spent on it.

Contractor's Yard

Contractor’s Yard

We arrived down at the main road to Brighton at Ocean View. After a short walk along the road we were able to gain access to the beach at the car-park (Freedom Campers spot). Good use of the facilities here was made for a comfort stop.

The tide was well out, just beginning to come back in, allowing us to walk on good firm sand for several kilometres. Other people were making use of the beach too – walking, exercising dogs and especially horses.

The Kaikorai Stream was closed to the sea, allowing us to return to the road on the Waldronville side, past the Pistol Shooting Club. The walk along the beach took a neat hour. We found a suitable lunch stop beside the car park at the road.

The Trampers' lunch spot. (Helen pic)

The Trampers’ lunch spot. (Helen pic)

From there we had to walk across the bridge and along the road a short distance. It was a little difficult climbing through a fence back onto farmland – several comments were made at this time about some not being as young as they used to be!

Trampers. A fence scramble. (Helen pic)

Trampers. A fence scramble. (Helen pic)

With the Green Park Cemetery on our left we had a very pleasant uphill walk through the large field, but with one especially steep pinch, before squeezing around the end of a gate and out onto the Old Brighton Road – closed long ago by a large slip.

Along the Old Road and then up McMaster Road a short distance, before taking a short-cut through private property. A donkey brayed a welcome as we passed, and then the lady was gardening at the house.

Coming back onto McMaster Road, we found three of the Hikers talking to the man of the house at his mailbox. The road levelled off, and soon we were back to Saddle Hill Road where we caught up with the Hikers with about a kilometre to go.

There were good views from here of Mosgiel, …

Mosgiel from lookout.

Mosgiel from lookout.

… the Taieri and beyond. In fact we had great views all day on this tramp, and good weather to go with them.

Our combined tramp could not have been more successful, as both groups began and finished the day together.

A big thank-you to Bob for this. Everyone was back to the cars by 2.15 p.m. The Trampers covered a distance of about 14 km (estimated).

***** SAFE TRAMPING IS NO ACCIDENT *****

– Arthur.

Hikers’ Report.

As Arthur has covered most of the day’s main points, this need be only a supplementary one.

Where Creamery Road joins Brighton Road, various options emerged.  Some drifted off: one had a car waiting for her, another walked to her home nearby, others shortened their walk by walking on the seaward side of the road to earlier catch the bus to Brighton and back. The remainder walked towards Brighton and waited at a convenient bus stop to catch the returning bus. The driver put on a mock-stern display, questioning our age entitlement and closely examining our Gold Cards. We had made his day, as we disported ourselves around his empty bus. From the Green Park Cemetery gates we made our way uphill behind the cemetery and were surprised (well, this reporter was) to see the beginnings of an eco-burial site of about twelve plots, aligned alongside a clump of bush, each plot planted with a native plant.

We lunched in a sheltered spot a little further on up the hill.

Hikers at lunch part way up hill.

Hikers at lunch part way up hill.

…. Much further on, as we turned from McMaster Road into Saddle Hill Road,  we were surprised and delighted to find ourselves caught up by the Trampers . The timing couldn’t have been better. Excellent planning, Bob. This has to have turned out the most rewarding “together-Tramp” yet!  – Ian.

37. 23/7/2014 Hikers. Greenpark Cemetery, McMaster Road, Creamery Road, Brighton Road, Beach. return. M. Leaders: Bob, Janice.

Cars parked at the southern entrance to the Green Park Cemetery. The leaders took us directly up through paddock from behind the cemetery, to swing right …
GPS

GPS of round route from Greenpark Cemetery south gate.

… and continue on
Blackhead

View en route. Blackhead (Liz pic)

Green Island

Green Island

Another view en route. Green Island (Liz pic, using zoom lens, no doubt.)
to eventually reach the style at the top of Creamery Road. Down the road to the Brighton Road, north along here to drop of Bruce and Marjorie at the home and on to the Ocean View domain for lunch.

Out onto the beach and a long walk to arrive near the Kaikorai Estaury. Through sand hills, skirt estaury, through horse yards, out onto the Brighton Road, and back along to the cars.
29/9/2010. Trampers. Saddle Hill from Old Brighton Road. Leaders: Keith and Glenis.

GPS Route Map, courtesy Ken.

Eight of us set off over a paddock much hollowed with slumps betraying old coal mine workings, caused probably by wooden props long since rotted, up towards Saddle Hill. (See last pic below.) As we approached the bush ahead of us, we were glad to be able to follow a cleared track that wound up to our left, foregoing the former track we used to take to the right, now heavily infested with gorse. The track further up was well grassed, but just SO boggy and wet, although drier in places. One such place was ideal for an early morning tea.

Morning Tea on log. (Ken pic)

On up through a second property and we crossed McMasters Road into a third property taking us up to the bush around Saddle Hill.

Bush track entrance.

The track through the bush took us round to the seaward side grassy slope and then it was up to another bush entrance for the last push to the top (473m, according to Ken), where there were views galore for our cameras. 11.00 a.m. and far too early for lunch.

Emma (Ken pic)

Saddle Hill trig. (Emma pic)

Mosgiel from Saddle Hill (Ken pic)

View south from Saddle Hill

We made our way down over a very bouldery grass paddock to Saddle Hill road, round into McMasters Road again to reach the place we had ascended, and then it was back down again. We found a most pleasant lunch spot softened by thick pine needles and sheltered in by pines. Then it was down and through the much-slumped paddock back to the cars.

Coal Mine slumps.

36. 27/2/2008. Hikers. Saddle Hill, Taieri Lookout. Medium. Leaders: Dot Bennett, Chris.

35. 25/1/2006. Trampers. Saddle Hill from Stevensons Farm. Medium. Leaders: George, Hazel.

34. 27/4/2005. Both. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill, Watts BushLeaders: Joyce, Hazel, Eleanor W, Eleanor B

33. 14/4/2004. Trampers. Saddle Hill via Creamery Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug J, Molly

Saddle Hill Hotel

32. 19/5/2004. Both. Saddle Hill, Pearsons Farm. Medium. Leaders: Pat, Bill, Betty, Ann
Doug, Bev H, Irene on slope background Kaikorai Estuary

Doug, Bev H, Irene on slope background

Kaikorai Estuary

Similar shot.

Similar shot.

Bob M and others descending seaward side.

Bob M and others descending seaward side.

31. 9/5/2004. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Betty B, Anne R
Saddle Hill stop. (Bob pic).

Saddle Hill stop. (Bob pic).

30. 5/11/2003 Creamery Road. Leaders: Ocean View Dot B, Chris
29. 5/11/2003. Hikers. Creamery Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot B, Chris.
28. 11/6/2003. Both. Saddle Hill through Pearsons.
Year round. Park overhead bridge. Contacts: Seek permissions. The Grange. Phone for appointment for permission to tramp on this property. “We like to see you face to face.” (Paddock with coal mine entrance and tram line track)
Park cars at motorway overhead bridge. Leaders: George, Hazel, Jack & Rosemary.
hotel

Doug, Catherine. Old hotel

Old Mine entrance. Arthur.

Arthur by hidden mine entrance.

Hi, Shirley. Bob on east side climb.

Hi, Shirley. Bob on east side climb.

old

foundations; tram track gap

tram

Coal Mine old Tram Track

27. 20/11/2002. Hikers. Creamery Road, Ocean View. Easy. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Muriel.
26.30/1/2002. Alt. Creamery Road – Watts Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Lesley W.
25. 7/2/2001. Creamery Road, Watts Bush. Leaders: Nelso and Dot, Winifred.
24. 7/2/2001. Creamery Road, Watts Bush. Leaders: Nelso and Dot, Winifred.
23. 9/8/2000. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: George, Hazel, Molly
22. 9/8/2000. Saddle Hill – Walnut Grove. Park Overhead Bridge.Leaders: George, Hazel, Molly.

21. 31/5/2000 Saddle Hill, Law Road, from carpark. Long Tramp. Leaders: Lance & Lois, Betty B

20. 7/2/2000 Creamery Road Finnies, McIntosh (frmly Watts) Bush, return Scroggs Hill, Brighton Road, Beach. Nelson & Dot, Winnifred

19. 8/12/1999. Creamery Road, Watts Bush, Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Bob H.

18. 25/8/1999. Car Park, Saddle Hill, Law Road. Long tramp. Leaders: Frank and Lesley, Arthur and Barbara.
Return Silverstream to car park. Long tramp. Leaders: Wendy, Evelyn M, Eleanor B, Hartmann
17. 24/3/1999. Creamery Road – Ocean View. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, W W.
16. 20/5/1998. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret D.
15. 1997 Saddle Hill, Jaffrays Farm, East Taieri Scouts Hall. Leaders: George, Betty B, Wendy
14. 26/11/1997. Saddle Hill, Fulton Hogans, Hills Clevelands etc. 5 hour tramp. Leaders: George, Betty B, Wendy.
13. 13/8/1997. Saddle Hill, Scroggs Hill, Walnut Grove. Leaders: Les W, Frank, Jack M.
12. 2/10/1996. McLeods – Saddle Hill. Average. Meet Ocean View carpark. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Pat
11. 6/9/1995. Creamery Road, Watts Bush, Scroggs Hill. Medium.Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H, Chris
10. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hill, Fairfield. Medium. Meet at Fulton Hogan Yard, Old Brighton Road. Leaders: Rob Q, Nelson & Dot, Molly
9. 24/7/1996. Jaffrays and Saddle Hill from East Taieri Scout Hall. Average.  Leaders: Dot T, Les and Mavis.
8. 15/6/1994. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill, Watts Walk (now Finnies, McIntosh), Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Chris, Joan H.
7. 28/7/1993. Start from car park, Saddle Hill to Law Road. Long Tramp. Leaders: Wendy, Evelyn M, Eleanor B, Hartmann
6. 23/6/1993 Creamery Road Finnies, Watts Bush (now McIntosh), return Scroggs Hill. Medium but long. Cars at Ocean View Picnic Ground. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Jack M, Joyce S
5. 20/11/1989. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: Mavis, Peg A, Margaret S, Daphne
4. 30/3/1988 Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill. A little bit of history. Meet at Saddle Hill Lookout. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A
3. 18/9/1991 Green Park – Saddle Hill, returning via Hare Street and beach. Splendid coastal views. Cars meet at Green Park Cemetery. Average. George, Eric & Dot,  Les W
2. 20/9/1989 Creamery Road, Ocean View. Average. Meet Ocean View carpark. Leaders: Mary Y, Daphne, Betty B, Margaret D
1. 24/3/1989 Creamery Road, Ocean View. Leaders: Doug M, Eleanor W

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Sep 12 2018

Government Track and beyond

Published by under Trampers

32 km from carpark.
2.5+ hours from road to pole-line and Styx Road.
No. 22 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Government Track Waipori Rd. Year Round.”
Link:  DCC: Mountain biking on Government Track
Link: DCC: Government Track map.
[DCC brochure extract: Government Track. 4 hr 30 min, 17 km (return).
The track entrance is 5 km down Waipori Falls Rd on the right; parking is 100 m further on the left. Traversing the slopes of the beech-and mānuka-forested Waipori Valley south of Dunedin, the Government Track was built in the 1860s to provide access to the central goldfields. For mountain bikers there is an option of riding up and returning the same way. Alternatively, once at the top follow the pylon track left and steeply down into Waipori township, then follow the road back to the start.]

28. 12/9/2018. Hikers. Government Track. Leaders: Clive and Lester.

25 Hiker set out from beside the Waipori River.

Hiker set out. (Clive pic and caption.)

At first the track was slippery and boggy. Then as we got up into the bush a walk up a steady incline was enjoyed by all.

Morning tea on the track. (Clive pic and caption.)

Until….  we hit the next patch of boggy ground and we had to negotiate more slippery track, made a bit worse by the cattle that had churned up the path. The weather was kind and we made it to the 5km mark before deciding that was far enough and returned to the open paddock for lunch.

Lunch in the sunshine. (Clive pic and caption.)

We then made our way back the way we had come trying to find the less slippery and boggy part of the path. The views from up the top were great.

The view up the Waipori River Valley. (Clive pic and caption.)

We all made it safely to the cars and then onto Topiary for afternoon tea.  – Clive & Lester

27. 25/7/2018. Trampers. Government Track. Leader: Sue.

Still quite cool. (Gordon pic and caption.)

A rocky slip. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Another obstacle. (Gordon pic and caption.)

A well deserved late lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

26. 30/8/2017. Trampers. Government Track. M. Leader: Dave.

14 keen  trampers met at the carpark near the start of the Government track on Waipori Road.  We soon started on the track noting the 4 twisted manuka trunks at the side of the track.  The track has a gentle grade and is 8.5km long.

The reason for the gentle grade and generous width of this track lies in its origin as the original “road” from Berwick through to the Waipori gold fields. Over 20 men were employed during the 1860’s to form this publicly-funded work, which was never much more than a bridle track unsuitable for wheeled traffic. When completed, it provided a cheaper alternative route to bring in supplies (horse drawn) from Dunedin, which previously had to be carted round via Lawrence.

Morning tea was had over the style, up the ridge, in the sun and on time at 10am!

(Margreet pic.)

We continued up the track which is through native bush, mainly manuka, kanuka and silver beech

(Margreet pic.)

. There were occasional views out to the Waipori valley and surrounding hills. A number of big tree trunks lying over the track were either scrambled under or over. There was plenty of talking and hilarity on this trip which was great!

Lunch break was at the top of the track, again in the sun.

(Margreet pic.)

We then continued along the forestry road and stopped at the highest point (580 metres) where there were great views all around,

(Phil pic.)

particularly Maungatuas, Lammerlaws and Rock and Pillar range.  Moving on to the top of the kowhai spur we stopped to get panoramic views of the Taieri plain, very clear because of the fine day. The kowhai spur is aptly named as it is steep and feet can move to the front of your boots! The next break was at a farmer’s workers hut

(Margreet pic.)

before heading down the ridge, through some bush and back on to the bottom of the Government track.  A number of birds were heard and sighted including kereru (wood pigeon) and bellbirds. On getting back to the cars we found we had covered 18.5km. A fair walk!

It was then off to the wobbly goat (with some wobbly legs) in Outram for a well, deserved coffee and more chit chat.

A great group to be with – Dave M.

25. 23/11/2016. Hikers. Government Track. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

Route map courtesy Ian. (N.B.) Used shortcut route on return. Regular route a bit longer.)

Route map, Government Track, courtesy Ian. (N.B. Used old shortcut route on return. Regular route a bit longer.)

The party consisted of 23 people.

The weather’s appearance was indifferent.  But the Government track up the Waipori Gorge afforded good shelter in the bush.  The condition of the track was excellent [thanks to track-clearing by the leaders on their recce, especially on the zig-zag beginning – ed.] and this track has a very moderate consistent gradient.  The return was a slight downhill grade & a total of approximately 9.5 kms was covered. Lunch stop …

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch on Government Track. (Ian pic and caption.)

… was brief as there was drizzle approaching.   On the return to the car park some hikers took an old short cut which gave them a minute advantage.

Hot drinks were enjoyed at the Wobbly Goat in Outram, …

Last of the Summer Wine. (Adrienne pic.)

Last of the Summer Wine. (Adrienne pic.)

… before returning to Mosgiel. – Betty and Jim.

 24. 17/2/2016. Trampers. Government Track. Leader: Various.
At the car park, Bush Road, we looked towards the silver peaks. It was raining. We were told the wind was 50k plus, so we changed our mind and decided on the Government Track.
Arrived at the lower Waipori car park. In front of us was bright blackberries. To the left a tree full of apples, and a deafening sound of crickets.
Five of us set off up Government Track. Morning tea at the grass clearing. No wind, little sun.

At the top of the Government Track, we had lunch in the sun.

Lunch in the sun. (Helen pic)

Lunch in the sun. (Helen pic)

After lunch, walked along …

Along the pole line (Helen pic)

Along the pole line (Helen pic)

… and down the pole line to the hut.

Down the pole line to the hut (Heb pic and caption)

Down the pole line to the hut. (Heb pic and caption)

Turned right, found a tape marker which led us over and down to the style on the track just below where we had morning tea. Carried on down the track to the car park.
Heard lots of wood pigeons and bellbirds. A great day’s tramp. About 17k, and quite warm temperatures. – Heb.

23. 21/10/2015 Hikers. Government Track. Leaders: Betty and Jim.
22. 27/5/2015. Trampers. Government Track, return part Kowhai Spur.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Government Track-part of Kowhai Spur (Ken pic and caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Government Track-part of Kowhai Spur. Walked 17.1 km; ave 4.4 km/hr; moving time 3hr.54min; climbed 480mtrs. (Ken pic and caption)

The day looked suspect, with some light drizzle, but the turn out at the carpark was very good, & we had 6 members on our adventure for the day. We motored out to the carpark at the Government Track where it was cold & still drizzling, so it was on with the rain jackets before we set off. Once into the bush, the rain became a non issue, but everybody kept their jackets on to combat the cold.
We had a short stop for morning tea,
1. Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic)

1. Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic)

then pushed on towards the very muddy part of the track, just before the open grassed area, where we hoped that our planned route would bring us back to on the return journey. The track was in excellent condition, as it had just been cleared, apart from some large trees down across the upper part, which we had to crawl under.We stopped just short of the top for lunch, as there was a cool wind blowing, & the bush gave us shelter. Then it was onto the Poleline track…
2. Looking back along Poleline track. (Ken pic and caption)

2. Looking back along Poleline track. (Ken pic and caption)

…which had some snow remnants lying on it.
3. Trudging through the snow grass. (Ken pic and caption)

3. Trudging through the snow grass. (Ken pic and caption)

We estimated the distance to the top of Kowhai Spur to be about 1Km, but were surprised to find it was actually over 2kms, but when we got to the top & looked down on the amazing views of the Taieri & surrounds,
4. View from top of Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

4. View from top of Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

5. another view from top. (Ken pic and caption)

5. another view from top. (Ken pic and caption)

it was worth the trudge through the snow. We made our way down the steep track till we came to the hut on the true right of the spur,
6. Hut where we turned off Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

6. Hut where we turned off Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

where we left the spur, & went down through a very steep paddock heading back to the Government Track. This part of the trip was quite hard, due to the steepness, & the muddy tracks formed by cattle movement. However, we were soon within sight of the Government Track, & didn’t even have to climb a fence to get back onto it. We came out at the first fence with a stile over it, [the boundary of the privately owned land] on the uphill side of the grassed area. Then it was a brisk walk back to the cars, & the trip home, punctuated with a stop at Outram…
7. Latest Cafe footwear fashion. (Ken pic and caption)

7. Latest Cafe footwear fashion. (Ken pic and caption)

8. Trampers coffee club. (Ken pic and caption)

8. Trampers coffee club. (Ken pic and caption)

…for the “Trampers Coffee Club”. – Ken.
21. 12/6/2013. Trampers. Government Track. Styx Rd return.
6 trampers ventured out for the walk up Government Track today. We stopped at a “dry area” for morning tea, at about 10am, then carried on to the top at Styx Rd. where we had lunch in the sun. The sign at the bottom had said 2 1/2 hrs to the top, & that’s very much what it took us.
Lunch

Lunch at top of Government Track. (Ken pic and caption)

After lunch we had a discussion on whether we tried Kowhai Spur, or just go back down the way we had come. The unknown condition of Kowhai Spur [very steep & slippery] meant that the decision was made to go back the way we had come, so we set off, & arrived back at the cars at 3:00pm.
Thanks to the earlier start time of 9:00 instead of 9:30, we were able to complete this 18.5km walk before it got too cold in the afternoon, & it gave us a time buffer if somebody had injured themselves.
We walked 18.5km
moving time 4hr 15mins
climbed 364mtrs
– Ken.
20. 3/10/2012. Both. Government Track. Leaders: Graham, Judy.
There were 17 of us, (but one turned back before the paddock). We did between 8-10 km in total, getting up to the beech section for lunch (much further than the Hikers did last time). The wind across the farm paddock was as severe as the last time the Trampers had done it. Several in the group were doing the track for their first time and were equally amazed at the ease of the gradient, and appalled at the muddy section just prior to the paddock. (They didn’t know how much better the present marked route was than some earlier routes through the slough.) This, and some other tricky bits took careful negotiating for those unsteady on their feet.
Four of the Trampers left early and did the whole track. Ken’s GPS record shows that they did 18.2 km at 4.4km/hr average. Moving time was only 4hrs 9min.Total ascent was 523 mtrs. They took an extended lunch break, making stopped time 1hr 19min. – Ian.
19. 6/4/2011. Both. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret.
There is no comment from the hikers on this one, so here is a report from the trampers.
It mitigated against the intended ‘bothness’, but the leaders generously permitted three appreciative trampers to set off to do the whole track. The sign posts indicate 2.5 hours up and 2 hours down. The trampers almost made the 2 hours down but fell well short of the time up. 19 km there and back!
When we arrived at the ‘paddock’, the predicted wind was there in full force and it was a real battle to make our way across and around its slope and back into the shelter of the bush. The sloppy muddy gully just below the paddock gets no better as time goes by, despite the many attempts to re-route the track to avoid it.

GPS of Government Track from the road to the Pole Line. Courtesy Ken. Depicts how close Kowhai Spur is to the track. The multitude of gullies traversed by the track are clearly depicted. 19 km ret.

The track was well-cleared and the gradient as usual beautifully steady.

A shot of beech trees taken looking across one of the upper gullies.

Track disappearing up into the gully. Taken from the same spot as the one above.

The above pic shows only a modest amount of pig rooting. It was much worse in other places with us having to tread a new path amongst the upturned soil.
Temperatures were cooler up at the Pole Line so we retreated from it back from the gusty wind into the shelter of the manuka bush to munch a quick lunch. There was nothing tempting us to linger long.
Doug set a good pace on the return trip and the clear track allowed us to step it out with a good swing.
Back at the exposed paddock, we found the wind had lost none of its force, but fortunately it was a tail-wind this time. Then it was the atrocious gully again. The paddock and its gully had to be the worst features of the tramp. – Ian
18. 3/2/2010. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Neil, Lex.
Location: 30 km.
17. 9/9/2009 Government Track, return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Ian, Sabina.
Starting Government track. George

Beginning Government track. George, Susan

A bit further along the track. Susan, Sabina

A bit further along the track. Susan, Sabina, Glenice

Morning tea on the paddock.

Morning tea on the paddock. Susan, Ken, George, Glenice, Sabina

Through the silver beech section. Ken.

Through the silver beech section. Ken, George, Susan, Glenice, Sabina

Lunch at the pole line. George, Glenice

Lunch at the pole line. George, Glenice

Lunch on other side of track. Sabina, Susan

Lunch on other side of track. Sabina (showing her colourful hat), Susan

DOC sign pointing back down the track.

DOC sign indicating back down the track.

Start Kowhai Spur. Ken.

View from top of Kowhai Spur. Waipori Lake and Taieri River gorge beyond. Ken Susan, George, Glenice, Sabina.

Further down.

Shaws Hill road and ridge from a little further down Kowhai Spur. Sabina, Susan detectable.

Rest by former hut site. Glenice, Sabina

Preparing to rest near site of former hut which had been moved up the hill behind camera.. Glenice, Sabina

16. 17/9/2008 Waipori Gorge Area, 1860s Government Track, Waipori Leaders: Bill H, Peter B
The 'disturbed' kanuka

The ‘disturbed’ kanuka

The ‘disturbed’ kanuka

The programme said ‘Waipori’, but it really meant Bill H’s traditional walk up the “Gummint Track”. As a past long-serving employee in the area (both on a farm and in electricity supply) he was the ideal leader.  As slips had made the upper reaches of the track difficult, the 15 of us began walking from the end of the seal up the Waipori road, then crossing farmland and having morning tea beside the river. After that we were following the route taken by early prospectors up the steady incline of the old 1860s Government standardised track for drays and horses to the Central Otago Goldfields. After an initial 3-minute climb, the track maintains a remarkably consistent, gentle gradient considering theodolites were not used and the construction teams used handtools!  The day was calm and mild, and spring growth was evident in the lovely mixed broadleaf forest, with signs of fuschia flowers and kowhai. The track was carpeted with innumerable ’skellingtons’ of fuschia leaves (the fuschia is one of the few deciduous NZ trees) which made it soft and springy and patterned.There were also Kanuka, Matai, Totara and juvenile Lancewood. At one point there were 4 Kanuka alongside the track that must have had a disturbed childhood as they all had right-angle bends in them! The sound of the river gradually receded, and at lunchtime we came out onto cleared farmland with cattle and a good view up the gorge to look at while we ate. We returned by the same route.  There was some birdlife to remark upon– paradise ducks, bellbirds, warblers- but the most remarkable was at a willow tree on the river flat in which Arthur counted 13 wood pigeons, all greedily gorging great gulps of green tips.  A very pleasant walk of about 16km through lovely local terrain.  – Bob

15. 12/12/2007. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Bill H

Resting among the trees

Only seven hikers took advantage of the ideal place to be on a very warm & humid day, the lovely bush of the Government Track in the Waipori area. It is a lovely place for a hike. Beautiful bush and beech forest. Lots of birds singing in the trees and great views of surrounding bush and road to Waipori Falls. The track is not too difficult and although you go fairly high it is a relatively gentle climb most of the way. With only a small number we took our time and lapped up the cool and pleasant conditions of the track. Morning tea sitting by the track just after 10am, and then, about 12noon, 5 of us decided we would stop for lunch. Two of the group thought they’d like a bit more of a challenge so went further up the track and had lunch before heading back. Those of us in the larger group found a really lovely spot in the beech forest to sit, chat and enjoy our lunch break. Then it was back down the track, (down hill all the way!) to the cars. All agreed we had had a very enjoyable days hiking. – Bev.

14. 29/11/2006. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
13. 5/7/2006. Both. Government Track. Leaders: (Easy+): Doug M, Bob H; (Easy):  Arthur & Barbara
12. 21/9/2005 Arthur & Barbara, Bill H, Lance & Lois
11. 22/9/2004. Hikers. Government Track, return. Easy. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Frank and Lesley.
10. 26/5/2004 Lesley S, Irene, Les W, Mary M, Ray
9. 22/10/2003. Both. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Helen S, Kerri; Hikers: Mary M, Barbara L.
8. 13/2/2002. Combined. Government Track. Leaders:
7. 6/12/2000. Government Track. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Mary Y.
13/9/2000 Bill H, Bill & Pat
6. 7/7/1999. Government Track. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Ray.
5. 7/10/1998. Government Track. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
4. 16/7/1997. Government Track. Leaders: Hugh, Bill H, Lesley S
3. 23/10/1996. Hikers. Government Track, Waipori. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Ted.
2. 14/12/1994. Government Track. Easy. This is a morning walk only, and as it is our last official tramp for the year, please bring some finger food to share for lunch, to be eater at the picnic ground. Leaders: Denise, Mary Y, Les and Mavis.
1. 13/3/1991 Government Track, Waipori Gorge, return Kowhai Spur. Nice bush and tussock walk. Average+. Leaders: Denise, Hugh and Judith, Ria de J

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Sep 12 2018

Grahams Bush/Old Rd Car Park, Organ Pipes, Buttars Peak, Mount Cargill.

Published by under Trampers

Click Grahams Bush history for background information.
Click Mount Cargill history for background information.
No. 19 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sawyers Bay – Grahams Bush. M Deuchrass. Summer.”
Sawyers Bay Road 28 km from car park.

13. 12/9/2018. Trampers. Sawyers Bay/Mt: Cargill/Bethunes Gully/Upper Junction/Sawyers Bay. Leader: Phil.

15 intrepid walkers set out from Hall Rd on a pretty balmy Harbour day up through Graham’s Reserve.  Birdlife was rife including some nice plump Kereru.  This may be in part due to the community trapping initiatives that now encircle the Eco Sanctuary as birds there stretch their wings to increasingly safer climes.

Morning tea was taken on and around wooden steps,

Morn.tea break in the bush. (Gordon pic and caption.)

looking through the canopy of a wonderful lady rimu; the quality of the bush was ‘right up’ there, with good stands of Rimu (also on the downward beat to Bethunes Gully).

I thought progress was steady, but when we arrived at the carpark on North Rd, and checked the watch, to my surprise 15 walkers did it quicker than 1 person on the recce, and that included morning tea time……must have been that the track was now so much drier!  Or was this a particularly talented and fit group of walkers?

A short break to catch breath and have a swig was taken at the carpark, where we also co opted a Welsh tourist to join us up to Buttars Peak, the Organ Pipes

Not much of Organ Pipes left. (Gordon pic and caption.)

having lost much of their points of interest.

Lunch was taken on the battlements at Buttars Peak,

A Welshman admiring our Valleys. (Phil pic and caption.)

what a place to repel the invaders, and although a coolish breeze tempered things a bit, the views were still ‘top notch’.

View from Buttars Peak. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We set off after lunch at 12.30pm and turning left at the Junction we descended to Bethunes Gully in 66% of the time the signposting stated.  Most took advantage of the low wooden fence to chill out, almost like waiting for the bus,

Waiting for the bus at Bethune’s Gully. (Phil pic and caption.)

which did not come, so we went up up and up Norwood St; it did not seem like this when I recce’d in the car…..

From here it was a short trip along North Rd before descending down through Upper Junction.  The Harbour areas and gullies have such a great eclectic mix of housing and gardens tucked away.  From Upper Junction Rd a small detour was made to by-pass the closed road and works, following major road slumping.

From here it was back up Hall Rd to the cars, and noticeably this road seemed quite steep in places!  A suggestion for another time being to park the cars at the bottom of the hill!

There was some differing perspectives on how far we had walked, depending on the country of origins of the myriad of devices, whether or not they spoke to you etc.….going by the DCC pamphlets and my car speedo I thought 14 km but then again I know my speedo understates speed by about 10%…….This proved to be a challenging loop walk but one that was appreciated and proved the all round fitness of everyone who came. And yes everyone knows how to tell if a Rimu is male or female.  Some even how to identify a Miro tree by the berry fruit.

It was agreed we would return to Blackstone for coffee, but because they had had such a busy day did not want our patronage, so we crossed the road and enjoyed great craic at Blend ( debating the merits or otherwise of traditional roles v sensitive new age males); we had to apologise to some other customers for the noise, and as they left said we were just like teenagers!  Wow what a complement to finish the day. – Phil.

12. 8/8/2018. Hikers. Mount Cargill from Old Road. M. Leaders; Phil and Raewyn.

24 intrepid hikers drove to the Organ Pipes track carpark on Mt Cargill.

Mt Cargill Road carpark. (Clive pic and caption.)

  A few ‘Oh dears’ were voiced when the steps at the beginning of the track were first seen, but taking it slowly we finally reached the morning tea stop, 15 minutes in.  Then it was onwards and upwards again with those jolly steps appearing around every corner.  Soon though we came across the pile of rubble which was once the Organ Pipes formation, and taking turns, everyone viewed the last remaining pipes standing.

New organ pipe evolving at the Organ Pipes site. (Phil pic and caption.)

  After a slippery boardwalk, the track evened out and it was a pleasant walk through the bush up to the turnoff to Buttars Peak.  Eight adventurers climbed to the top for a ‘wow’ moment,

Buttars Peak….Harbour Cone will be nothing after this. (Phil pic and caption.)

while the rest of us waited and waved from below.  Onwards around the base of the transmitter tower and the final ascent to the top – Oh no, those darn steps were back again with a vengeance.  Determinedly we all made it to the top for lunch…

Mt Cargill at the top. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch….listening in for contact from the galaxies. (Phil pic and caption.)

…and the 360 degree views over Dunedin, the Peninsula & Blueskin Bay.  The cool breeze that whipped up soon had us on the return trip and facing all those steps in the opposite direction.  Our ‘Ramblers 3’ joined us for morning tea, and did really well to continue upwards to have their lunch by the organ pipes rubble.  Well done ladies.  A great day followed by coffee at the Plaza Café. – Raewyn.

11. 18/10/2017. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast. M. Leader: Helen.

Only eight trampers today. Lots away. Started at Hall Road in Sawyers Bay. Parked cars at the start of the Grahams Track. Lovely walk up through bush and also some muddy areas. Had our morning tea stop on this section of the tramp. Up the steep steps to the Mount Cargill Road.

(Margreet pic.)

Across that and up to the Organ Pipes most which have fallen down now.

Organ Pipes. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continued on up to the top of Mount Cargill going past Buttars Hill. Had our lunch up there in the shelter as was quite windy on the top. Down we went again after conversations with other hikers and workman on our way down to the road. From there we decided to walk

View from road. Roseneath Quarantine Island and Portobello. (Helen pic and caption.)

in a large loop back to Sawyers Bay and cars. Distance was 16.5kms. Coffee at Blackstone in Mosgiel. A very enjoyabld day with lots of chatting. – Helen

10. 10/6/2015. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast.M.
We had a good turnout of 10 trampers for todays assault on Grahams Bush — Organ Pipes, & track up to the transmitter mast on top of Mt. Cargill.
We had morning tea break at the junction of the private road, & the left turn onto the track. I should’ve waited till a bit later as once into the bush the ground was nearly dry, whereas where we stopped was quite wet.
We made good time up to the road at the top of the Grahams Bush track, & after a short rest stop where we learnt that a couple from the Czech Republic had their car broken into, in the Organ Pipes car park, & a backpack stolen, which contained their passports along with other items, we carried on up to the Organ Pipes.
Those that had not been there before, or for a long time took the opportunity to view the tumbled down remains of the once great landmark, before we set off for the junction with the track leading up to the transmitter mast. We found a reasonably sheltered spot among the bush edge to sit down for lunch,
Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

before going up the rough track [in places] with the big steps up to the top, where it was very windy.
After having a good look around up here, & admiring the great view, we started to retrace our steps back down & along the Organ pipes track to the Mt. Cargill Rd. I was very pleased to see that the boardwalks that I built in the mid ’90’s are still like new after nearly 20 yrs.
Once at the road, two of the women members decided that they would walk back via the road down into Sawyers Bay, instead of negotiating the Grahams Bush track in reverse direction.
The walk back out to the cars was uneventful, with everybody making it safely.
A good workout for the lungs, & legs, with almost 1 KM climbed, but I didn’t hear any complaints, so I guess they all enjoyed the day.
Walked 11.6km @ 3.6km/hr.; moving time 3h 15min; Climbed 891mtrs. – Ken.
9. 9/2/2011. Hikers. Old Mt Cargill Rd car park, Organ Pipes, Mt Cargill, return. Leaders: Bev. and Lesley.
The title of the walk was “Tracks and Trails” – which allowed our leaders licence to take us anywhere. And so the 15 of us climbed to the organ pipes and continued past Butter’s (DOC signboard) or Buttar’s (expert Lex who remembers the family farming there from when he lived in Leith Valley) Peak and on to Mount Cargill …

And so on the Mt Cargill. (Bob pic and caption)

View back to the harbour mouth. (Bob pic and caption)

… where we lunched in the lee of a now keen southwester with a great view overlooking Pigeon Flat and the Waitati area. We then met up with the upward track again and returned.
Morning tea was at Hard Rock Café as Bob called it – that huge boulder decked with drips from the night’s rain sparkling in the sunlight. See if you can identify the drips in the photo!!

Identify the drips. (Bob pic and caption)

The Organ Pipes don’t impress as much these days as I can remember them doing from years ago before earthquakes tumbled many of them down. There are still a few standing tall but most are the ‘dis-organ-ised’ pipes now. (See below under the 6 Nov 08 entry for an “Organ Pipes” pic  of the ‘few standing tall.’ – Ian.)

Identify the dominos. (Bob pic and caption)

The track to them climbs up steps composed largely of fallen columns. After passing a track junction to the Mt Cargill Walk, you find a scree slide of columns where there was once a viewing platform. There is a good view of the Organ Pipes from here.
Wikipedia says of them, “… a prominent formation of columnar jointed basalt known as the Organ Pipes. Similar outcrops are found elsewhere in the Dunedin area, at Blackhead near Waldronville and at Second  Beach, Saint Clair. A second point of interest is the small temperate cloud forest which dominates the vegetation of the upper slopes. Though not a true cloud forest, in that it is not tropical, it bears many of the hallmarks of true cloud forest, with abundant moss and fern cover under thick low canopy. The cloud forest is protected within a 1.8 square kilometre reserve, which includes the peak of the mountain as well as several secondary peaks.”
The Organ Pipes rock formation was formed by the cooling of lava that flowed across Mount Cargill during the last period of volcanic activity in the Dunedin area. The hot lava cooling against the cold rock caused powerful expansions and contractions. When the volcanic ock cooled at the time, it cracked along long joints and consequently looks much like organ pipes standing up – that is, when they were standing up!!

Well, after all that, there was one still standing. (Bob pic and caption)

Which craggy protuberance is George? (Bob pic and caption)

Some of us simulated the domino collapse of the pipes, namely Bob who
slipped on a wet boardwalk and catapulted into Lesley who lost her
glasses in the process. Fortunately they were recovered !! Whew.
A good day’s outing. Bob
8. 11/6/2008. Trampers. Grahams Bush, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes, with Mount Cargill option for some. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Leonie

Tea Break

Organ Pipes

Buttars Peak summit

Buttars Peak summit

Trampers met at the top of Sawyers Bay Hall Road to walk from sea level to the “Top of the World” on yet another
glorious Wednesday. The tramping gods were certainly on our side as there was not a cloud in the sky as we started our ascent. The track is well maintained and a flat benched in track all the way which made for easy walking. Parts of the walk were in beautiful bush but every so often we would come to a clearing where we could look back over the harbour,

and enjoy glorious views while we got our breath back. Morning tea on the track a short way into Grahams Bush to give us sustenance for the hill climb and then onwards and upwards. Eventually we came to the road after ascending a steep flight of steps. Then over the road and up another flight of steps. During our lunch stop Evelyn entertained us with her story of the TV being blown by a gust of wind from its place in the wall into the conversation pit.

Sounded amazing. Lots of discussion about chloresterol levels and how to control them while some of us ate cheese (the bad boy) for lunch. Nearing the top there is a branch off the track which we followed to ascend Buttar’s Peak with its rugged basaltic columns. Sitting up there was like being on top of the world with uninterrupted views all along the coast from north to south with the harbour below with its picture-perfect reflections

Harbour from Buttars Peak

Harbour from Buttars Peak

and then over to the peninsula and all its magic beaches. That view has stayed with me since and hopefully for ever! After scrambling down from the peak the track divided and one group went back down and to the cars while the others went on to ascend Mount Cargill which was just in front of us.

Mt Cargill from Buttars Peak

Mt Cargill from Buttars Peak

A wonderful day and a good introduction for a visitor, and a few others who hadn’t tramped for a while. – Tash.

7. 23/8/2006. Grahams Bush, Mount Zion, Buttars Peak Organ Pipes round trip. Medium. Leaders: Jacqui, Doug J.

6. 21/4/2004 Leaders: Barbara M, Evelyn C
Enjoying the view. Glenice, Tom.

Enjoying the view. Glenice, Tom, etc.

The Buttars Peak scramble.

The Buttars Peak scramble.

5. 9/10/2002. Grahams Bush – Mount Zion. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Barbara McC, Sandra P.
4. 22/8/2001. Grahams Bush – Mount Cargill. Easy. Leaders: Graham, Bill H, Lesley S.
3. 9/11/1988 Grahams Bush to Organ Pipes. A good tramp with native bush and lovely views. Leaders: Mary Y, Peg A, Betty
2. 29/11/1995. Alternative to Hindon Pipeline: Grahams Bush – Organ Pipes. Leaders: Diana, Jack M, Les W.
1. 9/11/1989. Graham’s Bush to Organpipes. A good tramp with native bush and lovely views. Cars meet at Hall Road. Leaders: Mary Y, Peggy A, Betty B.

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Aug 29 2018

Steve Amies and Associated tracks.

Published by under Trampers

19. 29/8/2018. Trampers. Steve Amies /  Little Coal Tracks. M. Leader: Arthur.
7 very keen Trampers did a bush circuit in the Silverstream Valley. Parking at the Pump-house we followed the track past the swing bridge, then up to Tunnel Track to take us to McRaes Weir and the shortcut up to Steve Amies, down Little Coal Creek Track, and returned on Racemans.
Morning tea was taken a partway along Tunnel Track, above a large slip, where there is a good view across to The Chalkies. The shortcut track up to Steve Amies is a bit of a grunt, but taking our time we easily overcame it.
The day had shown promise before we started, but the cloud was low down on all the surrounding hills and high up on the Steve Amies Track the rain started. On reaching the top, at Trig Q, we immediately started down the Little Coal Creek Track.
We stopped to have our lunch in the first relatively sheltered place in the bush. It was colder, so we didn’t stop long before following the track on down.
The lower half, especially, of the Little Coal Creek Track is steep in places and was slippery and rather treacherous from the rain that had just fallen.
A variety of techniques were tried for descending the trickier patches – stepping, slipping, sliding, …

Very slippery track back down. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… falling, …

Still very slippery ? (Gordon pic and caption.)

… tree hugging, and even the rolly-polly method. Afterwards I was assured that all had thoroughly enjoyed (?) the experience – which seemed strange to me.

The last leg of our trip was simple in comparison, along the Racemans Track.

Everybody happy to be on level ground. (Gordon pic and caption.)

One final obstacle. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We were back in the cars around 3.15 pm, and I have it on good authority that we had walked 15 km.

The rain had eased off later, and conditions were pleasant other than being cold at lunch time. The leader awards a Gold Star to each of the party for their contribution to a great day’s tramping.

Upon returning to Mosgiel it was decided it would be inappropriate to visit any coffee shop, due to travel stain. – Art.

18. 14/9/2016. Swine Spur – Rollinsons Road –  Steve Amies – Tunnels Track. M. Car Shuttle. Leader: Arthur H.
A clear sky, brilliant sunshine, and only a light breeze – perfect.
After setting up a car shuttle for later, 6 enthusiastic trampers began the day’s operations from Rollinsons Road, to walk up the full length of the Swine Spur track.

We reached the junction with Possum Busters at 9.55 a.m. and made this our morning tea stop. There was some dissension about stopping early, but hey, the leader is the boss. (He has to have the occasional privilege.)

Morning tea spot. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Morning tea spot. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Further up we met 4 trampers and a dog coming down – and soon found that it was the same group that had had morning tea with us a week ago on the Tunnel Track. Pleasantries were exchanged.

Our group powered up the steep upper part of Swine Spur, …

High up on Swine Spur. (Arthur pic and caption.)

High up on Swine Spur. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… the talking hardly lessening, …

Near top of Swine Spur. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Near top of Swine Spur. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… and we topped out at 10.45 a.m.

At top of Swine Spur. (Arthur pic and caption.)

At top of Swine Spur. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After a brief pause to enjoy the view, we walked the road, passing the VOR aviation beacon on the highest point of Swampy, going down now.

After 50 minutes on the road we were on the track, heading in to Trig Q. On the way past, we stopped to check out the picnic area before heading down the Steve Amies Track.

With perfect timing we stopped at Bryan Freeman’s Memorial Seat to enjoy our lunch. A very pleasant spot with the sun filtering through onto us.

Lunch on Steve Amies. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Lunch on Steve Amies. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Note – Bryan Freeman was a keen tramper who died here on the Steve Amies Track in 2011. He was the son of Jim Freeman, who is remembered by the track named after him.

We continued down the Steve Amies Track until turning off to the left onto the short steep track that took us down to McRaes Weir and “the rope”.

From there we followed the Tunnel Track, which in turn follows the contour. Easy track but very enjoyable. No-one showed any enthusiasm to enter the tunnels, but we did admire them in passing.

We reached our tramps’ end at the road at 2.15 p.m. My car was nearby and it soon re-united Neil M. with his one at our starting point.

And so, back to Mosgiel. The good weather, together with the variety encountered during the tramp had made for an enjoyable day.

The distance tramped was around 11 km (at a very rough guesstimate). – Arthur.

17. 14/10/2015. Trampers. Little Coal and Steve Amies.

The tramp today was into the Silverstream Tunnels track, up Steve Amies track, & down Little Coal Creek track, with lunch at the picnic area near trig Q at the top,

Lunch at trig Q at top (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at trig Q at top (Ken pic and caption)

& back along Racemans

Return on Racemans (Ken pic and caption)

Return on Racemans (Ken pic and caption)

to the cars.
This was an  uneventful trip, with no problems encounted. The weather was great, cloudy conditions with very little breeze.
Eight trampers took part in the days activities, including a stop at a viewing spot …

Enjoying the view (Ken pic and caption)

Enjoying the view (Ken pic and caption)

16. 15/10/2014. Trampers. Little Coal Creek, Steve Amies. H.
Little Coal Creek, steep in places, can be slippery.
4 of us set off from the Pump House up Silverstream Valley, onto the Racemans Track. Calm weather. Had morning tea at a sunny spot at the junction of Little Coal Creek track. Took off one layer of clothing. On the ascent, stopped a few times to take in the views. Had lunch at Trig Q. The weather was so calm the bushes were not moving at all at 505m.
After lunch, we went down Steve Amies track, stopping to take  in the views north, south and west and listening to the birds, – the noises of them!
Back along Racemans Track to the car. Tramp enjoyed. The biggest comment on the trip was ‘How calm’. – Heb.

15. 29/7/2015 Trampers. Little Coal, North Coal.

Racemans Little Coal North Coal McRaes Weir Tracks

GPS map of route, courtesy Ken. Racemans Little Coal North Coal McRaes Weir Tracks. Walked 14.5 km; 4.3 km/h ave; 3h 23m moving; climbed 460mtrs.

Today was a hurried change of tramp, as when I got up to the Bullring for the start of our tramp, it was foggy, blowing, & VERY cold, so I made the decision to cancel this, & meet at the start of Silverstream Rd. Where we decided what we would do for the day.
We then made our way to the pump house car park at Whare Flat, & set off along Racemans track. When we reached Little Coal Creek track we decided to go up there, & come back down North Coal Creek, if the tracks were suitable. The ground was surprisingly dry, so we had no hesitation about carrying on. After struggling up Little Coal, with numerous stops to regain our composure, we arrived at the junction with North Coal track, so we went down there a short distance out of the breeze to have lunch.

1. three of the group at lunch

Three of the group at lunch. (Ken pic and caption)

We were all looking forward to descending North Coal, as last time we did it, Finn, Dermot’s dog was the one who led us in the correct direction, as the track was in very bad condition due to storm damage, & was non existent in parts. However, the Green Hut Track group have been through there & reopened it, & put in some more markers, so it is very easy to follow, but quite difficult travelling.
On the way back we went around the McRaes Weir track to lengthen our journey a bit, & walked down the unmarked track that comes out beside the picnic table down near the Silverstream. We stopped here for another cuppa before we walked out to the cars.
There were no incidents today , apart from me slipping off the edge of Little Coal  track at one point, & managing to arrest my slid with the aid of a handy tree. No damage apart from pride !!
The day had a few light showers, but didn’t require wet weather gear, however it paid to keep moving, as the temperature was quite cool with the small amount of breeze.

14. 1/2/2012 Both. Steve Amies from Access Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

Sixteen of us left our cars at the locked gate on Rollinson access Rd and made our way up to the Track Clearers’ Picnic area. The leaders took us round many of the little nooks and crannies (they just seem to multiply of their own accord), stopping to inspect the labels fronting each bush planting. Of poignant note in front of one bush was a label printed with the name of Les Murcott, whose funeral a number of us had attended only a fortnight earlier.

We stopped off for our tea break.

Arthur led us down and across to Trig Q, and then on down Little Coal Creek until we got to the look-out. We careful negotiated some quite steep parts of the track and avoided any casualties. Then came the more  arduous climb back up to the trig and across to the Steve Amies.

This latter track had a much more moderate decline (we stuck to only its upper reaches!), past another look-out, before making another turn around further down, to wander back up to the trig and on to the picnic area for lunch.

On the way across the wee saddle, we stopped to investigate the meaning of a sign indicating a sheltered area, whose side track opened out to a large open area in the bush, marked with a large white wooden equal-armed cross, laid flat on the grass. After some discussion, we decided the area was also to serve as a helicopter emergency landing spot. (There was even a ‘waiting room’ bench for passengers.)

Back up at the picnic area, our leaders discovered for us yet another alcove with ample tables and seats for a comfortable lunch.

Our leaders took us out to the road by a route different from the one we had entered by, and lo and behold, a salubrious shelter, doubtless erected by the track clearers for their comfort. Bravo.

Then we had only a stroll back down Rollinson Road to the cars. A leisurely 5.5 km walk, (as measured by two with their measuring devices.) Thank you, Barbara and Arthur for your careful leadership. – Ian.

13. 17/10/2012. Trampers. Pumphouse, Racemans, Steve Amies, Little Coal Creek, Racemans, McRaes, Pumphouse.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.We walked approx 14kmMoving time 3h 50minave 3.6km/hrTotal ascent 559m – Ken

Five of us had a great day doing the two ridges. The Steve Amies was as steep a struggle as ever at its foot. The easier bit at the top seemed much longer than the writer’s memory had shortened it. We had a leisurely lunch at the set of seats and tables a little beyond trig Q. Sunny and no wind. Great.

Then back again and down to where Little Coal Creek branches  off from North Coal. Again the first bit of climbing on Little Coal had escaped the writer’s memory. The steep ridge descent needed careful negotiating. One of the party was heard vowing it was a track they would never wish to ascend. Then it was off the ridge and down the side. The ground is so heavily littered with twigs and leaves that it is almost impossible to keep one’s feet on the steep bits.

Forgot to take photos! And the one below, taken back on the Racemans turned out mysteriously bad.

Taken on the Racemans on the return journey.

We elected to take the McRaes track back. The GPS of the route brings out the depththat the gully takes the track into before emerging back out again. We stopped en route for a drink break as it had been a longer day. We made our way around until turning off at the junction with the Tunnels Track onto the connecting track that took us down to emerge by the swing bridge.

A longer day – we got back out about 4 o’clock. Considerable height climbed and descended. A good work-out. And it was our good luck that the promised rain held off until we were back in the cars again. – Ian.

12. 8/6/2011. Trampers. Tunnels, North Coal, Steve Amies, ret. Medium.

We decided to do today’s tramp from the school house at Whare Flat. We parked in the normal position by the house, & joined the tunnels track at the normal place [wire across stream]. We walked along the Tunnels track/Racemans track [had morning tea in the pine trees again] until we came to Little Coal Creek track, where we had a meeting on whether we go up that one or carry on to the North Coal Creek track. Nth Coal won out, so we went there, & up Nth. Coal Creek. We had lunch overlooking Longridge, from that nice lookout point.It was quite a late lunch, as we decided to get to the top [almost] before having lunch. [It was 12:15 when we got to the bottom of the Nth. Coal Creek track.]

After this we went up to the picnic area, …

… & road, where we had another meeting about how we go back again. It was decided that we go down Steve Amies track, so off we went, with everybody starting to get a bit tired. We arrived back at the cars at 5:00pm, having started at just before 10:00am.

We walked [according to the GPS] 20.2 km, & did a total ascent of 578mtrs. Total moving time 5hrs 2min. moving ave. 4km/hr. overall ave 2.8km/hr. Stopped time 2hr 11min. So it was a big day for the 6 of us, but all enjoyed the walk. I think they will sleep well tonight !!!
The girls enjoyed the picnic area etc at the top by the road, along with the view from the lunch spot, so quite a bit of time was spent around there, as they had not been there before.
We started our descent at 2:30, so it took 2 1/2 hrs to walk back. Maybe better to do this tramp when we have a 9:00am start, as it was starting to get a bit dark by the time we got back. Also, we were not wasting any time while walking along the Racemans etc, much faster than we would normally be going. The trip could be shortened a bit by going in at the pumphouse, but how much that would cut off I don’t know.The day was fine & sunny, but cool & calm. The tracks were mainly dry, & only muddy in the normal Racemans track positions. The hill climbs/descents were quite good. Some parts of the tracks need a bit of clearing, but not too bad in general. – Ken.

11. 18/3/2009. Hikers. Steve Amies from Access Rd Hikers E+ Bev H, Joyce S

10. 25/7/2007. Hikers. Access Road, Steve Amies. Leaders: Bob H, Graham.

9. 19/5/2007 Trig Q from Silverstream via Steve Amies track. Steve Amies Track Circuit Leaders: Ria L, Hazel

8. 13/9/2006 Tunnels – Steve Amies – Little Coal Creek – Racemans. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Arthur H
7. 27/7/2005. Hikers. Steve Amies, Trig Q. Bob H, Les W, Mary M.
6. 27/7/2005 Tunnel, McRaes Weir, Steve Amies, Trig Q, Picnic Area; Little Coal Creek, Racemans. Bob H, Les W, Mary M

5. 21/7/2004 Trampers. Lake Whare, Steve Amies, Trig Q. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Bob H

Frost on Possum Busters. Bill

Frost on Possum Busters. Bill

Frost on Possum Busters. Bruce

Frost on Possum Busters. Bruce

New Bridge by Track-clearers. Ian

New Bridge by Track-clearers. Ian

4. 9/7/2003. Trampers. Tunnels, McRaes, Steve Amies, North Coal Creek, Racemans.Medium. Leaders: Irene, Doug J.

Bill at rocky point in Racemans

Bill at rocky point in Racemans

Rocky clambering on North Coal track

Rocky patch on North Coal track. Glenice, Lex, Doug

Trig Q. Doug M, Doug J, Lex, Pat

Trig Q. Doug M, Doug J, Lex, Pat

Tramp end. Irene, Glenice, Lex, Doug M, Doug J, Pat

Tramp end. Irene, Glenice, Lex, Doug M, Doug J, Pat

3. 30/4/2003. Steve Amies, Trig Q, Swineburn Photos

Tea

Lunch stop. Ria.

Microwave. Doug.

dwn

View

 

2. 23/10/2002. Tunnels – Steve Amies – Little Coal Creek – Racemans. Medium+. Leaders: Lex, Bob H, Wendy B.

1. 2/2/2000. Trig Q from Silverstream via Steve Amies track. Steve Amies Track Circuit Leaders: Peter B, Lex

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Aug 22 2018

Signal Hill tramps

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Distance Chingford from carpark: 20 km.
Follow Old Main North Road to Cleghorn Street which has the best view of the harbour. Walkway sign.
Walk starts starts at the gate on right, up McGregors Hill. Beyond stile Pine plantation on 3rd stile at summit.
Gravel road 10 minutes to end. Locked gate. Last stile. Signal Hill road.

16. Signal Hill Tramp 22/08/2018. Leaders: Neil and Margreet

A large contingent of 21 trampers set out from the Otago Yacht Club in a ‘lazy’ southwest breeze and threatening rain. We walked to Ravensbourne on the cycle/walk way admiring the recently completed landscaping and fitness course. Crossing SH88 we climbed the steep zig zag track from the WW2 Memorial to Manuka St and the beginning of the Signal Hill track.

Morning tea was at the nearby playground

Morning tea with Harbour views. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and then, in light rain, we climbed steadily to break out of the bush at the ‘Plateau’. A sharp right turn onto the nuggety but sheltered Telecom track soon had us at the Monument.

Monument view. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Great views over Dunedin up there, and we checked out the Centennial Memorial with its bronze male and female figures representing ‘History’ and ‘The Thread of Life’. 

To add interest to the tramp we then walked down the road and turned off onto a vehicle track which climbed steeply

Steep pinch to summit Signal Hill. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to the communication complex on top of Signal Hill. There we stopped for lunch

Sheltered lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

sheltering from the cold wind and taking in the sweeping views

View from lunch stop. (Gordon pic and caption.)

from Taiaroa Head to Mt. Cargill and Forrester Park.

The return hike was via a 4WD track that crossed all the formed downhill mountain bike trails.

Not far to cars now. (Gordon pic and caption.)

The track ended up at Logan Park High School and it was then an easy stroll past the Stadium back to our cars. Of note was the old Fever Hospital near Logan Park which finally closed its door in 1952 and was then bought by the University as accommodation for medical students.

After the 15km trek, we all enjoyed a coffee or ‘cuppa’ at Emerson’s Brewery.

Neil and Margreet Simpson.

15. 14/2/2018. Hikers. Cleghorn Street to Normanby Pub via Signal Hill and Centennial Memorial. M. Leaders: Pam and Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Clive pic.

Clive pic.

14. 14/8/2013. Hikers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip. M. Leaders: Lex and Graham.
We parked near Chingford Park and walked up the hill on the Mt Cargill Rd to the turn-off to Signal Hill.  Morning tea on the side of the road about halfway up.  It was blowing a gale and pretty cold but with everyone rugged up well there were no dramas.  Margaret and Les chose to turn back – it was hard going and I don’t blame them!
Elaine in bath. (Judy pic).

Elaine enjoying bath. (Judy pic).

 Lunch in the shelter of the trees near the top …
Lunch. (Judy pic)

Lunch break. (Judy pic)

… then across to the masts, and down to the road.  135 steps on the steep descent and a few stiff knees. – Judy
13. 29/6/2011. Trampers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken

We enjoyed the harbour view as we walked along the rather wet and muddy 4WD track after leaving Cleghorn Street.

The view down the harbour was wonderful

With younger members among the trampers now, we are making a faster pace than formerly and reached the ‘signals’ on Signal Hill a bit half an hour earlier than lunch time, so decided to carry on. We found a sunny calm spot on the Signal Hill Road side to enjoy lunch.

Lunch on Signal Hill roadside

12. 8/7/2009 Trampers Chingford Park, North Road, Cleghorn Street, McGregors Hill, Signal Hill, Signal Hill Road round trip. Medium. Leaders: Pat & Bill
Start

First view of harbour and Peninsula. Bill, Pat, Wendy, Ken.

 

St Leonards

St Leonards below.

Charles Cone

Mount Charles and Harbour Cone on Peninsula

Heads

Roseneath, Port Chalmers and Heads

Lunch

Lunch at top of hill. Doug, Arthur, Wendy, Ian, Pat, Bill. (Ken pic)

Dunedin

Down from Signal Hill with Dunedin beyond. Wendy, Ken, Arthur, Pat.

11. 13/5/2009 Hikers. Signal Hill, Cleghorn St. Leaders: Bev H, Joyce

10. 20/7/2005. Trampers. Cleghorn St, Signal Hill.
Harbour view. "Hi Shirley". Bob, Pat, Who?

Harbour view. “Hi Shirley”. Bob, Pat, Dot.

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

9. 14/8/2002 Logan Park High School, Signal Hill, Cleghorn St, NEV Road. Leaders: Molly, Hazel, Barbara McC
8. 22/5/2002. Alt. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Betty, Colleen.
7. 24/1/2001. Normanby, Signal Hill, Opoho. Leaders: Lance and Lois, Shirley R.
6. 16/8/2000 Bethunes Gully, Opoho. Leaders: Jack & Rosemary, Shirley R.
5. 26/4/2000. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Denise.
4. 24/1/2000 Chingford Park, Old Brown House, Signal Hill, Opoho, Leaders: Lance & Lois, Peter R
3. 22/4/1998. Chingford Park, Brown House, Signal Hill. Leaders: Shirley McN, Shirley R.
2. 16/6/1993. Bethunes Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Round Trip. Easy. Leaders: Shirley, Doreen, Diana, Nel.
1. 1/7/1992. Bethune’s Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Marie, June, Ray.

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Aug 22 2018

Harbour Cone, Broad Bay, Turnbulls Bay, Bacon Street, Peggys Hill, Broad Bay

Published by under Trampers

No. 49 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill Larnach Castle – Farm”

Location: 32 km.

Trampers park cars at Broad Bay. DCC Public Land; Hikers park at top of Bacon Street.

17. 22/8/2018. Hikers. Harbour Cone Walk. H. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

18 Hikers started off at sea level

Tea stop on way up from Bacon Street to Highcliff Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

and most made it to the top or 12,370 steps and 121 floors up to the summit.

Jim pic.

Betty pic.

The weather was cold, damp and could have been kinder for us.  The surrounding views were some-what reduced.

A very memorable walk. – Jim and Betty

16. 2018-07-11. Trampers. Harbour Cone. E-M. Leader: Arthur.

A very pleasant sunny mid-winter’s day arrived for our weekly outing.

The cars parked at the Broad Bay Boating Club and 13 trampers went off walking along the harbour side to Bacon Street.

Morning tea was taken in the dry area under some large pine trees,

Morning tea break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

near the beginning of the walking track.

We followed on up the old Bacon street walking rack to the road.

Heading up start of track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After crossing over (why did the chicken cross the road?) we found that the stone ruins of the old Allen House had been fenced off. Some timber framing, also new, was obviously in place to support the stone wall and prevent it toppling over.

From the ruins it was uphill all the way, but in time we picked our way through the rocks onto the summit of Harbour Cone. But the effort had been worth it as the scenery was magnificent.

View from summit. (Gordon pic and caption.)

The sunshine, and lack of any breeze allowed us to enjoy our time on top.

A cool breeze arrived just as we began the descent.

Heading back. (Gordon pic and caption.)

At 12 noon we found a sheltered spot (out of that breeze) to partake of the contents of our lunch boxes, and with a view looking out over Hoopers Inlet and surrounds.

After lunch we soon crossed back over Highcliff Road, down hill in the paddocks for a little, before the steep little climb up towards the castle. Everyone needed a breather then, but the hard work was all over.

It was easy now to follow the contour before descending on Camp Road (unformed), but still with interesting views of the harbour and environs. We arrived back at the cars at 1-45 pm after an enjoyable tramp in superb mid-winter conditions – the northerly wind had increased during the afternoon. Our group of 12, plus 1 guest (Eleanor’s daughter) had walked just over 10 km.

We drove back to Macandrew Bay and were shocked to find the coffee shop had closed down! After discussion we returned to Mosgiel and took our custom to the Blackstone Cafe, for our debriefing.

Coffee at Blackstone. (Helen pic and caption.)

Several had intended having an ice-cream at Macandrew Bay (another shop) but didn’t, in sympathy with the coffee drinkers, and so missed out entirely at Mosgiel – their sacrifice should not be forgotten!.

Thanks to all. – Art.

(15) 21/3/2018. Hikers. Bacon Street only.

The planned tramp to Harbour Cone had 22 trampers depart from Mosgiel in light rain.  During the drive to the start point the rain intensified, and it became a simple decision to abandon the tramp.  A coffee stop was suggested for the return trip to Mosgiel …

Coffee at the Good Oil. (Ian pic and caption.)

… which was attended by 19 of the party. -Cheers Jim.

14. 9/11/2016. Trampers. Harbour Cone.E+. Leader: Arthur.

The early rain cleared before assembly time at the car park and conditions were looking good. Ten eager trampers travelled in three cars to park by the Broad Bay Boating Club. The sky was brighter in the vicinity compared to the cloud down on the hilltops back in the city direction. A northeast wind to start with, which later turned southwest.

As an experiment we had decided to do this (circuit) tramp anticlockwise. The club had previously only ever gone clockwise. A short road walk back took us to Camp Road. The ascent was variable, with some easier gradients in between the steeper ones.

Morning tea was taken after 30 minutes with the worst behind us. From there the view was excellent and we could look across to Harbour Cone which seemed a long way off.

We continued uphill, gently now, past the two decrepit old buildings where “elf and safety” signs warning of the hazard they presented were noted. A little further and we turned left towards Harbour Cone, down hill. Funny, but it didn’t seem that steep going down as it had climbing up that part on a previous occasion. And then up a little took us to join the uphill paddock track from Bacon Street. Easier going for a while got us to Highcliff Road, with a stile on each side to climb over. And then climbing some more.

A brief rest stop on Rocky Knob gave us good views, especially over Hoopers Inlet. On  a bit, before descending a little to view the ruins at Nyhon Farm (there is a sign at the site now).

From then on it was uphill all the way to the summit. Comments such as “don’t look up”, “take short steps”, and “just keep putting one foot in front of the other” were heard. All good advice.

The cool (but not cold) wind was behind us as we climbed, and helped push us up, at least psychologically. In a short time we were picking our way through the rocks and came to the trig station on top.

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

The 360 degree views available to us were just a tad hazy, but the Mt Cargill mast stayed hidden in the clouds. What a great place to be! Not far below us, to the east of north, the white buddhist shrine stood out clearly in the sunshine. It was only 11.40 but on the summit was the only place to have lunch, even if a little early. Just over the brow it was sunny and nicely sheltered for this important ritual.

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Thirty minutes for lunch and then it was downhill all the way.

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

We descended to the ruins of the Allen Farm

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

(no sign seen here), crossed the road, before going down the old track to Bacon Street.

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

A walk back around the harbourside took us back to the cars at 1.00 p.m. The day’s distance was 8.25 km, not long perhaps, but we had quite a bit of uphill work. The summit of Harbour Cone is 315 metres by the way.

Several commented that doing an anticlockwise circuit had worked very well and it gave us the opportunity to have our lunch on the summit.

On the way home two cars stopped at Macandrew Bay to allow their occupants to visit the coffee shop. Another very enjoyable day’s tramp out on the fresh air over. – Art.

13. 22/7/2015 Trampers. Harbour Cone

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken.

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 10km; 3.6km/h ave; 2h 45min moving; total ascent 586m; max height 358m.

I must be getting old, I put the group wrong on where we were starting the tramp from, I had it in my mind that we were going to Portobello — how wrong was I !!! I apologise for the mix up !
Anyway, after we arrived at Bacon St. we parked up & made ready for the days exercise. 10 trampers, some new to the group set off, & we stopped at the normal spot under the Macrocarpas just past the top end of Bacon street, where the ground is dry, for morning tea. For today’s tramp, I had decided that we would go up the marked track in the paddocks, instead of climbing up the fence line track. This was a new way for all of us, which made it more interesting.
As we made our way up, I could see that it was going to be a longer walk going this way up to Harbour Cone, than the fence line track would be. However the gradient is much more gentle.
We all made it to the top of Harbour Cone, some in better condition than others !! So we spent some time up there admiring the views,…

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

… & resting up before carefully negotiating the boulders on the way back down.
Now, there was a water trough down near the bottom where you go through the gate by the stone wall in the next paddock, this water trough is fed by a pipe running down the hillside from above, & it is constantly overflowing, with the ground around & below it VERY WET, So, what does one member do — he walks down through the wet patch & promptly falls on his butt, then after standing up, he repeats this, just for good measure, & to make sure he was well covered in mud.!!! He arrived at the lunch stop by the stone wall looking very muddy & wet.
After lunch, we retraced our steps down into the valley, then up the other side to the Camp Rd. track below Larnachs Castle. This climb was almost the last straw for a couple in the group, but with some help everybody made it up there, & we had a lengthy rest break here for them to regain some energy, before setting off down Camp Rd.
When we reached the car park with the toilet in it at broad Bay [ where we should’ve stopped originally !!] I suggested that anybody who wanted to wait there could do so, & we would pick them up on the way back from getting the cars. this suggestion was eagerly pounced upon by 6 members of the group. [ now if we had parked there in the morning, all party members would’ve had to walk the full distance, so my mistake let them off the hook !]
The other 4 of us walked back to the cars, & then returned to pick up the ‘survivors’, & then we headed off to Macandrew Bay coffee shop for a chat session, & to keep up the ‘Trampers Coffee Club’ tradition.
I hope this trip which is really quite hard, doesn’t put off the new members we had on this tramp, as most of our tramps are not this steep. So hope to see you all again next week for our assault on Swampy summit.

12. 12/2/2014. Hikers. Harbour Cone from Bacon Street in Turnbull Bay. Leaders: Dorothy and Chris.

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Discretion being the better part of valour, the leaders spurned the steep fence track, choosing instead the much more graduated DCC yellow poled line one to the right, despite its many fence stiles. We had our cuppa amongst the clump of macrocarpa trees, (a point where a side track leads off to the right, through a gully and steeply up to underneath Larnachs Castle). But after our stop, we carried on up and across Highcliff Road to turn left and further up to Rocky Knob. Here the leaders and one or two others forewent the option of going further, allowing a hardy 12 to go over and across the next paddock, down through the gate by a stone wall and on up endlessly, it seemed, to the rocky-strewn summit of Harbour Cone.

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone.

We returned down to lunch on the stone wall before going on to join the others on Rocky Knob. Then it was just simply to retrace our steps back down to the cars. Threatening rain on a couple of occasions failed to eventuate. The day was lovely and calm and not too hot. A perfect and satisfying tramp, well-planned by the leaders. – Ian.

11. 21/8/2013 Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

Anti-clockwise GPS of route, courtesy Ken, (omitting Harbour Cone climb).

Stone walls of old settlement, adjoining Highcliff Road and below Harbour Cone.

After Harbour Cone climb, we went round via Rocky Knob and under Lanarch Castle. Half of us chose to go partly by Highcliff Road and then contour round Peggys Hill, the other half to follow the track poles over paddocks, deeply down through a gully and then very STEEPLY up to meet the others under the north side of Larnach Castle, where we lunched. – Ian

Heads from lunch spot on north slop under Lanarch Castle, just above derelict sheds of Lanarch’s old Model Farm.

Panorama video clip from north slope below Lanarch Castle

Hedge invariably beautifully trimmed

Hoopers Inlet to Highcliff Rd. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Hoopers Inlet Road. 2.20 ret. Route. Manager: DCC CAM
Very steep track. Suitable for experienced and agile parties only.

10. 28/4/2010. Trampers. Harbour Cone from Hoopers Inlet Track and Nyhon Track. Hard. Leader: Ian

The day was fine. A week of wet weather had stymied any recce, so this was it. Thanks to Antony Hamel’s description and map in his book Tracks and Trails around Dunedin, the leader was confident we could readily find our way. Not. First mistake up the Nyhon track was to turn right at the first stile. (It should have been the second). However, an inviting gully presented itself, so this was the route up, we thought. Not. It was very steep but we made it to what we first thought must be Rocky Knob, even if it looked a little different from what some of us remembered it as.

Hoopers Inlet from first knoll. (Ken pic.)

Morning tea in the sun on the knoll was very pleasant. But confusingly, a small distance away was another knoll, slightly higher.

Second knoll across from first knoll. Doug. (Ken pic.)

This too, when reached, didn’t quite match up to our recollections. It was only when we had made our way through an old homestead macrocarpa-surrounded block of stone walls

Interesting remains.

and up a further rise that we realised where we really were.  There, down a slope to our left was the obvious vehicle track that descends from the true Rocky Knob. An easy walk up, and we were there.

From there it was over well-remembered ground

Rocky Knob behind us.

to then grind our way up to Harbour Cone.

The long climb up.

A short stop to admire the view and then back down again, across to Rocky Knob, and down the vehicle track to zigzag  into the gully below the knob – the gully we should have taken on the way up. There we stopped for lunch.

About to stop for lunch. Beyond, track angles up hillside.

and were met by Ken who had more adventurously taken the original steep descent down through the bush.

Overlooking steep marked descent, adventurously taken by Ken from Rocky Knob.

He had made it all right, but not without entangling a hand in some vicious bush lawyer.
After lunch, accompanied by the squawks of a complaining bellbird, we made our way down through some bush, and across some marshy reeds on a narrow netting-covered boardwalk.

But then, surprise. Markers took us up steeply to hug a fence line over a rise to descend further along, now very steeply and to the marshland again.

The steep fence line track. Wasn’t there another way?

Another board, bridging a stream, stile to climb and we were out into a grass paddock again.

Before us loomed the Nyhon Track climbing (plenty of steepness again) up over a hill. We had plenty of time available so we decided to follow it across to Sandymount Road. It was muddy and slippery but we made it. (Was this now the fourth or fifth hill we had climbed that day?)  At the top we decided to carry on to Sandymount Road rather than retrace our steps back down again) and do a round trip. At the road,

Nyhon Track sign on Sandymount Road. (Ken pic.)

we carried on down and back across to Hoopers Inlet and the cars. It had been a good hard day, but all seemed to have enjoyed it, even a visitor who had learnt about us and had seen the website. And there were nine of us too. We had done good, to quote a client’s words to his barrister. – Ian

9. 8/12/2010. Hikers. Harbour Cone. Leaders: B Harvey, C Hughes.

8. 15/7/2009. Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

We were immediately into macrocarpas and elected to stop here for our morning tea.

Cuppa under macrocarpas.

Cuppa under macrocarpas. Pat, Bill, Hazel, Doug, Arthur, Ria, George.

Despite DCC-inserted yellow-topped poles leading off up a valley, we stuck to the original public walkway taking us directly up the steep hill to the macrocarpas on Highcliff Road. Across the road and past the building ruins we turned our attention to the relentlessly steep ascent of Harbour Cone. The polled track took us straight up and through the boulders at the rocky top to the trig.

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Amongst the wonderful views was the sight of two strange monuments in a property above Portobello as seen in the following pic.

Strange

Strange structures above Portobello. Viewed from top of Harbour Cone.

Returning down the south side of Harbour Cone we stopped for lunch in the saddle between the Cone and Rocky Knob. Then it was up a stone-walled track to the Knob. A virtual former cliff-face track led down to Hoopers Inlet, although now a new polled track made an easier descent around a farm track to the left, but that was not the way we were going today. We stopped to enjoy the sights of Sandymount, Hoopers Inlet and Varleys Hill but it was too windy to tarry.

Varleys Hill

Varleys Hill viewed from top of Rocky Knob. (Bill pic)

Going on down and back to Highcliff Road, most elected to go on up the road to enjoy a more level approach to Camp Road while four hardier (stupid?) ones took the yellowed poles track on across the road, down through a deep gully and then very steeply up to join the others where Camp Road enters the trees under Lanarchs Castle. Here we could take in another wonderful number of views.

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

The poled track took us around a contour under the Castle to eventually go steeply down into Broad Bay and so back to the cars. – Ian.

7. 30/11/2007. Broad Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill. Leaders: George
6. 11/7/2007. Trampers. Park Broad Bay Boat Club. Turnbull Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill. Leaders: George, Glenis
5. 2/12/1998. Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill – Larnach Castle. Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.
4. 23/7/1997. Broad Bay, Peggys Hill, Larnach Castle Road. Leaders: Doug J, Irene, Jack R
3. 8/6/1994. Harbour Coone. Peggy Hill. Leaders: Jack R, Bob H, Barbara, Peg C
2. 29/1/1992. Harbour Cone. – A good warm up to start the year. Average+. Leaders: Jack R, Ted, Betty B, Jean A, Peter R

1. 21/12/1988 Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.

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Aug 15 2018

Post Office Creek, Reid’s Station

Published by under Trampers,Year round

 No. 27 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mahinerangi – Post Office Creek. J Shaw. Year round.”
Impassable gorse-infestation beyond old Waipori School building (aft 2008).
33 km from car park.
16. 15/8/2018. Trampers. Verterburn Station. Leader: Jill.

11 trampers enjoyed a beautiful day on Andrew Reid’s property.  We parked at the woolshed and headed downhill before walking along a water race created by gold miners, to a now empty dam.

10409112nd—Quick stop morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

On old water race above Post Office Creek. (Phil pic and caption.)

We marvelled at how this race had been dug into the hillsides – and can barely imagine the living conditions of the early miners, one must certainly hope their toiling brought rewards!!  There were a few fences to climb

Another Bloody fence. (Gordon pic and caption.)

but we were rewarded with nice views over Post Office Creek and then Lake Mahinerangi.

Surveying the Post Office Creek arm of Lake Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

We then walked away from the lake, across a dam, and through paddocks up to the farm boundary with DCC forestry.  Lunch was eaten in the shelter of the trees.

A very welcome lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Then a few more ups and downs but we basically walked through the paddocks beside Mahinerangi Road back  to our cars.
A most enjoyable day.

Distance walked 15.5 km. – Jill.

15. 17/1/2018. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Leader: Jill.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

13 trampers met at Reid’s woolshed on Mahinerangi Road.  We walked down the hill to Post Office creek, and had morning tea at the “camp” before taking the track through gold mine sluicings to the top end of Lake Mahinerangi – a very low lake today!  After viewing the old Waipori school (which had been moved to this site to use as a musterer’s hut before Waipori village was drowned) …

School inspection. The “old” Waipori School moved to Post Office Creek before the raising  of Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

… we backtracked about 1 km and shortly after went up a very steep stock lane …

Onwards and upwards to the trig. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and lunched by the trig there, enjoying expansive views of the area.

Trig A4GT -618 m altitude. (Phil pic and caption.)

We continued up the farm track towards the back of the Maungatuas – the intention had been to look over to Waihola, but it was decided that was a bit far on this occasion!  It was an easy return down hill to the bridge over Post Office creek – and to our cars.

 

Jill proudly displaying the new charging station for e bike travellers. (Phil pic and caption.)

An 18.5 km tramp enjoyed by all. – Jill.

14. 7/5/2014. Both. Reid homestead, Verter Burn to Post Office Creek and old school buildings. Leaders: Ken and Peter.

GPS

iPhone GPS distance: 12.1 km. Garmin stats: We walked 12.9km; Moving ave 4.3km/hr; Moving time 2h 58mins; Climbed 342mtrs; Max elevation 572mtrs. Allow a further km or two for the pedometer distance recorders, and then pick the figure that suits you!

21 of us parked in the Reid’s homestead backyard and made our way through one or two fences down to a bridge over the Verter Burn (near ‘1’ on the map) for morning tea.

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

We followed a road on the stream’s true left, which begs the question as to where originated the pond with its beautiful reflection on our left. (About ‘2’ on map.)

Reflection

Reflection

Between 3 and 4 on the map, is where we approached the Verter Burn ford, into which we were to plunge later, but at this stage we swung off to our left to make our way through early gold-sluiced cliffs (8/4 on map) to finally cross the Post Office Creek and arrive at (5) the former Waipori School building (as reported to the writer) of the one-time but now submerged Waipori Township.

 

Waipori Township

The Township of Waipori. The valley is now flooded and the town site is inundated. Photograph taken in 1890 by Charles Kerr.

We climbed the steep hill alongside the Post Office Creek’s true left to skirt on our right a forestry of densely branched trees  (larches? [and unpruned!] with a scattering of eucalypt among them) for a lunch where the forestry road levelled out at the top (6).

Then it was back down to the school building and out to the aforementioned ford, which this time we crossed with variously successful attempts in keeping feet dry, (but mostly wet).

Beyond that, was the further challenge of the BIG CLIMB, of un-fond older members’ memory. A taranaki gate at its top was new to us, but Neil successfully unscrambled its complexity. Three more paddocks and gates took us out to the Mahinerangi Road ( 11) and along it to the homestead (12.1) again.

At Outram, the majority of the (now well-established) coffee club socialised at the Wobbly Goat, …

 

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

although some betook themselves to the No 8 w Herbs cafe across the road. And that’s it. – Ian.

13. 28/11/2007. Trampers. Post Office Creek, fishermen huts return. Skyline track was closed on the day. Working on roads, trees. Easy. Leaders: Bill & Pat.
The day was fine and not too hot for
13 of us to tramp the Lake Mahinerangi water-race track to the fishermen huts. We had morning tea at the Post Office Creek Old School.
Tea Break

Tea Break. Hazel, Wendy, Doug, George, Ken, Shirley, Pat, Joyce, Arthur L

Immediately beyond that, the leaders had found for us the clearest approach to the larch forest that borders the lake, the tussock and bog being now badly infested with gorse. A leisurely lunch in the sun at the fishing huts and the return back. The Verter Burn barring the way in and out, as always, inspired a variety of creative crossing techniques, from direct plunging through the water boots and all, to bare feet, to plastic bags over boots and even to gumboots carried in.
Crossing

Crossing techniques. Abe (bare feet), Peter, Pat (getting plastic bags), Doug (bags), Barbara and Wendy (boots on rocks), Arthur (gumboots)

The long hill climb back out of the Verter Burn gets no easier with age, but all agreed it was another good day out. – Ian

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

12. 8/11/2006. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Doug M
11. 18/5/2005. Both. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Doug J, Bill M, Joyce S, Lesley G
10. 29/10/2003 Forestry roads return. Leaders:
Hut

Crib by the ford. Bob Peter Arthur Barbara Who? Molly

Crss

Crossing Verter Burn. Peter Who? Molly

gate

The gate beyond Verter Burn.

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

Art

Lunch stop. Arthur & Barbara on a tea break on forestry road back out.

9. 25/4/2002 Leaders: Joyce S Shirley, Wendy B
8. 30/1/2002. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce, Bob H, Donny.
7. 25/4/2001. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Shirley McN, Wendy.
6. 5/4/2000. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Bill McL, Nancy.
5. 26/5/1999. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Nancy, Patricia.
4. 26/8/1998. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Pat.
3. 4/2/1998. Post Office Creek to Huts and return from Robert Reids. Leaders: Denise, Ria L, Nel K.
2. 30/4/1997. Post Office Breek (sic) to huts round trip. (Robert Reids). Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H.
1. 8/4/1992. Post Office Creek – off Mahinerangi Road. Average. Leaders: Hartmann, Ted, Barbara M, Mary M

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Aug 08 2018

Purakaunui

Published by under Beach,Trampers,Year round

No. 97 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Purekanui & Canoe Beach Year Round”

Meet Dn cars at Pt Chalmers. Park at Jetty. 39 km
At LOW TIDE it is possible to walk along the shore to Doctor’s Point.
Also pleasant stroll 1 km down southeastern end to mouth of inlet with scattered cribs.

15. 8/8/2018. Trampers. Purakaunui/Canoe Beach. Leaders: Jill and Judy D.

Another mild winter’s day spent in the Purakaunui area. We had to change plans as high tide was approx 12 md and we had  planned to walk from Doctors Point to Canoe beach before climbing the Mckessar track back to the cars.
Never mind, we parked at the Purakaunui domain

A quick morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and walked along the inlet track, passing the cutest little 140 year old holiday home on the seaward side of the track.  Not sure what will happen with the effects of global warming??

Onwards towards the open sea along another track where the amenities board have put in a couple of seats to enjoy the  view out to sea

Walking around the bay. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and up the north coast.

Back along the short track and up the road above the holiday homes scattered amongst the bush. There was continual birdsong along our way which was so pleasant. The inlet was very calm reflecting the quaint colorful boat sheds.

Some of the boat sheds in the bay. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We shifted along to Osborne where we walked out to the beach and up to the old maori pa Mapoutahi where we had a leisurely lunch with uninterrupted views.

Lunch Maori Point. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Out to canoe beach and back to Puraukanui beach to the cars.
We were very fortunate to see several Kingfishers, some diving, some Rosellas and even an Eagle sitting on some scrub out in the inlet.
It was decided to have coffee at Orokonui Sanctuary again with pleasant views. 12 trampers and about 8 kms travelled! A relaxing day had by all. – Jill.

14. 24/2/2016. Hikers. Beach, Caves, Spit, Urupu. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

GPS of Hikers' route.

GPS route map of Hikers’ tramp.

A turnout of 24 walkers enjoyed extremely good weather. Leaders were Betty & Jim Finnie.

On the day the planned section of the walk from Mapoutahi Pa site …

Cuppa stop on the Mapoutahi Pa peninsula.

Cuppa stop on the Mapoutahi Pa peninsula. Evidence of a new sandbar is visible at top of photo.

Just managed to catch the railcar before it got right into the tunnel.

Just managed to catch the railcar before it got right into the tunnel.

… to Doctors Point had to be curtailed due to the sea’s erosion of sand at the boulder pile. It appears that this had occurred in the last approximately 10 days.

After a short delay, seven of the more adventurous walkers made the difficult crossing of the boulder pile to inspect the caves while the balance of the walkers started into the remainder of the planned walk.

There was a regrouping for lunch part way along the Purakanui beach.

Following lunch on sand spit.

Getting up after a lazy lunch on sand spit.

The walk continued along the beach after an extended lunch …

View down sandspit. Potato Point

View down sandspit. Potato Point.

… and followed the inlet into the pine trees to the fenced Maori cemetery.

From the cemetery it was along the vehicle track back to the car park. – Jim and Betty.

13. 5/8/2015 Both. Purakaunui, Purakaunui Urupu, Doctors Point. Moderate. Leaders: Judy, Bob.
Purakanui Maori graves beach caves

GPS of route courtesy Ken. Purakanui Maori graves beach caves. (Ken pic and caption.) Walked 18km; 4.9km/h; 3hr 40min moving; climbed 260m.

Today was a joint tramp with the hikers, so we all drove to Purakanui & parked down by the old garage at the far end. Here, Judy, the leader on the day, suggested that as it was already late, the trampers carry on with what they had planned, & not worry about walking with the hikers. So we took off along the waterside track, & stopped at the picnic spot for a very late morning tea break.

The group at morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

The group at morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was on around the rest of the bay, & into the pine forest on the other side, to try & find the Maori graves in there. Now I have walked past, & driven past this point many times without realising there were any grave sites in amongst these trees, until about a year ago, when they were mentioned to me. I think most, or all of the other 7 trampers with me didn’t know about them either. So it was good to find the site & have a look at the few headstones there.

Headstone with nice inscription

Headstone with nice inscription (Ken pic and caption)

Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

More Maori Graves

More Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

We then went onto the old PA site, had a quick look around, before settling down for lunch. Then it was a quick dash along the beach to the caves on the way to Doctors Point, & back again, before the tide forced a return route over the large rocks halfway along the beach.
All that remained was the long road walk, & the bayside track, back to the cars. – Ken.

Mopanui Reflection

Mopanui Reflection

Someone's dream cottage

Someone’s dream cottage (John pic)

A quirky letter box

A quirky letter box (John pic)

Hikers grouped at the plantation entrance

Hikers grouped at the plantation entrance (John pic)

Urupu Sign

Urupu Sign (John pic)

Lunch at the Cemetery

Lunch at the Cemetery (John pic)

Memorial

Memorial. “In Memory of Richard Driver, Late Gunner, N.Z. Permanent Artillery. Died April 6th 1887, Aged 27 Years. Erected By His Comrades.” (John pic)

Occasion? Location?

Coffee at Careys Bay Hotel. (John pic)

12. 27/5/2009 Hikers. Purakaunui, Canoe Beach. Medium-. Leaders: Lex, Fred, Elaine

Flooded beach access road deterred Hikers from attempting to reach Canoe Beach.
11. 16/4/2008. Hikers. Purakaunui, Canoe Beach. Easy. Park at Picnic Ground. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
10. 26/9/2007 Trampers. Purakaunui Circuit. Moderate. Leaders: Shirley, Helen.
8 trampers met at the wharf at Purakaunui and welcomed Peter back into the fold after his long holiday in Australia. The day started out as rather cold and dreary but soon picked up after morning tea in the park at the head of Purakaunui Inlet. We wound our way around the inlet and over the causeway where the kingfishers love to fish. We tramped around the other side of the inlet all the way to Canoe Bay over the steps at the end of Purakaunui beach.
Canoe Beach group. Pat, Peter, Tash, Leoni, Lex

Canoe Beach group. Pat, Peter, Tash, Leoni, Lex

Canoe Beach Trio. Lex, Pat, Abe

Canoe Beach Trio. Lex, Pat, Abe

 Lunch in the sun sitting on the most beautiful beach in the world, before climbing on to the old pa site, Mapoutahi, with views in every direction.
Railway tunnel shot from Mapoutahi Peninsula

Railway tunnel shot from Mapoutahi Peninsula

We admired all the different colours of the flowering currants along the sandy path leading back to the track and talked to a chattering and busy Tui on the way back. The tide had come in since the morning and we kept to the path all the way rather than cutting across the tidal flats. A magic place to spend the day! – Tash
9. 5/4/2006. All. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Leaders: Doug M, Bob H, Anne R, Eleanor W.
8. 15/9/2004. Both. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Glenys P, Bev H, Les and Margaret.
7. 6/11/2002. All. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Betty, Colleen.
6. 1/8/2001. Combined. Purekanui – Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Bev H.
5. 3/11/1999. Purakanui – Canoe Beach. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Chris.
4. 22/7/1998. Purakanui, Goat Island. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire.
3. 6/8/1997. Purakanui area. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Barbara McC.
2. 1/11/1995. Purakanui – Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Chris, Joan H.
1. 15/11/1989 Purakanui and Doctors Point. Interesting ancient Maori redoubt. Average+. Leaders: Dorothy W, Eric & Dot

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