Archive for the 'Hikers' Category

May 29 2019

Mornington Ramble

Published by under Hikers

3. 29/5/2019. Mornington Street Walk.M. Leaders: Lester and Doug.

2. 18/9/2013.Hikers. From Unity Park north. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

GPS of part only of route

GPS of part-only of route. Started late and battery ran out.

Wednesday’s walk for the hikers was a street walk led by Lance and Lois Woodfield. The day was sunny and there was no wind.

Fifteen of us met at Unity Park near the top of Eglington Road. The statue of Admiral Bryd [1888-1957] is positioned facing the Antarctic. Byrd was a famous American explorer. His statue caused a lot of letters to the editor at the Otago Daily Times when it was first mooted as it has its back  to the city.

We wandered our way north thru the streets around the town belt.

Lance and Lois were very informative about the historic houses in the area, some Victorian in style, others Edwardian. [Edit note: Others again detached terrace houses, with windowless brick walls on either side. Just English transplants.]

At one point we came to the Arts and Craft house designed by Basil Hooper [1876-1960], a famous architect who designed more
than 80 houses. Features were curved gutter brackets, coloured leadlight windows and sweeping roofs.

The day got very warm so everyone was pleased to stop at Olveston for lunch. Did you know that the public can access the grounds free to look at gardens and the garage where the Theomins’ 1921 Fiat 510 Tourer is housed in a glass case? The Edwardian Olveston was gifted to the city by the Theomins as a treasure of bygone days.

Neil Buckley was very knowledgeable on the early cable cars and trams. He pointed out where they ran.

So we carried on up and down quite a lot of steps and lanes  in this old part of the city. Adam Street has some 1890 houses, all fully restored. My grandmother lived at No. 8 in the 1900s.

We did have a good  day.  We walked approx. 8.9 kms.

Some of us went to Flax in Caversham for coffee afterwards. – Elaine.

1. 17/9/2008 Hikers. Mornington Ramble Leaders: Bev H, Bev M

Eighteen hikers, including a German Rotary Exchange student, Hanne, who was taking the opportunity to see another part of her host city, set off from Lookout Point on a morning where walking anywhere would be pure pleasure. It was a glorious spring day, reflected in the many beautiful gardens we passed where spring blooms were in full flower. Bev led us down several quiet little side roads where many of us had never been before. From a number of places there were extensive views over the city and ocean. The mix of older style houses with modern ones was interesting in what is surely one of the most attractive residential areas in the city. We partook of a little local history, viewing the home of A. H. Reed and the old tram building. At lunchtime we basked in the sun at Mornington Park before the return journey. Altogether it was a very pleasant morning out. – Bev.

Leaders:

17/9/2008

No responses yet

May 15 2019

Botanic Garden, Logan Park, Northern Cemetery, Chingford

Published by under Hikers

Distance from carpark: 20 km.

22. 15/5/2019. Hikers. Chingford Park, Botanic Garden Loop. E+ Leaders: John and Dave R.

On 15th May, 24 Hikers met at the lower Botanic Garden car park  at 9.25am to depart on an inner City walk in windy, but pleasantly mild conditions.

With the glass houses not opening until 10.00am, a brief loop of the northern upper gardens, included a brief rundown of facts and history of the Garden, then a stop for an early morning tea.

DSC03146c

(John pic.)

Following a visit to the glass houses,

K.IMG_1965c

(Kevin pic.)

K.IMG_1967c

(Kevin pic.)

we made our way up the hill to the aviary.
Departing the garden at the mid Opoho Rd exit we climbed to Arden St, then Chambers St, up steps to Taine St, before descending down  Frame St.

A walk on the sunny side of North East Valley , saw us arrive at Chingford Park in time for lunch, at about 12.20pm.

IMG_3577c

Lunch in Chingford Park. (Ian pic and caption.)

The return walk was via the “magic fairy walkway’ above Chingford Park, and Alex’s Lindsey Creek track (entrance at old Palmer’s Quarry site.)
Arriving back at the Croc-a-dile Cafe just after 2.00 pm for coffee, the walk concluded under threatening skies.
This being the 1st walk organised by Dave and myself, we hope all enjoyed it, and thank the club for the opportunity. – John.

21. 24/5/2017. Hikers. Botanic Garden and Logan Park. E. Leader: Marjorie.

28 hikers set off from the Gardens car park for a leisurely wander up to the azalea garden for morning tea. The fact that two groups became separated from the leading group, due to the multiple track system, reminded the leader of the need to regroup frequently. All reached the morning tea area…

Clive pic.

…and from there we proceeded out to Lovelock Avenue and entered the bush area, then proceeding up the track…

Clive pic.

…to the top of the cemetery. We walked through the cemetery on the main track,

Clive pic.

stopping to view the Thomas Bracken tombstone, and then followed the track through the bush to Logan Park car park. An easy stroll followed along Butts Road, through the area of the Sports Academy (old art gallery), along the sports field and back along the track on Butts Road. The 250 steps of Abbs Way were a good work out bringing us back to superb views over the city.

Clive pic.

Continuing up through the cemetery with a short detour to the Larnach tomb had us back into Lovelock Bush and then to the azalea garden for lunch. We ended the hike with a walk through the geographic gardens area and the bird aviaries, then down to the lower gardens where most of us had coffee at the Crocodile café. Some of the planned route had to be abandoned due to the closure of tracks for tree cutting but suitable alternatives were available. Although the overall distance was fairly short the steeper areas provided sufficient exercise. The Gardens were in their autumnal colourful splendour and there were many points of interest in the Gardens and the cemetery which made for a diverse and interesting day. – Marjorie.

20. 19/10/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh, Botanic Garden. E. Leaders: Dot and Bev.

Route Map (Courtesy Ian.)

Route Map. (Courtesy Ian.) A delightful Ramblers-style walk in the blaze of the Spring-blossomed Botanic Garden. – Ian.

Wednesday saw 25 happy hikers assemble in Duke St at the back of Woodhaugh Gardens to enjoy what proved to be a very relaxed and pleasant day out. We walked through bush tracks to emerge in the children’s play area, where some ‘older children’ couldn’t resist the challenge of a small flying fox,

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

and then on to the paddling pool section where we sat and enjoyed an unhurried morning tea break.

From there it was out to George St. and a walk along to the Gardens corner to enable us to cross to the Botanic Gardens with the safety of the traffic lights.

We walked right through the Gardens to the exit at Gore St. which we didn’t use but turned up the track to take us to Upper Gardens. From there we wandered round quite a few tracks that a lot of people hadn’t been on before. These took us through areas of bush, the rhododendron dell, and other not so well known areas of the Gardens.

We arrived at our designated lunch spot by 11.45 a.m. but nobody seemed to mind an early and extended lunch hour. Everyone took their time over lunch and from there were free to wander the Gardens at their own pace, meeting again at main gate at 1.30pm to walk back to, and through, Woodhaugh Gardens to the cars.

The Dunedin Botanic Gardens are looking beautiful and are well tended and maintained. Certainly well worth visiting at any time of the year.

Coffee stop was Plaza Café. – Bev.

19. 30/9/2015. Hikers. Logan Park. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Hikers' GPS

GPSs of route, courtesy Bruce.

Report on hikers’ trip to Logan Park 30 September 2015

Twenty-four hikers, including three students on holiday, set off, on a sunny spring morning, from the Gardens Car Park, opposite Mecure Dunedin Leisure Lodge, at 9.30 am and walked near the Gardens perimeter in a clockwise direction. We appreciated the new bark covered walkway near the themes of sculpturing hedge plants (topiary), coloured plants and plants with fragrancies. We went through the Clive Lister garden and after crossing the bridge viewed the brown trout sculpture near the duck pond commemorating the early breeding of trout in the Opoho Creek ponds in the 1860s. After looking at the two Peter and Wendy themed sculptures we crossed the stream and made our way up hill through the middle of the gardens for morning tea at 10.05 am at the Azalea/Rhododendron dell lawn area.

Refreshed, we passed through the Lovelock Bush on the other side of the road, went up the path and crossed Opoho Park to the right of the rugby club rooms to turn right into Opoho Road and then left into Warden Street. We proceeded to Opoho School at the end of Warden Street and then turned to the right down the driveway at the end of Blacks Road. We passed to the left of a tree at the end of the driveway to proceed downhill on a public walkway, that was initially covered with bark. The advance description of the hike noted that, “Some of the paths are very good, others are steep and less well formed.” The descent from Blacks Road to the Opoho Creek matched the latter description more than the former. Some bird song was heard in this area and a pair of tuis observed. The native bush, including large pungas was quite dense …

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

… and Jennifer noted that it was possible, at one time, to hear other trampers but not see them. The track followed alongside the Opoho Creek to a curved bridge where it met a mountain bike track. We continued downhill on this better track (right turn) and came to the remnants of the 1868 Opoho Creek trout breeding ponds about 75 m further along.

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We then continued downhill on the mountain bike trail until we came to a pile of gravel on the right when the playing fields of Logan Park school were visible and turned left up the Marshall mountain bike trail for approximately 50 metres where a large rock was present and then turned right contouring through bush towards a white cloth marker on a tree (Just above the rock in a sign, seen from the uphill side, on a tree with red and green arrows). We went slightly downhill, for about 20 m, to a ledge (part of a trail) and then up and to the right towards another white marker (20 m) and then straight ahead for 20 m to come to the Pelichet Bay rifle butt remains, a stone structure about 20 m long and 2 m high.

 Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We noted the hidden geocache container in the region.

The white cloth marker track led out the other end of the butts and turned to the right to cross a stream (a few metres above a steep descent in the stream where some brave souls saw the need to provide themselves with additional challenges by crossing here). We went downhill on an angle for 30 m and then uphill and to the right for another 30 m to a yellow marker and then followed the track out to the main Signal Hill mountain bike track and then down this to the top mown field at Logan Park to stop for lunch on the sheltered sunny north facing bank at 12.05 pm.

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Some required sun burn lotion to be applied.

After lunch we crossed the broad track above the mown field, on the left edge of the unmown rough area, to reach the gravelled track on the north side of the gully. About 100 m down this, on the top of a slight rise, the groups split into two. Les kindly led a group back to the car park via the gravel track to Dundas Street and then Leith Street. The others arrived about 30 minutes later after ascending the track through the bush on the right, up and to the right, to the corner of Opoho Park by the playground.

From there they crossed to the left hand end of the pine trees on the west side of the park, past the happy ribbon tree,

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

across to the top of the cemetery by the path, through a small part of the cemetery, back through the Lovelock Bush, over the road, downhill through the rhododendron dells, down a native bush path turning to the right down some steps just before the bridge and down a long board walk to Lovelock Avenue which featured a view of a large broadleaf tree that was just a seedling in the early days of Dunedin in 1844. We emerged on Lovelock Avenue just above the memorial stone and re-entered the gardens about 30 m further on to follow the excellent track above the left bank of the Leith Stream back to the car park.

Many had afternoon tea at the Croc-o-Dile.

The bush above the fish breeding ponds in Opoho Creeks was noticeably denser with more moisture than that near the conifers and manuka/kanuka near the rifle butts, and on the hillside between the school fields and Opoho Park. The track descending from Blacks Road to Opoho Creek may be better suited to trampers than hikers and future alternatives would include going from the car park to Lovelock Avenue along the left bank of the Leith track, walking on the streets to Logan Park school, and visiting the fish pond with a dog leg walk up the good quality mountain bike track.

Distance travelled: 8.2 km.

Bruce and Marjorie.

18. 8/10/2014.Hikers. Logan Park, Gardens, University. E. Leaders: Janice and Theresa.

Route

Route. Parked Logan Park HS. 1km: top of Northern Cemetery; 2km: Entering Upper Gardens; 3km: At the Worm; 4km: Near duck pond; 5km: Into Nth Leith St; 6km: Point where Leith turns towards the Harbour; 7km: coffee at University Plaza Cafe.

26 of us parked at the Logan Park High School, closed at the time for the school holidays. Walked further around Butts Road and climbed St Abbs Place steps to Brackens Lookout. Went into the Northern Cemetery to William Larnach’s tomb. Wandered around cemetery to find Brackens grave. Had morning tea amongst the graves, sheltered from the wind by a hedge of bushes. Came back out and climbed up the track behind the new planting out buildings of the Botanic Garden. Entered the Upper Garden at the top corner and went through them into the Rhododendron Dell. Came back up and across to the Mediterranean Garden Terrace.

Mediterranean

Mediterranean Garden Terrace

Next, went down to the flat and admired the Ouroboros stainless steel worm sculpture, designed to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Botanic Garden.

worm

Ouroboros worm sculpture

Walked through to the Gardens Corner exit and made our way along to the Woodhaugh Gardens for lunch on a set of some conveniently sheltered seats.

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch finished, we made our way across the gardens via the Duck Pond to Duke Street. We stopped and wondered at the white spanish type building at the foot of the Bullock Track, but no one could shed any light on it’s design origins. We continued down Duke Street into Nth Leith St, into Montgomery Avenue to cross the St David Street pedestrian bridge and to wander along the grass frontage to the original University Buildings, admiring the stepped Leith Stream flood works still underway. We emerged onto the Dundas Street pedestrian bridge, making our way through various newer buildings, past a fruit and vegetable co-op to return alongside the Leith Stream again. We crossed and recrossed this, emerging at last onto Anzac Avenue.

Tramp’s end now in sight, we had to sit down outside Plaza Cafe on the University Plaza adjacent to the Forsyth Barr Stadium to ponder whether to get our (now) customary coffee shot before or after getting back to the cars. Most decided before, several after. This, with much thought, determined and accomplished, wound up the tramp for the day.

Thanks to Jan and Theresa for a successfully conducted tramp, losing none of our straggling party through the many twists and turns of the day. The threatened rain held off and cool  temperatures made for good tramping conditions. A good day out, through many varied locations. Again, thanks Jan and Theresa. – Ian.

17. 11/9/2013. Hikers. Botanic Garden – Bracken View – Rhododendron Dell – Northern Cemetery. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
Last Wednesday 29 hikers turned up at the car park, led by the Woodfields. A nice sunny day.
We started at lower car park at the Botanic Garden and walked our way up the paths in the garden. We stopped at the Mediterranean Garden Terrace for the tea break and enjoyed the lovely cake made by Hazel for George’s Birthday.
The magnolia trees were just starting to show their blooms and the early rhododendrons were out. Roll on October when the main ones bloom.
Blossom
Lunch was at a grassy area at the upper garden. George, who was 85 – did you know GEORGE WAS 85? – shouted a lot of lovely brut,  bubbly and nibbles. This was a wonderful time …. How many of us will be still hiking around when we are 85? As usual we had lots of laughs.
We visited the northern cemetery and looked at the  William Larnach tomb and then we worked our way down through the Garden.
I think everyone had a good day as there certainly was a lot of talking going on.
Some of the group finished of the day at the Topiary Cafe at Wals Plantland  in Mosgiel for coffee with warm pikelets and cream and carrot cake.
Being retired is so good. – Elaine
 16. 23/5/2012. Hikers. Botanic Garden. Leaders: A & B Landrebe.

15. 26/10/2011. Hikers. Botanic Garden.

14. 17/11/2010 Dunedin Botanic Garden. Leader: Bev.
13. 11/11/2009 Hikers. Upper Gardens, Rhodendron Vale, Northern Cemetery, Aviary. Leaders: Lance and Lois
(Bill pic)

Just representational of the Rodo gardens and borders. Many of our group enjoyed guessing names of rhodos but there are so many, especially hybrids, that to get one right is near impossible. (Bill pic and caption)

 

(Bill pic)

Morning tea interest group. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Best to just listen. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Knarled convolutions. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Northern Cemetery. Another place worth a further (temp. only) visit. It was noticeable so soon after 31st October how many large cracks in the plastering there were. Do they repair these each year? (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Palmers Quarry. (Is that apostrophe s or s apostrophe? Probably apostrophe s.) This stop-to-view coincided with 11.11.11. and I wasn’t sure which bangs were quarrying blasts and which were cannon shots. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds. Thanks DCC. They got this one right. What a great use for a stadium. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds(2). (Bill pic and caption)

12. 25/6/2008. Woodhaugh, Botanic Gardens and Northern Cemetery. Leaders:
After some concerns about the weather the day before, we were pleased to wake up to relatively clear skies and no wind. The decision was made to proceed with our mid winter ramble in Woodhaugh and the Botanic Gardens and all fourteen participants set off enthusiastically. There was certainly a nip in the air and snow on the surrounding hills encouraged us to walk briskly along the banks of the Leith and around some of the well maintained bush paths. Sheds 3 and 4 provided shelter for our morning tea break and then we headed across the busy highways via Willowbank and Leisure Lodge to enter the Botanic Gardens. A stiff hill climb levelled out in the rhododendron area, the bushes bare of flowers but still sporting lush green leaves. Crossing Lovelock Avenue, we entered Lovelock Bush, to shortly emerge at the reservoir.
There followed a circuit of the northern cemetery. A warming sun came through the grey sky to enable us to proceed more leisurely and take in some of the interesting sights and historic old tombstones as well as admiring the sculptured trunks of the even older trees.
Lunch with the ducks

A rest at the cemetery

We made a fairly brisk descent to the lower Gardens via the aviary where the birds were in fine, if raucous, voice.

The Shakespeare Gardens

The Shakespeare Gardens

It was warm enough to eat lunch on the seats overlooking the duck pond and lower gardens where we were soon joined by hopeful seagulls, one drake and a blackbird. Some took the opportunity for a quick look at the information centre and glasshouses
Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

before we returned to the cars, well satisfied with our outing and happy to get off home before the weather deteriorated. – Marjorie
11. 19/11/2008 Botanic Gardens, NEV street walk, Chingford Park ret. Leaders: Graham.
Botanic Gardens - Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

Botanic Gardens – Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

The programme said “Chingford” but Graeme, our leader realised that it alone would not extend us, so we began at the Botanical Gardens carpark, completed numerous walks along Gardens paths, had morning tea among the rhododendrons, Continue Reading »

No responses yet

May 08 2019

Tomahawk Lagoon and nearby tracks/areas

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Ocean Grove, also known as Tomahawk, is a suburb in the southeast of the New Zealand city of Dunedin. … The suburb was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name not being a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”.
No. 23 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karetai Rd via Monument from Lagoon. Year round.”
Distance from car-park: Tomahawk: 19 km; Smaills Beach: 22 km;  Paradise Road: 26 km.’
DCC List: 41 Peg Track. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Oregon St. 3.5 hrs ret. Tramping track – unbenched. Managed: DCC CAM, private land.
Description – This track provides a link between Ocean Grove and Highcliff Road. Access to the track in Ocean Grove is off Oregon Street. An attractive walk around Tomahawk Lagoon then climbs through gorse and native bush. Turn right towards Soldiers Memorial through paddocks with gorse sometimes obscuring the rock walls.
  • Classification – Hard
  • Time – Approximately 45 minutes.
  • Parking – Limited at Highcliff Road. No dogs.
  • Dogs – No
*****

Distance from car-park: 19 km.

38. 8/5/2019. Hikers. Tomahawk – Marlow Park ret. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Tomahawk hike 8.5.19 (2)c

Route map of Tomahawk Hike, courtesy Bruce.

Thirty-four hikers assembled on a cloudy morning with a chilly NE breeze at the carpark near the Tomahawk Lagoon outlet on Tomahawk Road, just over the bridge on the right down the hill from the crematorium entrance, before setting off, at 0929, past the white gate on to the Ocean Grove sports fields. At the top left corner of the sports grounds we went up the mown path and turned to the right along a cut path in the grass and emerged near the site of the now demolished Ocean Grove school and swimming pool. The rotunda and dental clinic building have been retained. We then walked down the track on the left and along Lock St before turning left into Tomahawk Road at the Otago Anglers Association building on the corner, then right into Oregon St, and then left into the right of way leading to the Tomahawk Lagoon.

We walked along the path on the right bank of the lagoon, at which were mallard and paradise ducks together with black swans, to the style at the fence at the end and then turned back and retraced our steps to Tomahawk Road where we turned left and went up the hill to the Ocean Grove playground on the right where we had morning tea.

After morning tea we followed the track leading to the beach …

C.4 Over the sand dunes to Tomahawk Beachc

Over the sand dunes to Tomahawk Beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

… and then turned left to explore the cave at the north east end of the beach.

I.2.Cave on Tomahawk Beachc

Cave at end of Tomahawk Beach. (Ian pic and caption.)

We then proceeded back along the beach to the south west end, turned right towards the bridge and took the track up the bank on the right, crossed the bridge and went up the hill to the green transformer where we took the track up to the golf course

We followed behind a group of golden oldie golfers to the green ahead keeping to the perimeter of the course and avoiding walking on the greens. We took the track up to the Leonard Wright memorial which starts near the tee off area.

We inspected the view from Lawyers Head,

C.11.Tomahawk Beachc

Tomahawk Beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

noticed the colourfully painted seats with their message of hope for those contemplating suicide, had a group photo taken …

C.15c

Group photo at one of the ‘Hope’ seats. (Clive pic.)

… and walked the length of the John Wilson drive to the Marlow Park playground for lunch

C.16. Lunch at Marlow Parkc

Lunch at Marlow Park. (Clive pic and caption.)

arriving from 1155 to 1210.

After lunch, we passed the right side of the Pirates Rugby Club building and crossed the rugby ground to enter the golf course at the entrance sign situated in about the middle of the field. We proceeded through the course keeping to the left hand side, eventually passing to the right of the club house, climbed the small hill behind the club house and went down to the left to the start of the path that leads through the golf course to the north east end where we went on to the path.

Most of us then deviated to the left to meander through the cemetery while a group of 4 kept on straight ahead to head back to the cars. On the cemetery walk we passed the plaques acknowledging those who donated their bodies for use in medical education and the 37 women who died in the Seacliff mental hospital fire on 8 December 1942. Further on was the grave William Edgar Adams. Professor William Edgar Adams (1908–1973) was a distinguished University of Otago student, graduating MB ChB in 1935. In 1944 he became Professor of Anatomy and was appointed Dean of the Medical School in 1968. He was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Zoologists (India) in 1955, Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 1959 and Honorary Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in 1962. He died in office on 18 May 1973.

After following a semicircular route through the cemetery we emerged by crossing the fence at the bottom of the hill on the path where we had entered the golf course earlier in the day and arrived back at the cars at approximately 1343. Coffee was enjoyed at Nichols. Distance travelled 12.25 km.

Bruce and Marjorie

37. 18/10/2017. Hikers. Tomahawk. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce

36. 15/2/2017. Trampers. Highciff Road, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Paradise ‘Road’, Highcliff Road.

Our tramp started on Highcliff road. 11 of us today. Lovely to see Judy out again, also Bruce after his holiday. Also back again was Neil number 3 after an outing with us last
week. Along Karatei Road to McMeeking Road and past farmhouse. Got onto Highcliff track after our morning tea.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Some stunning views of Boulder beach,

Boulder Beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

farmland and the coastline. Along the side of the hill

Along the side of the hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

and down to not quite the beach.  It was closed for the penguins.
Passed the old houses and onto Paradise  track up to the road having lunch on the way.
Up the road then and back to our cars. Decided to go to the pool cafe at St Clair for our coffee debrief. A lovely trampall up. – Helen.

35. 8/6/2016. Hikers: Tomahawk/Smaills Beach. E. Leaders: Judy and Jay.
Nike Route Map.

Hikers’ Nike app Route Map.

A fine frosty morning found 30 hikers heading for the crematorium carpark.  We wandered down the track from the carpark corner out onto Tomahawk Road, and along to the Tomahawk School (now closed) for morning tea.
Unfortunately the planned walk up between the two lagoons could not be followed due to a last minute refusal from the land-owner.  So instead of a round trip, we turned into Oregon St and followed the track around the north lagoon, a pleasant walk in the bush.  The swans on the lagoon made a great sight (and noise) as they lumbered across the still waters and took flight from our invasion.
Across the style, and then a short climb up though the bush to a second style.  18 keen types carried on up the fence line for another 10 minutes, enjoying the views on such a marvellous morning.  (This track continues on up to the Soldiers’ Monument on Highcliff Rd.)

Calm lagoon, from Peg 14 track. (Sharyn pic.)

Calm lagoon, from 41 Peg track. (Sharyn pic.)

The rest wandered back down the track to wait at the picnic tables for the others to return.
Then it was back out to Tomahawk Rd, and a long pull up the hill past the gun emplacements, …

White Island, from gun emplacements.

Islet off Smaills Beach, taken  from WWII gun emplacements area.

… across the Centre Rd junction and down to the Tautuku Fisherman’s Lodge …

The notable Glen Cairn stone house. Originally owned by the Smaill family, early 1880 settlers in the area. (Sharyn pic.)

The notable Glen Cairn stone house. Built by the Smaill family, early 1880s settlers in the area. (Sharyn pic.)

… for lunch.  With no-one in residence there we had to crawl under the barrier arm and across the cattle stop, a good exercise in balance!
After a leisurely lunch,

Leisurely lunch. (Judy pic.)

Leisurely lunch at the Lodge. Where’s Fred off to with his chocs? (Judy pic.)

Ah, here's Fred. Good one!. Gotcha!. (Judy pic.)

Ah, here he is. Gotcha! Good one! Thanks, Fred, for the weekly treats. (Judy pic.)

it was back up the hill to the bus terminus, then through the track to the sand-hills and down to the beach.  A good low tide allowed some to explore the cave …

Exploring small cave at northern end of Tomahawk Beach. (Adrienne pic.)

Exploring small cave at northern end of Tomahawk Beach. (Adrienne pic.)

… at the end of the beach before proceeding to the far end, then out to the road and back up to the cars.
Coffee at Nicholls was enjoyed before it got too cold to hang around!
– Judy and Jay.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce

Bruce

34. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

33. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
4.1km/h
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water
Ducks (Eleanor pic)

Ducks on ice (Eleanor pic)

or swans trying to get out of frozen water?

Swans

Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.

Memorial

Soldiers’ Memorial (Eleanor pic)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…

Track

Tarseal Road (Eleanor pic)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil
32. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

31. 15/7/2015. Trampers. Buskin Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track. After a bit of a mix up over pickup points, we parked up beside Penzance Kennels, where we had a discussion on which way we would tackle the days walk. We settled on going down Buskin Track & worrying about the return journey later.
The track was mostly dry apart from a few areas where it has been damaged by water scouring it out quite badly. As two of the party of three, had never been there before we took some time to check out the cribs [baches] at the bottom of the track.We also came across an employee of Otago Pest Destruction [I think that’s what they are called] who was happily banging a possum on the head, after it got caught in one of his traps. He said he got 27 the day before, so much for a possum free peninsula !!!
We then made our way out to the beach for some boulder hopping practice, before gaining the sand at the northern end. As we passed by the log shelter I noticed an intruder lying inside, looking very cosy indeed.

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

It lifted its head to survey me for about two seconds, then just went back to sleep ! What a life !!
We wandered along the beach wondering where all the sand had gone, the bank holding the tussock is badly eroded, & about 1 meter high. So now, there is no way for the Yellow Eyed Penguins to climb up & get to their nests further up the hill.
We walked back past the intruder in it’s cosy shelter,

3 Anothe shot of the intruder.

3 Another shot of the intruder.

& had lunch sitting on a large bit of driftwood,

Boulder Beach, Otago Peninsula New Zealand

1 Lunch spot at Boulder Beach

before walking up Braidwood Rd. to the gate into the paddocks leading along to the Double Bay area, where I had an unsuccessful look for the viewing hide I had seen at an earlier date, but the vegetation had me beat, so we retraced our steps around to the bottom of Paradise Track, made our way up there, & back along Highcliff Rd. to the car.

We walked 10km
ave 3.3km/h
climbed 475m – Ken

30. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
4.1km/h
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water …

Ducks on ice. (Eleanor pic.)

… or swans trying to get out of frozen water?

Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic.)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.

Soldiers’ Memorial. (Eleanor pic.)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…

Tarseal Road. (Eleanor pic.)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk. (Eleanor pic.)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil.
29. 29/1/2014. Hikers. John Wilson Drive, Golf Course, Beach, Cave, Tomahawk Lagoon, return Lawyers Head Paper Road. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
A few of the over Christchurch over 40s Tramping Club contingent lodging for the week at Waiora Scout Camp went off with our Trampers but the majority at the car park threw in their lot with the Hikers. The task for the Christchurchian cars to navigate through the city to the St Kilda playground adjacent to the John Wilson Drive was made easier by someone’s suggestion that locals spread themselves out amongst their cars as pilots and that worked well.
When we were eventually all gathered at the beginning of John Wilson Drive, Marjorie counted 51 of us. An all-time record? The views along the drive, with the Chisholm Park Golf Links and city on one side, the beach and sea on the other, was remarked upon by all. Further there were no cars to bother us this early in the day. It was time for morning tea when we reached Lawyers Head, one of a series of basaltic headlands which punctuate much of this section of the Otago coast, (others nearby being Maori Head and Blackhead). This one is named for the likeness of the cliff face to the profile of a lawyer in traditional legal wig, …

Lawyers Head.

… so we supped our cuppas  around the Leonard Wright memorial at the Head.

Lawyers Head Lookout.

Hidden hard nearby was a narrow steep track connecting down to the golf links, around whose Lawyers Head coastal edge the leaders had gained permission for us to single-file our way. We found ourselves right on the crest of the Lawyers Head cliff, the Tomahawk beach stretching out below us. We made quite a strung-out sight.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless applauded tee shot.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless ironically applauded tee shot at the end of our links perimeter stroll.

Now down and away from the links along another narrow, but lengthier track out and across to the Tomahawk Road.

A long line.

Looking back upon another strung-out sight.

We emerged upon a playground on Tomahawk Road.

The suburb beyond us, now called Ocean Grove, was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name being, not a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”. (Wiki).
We descended the road a little way to the lower of the twin-lobed Tomahawk Lagoon, this lobe being its outer one,  whose outlet we skirted on its true left to emerge onto the Tomahawk Beach.
The day’s trip had been selected for one of Dunedin’s low-tides, so the beach was ours, as was the small tidal cave at its end, an addition to the area’s features.

Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Up a small but energetic sand-hill and we were on another track out to the road again, down it a bit, and into a side road leading to yet another side route and out onto a recreation area alongside Tomahawk Lagoon’s inner lobe, this one a wildlife reserve, although both lobes are noted for their bird life.

Here was to be the lunch stop, but prior to that there was a short walk up alongside the lakelet to where our local club members knew of a Trampers’ track leading up to a soldiers’ memorial on by the Peninsula high road. But this was to just to wander the level part of track and enjoy (??) at one spot a strong pong from the the slightly stagnant waters and mud verge. (Roll on a storm flush!)

So we lunched leisurely, variously at tables and on ledges until our leaders judged it time for the return journey.

Out on the road, a motor cyclist stopped to talk and admire our impressive size. He was glad to hear we were returning by the Lawyers Head paper road and invited us to notice the “use it or lose it” graffiti posted in a couple of places before its entrance. (Apparently the City Council proposed closing it.) We were going to be a wonderful “use it” example.

The ‘road’ led us through a corner of the Andersons Bay Cemetery, close by the towering Crematorium and out through the Chisholm Park Golf links. Then across the Pirates Football Club pitch and we were at our cars again and adjacent to a useful new toilet block by the playground.

Now came farewells and dispersal time. There were many appreciative remarks from the Christchurch Club members about the unique difference of such a walk, with its wonderful unexpected variations. ‘The best of their week so far’ was one comment.

I know our club felt quite proud to hear such unstinted praise, and of course are so indebted to Marjorie and Bruce for their careful planning, taking into account the meal stops, the permissions sought, and the trip duration. Bravo. Of course the day’s excellent weather didn’t hurt either. – Ian.

28. 28/11/2012. Trampers. Tomahawk, Soldiers Monument, Buskin Track, Highcliff,  Karatai Rd

GPS Tomahawk Soldiers Monument Buskin Track Karatai Rd, courtesy Ken.

Lunch at junction of Boulder Beach tracks. (Ken caption and pic)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic)

27. 26/9/2012. Trampers. Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road.

Karetai

Six of us parked at Smaills Beach car-park. We had dropped the idea of Silver Peaks because of the forecast rain with its fog. As we went up Karetai ‘Road’, we reached the rain level at our tea break and had to ‘parka-up’. We turned off further up onto the Highcliff Track …

Boulder Beach from Highcliff Track

and round to Beatties Cottage where we lunched. We didn’t bother going down to the beach but lazed in the sunshine (temporary but happily well-timed) in the shelter of the cottage’s large hedge from the wind.
The climb up Paradise Track gets no shorter but by and large, with its couple of zig-zags, provides a good gradient.
Along Highcliff Road, we forewent turning down the Buskin Track, with its promised steep climb back up the Highcliff Track, and carried on to the Karetai Road turnoff, returning down it to the cars.
Surprisingly Ken’s GPS recorded we had done 14.5 kms! A useful day’s walk. – Ian

26. 1/6/2011. Both. Bowls Stadium, Cemetery, beach, Fishing Club, Karetai Rd, Smaills Beach, return. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Select only coastal part of GPS for this route. GPS Courtesy Ken. Distance travelled = 11.7km Moving time = 2hr 46min. Moving ave. = 4.2k/hr Stopped time = 1hr 50min.

Twenty-three hikers and trampers set off from the Westpac Bowls Stadium in Tahuna Road at 1000 in cool cloudy conditions and went up the grass verge between the road and the Chisholm Park golf links before entering the first gate on the right to the Andersons Bay cemetery. We walked through part of the cemetery before continuing down the hill, watching some horses train behind a motor vehicle, and crossing the bridge over the outlet from the Tomahawk Lagoon. Immediately over the bridge we followed a gravel road alongside the outlet stream and then, after 80 metres,  a track alongside the stream down to the beach where trucks were removing sand, probably for attempting to remedy the erosion at Middle Beach.

Truck and loader for removing sand from Tomahawk beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We proceeded along the length of the beach to the two caves at the far end and had morning tea on the rocks there. Some inspected the cave, risking getting wet feet in the process with high tide approaching at 1430.

Morning tea near the caves at Tomahawk Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After morning tea we ascended the sand hill to the Tomahawk Road and continued down the private road to the Tautuku Fishing Club, Dunedin and Haast Inc. We arrived there at approximately 1130 and were kindly shown around and given a history of the Club and the fine bluestone building by the club president Brett Bensemann.

Tautuku Fishing Club premises. (Pic: Ken. Caption: Bruce.)

Bob pic.

Bob pic.

The building was originally the homestead of Alexander Smaill and was bought by the club, together with some surrounding land, by the Club in 1972 for $5000.
At 1205 we continued up Karetai Road for 15-20 minutes

Bruce on Karatai Rd. track with others in the background. (Ken pic and caption.)

to the corner near the style leading to a black and white Geodesic Trig on the right.

About nine of the group, following a route pioneered by Ken, went down to the trig …

Ken at the Geodesic Trig looking towards Sandymount (Bruce pic and caption.)

… and then contoured around on a track

Bob pic.

back to the lower reaches of Karetai Road while the others retraced their steps down the non-rutted road in good  condition for walking. We lunched in a sheltered area close to the start of the first track on the left leading from the road to Smaill’s Beach.
After lunch we proceed to the beach via three routes, necessitated by a slip which had damaged the track (a) up the sand hills to avoid the slip, (b) via a narrow edge beside the river, or (c) retreating back to the gate and taking an alternative direct to the beach instead of going alongside the river bank. After briefly looking at the windswept beach and the offshore Bird Island (which has claimed many lives on account of a strong under-current including William and Thomas Henderson of Tomahawk  in about 1900)

Doug and others leaving Smaill’s Beach with Bird Island in the background. (Bruce pic and caption.)

we climbed back up to the gun emplacements at the Jack Fox lookout. Two six inch Vickers coastal defence guns were part of a network of coastal batteries during WW2. The guns were removed  in 1945. A cluster of three similar batteries were present at Taiaroa Head  and the mother of one of the group nursed there.
We returned to the cars via Tomahawk Road, Luke Street, the disused Tomahawk School, the soccer playing fields and the cemetery grounds which we entered via the pedestrian entrance on the left a short distance above the bridge. We arrived back at 1445 somewhat wind buffeted but knowing more about Porbeagle Sharks which are only caught in the local area. (For more information about the Tautuku Fishing Club see: Tautuku Fishing Club) – Bruce.

25. 23/9/2009. Hikers. Tomahawk, Centre Road. Medium. Leaders Arthur and Barbara.

24. 4/6/2008 Both. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial, Centre Road. Leaders: Joyce, Ian, Lesley G
Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Three shaggy dogs

Three Irish Wolfhounds

23. 26/9/2007 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Memorial. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Although the day dawned very cold, overcast and threatening to rain, 8 intrepid Hikers turned up at Glascow St. carpark for the day’s tramp from Tomahawk Lagoon. In spite of weather we had a very happy and enjoyable day. We left cars in car park by the Lagoon and set off up the track to WW 1 Soldiers Memorial on Highcliff. Although track was very wet and muddy it is now much improved to what it used to be when we tramped in the area many years ago. Morning tea was a very welcome and refreshing break in the slippery slog up the hill. Up to the Monument and lovely views of our beautiful harbour.

Peninsula Soldiers’ Memorial

Highcliff Rd to Centre Rd. was pretty cold but we soon warmed up. Then we had the great views over the other side of the Peninsula. Found a nice sheltered spot for our lunch and were vastly entertained by a very interested audience of 3 Irish Wolfhound dogs. Hard to say whether dogs or people were most fascinated.
Down the road and round the corner, back to cars after an enjoyable, sociable and refreshing day out. – Bev.
22. 25/7/2007. Trampers. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial. Moderate. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

21. 14/2/2007. Trampers. Boulder Beach, Karetai, Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders; Bruce and Marjorie.

20. 31/1/2007. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Mary M.

19. 13/4/2005. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Rosemary and Jack.

18. 3/12/2003. Hikers: Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Dot T

17. 29/10/2003. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Joan H, Chris.

16. 14/5/2003 Hikers. Karetai Road, Boulder Beach. Medium.Leaders: Colleen, Betty

15. 11/4/2002 Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Ray, Les W

14. 20/3/2002. Alt. Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Smaills Beach. Medium. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

13. 15/8/2001. Alt. Tomahawk, Karetai. Leaders: Nancy, Val, Peg C.

12. 11/4/2001. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Les W.

11. 19/7/2000. Boulder Beach, Karetai Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris, Joan H.

10. 23/2/2000. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Ria H.

9. 30/6/1999 Tomahawk Lagoon. Centre Road. Leaders: Jean Y, Denise, Eleanor W

8. 12/8/1998. Highcliff Centre Road from Lagoon. Leaders: Molly, Frank.

7. 18/3/1998. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road round trip. Leaders: Jean, Ria H.

6. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean

5. 18/9/1996. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Chris, Joan H, Ngaire.

4. 13/4/1994 Tomahawk Lagoon, Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Buskin Road, Soldiers Track and return. Medium. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, June G, Betty H

3. 8/7/1992.  Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Centre Road. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, Bev H, Merle

2. 7/3/1991. Cars park Karetai Road Car Park. Karetai Road from car park. A good peninsula walk. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret S, Les W, Jack M.

1. 12/7/1989 Centre Road, Highcliff. Average +. Leaders: Kees & Ria, Diana
B, Ria H

 

 

No responses yet

Apr 03 2019

Bus Trip: Daisy Bank to Hyde. Rail Trail

Published by under Hikers

No. 106 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bus Trip to Old Central Railway”

3. 3/4/2019. All. Daisy Bank -Hyde. Rail Trail. leader: Bob.

After a delayed start owing to members being given differing start times the bus finally left the car park at 9am.
The morning was crisp and clear with the roadside verges having frost on them.
We arrived at Daisy Bank in time for morning tea on a calm sunny morning.

H.Morning tea at Daisybankc

Morning tea at Daisybank. (Helen pic and caption.)

48 members set off towards Hyde on the rail trail that was excellent to walk on.

G.1st photo-- On the wayc

On the way. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We stopped for lunch by the Taieri River 6km into the 11km walk.

H.Viaduct and lunch stopc

Viaduct and lunch stop. (Helen pic and caption.)

At the tunnel…

G.5th photo-- Prices creek tunnel entrancec

Prices creek tunnel entrance. (Gordon pic and caption.)

G.7th. Prices Creek TunnelJPG

Prices creek tunnel.(Gordon pic and caption.)

…some of the more energetic members went down to the river to see the 50 mtr diversion of the river through rock so they could mine for gold on the then dry river bed.

P.3.Surveying the diversion channelc

Surveying the diversion channel. (Phil pic and caption.)

We arrived at the Hyde Cafe at 2.30pm for an ice cream or a drink or both.

G.8th-- Finish and icecreamsc

Finish and ice creams. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We left there at 3pm arriving back in Mosgiel just after four oclock.
Thanks to Richard Tranior of Good Time Tours for his excellent service.
– Bob & Peter.

2. 29/3/2011. All. Daisy Bank – Hyde. Rail Trail.

GPS of Railtrail route, courtesy Ken.

Bob’s bus was big and comfortable. Thanks to one or two club members rounding up extra passengers, numbers travelling managed (just) to reach the 30 needed to pay for it. We arrived at Daisy Bank at ten past ten so decided to start the walk with morning tea.

Morning Tea, under what shade was available. (John pic)

With Bev willing to play the role of back-marker, we were able to set off at our own times, at our own paces and with whomsoever we cared to link up.
A warm nor-wester tail-wind comfortably tempered what might otherwise have been too hot a day. But so vigorous was its assistance at times, it was difficult to maintain a dignified walking-pace.
The viaducts were great. This one, awesome.

Prices Creek Viaduct. (Ken pic)

To the left of the tunnel entrance was the following interesting notice.

Tunnel sign (John pic)

Ken, who in a previous life had worked with DoC, and had hammered some of the nails into the previous viaduct, on two – yes, two – occasions was willing to escort companions close-by at the time, down to the Taieri River diversion channel referred to in the above notice.

Diversion inlet. Can just see the outlet. (Ken pic)

Diversion outlet. (Ken pic)

Tunnel Entrance. (Ken pic).

Yours truly was willing to cast all photogenic illusions aside to grace a tunnel alcove with human interest.

Tunnel alcove. (Ken pic)

The cafe at the end did a roaring trade accommodating a big club spend-up. The day was still relatively young, and we were in no hurry to get back on the bus, so we didn’t, for a restful long while.

Hyde Hotel Cafe.

At long last, we were back on the bus and headed back to Dunedin through a surprising band of rain at one point. A good day out, well-enjoyed by all. – Ian
20/5/2009. Hikers. Daisy Bank to Hyde. Rail Trail. (Cancelled. Weather wet, windy. Middlemarch road closed. Snow.) Leaders: Neil, Evelyn C.
1. 6/3/2002. Daisy Bank – Hyde. Rail Trail.
20/11/1997 ( Data missing)

One response so far

Mar 27 2019

Karitane beach to Huriawa Pa, Beach walk

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 12 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karitane to Maori Pa and Beach Walk. C Tither. Year Round.”

Pa accessed from Karitane wharf. 2 hr ret. Walking Track. – Manager: DOC.

If you want a history of Huriawa Pa, Sir Truby King or early Methodist missionary James Watkin, it’s all just a click away here.

57 km from car park.
5. 27/3/2019. Hikers. Huriawa Pa Peninsula, beach walk. E. Leaders: Clive and Alex.

The week leading up to this walk at Karitane had threatened all kinds of extreme weather.   So it was surprising to muster at least 26 Hikers and Ramblers at the start of the walk outside the local fishing club.   First things first it was nearly 10 o’clock so fortification of morning tea was taken before setting off.   We headed to the prominent headland , whose history has been recounted in earlier visits and reports.   Alec who had spent many a happy hour in Karitane had extensive local knowledge and immediately tried to put it to good use by taking a little known short cut  …  over a cliff ….   So not that way.   The views from the headland are spectacular and a couple of more intrepid hikers made it further out on to the headland.  See photos attached.

C.3c

(Clive pic.)

C.4c

(Clive pic)

After the headland we made our way down through the bush to connect up with the road.    Although it was high tide there was enough beach to walk on and we made our way to the basalt rocks at the far end of the beach in time for lunch.

C.5Beach walkc

(Clive pic)

C.6c

(Clive pic)

A number of the hikers were able to recall holidays spent at Karitane over lunch.

Just as we finished lunch a cool wind came up heralding rain.   It was behind us so we made a faster return down the beach and up onto the main road.    By the time we reached the local dairy the rain had set in in earnest so we didn’t hang about but made it back to the cars just as the heavens opened.

We followed the scenic route over the hill past Seacliff to Warrington.  We had a short stop at St Barnabas’ church, which had been built in 1872 and is a tribute to the caring local community who keep it in such a fine state.

C.7.St Barnabasc

(Clive pic)

To end the day, with the rain lashing down,we made it to the Blueskin Nurseries cafe at Waitati for afternoon tea. – Clive.

Five Ramblers did a leisurely stop and start 2 km circuit of the Peninsula, rewarded with seeing a White Heron on a small outcrop while lunching. Avoided the worst of the rain while awaiting the Hikers’ return from the beach. – Ian.

4/10/2017. Both. Huriawa Pa Peninsula, beach walk. E. Leaders: Jan and Bev.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Started recording late, so true distance 7 km. Trampers did 8 km.

A large contingent of trampers and hikers (40 in total) set off from the rivermouth area  along the edge of the estuary to the Huriawa Pa  peninsula.  Track then headed upwards, and we had morning tea on a bank under a large marcrocarpa tree.

Morning tea on the start of the walk up the Huriawa peninsula. (Clive pic and caption.)

Track climbed steadily tho not steeply up to a totem pole, then along the edge of the cliffs to the blowhole.  A group of trampers went up a steep little track to the highest point on the headland with great views.  Past the blowhole we  detoured off the main track along a mown pathway which looped round a newish planting of natives.  Then took another detour down to the water’s edge and back up to the main track which led on to the beach.  The weather had turned warm and sunny with no wind, so perfect beach conditions.

There’s a hole in my tooth. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

Came across a sea lion sunbathing on the beach, but he eventually trundled his way back to the water.

Basking sealion. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Walked to the end of the beach, and came back a little way to a lunch spot.

Cape Karitane launching pad. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

There were  lots of large slips along the bank which runs along  the edge of the beach and one of these slips provided good seating on the various tree trunks, rocks etc.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Some of the hikers carried on back down the beach to the cars, whilst the rest took a track off the beach and meandered round the streets of the Karitane township before returning to the car park via the main road.  The tide was well in by  then, so quite a different look to the estuary.  The majority stopped off for coffee at the Blueskin Nursery  Cafe on the way home, but the staff coped well with the rather large crowd. – Jan.

10/12/2014 All. End of year Christmas shared lunch. Karitane Fishing and Boating Club Hall. Tramp: Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Elaine and Eric
Route

Route

Elaine’s planning for the day did not disappoint us. Eric, obviously under precise instructions, ably led those who came for the tramp around the peninsula…

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

last climb as we approach saddle near ocean end of peninsula.

Last climb as we approach saddle near seaward end of peninsula track.

…and along the beach and return to get us back to the hall right on the dot of the appointed time of 11.30 a.m.to meet up with those who were able to come only for the occasion. Well done Eric, for someone who had never done the route before! So thanks, Eric – and Elaine, who stayed behind. And what was that for?

Surprise! Yes, meantime Elaine had been busy secretly putting up countless photos with questions attached, pens and slips of paper to write the answers down on, not forgetting bags to put them into. What preparation! What inventiveness! What tramper was the child in the photo? In what year was the camp in the photo held? Identify the car. How many pages in the day’s ODT? The puzzles went on and on, around the walls of the small hall, inside and out.

Of course there was wonderful food in all its variety…

The spread. (Helen pic)

The spread. (Helen pic)

After we were all satiated, came the declaration of the winners. from the bags accompanying their respective photos, Elaine drew answers, correct, facetious and otherwise.  Each winner was awarded a Christmasy-wrapped present fetched and delivered by Eric from a large bag of presents donated by – who knows who? Where does Elaine get her sponsors from? Present after present. And we mustn’t forget the lucky numbers handed out when we first went in. It seems every number holder was awarded a present also.

After this was all over, Elaine got the Four Jolly Tramping Mates to perform their song, a song which has now come to be sung on one or two previous occasions. Well, it’s really Peter’s song as he has written the lyrics and chosen the tune. Over the years,  the membership has perforce had to slightly change, with Heb now replacing Ray who has retired from the Club. And that’s not the only change either. Peter had added two further brillian verses to include Fred’s chocolates and Margaret’s red brolly. The lyric’s subjects are so pertinent, cheeky and entertaining, it has stood up well to repetition over the years. Thanks, Elaine, for arranging this part too.

The Three Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

The Four Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

Well, that was it, unless you include the coffee stop (another of Elaine’s innovations) at Blueskin Cafe on the way home for some.

Well, Elaine. You have certainly put your stamp on the social side of our Club’s activities. Thank you, and Eric, for providing a most enjoyable finish to the year’s activities. – Ian.

28/5/2014 Hikers. Karitane, Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Bev and Lesley
GPS of route

GPS of route

Here we were at Karitane, all ready to set out, with Leader Bev out there on the right waiting for us to follow.

Before tramp. (John, Panorama)

At cars before tramp. (John, Panorama)

And as you can see from John’s second panorama below,

Tramp ending

Tramp ending (John panorama, showing both ending and starting points)

at either end of the pic you can see both the the tramp’s end on the left and its entrance point onto the peninsula. We made our way along right on the harbour inlet’s edge to a lovely spot for the morning tea cuppa. We we surprised by the occasion whiff of warm air which accompanied us for the day, until a norwester blast hit us just as we were returning to the cars, a trace of which can be seen on the above panorama.

Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa alongside inlet’s entrance  (John pic)

Following the leisurely sit down, was a bit of moderately steep climbing to reach the top of the track where it returned  back on the peninsula’s southern side. We admired the following blowhole.

 

Cavern (John pic)

Blown out blowhole. (John pic)

Les recalled how once he and Ivan McIntosh had braved the ledge along the top. Not now!

By various stops and starts (part of a track we found too flooded to negotiate so had to find another way) we made it back to the peninsula’s beginning, and onto and along the long firm beach, to lunch at its southern end. Here John and Elaine combined to make this stunning photo.

Elaine

Elaine

After another leisurely break, we made our way back along the beach, across the peninsula’s neck and back to the cars.

A great day out for some 30 hikers, well led by Bev and Lesley, to whom much thanks. – Ian.

22/3/2006. Hikers. Karitane, Maori Pa. Leaders:  Graham, Arthur & Barbara
25/9/2002. Alt. Karitane – Maori Pa. Leaders: Mary Y, Jean, Chris.
14/4/1999. Karitane – Maori Pa – Beach Walk. Leaders: Catherine, nancy, Lesley S.
20/8/1997. Karitane Maori Pa and Church. Leaders: Catherine, Nel K, Denise.
15/2/1995. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Mary Y, Denise P.
1/6/1994. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Mary Y.
3/3/1993. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Mary Y.
27/1/1993. Karitane. Round Trip. Average. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Marie.
/9/2002 Mary Y, Jean A, Chris
19/8/1992. Karitane Beach to Maori Pa. Round trip. Average. Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Marie F
8/4/1990. Karitane to Maori Pa. Also beach walk. Interesting history. Easy walking. Leaders:  Peg C, Joan A, Audrey, June W
14/4/1989 Catherine, Nancy, Lesley S

No responses yet

Mar 16 2019

Tramps associated with Saddle Hill, (Makamaka)

[No. 7 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Creamery Rd. Ocean View. C Hughes. Farm. Lambing.”
Not during lambing September to October.
USE STILE AT END OF CREAMERY ROAD.
No. 84 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Taieri View (Blairs) (East Taieri) Farm”
No. 104 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Old Brighton Rd – Clevelands – Saddle Hill (See George Haggie) Farm”]

40. 16/3/2019. Hikers. Saddle Hill. Leaders: Bob and Jenny.

Today was my 1st official time at being “the Tail end Charlie” with fluro jacket.
I’m often at the back but not with a fluro.. there were 21 hikers and our 3 lovely ramblers. I think I got the numbers right???
We met in a paddock in McMasters Road. I presume Bob had permission?
The hike up the Saddle was the one that the Rotary had done as a fundraiser for the Mosgiel Pool. We had morning tea at the entrance to the scrub area,after which we climbed up a stoney track.It was good workout for us all. We came out to a clearing with fabulous views of wonderful coast line. Quite a few minutes were taken to enjoy and then we carried on up to the top for a photo shoot.
Alexc

(Alex photo.)

More panoramic views were taken in before we went down the hill,out of the cool breeze, and had a leisurely lunch looking out over the Taieri. We then wandered down the hill and out onto Saddlehill Road and back to the cars. Coffee was at the Village Green. Thanks Bob. – Jenny.

39. 19/9/2018. Trampers. Saddle Hill circuit. Leader: Eleanor.

On a very warm spring morning 14 trampers set off from Quarry road and walked up Coal Stage and Saddle Hill roads then down McMaster road.  Enjoying a great display of Kowhai in full bloom, also a mix of blossom and animals along the way.  One member recalls riding horses as a girl on a property we passed.

Just the best Kowhai forest around. (Phil pic and caption.)

We enjoyed smoko break overlooking the ocean.  At this point with the sun shining brightly upon us, we decided to do an add on.

Welcome morning tea break after earlier start. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Turning onto Old Brighton road we headed to Fairfield, then crossed over to Flower street walked up the couple of hills crossing a stile into the water tank paddock.  Once again (on both sides of the rather steep stile) with more great views, lunch and chatting was enjoyed.

View of Kaikorai Valley from lunch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Donkeys on Chain Hill road. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We then walked along Chain Hill road and back down Quarry road to our cars.

View of Mosgiel from overbridge. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Blend was the chosen coffee shop, we enjoyed catching up with 2 members unable to tramp on the day.
We reckon we walked 15 km, give or take a little.
Great to be back out with such an enthusiastic group of friends.
– Cheers Eleanore

(12/2/2017.)

Route map

38. 6/4/2016. Both. A Circumnavigation of Saddle Hill, majoring on the seaward slopes. Leaders: Bob, Doug and Arthur.
The Hikers' easier route. The trampers took the beach.

The Hikers took the bus,  the Trampers, the beach.

Apr 6 Tramp Saddle Hill 2016. ... Distance not counting the bus travel 10.2 km. (Bruce pic and caption)

Apr 6 Tramp Saddle Hill 2016. … Distance not counting the bus travel 10.2 km. (Bruce pic and caption)

Trampers’ Report. Saddle Hill to the Sea. – Arthur.

Being the first Wednesday of the month, this was a combined operation. Together with the Hikers, our group parked beside the wool-shed on Saddle Hill Road, before walking through the “Saddle” and down through farmland on the other side. Special thanks to the landowners for giving us permission to do so. A suitable spot was found at 10 o’clock for morning tea.

The 27 of us at morning tea

All twenty-seven of us at morning tea, part-way down the slope.

The view from our morning tea spot

The view from our morning tea spot.

The two groups then split, with the Trampers forging ahead, as they had further to walk. We had 8 trampers now, and it was noticed that the 2 men were outnumbered by the ladies.

Continuing down through the sheep farm we climbed a style out on to Creamery Road. Going down the road now, we could view several lifestyle blocks with new houses on them. At the bottom of the hill a large contractor’s yard had obviously had much money spent on it.

Contractor's Yard

Contractor’s Yard

We arrived down at the main road to Brighton at Ocean View. After a short walk along the road we were able to gain access to the beach at the car-park (Freedom Campers spot). Good use of the facilities here was made for a comfort stop.

The tide was well out, just beginning to come back in, allowing us to walk on good firm sand for several kilometres. Other people were making use of the beach too – walking, exercising dogs and especially horses.

The Kaikorai Stream was closed to the sea, allowing us to return to the road on the Waldronville side, past the Pistol Shooting Club. The walk along the beach took a neat hour. We found a suitable lunch stop beside the car park at the road.

The Trampers' lunch spot. (Helen pic)

The Trampers’ lunch spot. (Helen pic)

From there we had to walk across the bridge and along the road a short distance. It was a little difficult climbing through a fence back onto farmland – several comments were made at this time about some not being as young as they used to be!

Trampers. A fence scramble. (Helen pic)

Trampers. A fence scramble. (Helen pic)

With the Green Park Cemetery on our left we had a very pleasant uphill walk through the large field, but with one especially steep pinch, before squeezing around the end of a gate and out onto the Old Brighton Road – closed long ago by a large slip.

Along the Old Road and then up McMaster Road a short distance, before taking a short-cut through private property. A donkey brayed a welcome as we passed, and then the lady was gardening at the house.

Coming back onto McMaster Road, we found three of the Hikers talking to the man of the house at his mailbox. The road levelled off, and soon we were back to Saddle Hill Road where we caught up with the Hikers with about a kilometre to go.

There were good views from here of Mosgiel, …

Mosgiel from lookout.

Mosgiel from lookout.

… the Taieri and beyond. In fact we had great views all day on this tramp, and good weather to go with them.

Our combined tramp could not have been more successful, as both groups began and finished the day together.

A big thank-you to Bob for this. Everyone was back to the cars by 2.15 p.m. The Trampers covered a distance of about 14 km (estimated).

***** SAFE TRAMPING IS NO ACCIDENT *****

– Arthur.

Hikers’ Report.

As Arthur has covered most of the day’s main points, this need be only a supplementary one.

Where Creamery Road joins Brighton Road, various options emerged.  Some drifted off: one had a car waiting for her, another walked to her home nearby, others shortened their walk by walking on the seaward side of the road to earlier catch the bus to Brighton and back. The remainder walked towards Brighton and waited at a convenient bus stop to catch the returning bus. The driver put on a mock-stern display, questioning our age entitlement and closely examining our Gold Cards. We had made his day, as we disported ourselves around his empty bus. From the Green Park Cemetery gates we made our way uphill behind the cemetery and were surprised (well, this reporter was) to see the beginnings of an eco-burial site of about twelve plots, aligned alongside a clump of bush, each plot planted with a native plant.

We lunched in a sheltered spot a little further on up the hill.

Hikers at lunch part way up hill.

Hikers at lunch part way up hill.

…. Much further on, as we turned from McMaster Road into Saddle Hill Road,  we were surprised and delighted to find ourselves caught up by the Trampers . The timing couldn’t have been better. Excellent planning, Bob. This has to have turned out the most rewarding “together-Tramp” yet!  – Ian.

37. 23/7/2014 Hikers. Greenpark Cemetery, McMaster Road, Creamery Road, Brighton Road, Beach. return. M. Leaders: Bob, Janice.

Cars parked at the southern entrance to the Green Park Cemetery. The leaders took us directly up through paddock from behind the cemetery, to swing right …
GPS

GPS of round route from Greenpark Cemetery south gate.

… and continue on
Blackhead

View en route. Blackhead (Liz pic)

Green Island

Green Island

Another view en route. Green Island (Liz pic, using zoom lens, no doubt.)
to eventually reach the style at the top of Creamery Road. Down the road to the Brighton Road, north along here to drop of Bruce and Marjorie at the home and on to the Ocean View domain for lunch.

Out onto the beach and a long walk to arrive near the Kaikorai Estaury. Through sand hills, skirt estaury, through horse yards, out onto the Brighton Road, and back along to the cars.
29/9/2010. Trampers. Saddle Hill from Old Brighton Road. Leaders: Keith and Glenis.

GPS Route Map, courtesy Ken.

Eight of us set off over a paddock much hollowed with slumps betraying old coal mine workings, caused probably by wooden props long since rotted, up towards Saddle Hill. (See last pic below.) As we approached the bush ahead of us, we were glad to be able to follow a cleared track that wound up to our left, foregoing the former track we used to take to the right, now heavily infested with gorse. The track further up was well grassed, but just SO boggy and wet, although drier in places. One such place was ideal for an early morning tea.

Morning Tea on log. (Ken pic)

On up through a second property and we crossed McMasters Road into a third property taking us up to the bush around Saddle Hill.

Bush track entrance.

The track through the bush took us round to the seaward side grassy slope and then it was up to another bush entrance for the last push to the top (473m, according to Ken), where there were views galore for our cameras. 11.00 a.m. and far too early for lunch.

Emma (Ken pic)

Saddle Hill trig. (Emma pic)

Mosgiel from Saddle Hill (Ken pic)

View south from Saddle Hill

We made our way down over a very bouldery grass paddock to Saddle Hill road, round into McMasters Road again to reach the place we had ascended, and then it was back down again. We found a most pleasant lunch spot softened by thick pine needles and sheltered in by pines. Then it was down and through the much-slumped paddock back to the cars.

Coal Mine slumps.

36. 27/2/2008. Hikers. Saddle Hill, Taieri Lookout. Medium. Leaders: Dot Bennett, Chris.

35. 25/1/2006. Trampers. Saddle Hill from Stevensons Farm. Medium. Leaders: George, Hazel.

34. 27/4/2005. Both. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill, Watts BushLeaders: Joyce, Hazel, Eleanor W, Eleanor B

33. 14/4/2004. Trampers. Saddle Hill via Creamery Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug J, Molly

Saddle Hill Hotel

32. 19/5/2004. Both. Saddle Hill, Pearsons Farm. Medium. Leaders: Pat, Bill, Betty, Ann
Doug, Bev H, Irene on slope background Kaikorai Estuary

Doug, Bev H, Irene on slope background

Kaikorai Estuary

Similar shot.

Similar shot.

Bob M and others descending seaward side.

Bob M and others descending seaward side.

31. 9/5/2004. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Betty B, Anne R
Saddle Hill stop. (Bob pic).

Saddle Hill stop. (Bob pic).

30. 5/11/2003 Creamery Road. Leaders: Ocean View Dot B, Chris
29. 5/11/2003. Hikers. Creamery Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot B, Chris.
28. 11/6/2003. Both. Saddle Hill through Pearsons.
Year round. Park overhead bridge. Contacts: Seek permissions. The Grange. Phone for appointment for permission to tramp on this property. “We like to see you face to face.” (Paddock with coal mine entrance and tram line track)
Park cars at motorway overhead bridge. Leaders: George, Hazel, Jack & Rosemary.
hotel

Doug, Catherine. Old hotel

Old Mine entrance. Arthur.

Arthur by hidden mine entrance.

Hi, Shirley. Bob on east side climb.

Hi, Shirley. Bob on east side climb.

old

foundations; tram track gap

tram

Coal Mine old Tram Track

27. 20/11/2002. Hikers. Creamery Road, Ocean View. Easy. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Muriel.
26.30/1/2002. Alt. Creamery Road – Watts Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Lesley W.
25. 7/2/2001. Creamery Road, Watts Bush. Leaders: Nelso and Dot, Winifred.
24. 7/2/2001. Creamery Road, Watts Bush. Leaders: Nelso and Dot, Winifred.
23. 9/8/2000. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: George, Hazel, Molly
22. 9/8/2000. Saddle Hill – Walnut Grove. Park Overhead Bridge.Leaders: George, Hazel, Molly.

21. 31/5/2000 Saddle Hill, Law Road, from carpark. Long Tramp. Leaders: Lance & Lois, Betty B

20. 7/2/2000 Creamery Road Finnies, McIntosh (frmly Watts) Bush, return Scroggs Hill, Brighton Road, Beach. Nelson & Dot, Winnifred

19. 8/12/1999. Creamery Road, Watts Bush, Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Bob H.

18. 25/8/1999. Car Park, Saddle Hill, Law Road. Long tramp. Leaders: Frank and Lesley, Arthur and Barbara.
Return Silverstream to car park. Long tramp. Leaders: Wendy, Evelyn M, Eleanor B, Hartmann
17. 24/3/1999. Creamery Road – Ocean View. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, W W.
16. 20/5/1998. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret D.
15. 1997 Saddle Hill, Jaffrays Farm, East Taieri Scouts Hall. Leaders: George, Betty B, Wendy
14. 26/11/1997. Saddle Hill, Fulton Hogans, Hills Clevelands etc. 5 hour tramp. Leaders: George, Betty B, Wendy.
13. 13/8/1997. Saddle Hill, Scroggs Hill, Walnut Grove. Leaders: Les W, Frank, Jack M.
12. 2/10/1996. McLeods – Saddle Hill. Average. Meet Ocean View carpark. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Pat
11. 6/9/1995. Creamery Road, Watts Bush, Scroggs Hill. Medium.Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H, Chris
10. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hill, Fairfield. Medium. Meet at Fulton Hogan Yard, Old Brighton Road. Leaders: Rob Q, Nelson & Dot, Molly
9. 24/7/1996. Jaffrays and Saddle Hill from East Taieri Scout Hall. Average.  Leaders: Dot T, Les and Mavis.
8. 15/6/1994. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill, Watts Walk (now Finnies, McIntosh), Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Chris, Joan H.
7. 28/7/1993. Start from car park, Saddle Hill to Law Road. Long Tramp. Leaders: Wendy, Evelyn M, Eleanor B, Hartmann
6. 23/6/1993 Creamery Road Finnies, Watts Bush (now McIntosh), return Scroggs Hill. Medium but long. Cars at Ocean View Picnic Ground. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Jack M, Joyce S
5. 20/11/1989. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: Mavis, Peg A, Margaret S, Daphne
4. 30/3/1988 Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill. A little bit of history. Meet at Saddle Hill Lookout. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A
3. 18/9/1991 Green Park – Saddle Hill, returning via Hare Street and beach. Splendid coastal views. Cars meet at Green Park Cemetery. Average. George, Eric & Dot,  Les W
2. 20/9/1989 Creamery Road, Ocean View. Average. Meet Ocean View carpark. Leaders: Mary Y, Daphne, Betty B, Margaret D
1. 24/3/1989 Creamery Road, Ocean View. Leaders: Doug M, Eleanor W

No responses yet

Jan 23 2019

Doctors Point area tramps

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Distance from car-park to Waitati: 34 km.
Distance from car-park to Doctors Point: 38 km.
23/01/2019. Hikers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Urupa. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

The early morning shower made the cancellation of the hike a real possibility, but an improvement in the weather encouraged the 24 hikers to the starting point of our hike. The early section to the Mapoutahi  Pa site for the morning tea stop,

Morning tea at Mapoutahi Pa site. (Clive pic and caption.)

showed some amazing changes in the beach with the sand completely stripped away from familiar beach sections and a sand build up in the caves to a height of over a meter.

The tunnel. (Clive pic and caption.)

Canoe Beach Dr’s Point.(Clive pic and caption.)

This Pa site provided a good view of the Purakaunui Beach which we traversed in about 15 minutes to the channel, into the Purakaunui Inlet.  After a tramp in heavy sand we entered the forest, for a visit to the Purakaunui  Urupa ( Cemetery).  Early lunch

Lunch at Purukaunui Urupa. (Clive pic and caption.)

was followed by an easy stroll on defined tracks, to connect again with the beach at the junction of the Mapoutahi  Pa.  The distance to our cars was covered in short order, as there was the sign of a storm brewing, which arrived soon after we were installed in the Blueskin Cafe. – Betty & Jim   

21. 13/6/2018. Hikers. Opeke Track and Orokonui Estuary Track. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.

This area is a popular one for the hikers. Especially at this time of the year when weather can be somewhat inclement. This Wednesday was one of those days. Dull and overcast, threatening rain. However, 27 turned out and once again enjoyed a pleasant relatively easy walk. The rain did start after lunch but was really only a misty-like drizzle, so not too unpleasant. We parked at Blacks Bridge as usual and had our morning tea before we started as it was well after 10am! Walked down Doctors Point Rd to the far end of the Opeke Track then back along the track, enjoying the views and scenery as we went. Were a bit early at the favourite lunch stop but decided just to have an early, leisurely lunch break anyway.

Then it was back along the road, in the the rain, to Chelivode St. and the start of the Estuary Track. We didn’t waste much time walking this track back to the cars as we were getting rather wet. We still enjoyed the bush, birds and views along the way though and everyone said they’d had a good day out in spite of the weather.

Adjourned to Blue Skin Café for after-hike refreshments and chat. – Bev, & Lesley

20. 2017 Jul 26. Hikers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Urupa. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
23 hikers reported for duty at the Doctor’s Point carpark on a calm winter’s morning.

The tide was still going out as we made our way along Canoe Beach, through the caves

Clive pic.

 to our morning tea stop at the bottom of Mapoutahi Pa.

Our pathway to Purakaunui Beach was almost blocked by a large tree which had fallen due to the recent floods.
Then, as we headed along the track towards Osborne Road we encountered deep water which made us retrace our steps and walk along the beach.

After a pleasant beach walk,we made our way through the trees to the Maori cemetery.

Clive pic.

We then retraced our steps back to Mapoutahi,where we planned to have lunch. This plan was quickly abandoned,as the incoming tide was threatening our route back to the cars.

Clive pic.

We eventually had lunch on the beach near Doctor’s Point.
 Time and tide wait for no Hikers!!! – Peter B.
19. 2017 Jun 21. Hikers. Orokonui Estuary & Opeke Tracks. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
On a cold, frosty but rather dank morning 27 keen hikers parked their cars at the parking/picnic area on Orokonui Rd., where the Estuary track starts. From there we walked the short distance back. to the Waitati Cemetery where we had morning tea.

Clive pic.

Quite a few people hadn’t been there before so were interested to have a look around the graves. As it was rather cold though we didn’t linger too long. On down Orokonui Rd. till we reached the little bridge crossing the Waitati river which brought us out onto Killarney St. at the end of which was a new bit of track with some board walk coming out onto Doctors Point Rd. From there it was along the road till we reached the far end of Opeke track. By this time we were all feeling somewhat warmer after a reasonably brisk walk. Then it was down onto the Opeke track. This is a very attractive and interesting walk which gives pleasure to the many people who use it. Locals and visitors alike. Near the end of this track is a short detour into an area that has some seats and great views across Blueskin Bay to Warrington and the other side of STH 1. Ideal for our lunch stop.

Wednesday’s walk was the nicest walk I have done. The plantings of native bush out there is so beautiful and the track was great as well. (Eleanor W pic and comment.)

We had a fairly leisurely lunch and then it was off again

At The cove was the royal blueskin Bay yacht club HQ just below the nesting tree of the Royal spoonbills. (Clive pic and caption.)

Clive pic.

to the end of the Opeke track and back onto Doctors Point Rd. The walk along the road helped to warm us up again as it had got a bit chilly sitting at lunch time!. We turned up Chelivode St. and along to the other end of the Estuary track. This took us back to the car park and the end of what everyone agreed was a most enjoyable and ideal walk for a winter”s day. The Estuary track is a lovely track with bush and birds plus lovely views. We all felt it a suitable one to repeat yearly. The day finished off as usual with coffee break at Blueskin Café. Lesley & Bev

18. 2016 Aug 31. E. Hikers. Orokonui Inlet Track via Orokonui Ecosanctuary exclosure fence lower gate. E. Leaders: Leslie and Bev.
Hikers' route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The "55.55' is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Hikers’ route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The “55.55′ is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Cars at tramp start.

Cars at tramp start.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

View from further up along fence.

View from further up along fence.

17. 2015 Jul 22. Hikers. Opeke and Orokonui Inlet track and back blocks of Waitati. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

What to start off with? Well, two things, actually. We are suffering a barrage of birthdays presently. Adrienne had a big one last Wednesday, Dorothy anticipates a bigger one next week and Ian a small one a few days ago. And the other? Maybe a record? A full twenty of the twenty-four hikers of the day socialised for coffee later. A beautiful Birthday Card, crafted by Pam and signed by all present, was presented to Dorothy, who responded with a most pretty speech.
Tramp matters. The day was calm and got really warm.
Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all.

Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all. (John pic)

Many who hadn’t been on the last visit to Opeke were struck with the embellishments added to the trackside. The CAR, and small limestone carvings to mention only two. We had parked at the bridge and road-walked between Opeke and the Orokonui Inlet Track.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch. (John pic)

Two birthdays

Two birthdays (John pic)

The track crowns the inlet’s head and finishes off along the Orokonui Road. We took the foot bridge across the Waitati Stream to skirt a back-blocks or two …

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye (john pic)

… before emerging onto the Doctors Point road and returning to the cars. Lesley and Bev had picked on doing this trek again, foregoing the earlier swap plan of exploring the Old Waitati Road area due to his colder shadiness under the hill. So thanks to Bev and Lesley for opening this newer area to even more Hikers. – Ian.

16. 2015 Apr 15. Hikers. Orokonui, Estuary and Opeke Track. E. Leaders: Bev and Lesley.

*** THE POEM ***

OROKONUI ESTUARY WITH THANKS TO LESLIE AND BOB

‘Twas a cold and windy morning – the sane ones stayed in bed.

But fourteen hardy hikers, bravely out were led.

They travelled to Waitati, the river was quite high –

They didn’t fancy wet feet, I can’t imagine why.

Instead, the estuary beckoned, with better shelter there.

With coats and hats and gloves on, they didn’t have a care.

 

The track was easy walking, through bush and flax and trees.

They lingered over morning tea, sheltered from the breeze.

A grassy bank was found for lunch, it wasn’t even wet.

John took lots of photos, you’ll see them on the net.

Leslie found a bird’s nest, she took it home to keep.

(I hope the birdies last night, did find somewhere to sleep).

 

On to Blueskin they did go, for coffee and a talk,

Joined by Jim and Betty, who didn’t do the walk.

Plans were laid for Luxmore, a short two weeks away,

With satisfaction they went home – It was a lovely day.

– Judy

***  THE REPORT ***

(Sorry, no route map. It seems a bug got into my application. Ian.)
On a day when only heroes and the mad go out, we found the Waitati Stream at the foot of the Waitati Valley Road too full to attempt the intended crossing. So leader Leslie, who with Bev had already recceed  the above  Orokonui Estuary walk set for later in the programme took fourteen of us on a route more suited to the day. We parked at the Estuary bridge and set off, well-clad in storm gear, to the Opeke track’s northern entrance for morning tea at the lovely setting of table and seating near its entrance. Fortunately although windy, (and here we were well sheltered) the day was dry.
Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa at the table and seats by the Opeke track.  (John pic)

We completed the Opeke circuit – for the first time in this reporter’s experience – in an anticlockwise direction. It’s so revealing viewing stuff when going in the opposite direction. As well, quite a number of improvements were there to be discovered, not least an old wreck of a car…

What's this alongside the track? (John pic)

What’s this alongside the track? (John pic)

…tied down and waiting to be wreathed in nature’s verdure – apparently!

Trekking back from Opeke, we turned off just short of the bridge up Chelivode street, passed a hay-baled house, and turned down a newly-made track to skirt the side of the Orokonui Estuary.

Track (John pic)

Track (John pic)

The track wound up, down and around through bush and paddock to emerge at the head of the estuary to cross swampy ground…

Solid (John pic)

A walkway across swamp, solidly built to last a lifetime.  (John pic)

…to reach the back yard of a number of farm sheds accessed from Orokonui Road. The track diverted down around a paddock or two to soon parallel the Orokonui Road on one side, and a heavily swollen Waitati Stream on the other.

Waitati Stream

Waitati Stream (John pic)

We lunched on a now sunny bank, still clad however in our parka-covered woolly underlays.

Lunch

Lunch. (John pic)

Further along,…

The nest referred toby Judy in her poem. (John pic)

The nest referred to by Judy in her poem. (John pic)

..and we crossed the stream via the Erne Street footbridge to walk along Killarney Street and turn into Foyle Street. Here we came across a garaged honesty stall featuring jams and sauces…

Garage (John pic)

Garage (John pic)

…and lingered a while. Then it was out onto Doctors Point Road, back to the cars and to resort to the Blueskin Nursery cafe,…

Coffee (John pic)

Coffee at Blueskin. (John pic)

…- all 14 of us, augmented by Jim and Betty who turned up.

Thank you to Lesley and Bev, ably supported by back-marker Bob keeping us safely together, for devising such an appropriate alternative for such a challenging day. – Ian.

15. 2015 Jan 21. Hikers. Doctors Point. Mapoutahi Pa, Forestry and Urupu, return. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Jim and Betty, who had been allocated leadership the last three visits to Doctor’s Point, gave the trip an original twist, – by dint of three recces to get matters precisely aligned to the tide. They led 29 of us to the Mapoutahi Pa site for the tea break.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site. (John pic)

Via the beach beyond the peninsula we turned off into the FWD through the sandhills, past the cliffs and on to the beginnings of the road proper, at the corner of the forestry. Here Jim opened the gate and led us past the following sign.

Urupu notice

Purakaunui Urupu notice at forestry’s entrance.

Another FWD track led us a considerable distance through the forest to terminate at a historic Maori graveyard.

A Urupu site

The Urupu site (John pic)

Betty and Jim then led us on through the forest by a route that they had previously explored and marked (well done!) to take us out to the inlet’s entrance, where there was quite a cold wind persuading several to don more protective garments.

Panorama

Panorama  of Potato Point and Purakauni. (John pic)

Only a little way down towards the beach Jim let us into a well-sheltered spot amongst Marram Grass for lunch, where a warm sun persuaded garment-offing again.

Lunch

Lunch (John pic)

The return walk along the beach took us over the neck of Mapoutahi Pa peninsula to happily reveal that there was still a stretch of navigable beach at the bottle-neck by the rockfall not yet swallowed up by the incoming tide.

Returning through cave

Returning through the cave. Thought this photo worth displaying. (John pic)

A walk back to the cars ended a most satisfying day, with all of us congratulating and thanking Jim and Betty for the quality time they invested into their recce. Thanks to them here, too. – Ian.

14. 2014 Mar 19. Hikers/ Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, return. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

GPS of Route

GPS of Route

This must be our most popular tramp, as we schedule it about twice a year. This time Arthur and Barbara gave us the full Waitati to Mapoutahi Pa road and beach walk, with Opeke for morning tea in between. The very low tide gave us the largest beach expanse this reporter has ever seen. The sea mist spoilt views but cleared just enough for us to glimpse the rail tunnel from the peninsula. The near record of 30 of us included three new members and one visitor. Thank you Barbara and Arthur for your good careful leadership. – Ian.
13. 2013 Oct 9. Hikers. Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Purakaunui inlet, Mapoutahi Peninsula. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of routes. First Opeke Walk. Second Drs Point to Purakaunui Inlet mouth, return, 8.53 km total.

We parked the cars first at Michies Crossing, and walked across the line Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Jan 16 2019

Chain Hills-Friends Hill Tramps

Published by under Hikers

No. 102 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Friends Hill Chain Hills Year Round”

Saddle Hill Hotel

41. 16/1/2019. Hikers. Friends Hill Road and Farm circuit. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Route map, from cars to house and farm walk only, courtesy Ian. (5 km flag hidden under the 1 km flag. Evidently the app ignores altitudinal distances, only level.)

On a very warm morning, 25 hikers travelled to Wingatui Raceway where we parked up and commenced our walk up Friends Hill.  We arrived at the farm gate which was locked and unfortunately the key was missing, so we scrambled over the wooden fence and on down to revisit the old cottage on the farm with its great view over the Taieri.  We then backed up

View of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.)

and did a circuit of the farm, downhill for a while and then a good nudge back up to Friends Hill

Up hill to the lunch stop. (Clive pic and caption.)

road again.  As it was a hot day, some chose to take advantage of Janine’s kind offer to visit her property and stayed there for a tour around the garden and then lunched.

Lunch at ‘Pixies Place’ (Thanks Janine). (Clive pic and caption.)

(Francis pic.)

Others of us carried on up the track hoping to be at the top for lunch.  However the day was getting warmer and there was no respite from the burning sun, so we wisely backtracked down the hill and some chose to sit on the side of the track in a lovely shady area for our lunch and others walked back down to Janine’s for their lunch.  After lunch we joined up at Janine’s place and all agreed that we would carry on down to our cars at Wingatui and enjoy a nice cold drink at Blackstone where we sat outside enjoying the shade. – Jan B.

40. 21/11/2018. Trampers. Friends Hill and Pixie Patch. Leader: Janine.

After large amounts of heavy rain producing some minor flooding, turnout of enthusiastic trampers was a little sparse. Discussion of available, suitable options led 7 trampers to venture off from The Pixie Patch in Friends Hill under cloudy, indecisive weather conditions. Rocky, the dog, …

(Janine pic.)

… was left home as we headed off up the hill finding the gravel road in excellent condition despite the still considerable amounts of rainwater running down the drains. 100 metres on – a short stop to examine the very busy large breather holding connecting incoming water pipes from Deep stream and Silverstream – then running up the road to join us came Rocky!

Near the gate blocking traffic from throughfare to Dunedin we turned left climbing the fence to more views accross the Taieri

(Janine pic)

and examined all the ‘large puddles’ on the plains before us. Stepping along the track, originally designated as a road leading to numerous lifestyle blocks which never eventuated, Rocky had great delight when a rabbit ventured on that same path (it got away). It would seem this block of land is the home of broken dreams as the subdivision never went ahead, that owner declared bankrupcy, then a later owner had plans to make use of these extensive views and put in little home stay cottages. After making a start he also left the area uncompleted, so we trampers examined the start up of the first cottage with great despair at such great ideas being abandoned.

The plan was then to return to The Pixie Patch for morning coffee then head off over the newly logged area towards Chain Hills. On the way home Rocky was determined to get something in a woodpile so was left to bark and run round in circles while we walked a little quicker trying to ignore the thickening cloud. As we reached The Pixie Patch one member asked for a garden tour ‘quick’!!

(Janine pic.)

By the time we filed in for coffee it was decidedly damp and even Rocky came home thinking maybe there were biscuits too. No biscuits but we had plenty to talk about after our Hollyford trip and despite the offer to investigate the Chain Hills track/views all were happy to chat till lunchtime.

So we had a very social day, walked 2.5 km, had a coffee break, discussed tramps, trampers, budgies, books, painting, prices, but not world peace, then ate lunch. – Janine.

39. 17/10/2018. Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street. M. Leaders: Shona and Keith, Ian.

25 hikers and ramblers parked at the area  bounded by Coalstage Rd
and Morris Rd before walking single file across the motorway bridge
 then turning up onto Chain Hills Rd.
A stiff tail wind helped us up and down until we stoppped in a

sheltered hollow for an early morning tea.

Morning tea in a Chain Hills driveway (out of the wind). (Clive pic and caption.)

Continued on to turn right into Flower St, climbing over the high stiles

Crossing Stile in Style. (Clive pic and caption.)

and wandering downhill through the paddock and following Flower St,
before turning right into Martin’s Rd meeting up with the ramblers and

stopping for an early lunch at the skate board park at the Fairfield Hall.

Lunch at Fairfield Community Hall. (Clive pic and caption.)

 We straggled back from there back to the car park.
Distance 9.5kms – Leaders Shona Ian Keith

38. 13 Jun 2018. Trampers. Friends Hill circuit. Leader: Janene.

As I was quickly sweeping the outside doorway, 12 trampers arrived, enthusiastic about what I had in store.

The weather was cool (not cold) and clear as 13 trampers set off from The Pixie Patch, Friends Hill and crossed the road onto the start of the well known ‘Chain Hills’ walking track. After passing the water reservoir we turned left downhill and followed a track along the bottom gully, passing the entrance to the old railroad tunnel …

The old railway tunnel. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… before ever so elegantly scrambling over the barbwire fence (it had been lowered!) Now on Abbotsroyd Farm we all powered up a sizeable hill, the promise of a coffee break at the top deterring any breathless moments, to find a magnificent few of Abbotsford, Green Island, Saddle Hill and all surrounds. While on our refreshment break, the whistle blew and along came the Fonterra train passing along just below us.

So this is what’s on the other side of the hill. (Phil pic and caption.)

All that replenishing and the long downhill traverse with excellent footing saw us speedily depart Abbotsroyd and venture onto road-walking for a while. North Taieri Road then Abbotts Hill Road was a steady climb turning to a track then reaching the tarseal of Mount Grand Road.

Scotch mist o’er Abbotsroyd. (Phil pic and caption.)

The weather had started to slowly deteriorate with a misty fog surrounding us. From there the steady climb turned ’real grunty!’ Come on people – was a lovely avenue of huge old macrocarpa trees at the top and I did allow a lunch break there!

Lunch under the trees. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After lunch we continued, somewhere along the way the road changed from Mt Grand to Dalziel Road, and at the Mt Grand reservoir we turned into Brinsdon Road for more ‘gentle’ climbing, passing through the ‘no vehicles’ track on to Halfway Bush Road which also at some unknown point becomes Friends Hill! The downhill …

Heading back to the cars. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… was a little treacherous and all that mud sure stuck to the boots – and the promised views were detained in the fog – but we had no muddy bums and no complaints (that I heard). Probably because we had coffee and eats at the Pixie Patch afterwards, and everyone went in the front door after I swept the main doorway!!

13.3km covered in great company and I delivered some walnut cookies from afternoon tea to Abbotsroyd the next day. – Janine.

37. 17 Jan 2018. Hikers. Friends Hill Road. M. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Route Map, courtesy Ian, not including racecourse walk.(Ian pic and caption.)

We parked at the Wingatui Racecourse. From there 23 hikers set out in very pleasant temperatures for a trek up Friends Hill Road

Road (Clive pic and caption.)

to the top gate where we stopped for morning tea.

morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

We then set off for a walk round farmland with views over the  Taieri.  We made our way to a little cottage that was first built about 15 years ago as a B & B but was never completed inside.

A surprising substantial unfinished cottage. (Ian pic and caption.)

Unfortunately the door didn’t do its job properly so the starlings made good use of the free accommodation leaving behind a carpet of their own making!!!

From there we carried on this farmland which backs on to Invermay to a track through a stand of Manuka trees and then made our way to our lunch spot which was at the home of tramper, Janine Hearn who kindly said we could sit on her deck, enjoy the views and walkaround her lovely garden.

A friendly tramper who lives on Friends Hill said we could use her back garden for lunch – Thanks Janine. (Clive pic and caption.)

 After lunch we headed back to the cars and five of us did a circuit of the racecourse and the rest opted to go for coffee at Blackstone.  – Jay and Jan

36. 2 Aug 2017  Both. Fairfield to Friends Hill. M.  Leaders: Keith and Shona.

It was drizzly and cold as we gathered at the Bush Rd car park.

After considerable discussion 20 people caught the bus …

What does the Taieri Recreational Tramping Club do and a wet cold winters day – They catch a bus and head for the hills! (Clive pic and caption.)

… to Fairfield, where further discussion occurred before Keith led the group along and up Flower St to the morning tea stop in the trees.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to start it only at morning tea stop! so add 1 km from Flower St bus stop. Tunnel diversion for the “8” added 3 km. Do your own math for your total.

We headed up the track to Chain Hills Road where we met Janine and her little dog Rocky.

After about an hour we made it to the top of Chain Hills Road that was covered in mist with constant rain. (Clive pic and caption.)

By then the drizzle had eased and after the first downhill, …

Among the gum trees on the descent of Chain Hills. (Clive pic and caption.)

… 8 went [yet further! – Ed] down with Janine to inspect the Wingatui tunnel …

Eight of the more intrepid trampers branched off to view [& walk! – Ed] the old [800m – Ed.] railway tunnel [end to end, return! – Ed.].  Several found the novel way down [the first track – Ed.] by sitting down in the mud (unintentionally)! (Clive pic and caption.)

… and the rest negotiated the muddy track, climbed the stile and moved into Janine’s home to eat lunch. (Thanks, Janine.)

As we left, the 8 appeared [back up! – Ed.] over the stile and we all meandered back to Mosgiel, 7 having coffee at Blackstone.The remainder had disappeared (?) home for coffee, showers or even lunch for some. – Keith and Shona.

35. 19 Jul 2017. Trampers. Chain Hills. Leader: M. Helen.

A nice tramp today. Starting from Gladstone Rd and walking up hill over the top of the motorway. Turned onto Chain Hill Road. Found a nice spot for our morning tea on the top of a hill overlooking Mosgiel.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

View from top of inversion layer over Mosgiel. (Helen pic and caption.)

The 12 of us then proceeded along the ups and downs along to the end. Turning left over the stile and the down through the paddocks to Friends Hill Rd. Down to the racecourse where we sat in luxury in the grandstand for our lunch.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

Chen a leisurely walk along Gladstone Rd back to our cars. Coffee for 9 of us at Blackstone’s. Lovely day and a nice 12.2km tramp. – Helen.

34. 10/5/2017. Hikers. Friends Hill, Chain Hills, Gladstone Road. M. Clive, Jay and Jan.

Nike app route map, courtesy Ian.

Autumn on the Taieri.   One of those Southern days of sunshine found an intrepid band of hikers (16) setting out from Wingatui racecourse to walk up Friends Hill and then across country to Chain Hills Road.   The going to start with was steep and a challenge for some,  but then it came to the stile to get onto the public pathway to Chain Hills Road; the step up to stile was about a meter and made for more limber people.   Well all rose to the challenge and made it over the stile to the sheep pens at the top of the hill where we rested for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and watched the fog in the valley roll away.    By now the temperature had risen to the promised 17 degrees and jumpers and fleecy jacket were shed to climb the next couple of hills to Chain Hills Road.   It was then we found that the first stile was just a taster for the next two stiles that were very high and over barbed wire.    Some gentleman from years past laid down his coat so that the ladies did not snare their stocking on the barbed wire. [’twas the reporter! – Ed.]    We gained Chain Hills Road by 11 o’clock so it was a nice walk along the ridge line to arrive above Mosgiel just before midday and a spot to sit and eat lunch.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

A herd of friendly cows watched from across the road and then when they realized we were not there to feed them showed their opinion in that unique bovine manner – pats all round.

Thanks for the view too, Clive, as well as all the above. (Clive pic, Ian caption.)

The walk off Chain hills had the leader focused on road safety and the safest way to negotiate Morris Road (a busy road), down to Quarry Road.   Then it was along the flat back to Wingatui to pick up the cars for afternoon tea and Blackstones cafe.   I think we got a suntan on the way! – Clive.

33. 18/5/2016. Hikers. Flower Street, Friends Hill, Wingatui, Car Park. M. Leaders: Keith and Shona.
Hikers' Route.

Hikers’ Route. Morning Tea stop in rain at about 1 km. Lunch in sun at 6 km. Coffee at 10.6 km.

18 Went by bus from outside the Mosgiel Post Office, arriving Flower St, Fairfield about 9.30 a.m.

Wandered up to the top of Flower St to have morning tea in the gum trees, as there was still drizzly rain falling.

Rain eased and we progressed over the stile and up the grass track, exiting onto Chain Hills Rd. After turning right, followed it to the end. Negotiated the stile there safely and followed the fence line down, up, and around, …

Green Island(?) from Flower Street. (Sharyn pic.)

Green Island from a ‘down’ paddock. (Sharyn pic.)

Wingatui from Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

Wingatui from above Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

… eventually exiting onto Friends Hill Rd.

Walked to Wingatui Race Couse for lunch, where there were toilets and dry seats in the grandstand for the rain had stopped. Made our way down Wingatui Rd, through track, across Haggart Alexander Drive, down Green st to end at Blackstone Cafe for a coffee. – Shona and Keith.

32. 11/6/2014. Hikers. Chain Hills, Flower Street. M. Leaders: Pam, Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Cars parked foot of Coalstage Rd, Morris Rd overpass, Chain Hills Rd, Flower St, Kennedy Rd, Walkway, Main Rd, Park by Fairplay St, Main Rd, Saddleview Pl, Underpass, Saddle Hill Rd, Coalstage Rd again. Distance: 8.93 km; Fastest 4.78 kph; Slowest 3.73 kph.

Pam and Dawn led us, thirty strong this trip, on a route largely familiar to most, but a little less so to this reporter. We took the SH1 overpass, stretched out indian-file, making quite a picture no doubt to motorists passing underneath, to judge by the horn toots we got.
Bridge

Overpass. (John pic)

Down Morris Road to turn sharply up Chain Hills Road.

We ‘morning-teaed’ at the red spot on the map between kilometer marks two and three on the GPS map.
Panorama

The customary morning tea spot on Chain Hills Road. (John pic)

A little further on as we took the Chain Hills Road right fork taking us down to Fairfield. The top of Flower Street lay through private land, guarded by locked gates provided with not-very-accommodating styles.

Style queue

The style at the Flower Street top locked gate. (John pic)

Further down again (or was it higher up?) we came across this mock farmyard, complete with tractor, water wheel, cow, et al.

Glove

A rubber glove udder for a tinny cow. (John pic)

Down in the paved part of Flower Street we were taken with a letter box making industry operating out of a private property.

Letter Boxes to order

Letter Boxes made to order.

Then it was into Kennedy Road, out through a walkway to emerge on the Main Road and on to lunch at a park abutting Fairplay Street.
Collage

Collage of lunch groups (John collage)

From there it was further up the Main Road, then to be pleasantly surprised by the leaders taking us not via the customary Morris Road but by Saddleview Terrace and through the SH1 underpass and up, very steeply up, Saddle Hill Road to Coalstage Road. A short distance along and we stopped to admire Janice’s house and to farewell her down the driveway. Then it was just on down back to the cars.

A good day out, despite an icy edge to the light wind at times. Thank you, leaders. – Ian.
31. 12/3/2014. Hikers. Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
We parked our cars  up Quarry Rd to the right of the overbridge on the north side of the
Saddle Hill.
25 fit and healthy Hikers started up over the bridge and up Chains Hill Rd.
We were met early on by a very fit brown lab dog who followed us all the way …
Dog

Dog (Pic John)

… to the morning tea stop.

Morning tea

Morning tea. (John, pic.)

It sat down and waited while we ate and sipped our tea and water.

Continuing on, we arrived at the Chain Hills Rd end. I thought the dog would have gone home. The DOG sat down and waited till we all leaped over the stile (some climbed carefully).
The DOG then left and went home.
Lunch was at a cosy spot …

Sheltered lunch spot

Sheltered lunch spot (John, Panorama pic.)

… out of the wind.
Fred gave out chocs.
The ground was even and not at all muddy. The views are worth stopping for to catch a breath.
When we reached Gladstone Rd North, we walked to the Wingatui Hall where we had cunningly had a car parked for those who needed a lift back  to the cars up saddle hill. Several Hikers took up the offer and Fred transported them up to their cars. We continued down Gladstone Rd North to the z station, then up quarry rd back to the cars.
Several hikers took up the offer of going for coffee to Wals at the end of the day. (Can’t guess who. – Ed)
A very hot day enjoyed by all. – Elaine.
30. 11/12/2013. All.  Friends Hill, Chain Hills. End of Year finger-food lunch at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS of route

GPS of route from Friends Hill to Chains Hill road, return.

Our leaders had to change our end of year location. Berwick Camp had been already booked. Where to plan the tramp? A brilliant choice. From the Hall, up Friends Hill to the stile and across the poled route to the Chain Hills road end for morning tea. It was the first time this reporter remembers doing the route UP from ‘Friends’ to “Chain’. He discovered how much easier it is doing the reverse route DOWN. The trampers among us were not disappointed either. Bravo, leaders. Our shared lunch was  another successful end-of-year treat. Thanks to Bruce for leading us in a sing-a-long. Happy holidays. – Ian.
29. 28/3/2012. Hikers. Chain Hills. Leader: Graham.
28. 23/11/2011. Hikers. Fairfield circuit, Fairfield. Leaders: Graham, Wendy.
27. 29/6/2011 Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
Start Carpark at Saddle Hill overbridge,
to end of Chain Hills road,
across farmland …
Single

“Single File please people.” (As if we could do anything else.)(Bob pic and caption)

Downhill

Pleasant downhill walking. (Bob pic and caption)

What

Lunch queue? A good spot actually with shelter, sun, and log seats laid on. (Bob pic and caption)

Fred

Fred jealously guards his chocolates. (Bob pic and caption)

… down to Friends’ Hill Road.
Good leadership – except that Quasimodi challenged for the leader’s role, …
Quasi

Quasimodo joins the group. (Bob pic and caption)

… the leader threw down the gauntlet (ie orange jerkin), and the usurper reigned, …

gauntlet

Quasimodo surges into the lead. (Bob pic and caption)

…  and misled the people at one point,
at which the the old guard led the errant followers correctly.
Along Gladstone Rd, and
up Quarry Rd to cars.
We started with 18 and with defections reduced to 6!!
A lovely walk. Great weather. – Bob.
26. 26/1/2011. Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
Some 18 of us (the number varied a little at points in the walk) set out from the bridge carpark on Saddle Hill on a fine and calm morning, continued up Chain Hills Road with morning tea at the “potato planter” (pictured),

Morning tea by the potato planter. (Bob pic and caption)

Ditto. (Bob pic and caption)

across a small piece of farmland by the reservoir (where there was the possibility of a confrontation with a cattle beast

Does he want to have a beef with us? (Bob pic and caption)

– but avoided because of the amiable nature of all on two or four feet ) and so onto Flower St, Fairfield, and past several novel garden ornaments, one of which is pictured.

Neill admonishes the little people. (Bob pic and caption)

Lunch stop was at the park with shelter from the hall wall against the strengthening wind, and chocolates from Fred, and the last part of the round-trip was up the old main road (Morris Rd) in gathering drizzle. A frequent topic of conversation was the ailments (and recovery) of various people present or absent, and the name of Don who used to come out with us but whom we haven’t seen for some time and whose name eluded several. [Donny Hunter? – Ed] ( I am reliably informed that there are no longer “senior moments”, but rather “intellectual pauses”.) Two new faces, Jim and Betty, came to ‘try us out’. Thanks to Frank and Leslie for leadership. – Bob M
25. 9/6/2010 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.

I guess that the residents themselves are their best critics. (Bill pic and caption)

24. 22/4/2009 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
23. 28/5/2008. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley
22. 23/1/2008. Hikers. Chain Hills to Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
21. 27/9/2006. Hikers. Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Eleanor W, Dot T.
20. 17/8/2005. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Leaders: Margaret S, Carmel.
19. 28/7/2004 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hills, Fairfield. From over-bridge. Leaders: Les W, Ray, Mary M.
Dunedin from Mount Grand

Dunedin from Mount Grand

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

18. 16/7/2003. Hikers. Overhead Bridge, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
17. 19/2/2003. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Trampers. Leaders: Donny, Graham.
16. 19/6/2002 Alt. Winter walk from Fairfield Tavern. road walk. Leaders: Joyce S, Eleanor
15. 29/5/2002. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Wendy, Graham.
14. 23/5/2001 Friends Hill. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary M, Val
13. 26/7/2000. Fairfield via Flower Street from carpark. Leaders: Lesley and Frank, Margaret D.
12. 24/5/2000 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hill Circuit. Leaders: Ronny, Irene, Hazel
11. 17/5/2000. Chain Hills – Circuit. From Fairfield Tavern. Leaders: Donny, Irene, Hazel
10. 10/6/1998. Wingatui, Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Peg C, Molly.
9. 1/3/1998 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Margaret D, Lance, Lois
8. 25/6/1997. Maurice Road, Fairfield, Chain Hills. Leaders: Betty B, Judith D, Mary Y.
7. 20/11/1996. Friends Hill and beyond. Meet at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B, Judith D.
6. 1/11/1996 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B
5. 19/6/1996. Chain Hills – Fairfield Tavern for lunch – Return Main Road. No fare. (Alternative to Pole Line) Leaders: Daphne, Evelyn M, Colleen.
4. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Medium. Leaders: Bob Q, Dot and Nelson, Molly.
3. 16/9/1992. Wingatui Friends Hill Rd Halfway Bush Rd Three Mile Hill Rd Dalziel Rd Brinsdon Rd return
2. 6/5/1992. Walk from Glasgow Street car park, Saddle Hill, Chain Hills, Wingatui. Easy. Leaders: Jack M, W Bathgate,
1. 9/8/1989. Wingatui Racecourse. Over the Hill. Easy+ Leaders: Betty, Molly, Ria.

No responses yet

Jan 16 2019

Green Hut, Pulpit Rock, Dark Horse Hut

Published by under Hikers

Location: 50 km from car park.
Click Silver Peaks Forest for background information.
No. 21 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Green Hut & Pulpit Rock return or via Possum Hut. C Williams. Year Round. Long.”
19. 16/1/2019. Trampers. Dark Horse Hut. Leader: Janine.

Route map, courtesy Janine. [Read right to left, cars to Hut. Ed.]

After the dawning of a cracker day, 14 trampers set of from the car park. We gathered up another couple passing through Dunedin then all converged on Semple Road where we met our search and rescue partners, Dermot and Cuchulainn. Due to the length of the tramp we wasted no time striding out along the Silverpeaks track, not stopping for morning tea (no groans were heard) till we reached the old Green Hut site.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

After light conversation and a cuppa with a division of OTMC trampers also passing through we tackled the steady climb up to Pulpit Rock. Here one member recently returned after illness wisely decided to go no further and rather than toil in the escalating heat to wait our return. In contrast Dermot ,who was limited with time constraints decided to push on at speed to try and reach this mysterious never seen hut. The remaining 15 trampers continued at a more suited pace!

The steady climb continued through diverse landscape, at times very long tussucks or very rocky tracks until other commitments saw another two trampers turn back and a further two felt they had reached their limits for the day.

Group past Pulpit Rock. (Helen pic and caption.)

We just bipassed the last turn off to Jubilee Hut, only to met up with Dermot on his return with news that a machette would be really handy. Knowing the ’bush bashing’ needed would only last 4-500 metres we toiled on to reach that magical marker showing the track down into the painted forest.

The Dark Horse Hut was built in 1988 with remains of the Green Hut and while reasonably sturdy offers only basic shelter and maybe what could be called a couple of bunks! This trip was a first for many of those in the group, it was a welcome lunch stop for 11 trampers and it was a delight to sink down into the mystical painted forest.

Dark Horse Hut. (Janine pic and caption.)

Another view of Dark Horse Hut. (Ross pic.)

Although the return home did involve some initial ‘grunt work’ uphill it was thankfully mostly downhill gradient with a little welcome breese on occasion to cool the heat. Sadly the days exertions had taken us a little longer than hoped and we were too late to make the coffee shop before closing, nevertheless a productive day was had by all, the complete tramp covered 14.6km. – Janine.

18. 7/2/2018. Both. Green Hut and Pulpit Rock. M. Leaders: Clive and Dave.

On Wednesday we had a very good turn out of 36 hikers and trampers.   The day was overcast so ideal for walking. 25 minutes from the Semple road car park had us all nicely warmed up so time for a cuppa.

(Clive pic)

After morning tea, 16 trampers (a good number!) left for the Green hut clearing. The hikers followed on behind to the old Green Hut site. It was a pleasant walk generally on the ridge through the Manuka and regrowth. After a short break at the clearing it was then steadily uphill for the trampers but ok – we finally got out of the Manuka and could see the track ahead of us leading up to Pulpit rock. There was a cool breeze as we climbed.

 

Nearly there. (Phil pic and caption.)

Finally we made it to the site. We climbed up to the summit – precariously looking round and taking photos of the amazing views 360 degrees around us.

 

We gotta get out of here. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch was had in the shelter of a ridge and tussocks near the rock. It was then a pleasant walk back as the breeze had abated. A group of 8 headed down in search of an emergency hut and found it – even with a good water source nearby.

The hikers had lunch at the Green Hut site (where the seats used to be!!

(Clive pic)

It was then down and out and a muster for all and an enjoyable coffee at Waitati. – Clive.

17. 11/5/2016. Trampers. Pulpit Rock. Medium.  Leader: Arthur H.
And summer continued for another day. …
The sky was clear and sunny, the wind was a warm northerly – perfect for our day’s tramp.
We arrived at Mountain Road to find several vehicles already in the car park. We guessed, correctly, that “The Green Hut Group” was out track clearing.

Setting out, we walked for about 15 minutes before stopping for morning tea at the junction where the track from Swampy joins.

The next stop was at “Green Hut” – the hut had been long gone, but the clearing where it once stood is still referred to as Green Hut.

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Green Hut stop. (Helen pic)

We were able to admire the 2 recently installed bench seats at the site – actually only one could be admired as the other had already been destroyed! Sadly,  there is no shortage of morons in N.Z. these days.
Continuing on,  the track trends ever upward. We encountered the track clearers at various spots, and stopped briefly to talk, and especially to let them know that all their hard work is much appreciated.
After passing the top of Rosella Ridge, it was only a short distance up to Pulpit Rock. As we approached, 2 of the track clearers were having a brief rest on top before resuming work.

Standing on top of the rock, …

View from top of rock

One of the great views from up on the rock. (Margreet pic and caption)

… one had to hold on tightly to one’s hat as the wind coming up from the other side was strong! Time for lunch. We moved back a few metres to be out of the wind, and settled down in the tussock to enjoy the magnificent view, and our food.

T-Lunch

Lunch on top. (Helen pic and caption)

Afterwards we walked a further 2-3 hundred metres on the track towards “Jubilee Hut”, so as to be able to see “The Pulpit” better.

Pulpit Rock. (Helen pic and caption)

Pulpit Rock. (Helen pic and caption)

No one had thought to prepare a sermon (least of all the leader), so a little reluctantly we turned for home.

We travelled back on the same track, again passing the workers. Two of them had scrub bars, the others using hand operated implements. Mostly downhill now, but some of our group don’t enjoy going down too much as it is a bit hard on the knees.

At “Green Hut” it was discovered that 6 trampers could comfortably sit side by side on the one remaining seat.

Seat

On seat at Green Hut site. (Helen pic and caption)

It was most pleasant there in the sun, but after 10 minutes we resumed our journey. We were back at the cars at 2.35 p.m., very satisfied with ourselves. The wind had not bothered us at all except for right on top of Pulpit Rock.
We stopped at Waitati for a while on the way home, to discuss life in general.
On the day, 10 trampers had covered 11 km. It had been a wonderful day’s tramp. – Arthur H.
16. 4/12/2013. Both. Green Hut site and Pulpit Rock. Medium. Leaders: Lester and Elaine.
Trampers: Silver Peaks No. 2. From the car park, the Green Ridge track was dry, not muddy as it usually is. We had morning tea at the Green Hut site. It was a very hot sunny day.
They we went up the Green Hill track and on to Pulpit Rock, over to Silver Peaks No. 2 to look down the Devils Staircase, returned back to head west to the top of the Painted Forest  to look for Dark Horse Hut. We never found the hut. (Have worked out since [see Hamills book p. 7.08] that we would have had to go on another 10-20 minutes, through a gully and on to the next knoll.) Lunched at the top of the forest and then returned to the car park.
We saw five members of the Green Hut track clearing group. We met a couple from Germany. Also another party of three people and their dog. Very hot tramping conditions – mid-20s. – Heb.
Hikers: Green Hut.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Although the return trip is only 8 km, some of the steeper slopes make it seem longer. – Ian
15. 2/5/2012. Both. Green Hut site and Pulpit Rock. Medium. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
The entrance track was much improved. Thanks to the Green Hut Track-Clearing Group for working on some Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Nov 28 2018

Woodhaugh Gardens and Leith

Published by under Hikers,Year round

19 km from car park.

8. 28/11/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Judy and Elaine.

Nike map of route, courtesy Ian.

After an overdose of rain, 23 hikers and four ramblers abandoned the planned Flagstaff/Swampy hike in favour of the Botanic Gardens area.

We parked in the gardens car park and wandered by various paths to the Rhododendron dell for a leisurely morning tea. The sun shone and the birds sang.

(Judy K. pic.)

 Eventually we headed off over the road, into the northern cemetery where a successful search was made for Elaine’s ancestors.

(Judy K. pic.)

  Leaving them undisturbed we headed off down the hill, and the steps, to Logan Park and around to the stadium for lunch. (Quite a relief to have toilets available at both morning tea and lunch!)

Lunch time. (Adrienne M pic and caption.)

  The sun shone and a one-legged seagull enjoyed lots of titbits.  From here it was a stroll across the road into Anzac Ave, then across to follow the Leith up through the University

(Judy K. pic.) [Inserted only at Judy’s request. Ed.]

(Judy K. pic.)

and so back to the Gardens, coffee, and the cars.

Judy and Elaine

7. 15/8/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Edinburgh stone memorial. (Clive pic and caption.)

 

Calm day on the harbour. (Clive pic and caption.)

Après déjeuner scene, Upper Garden. (Ian pic and caption.)

Nancy Syme fountain, Botanic Garden. (Lester told of Nancy Syme long time Mosgiel resident who dontated the fountain. (Clive pic and caption.)

6. 28/6/2017. Hikers. Leith walk Mouth to Woodhaugh. E. Leaders: Jan Y and Jan B.

Calm yachts where parked cars. (Ian pic and caption.

Albatross wing bridge. Wired head and body difficult to discern. (Ian pic and caption.)

Woodhaugh lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Grafitti on lower Leith concrete way. (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 25/6/2008. Hikers. Woodhaugh – Botanic Gardens. Easy. Leaders: Marjorie, Carmel.
4. 17/7/2002. Alt. Bullock Track – Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders:Denise, Shirley R, Bev McI
3. 12/9/2001. Alt. Bullock Track, Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders: Arthur & Barbara L, Winifred
2. 27/10/1999. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Betty.
1. 15/5/1996. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. (Alternative to Quoin Point.) Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

No responses yet

Nov 21 2018

Ocean View

Published by under Hikers

No. 18 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps.”Ocean View – Saddle Hill. D Bennett. Farm. Lambing.”

21/11/2018. Hikers. Ocean View. Leaders: Bruce and Jan Y.

Hikers report

Wednesday 21 November 2018

Seventeen hikers set off at 9.30 am from the Brighton Surf Club car park down to the sea alongside the river which had a high flow due to the recent rain and had cut a 0.7 m bank in the sand. We then passed the area of pingao planting and went to the right of the Surf Club building to ascend the steps and continue along the footpath to the sidepath leading on the right to the small beach below.  Two blue penguin boxes were at the top of the steps. The far rocky cleft on the beach to the right was empty of penguins and the sea demonstrated how the force and volume of the waves can vary. The remains of a dead penguin were visible in the rocky niche closer to the stairs. As the tide was not out far enough to proceed north along the beach we re-ascended the stairs, continued along the footpath and went to the beach via the car park at the bottom of the hill, Kirkness Hill. We walked north along the beach. 

 Taylors Creek had a significant flow where it went out to the sea. After considering our options we took the plunge and went across the creek which was ankle deep in parts. 

About 250 metres south of the car park/freedom camping site at the entrance to Ocean View we observed how a dead seal was being buried naturally in the sand. 

We had morning tea at the car park at 10.45 and at 11 am  were joined by George, who had taken the bus to the Presbyterian Church on Brighton Road, and continued north along the beach for 30 minutes,

(Adrienne pic.)

making another creek crossing with ankle-deep water, to where some plastic debris in the form of a large pink float and a small blue float numbered 63238, attached to 40 metres of rope, were collected as part of a campaign to remove plastic from beaches. We then returned …

(Adrienne pic)

… to the car park to lunch there at 12 midday. After lunch we proceeded through 727 Brighton Road, depositing the rope and floats there, and turned to the right on the track which we followed until it came out on Brighton Road beside the clothing collection box. George caught the 10.20 am  bus opposite McColl Road back to Brighton.

We turned to the left on the footpath and proceeded to admire the work of the Third Little Pig in the form of two houses. We looked at the view of the sea from the landscaped part of the reserve just south of the row of tree stumps marking the edge of the reserve area near the second house which was the subject of a recent TV programme. Grand Design, shown at Grand Designs. On the website the house is described as being at Oceanside, Little Brighton.

After crossing the bridge over Taylors Creek, we turned to the left and followed a meandering track back to the Kirkness Hill carpark and then, via the footpath, back to the Surf Club carpark, arriving there at 1 pm. Refreshements were consumed at the Brighton Beach café which we left at 2 pm, just before the rain returned with a greater ferocity.

Distance cover 10.29 km. The weather was overcast, with a slight drizzle at times, no wind of note and a bearable temperature. It could have been worse. The participants may have had some cobwebs shaken off and no lasting damage was sustained by anyone. With Marjorie, who assisted with the planning, having to offer her apologies for not being able to attend on the day, my thanks to Jan Yardley and Alec Griffin for leading at the back.

Subsequent enquiries with the Vessels Registrar on FishServe revealed the rope and floats belonged to  a Carey’ Bay based fisherman Chris Cooper. I phoned him and he said he would be pleased to receive his floats back at the Fishermans Wharf, Carey’s Bay, but that I could keep the rope. I said I would deliver them at some stage in the forthcoming weeks. He thought the rope may have frayed on rocks near where the crayfish pot had  been set in the region of the Nuggets, south of Kaka Point. – Bruce.

10/4/2013. Hikers. (31). Ocean View Ramble. Easy. Leaders: Dorothy, Chris.
GPS

“GPS” of half of route. Began recording only at the top view. Total distance 9 km.

Dorothy led a large group on an excellently-planned route around, above and through the Ocean View settlement, Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Nov 16 2018

Tramps Incorporating Three Kings

Published by under Hikers,Trampers,Year round

No. 26 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Wesleydale – Maungatua – via 3 Kings. L Wiffen. Year round.”

Abt 25 km from car park.

24. 14/11/2018. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Thirty of those who weren’t away at the Hollyford Camp turned out to tackle the 4WD track up to Three Kings. Three Ramblers, who have chosen for themselves the name “The Eighties Plus” dropped back to continue at their own pace, getting ultimately as far up as the last gate on the track. The rest, with occasional rest stops and regroupings,

Morning tea with views of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.)

Ian explaining part of the history of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.) [Pointing out the original route up from Wesleydale Camp. – Ed]

made it up the steadily graded track, overcoming the last very steep bits to reach the rocks high up on the Maungatua Range at its southern end by lunch time.

The day was fine and calm with only a little sharp wind up here persuading us to find our own sheltered but sunny spot for lunch. Quite a number of us were newer members and for many this was their first visit to these prominent rocks. Well done.

Lunch at Three Kings. (Ian pic and caption.)

Our leaders Ian and Doug. (Clive pic and caption.)

After a leisurely lunch, it was back down the track again, this time each at their own pace now that  it was a known route, and into the cars, to regather for coffee at Outram. A successful outing. – Ian and Doug.

23. 17/5/2017. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Route map courtesy Ian. Nike pp not turned until 1km into trip so add 1km to all distances. (Ian pic and caption.)

We navigated our cars to what for the Hikers was a new entry spot. Back in 2006 the Todd Group had denied us access through the paddock next to the old Wesleydale Camp which gave us access to a lovely track through the bush above it opening to gorse leading to the FWD track above. Now, back at the bottom of a big dip in  Heenan Road, there was an entry point to a parking spot up at the very bottom of that track, thanks to a hospitable owner’s permission.

Only 13 were able to turn out for the day. A first long-grassed paddock was the only steep effort, the track thereafter proving a delightfully modest steady gradient elevating us soon to impressive views over the Taieri plain. We stopped for morning tea at one such view,

Viewing the plain. (Ian pic and caption.)

but low cloud below us was  beginning to condense obscuring the former clear air.

Later, where we at last emerged from the bush part of the route, we stopped to point out to newer members the old way by which we used to reach this point. Beyond here, the track now steadily steepened the nearer we got to the Three Kings. We took it slowly, with frequent rests and regroupings. Until behold, there was a new track cut right across an extensive cleared area, changing the whole aspect of what we used to experience eleven and more years ago. The new track was even steeper, but at last all got there.

We hunkered down for lunch beneath the principle rock, sheltering from a brief but wetting rain shower.

Shelter for some. (Ian pic and caption.)

A clever perch. (Ian pic and caption.)

But that was it. The day remained calm, if cool. We returned back down the way we had come, all very pleased at having achieved our object. One older member expressed their delighted at achieving a return to the rocks after such a long absence, having given up all hope of ever making it again.

We stopped for coffee at George’s ‘hairy’ goat cafe, delighted to meet up there with the Trampers’ other half of the club, returned just before us.

A satisfying day. Roll on the wintry weekend ahead. – Ian.

22. 8/2/2017. Trampers. Maungatua Summit from Heenan Road. M. Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Tony. Trampers Maungatua trip.

I believe this tramp was a “first’ for the club. We have been up to the “3 Kings” area many times in the past, but today we continued on to the summit.

A small group out today, only 4 of our regulars, 1 potential member and  1 guest: 6 in total.

We left the cars parked up a farm drive off Heenan Road. Our tramp began at 9.00 a.m. on the uphill farm road which goes around the south end of Maungatua, and out towards Mahinerangi.

It was a fine day, sunny but with many clouds. A cool S.W. breeze kept the temperature down.

Morning tea was taken in the last available sheltered spot, the leader being rubbished for stopping 5 minutes early though!

Up a farm track and then in to the tussock taking us up more steeply to trig “F” at 702 metres, from where we could look down onto the “3 Kings“.

Onward on a farm track, before turning off into the tussock for the last 3.25 km, single file following the fence line.

Beautiful moss. (Helen pic and caption.)

The summit was reached at 12.05 p.m. for our lunch stop. Sitting down in the shelter of the vegetation was necessary to get out of the wind. The sunny periods were very welcome as we ate and rested.

Before taking our leave, the obligatory photo of the group at the summit marker post was taken.

Arthur Carol Neil Helen and Neil. (Helen pic and caption.)

Plaque on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Just at this time the red helicopter flew over us at low altitude, our waves being returned.

Red helicopter giving us a wave. (Helen pic and caption.)

No rescue needed today, though, thankfully.

After about 2 km on the return journey we took to the farm track for the remainder. It was somewhat easier going, and also gave a little variation from the inward track.

The wind had eased early afternoon, and then changed to a southerly breeze. Showers were visible in the Balclutha-Milton direction, but were then going out to sea and not towards us.

Lower down we stopped briefly to admire the view out over the lower Taieri Plain. The whole area was bathed in sunshine, and was a real picture. The views from the top of Maungatua had been spoiled a little by all the cloud shadows on the landscape.

Back at the cars at 3.00 p.m. it had been a neat 6 hours from go to whoa. A very satisfactory day’s tramp in the leader’s opinion. Total distance was 17 km, and an altitude climb of 800 metres.

The timing was absolutely perfect!

As we sat down after ordering our drinks at “The Hairy Goat” the rain arrived!

Thanks to all who participated in the day’s very successful tramp. – Art.

21. 22/10/2014. Trampers. Three Kings. M.
This weeks tramp was to the “Three Kings” at the south end of the Maungatua’s. Six trampers travelled to McLaren Rd, drove around past the Lavender farm to our parking place just inside the farm yard gate. Jill went & got the key for us, & then drove back home again, leaving us to find our way up to the tops. The walk was on farm 4WD tracks all the way up, with just a short walk through tussock to the Three Kings where we had lunch in the shelter from a strong cold wind. Then it was a quick retreat back down again out of the wind, & back to the cars. Walked 12km; 4.1 km/h ave; 3hrs moving; climbed 690m.
The view from the top was very good, but the cold wind didn’t make for pleasant viewing. We practised our Coffee Club by calling into the Outram coffee shop on the way home where a good chat session was had. – Ken

18/10/2006 Jeff Todd of Todd Group 477 8902 (10/06). Todd Group had bought Wesleydale and paddock and allowed it to be used for army live firing! Access through all this area denied.

20. 26/4/2006. Trampers. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Evelyn C, Sabina.
19. 24/8/2005. Both. Wesleydale, Three Kings and option of Trig. Leaders: Ria, Irene, Val and Brian, Eleanor B.
18. 19/11/2003. Both. Three Kings from Farm sheds. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Bill and Pat; Hikers: Les and Margaret, Carmel.
des

Down through Gorse. Wendy? Pat

Geo

George on rise, below Trig above Three Kings (19/11/2003)

17. 17/7/2002 Three Kings, Mill Creek, Kowhai. Spur Leaders: Bob H, Doug M, Wendy B
Long. Hard. Water. Steep down Kowhai Spur.
16. 10/7/2002. Wesleydale Methodist Youth Camp to 3 Kings. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Frank.
15. 22/11/2000 Leaders: Lex, Ian
14. 22/9/1999. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Lex, Bill H, Lesley S.
13. 12/8/1998. 3 Kings, Maungatua. Leaders: Irene, Shirley R.
12. 19/11/1997. Wesleydale to 3 Kings and Trig. Leaders Judith and Hugh, Ian.
11. 12/3/1997. Three Kings – Mill Creek Reserve – Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Graham, Barbara McC.
10. 1/5/1996. Duncan’s Farm Road and return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Les S, Graham S, Doug M
9. 3/4/1996 Three Kings from Heenan Road to McLaren Road Start past Little Creek. Medium.
Seek permissions
Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Nelson and Dot.
8. 20/4/1994. Three Kings. Medium. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ivan, Les W.
7. 6/10/1993. Mill Creek (back of the Maungatuas.) Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Ria L, Nel, Betty H.
6. 26/5/1993. Wesleydale Camp – uphill following 4WD track to Maungatuas. Great views. Medium. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Nola, Judith.
5. 9/9/1992. Wesleydale Camp to the Maungatuas. Follow 4WD Track. Average. Leaders: Joan, Betty, Jean, Diana.
4. 29/7/1992. Wesleydale Camp, up the hill following 4WD track to the Maungatuas. Lovely views. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Dave and Jean.
3. 23/10/1991. Maungatuas – Wesleydale to ‘3 Kings Rocks’. Steady up hill grade, but not a long tramp. Average+. Leaders: Nancy, Ray, Ted, Jack R.
2. 27/6/1990 Wesleydale to Three Kings. Average, if taken in easy stages. Don’t rush hill please. Leaders: George, Margaret D, Margaret B, Ria.
1. 8/3/1989. Three Kings. Good tramp up the Maungatuas. Great views of Lower Taieri. Leaders: Denise, George, Peggy.

No responses yet

Oct 03 2018

Tunnel Beach

Published by under Hikers

No. 62 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Tunnel Beach. Farm”
Tunnel Beach.
See 1983 for an account of its opening.
Tramping Track managed by DOC. Tunnel Beach Road accessed from Blackhead Road.
Plenty of parking at end of Tunnel Beach Road. Distance from carpark:
Concord Tavern park for longer walk. Distance from carpark: 10 km.

3/10/2018. Both. Tunnel Beach from Kaikorai Estuary. M. Leader: Keith.

37 members set off on a combined walk from the Kaikoai estuary carpark at Waldronville …

Getting ready to move out, (Gordon pic and caption.)

… on a beautiful day and headed along the beach towards Blackhead.

Heading to Blackhead Quarry. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After smoko on the beach…

Great place to ponder after morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

…we headed up to Blackhead carpark.

Unfortunately some got hit by larger waves with one gentleman
falling over and getting quite wet , while others got wet up to their knees.
At Blackhead, 12 left, walking along the roads back to the estuary to fetch their cars while the rest walked up Blackhead Rd to Tunnel beach car park.

!8 walked down to the tunnel entrance for lunch,

Great spot for lunch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

the rest regrouping in the  carpark, much to the interest of a Chinese couple who snapped photos of the group having lunch.

Tunnel beach and carpark were very busy with lots of tourists. There was even a couple in their wedding finery taking selfies.

After the slog back up to the carpark and a breather, and a quick chat to those who had stayed, we set off walking down Green Island Bush Road

Heading back to Waldronville. (Gordon pic and caption.)

through Waldronville to the cars. Distance 15kms.

Hope everyone got home safely as it was impossible to keep an accurate count when there were so many people and several options for walking. – Keith

12. 16/11/2016. Trampers. Tunnel Beach. E+

Seven trampers decided to just do tunnel beach walk. Weather was not that good.  We all decided we had nothing to moan about after being unscathed from the earthquake. We saw a  beautiful beach and some stunning rock formations and colours.

Stunning rock formation. (Helen pic and caption.)

Stunning rock formation. (Helen pic and caption.) [Is there an eye, nose and mouth there? – Ed.]

Rocks out to sea. (Margreet pic.)

Rock stacks off the northern ends of the beach. (Margreet pic.)

Two waterfalls today.

One of the waterfalls. (Helen pic.)

One of the waterfalls. (Helen pic.)

The other waterfall. (Helen pic and caption.)

The other waterfall. (Helen pic and caption.)

Had morning tea down there in a cave entrance.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Also saw a lot of visiting tourists looking at our hidden attraction. – Helen.

11. 21/9/2016. Hikers. Tunnel Beach from Kaikorai Estuary. M. Leaders: Jan Y and Peter.

Nike app GPS of route.

Nike app GPS of route.  Kaikorai Estuary – Beach – Blackhead Rd – Tunnel Beach Rd – Tunnel Beach – Green Island Bush Rd – Blackhead Rd – Brighton Rd – Kaikorai Estuary.


24 hikers set off on a cool grey morning. Parked at the Waldronville estuary and walked through the dunes to the beach, then along the beach to Blackhead, stopping for morning tea halfway along the beach. 4 hikers walked back to the car park at this stage to drive to Tunnel Beach. The rest walked to the end of the beach, watching a couple of surfers at the end. Then up Blackhead Road which was reasonably busy, but not so many trucks as the day the leaders did the reccie. Headed down the track, which has been widened and upgraded. The sun came out at this stage, and the cliffs round Tunnel Beach looked quite spectacular and jackets came off. A group of hikers elected to just go part of the way down, as it is quite a steep track. The tide was out, and we picked our way across a large number of boulders at the foot of the tunnel …

Tunnel steps exit. (Adrienne pic.)

Tunnel steps exit. (Adrienne pic.)

… to the beach where we had lunch.

Lunch

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Mouth of a low-tide cave.

Mouth of a low-tide cave. (Ian pic and caption.)

Study in angles

Study in angles. (Ian pic and caption.)

Returned to the car park via Green Island Bush Road which had far less traffic. Great views across to Green Island and Saddle Hill from here. Then on to Brighton Road back to the car park, where the co-leader discovered that we had done around 15 ks, which was a bit of a surprise to her. Calculations had been a bit out. Well done to all those who completed the whole walk – quite good to get pushed out of your comfort zone occasionally. – Jan.

10. 1/12/2010. Both. Tunnel Beach from Concord Tavern. Leaders: Neil, Lex.

The peninsula in context. (Ian pic and caption.)

Vegetation on an oozing waterfall. (Ian pic and caption.)

Ants? on a rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

Low tide entry only for this cave. (Ian pic and caption.)

9. 10/12/2008 Hikers. Concord Tavern, Tunnel Beach, Green Island return. Leaders: Neil, Peter.
8. 15/11/2000. Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Joan H, Dot B, Chris.
7. 12/4/2000. Concord, Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Joan H, Dot B, Myrie.
6. 17/3/1999. Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Daphne, Bev McI, Shirley R.
5. 12/11/1997. Blackhead, Tunnel Beach. Park at Blackhead Quarry. Leaders: Dapne, Margaret D.
4. 1/11/1996 Blackhead, Tunnel Beach. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret D
3. 29/5/1996. Concord – Tunnel Beach. Average. (Alternative to Mt Charles.) Leaders: Margaret D, Chris, Joan H.
2. 29/5/1991 Concord – Tunnel Beach. Interesting coastline. Average. Leaders: Doug & Ngaire, Peg C, Joyce I, Penny & Peter
1. 17/3/1989 Concord Tavern, Tunnel Beach, Green Island return. Leaders: Daphne, Ivan, Peter

No responses yet

Sep 19 2018

Port Chalmers and environs

Published by under Hikers

Click Dunedin’s Hills’ History for background Information.
30 km from car park.
21. 19/9/2018. Port Chalmers walkabout. E. Judy.
On Wednesday 19 enthusiastic hikers gathered at the Careys Bay Hotel
Establishment on a beautiful spring day.   We walked up to the lookout with stunning views of the harbour and had morning play-lunch at the
Ralph Hotere Garden. From there we made our way down  to Back Beach

Met up with some children on our track walk down to Back Beach. (Jan B. pic and caption.)

where we did a short walk out to the point where there were people
fishing for their evening meal.  We then walked round the point

Our walk around Back Beach taking us out to the Port Chalmers School. (Jan B. pic and caption.

School children on a kayak lesson. (Jan B. pic and caption.)

and made our way to the Lady Thorn Rhododendron Dell for lunch.  After lunch we walked up to the cemetery where some walked back down the hill and the others carried on another steep track which then took us down to the town and back to Careys Bay Hotel

Jan B. pic.

where we all enjoyed a beverage of various delights.  – Leaders Elaine and Jay.

20. 22/11/2017. Hikers. Port Chalmers. Leader: Judy.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Battery died within the last half km. So really 9 km.

22nd November saw two members celebrating the same birth date (Dave Mellish and the writer).  Are there any other shared birthdays in the Club?

Anyway, after some rather off-key singing, 18 hikers set off for Port Chalmers and the Careys Bay car park on a beautiful warm sunny morning.  The planned morning tea stop on Boiler Point didn’t happen, as the track was closed for new wharf development, so it was a bit of a slog up to the lookout (with a look inside the church on the way) and the Hotere garden for a well-earned break.

With a cruise ship in, there was plenty to see, and it took a while to gather the troops for the walk down to Back Beach, then around the point past the school …

(Kevin pic.)

… and rugby grounds, across the railway line and so up to the rhododendron dell for lunch.  Everyone sought whatever shade could be had, and we were entertained by rock climbers on the cliffs behind.

(Kevin pic.)

The excitement of watching a container ship berthing delayed some after lunch, and the group split at this point, eight continuing up the hill to the Scott Memorial, …

Radiance of the Seas and recently berthed container ship, taken from Scott Memorial. (Ian pic and caption.)

… then up and around the track beyond the car park on the far side (sorry, the leader forgot it went up some steepish bits for a while) and down in leaps and bounds to the Blueskin Road, across it to the track again, and so down to the Iona Church and a look inside here too.  There were quite a few cruise ship visitors about, and it was a good excuse for a rest as we stopped and chatted….  The choice then for these eight was either up and through the cemetery, or straight down to the road – guess which way we went?  Well, we were pretty hot and tired by then.

The remainder of the group were well installed in the hotel by the time we arrived, having taking an easier route through the cemetery and straight down to the Bay.  After some liquid refreshment and a leisurely chat, it was quite a late return home! – Judy.

19. 3/8/2016. Both. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Judy and Peter D.
On a cold wet winters day with snow predicted to 200 mtrs 9 hardy trampers left the carpark for Port Chalmers. We were farewelled by 6 fellow members who opted to go for a coffee fix rather than getting wet right from the start of the outing.

However our trip was very pleasant. Leaving the carpark at the back beach …

Back Beach. (Helen pic & caption.)

Back Beach. (Helen pic & caption.)

… of Port Chalmers following the road round the harbour with views of the Peninsula and further down the harbour towards Dunedin in the haze to the Harbour side rugby pavilion where we had shelter from the northerly driving rain, to enjoy our morning tea break.

Morning tea at rugby club. (Helen pic & caption.)

Morning tea at rugby club. (Helen pic & caption.)

We didnt dilly dally for too long as it didn’t take long to start chilling off. From here we proceeded along the railway line to the main road into Port Chalmers up to Ajax St and along Church St over the main trunk line to  the junction of the road to Lady Thorn Dell and up the short steep gravel track to the Blueskin Bay Rd.  Over the road and into the bushes following the Rangi track till we came out to a clearing greeted by a colourful array of noisy roosters at the Scott Memorial.

(Margreet pic.)

Two of the brave (?) few. (Margreet pic.)

(Margreet pic.)

One of the brave (?) few and a noisy (?) rooster (?) (Margreet pic.)

In this area we were very sheltered by the canopy of bushes . At the lookout we had panoramic views …

(Margreet pic.)

A rainy view. (Margreet pic.)

… of the container port at work and into the haze we could see right down to Tiaroa Heads. Quite surreal. Still no snow. From the monument we followed the Brailley Track to the Port Chalmers Cemetery where we found a shelter for lunch.

Lunch at Cemetery. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch at Cemetery. (Helen pic and caption.)

Careys Bay was beneath us so a quick zig zag through the cemetery to the famous Hotel where they allowed us to hang our wet gear in their front foyer while we enjoyed the warmth of the environment  and the open fires.

Coffee at Careys Bay hotel. (Helen pic and caption.)

Coffee at Careys Bay hotel. (Helen pic and caption.)

Two of our men did the gentlemanly act by fetching their cars and brought them round to Careys Bay to save the rest of us from further exposure from the elements !!

We walked 6.6 kms and ascended 200 mtrs, all satisfied that Wednesday’s tramp was a good day out – different from the many sunny days we have had in the past !! – Jill.
18. 22/4/2015 Hikers. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Judy and Jennifer.
GPS of route

Nike app GPS of route around Port Chalmers.

Judy, well backed up by Jennifer, led 30 Hikers an interesting trek around  Port Chalmers, pointing out several locations associated with her ancestors.
From the car park on Peninsula Beach Road she immediately took us up onto the  Island Terrace road whose northern end put us  onto the steep fenceline track that took us struggling up to the Flagstaff Point, (as it was originally called, but also variously known as Observation Point, Flagstaff Point and Flagstaff Hill,  in case you really wanted to know). (abt 0.22 km.) From here we took in the view of a China Shipping Line (a term new to this reporter)…
China Shipping Line. (John pic)

China Shipping Line. (John pic)

…ship, riding high in the water, loading containers. Back into the Hotere Sculpture Garden…
Hotere Gardens. (John pic)

Hotere Garden. (John pic)

…we morning teaed…

Cuppa. (John pic)

Cuppa. (John pic)

…and wandered round the well labelled (well, they were brass plates really) exhibits.
Judy then took us down and along the full length of Constitution Street before turning down – at its end – to right at the other end of Island Terrace, and down a bush track to the Peninsula Beach. Road. (abt 0.8 km) We walked to the Peninsula’s end and reflected on the sinking of the Yarra. (abt 2 km)
Yarra. (John pic)

Yarra. (John pic)

From here the road became Victory Place and yet further along, Wickliffe Terrace. Around about here Judy pointed out, half-hidden about us, what could well be the largest old house in Port Chalmers, the home of a former Dock Master, one of Judy’s relatives. At this point we turned off down a track that got us (abt 3 km) across to Albertson Avenue and thence to the southern end  of George Street, which we crossed, to climb-  in turn – Ajax Road and Church Street. Crossed the Railway line,  (abt 4 km) pass the gate of Lady Thorn Rhododendron Dell, on and up to end up via Braille’s Track at the Scott Memorial…
Lunch at Scott Memorial (John pic)

Lunch at Scott Memorial (John pic)

…and the “Nine Fathom Foul” large anchor (which used to foul fishermens’ nets)…
Anchor

“Nine Fathom Foul” Anchor. (John pic)

…for lunch.
Back down Braille’s Road, this time turning off into the Port Chalmers Cemetery,…
Cemetery

Port Chalmers Cemetery (John pic)

…noting on the way one of Judy’s Knewstubb relatives graves. Out near the bottom, now on Church Street again, (abt 4.8 km) across onto Harbour Terrace, viewing a wee ‘but-and-ben’ of Judy’s parents when young, down Slant Street to Join Macandrew Road by the Careys Bay Hotel. Along that road, past the dock entrance (abt 6.5 km) and along Beach Street back to the cars.
Thanks, of course, very much, to Judy and Jennifer for keeping us safe and well informed on a very well-planned route. – Ian.
17. 8/5/2013 Hikers. Sawyers Bay, Old Road, Lady Thorn Dell, Lookout, Back Road, return. Leaders: Mollie and Pat.
Route

Route

25 of us parked in Stevenson Road in Sawyers Bay, walked
from its end around Borlases Road, turned up Ajax Rd above the steepled Presbyterian Church, onto Church Rd, crossing the railway line to reach Lady Thorn Dell for morning tea amongst the Rhododendrons, small groups disported between the seats and tables there. The day was fine and the view from the viewing platform down to the container wharves excellent.

It was then back down Church Rd, Ajax Rd, onto Mount St, to cross State Highway 88 to climb steeply up Grey St, Scotia St and Constution St to the Lookout at its top. We spent some time there watching bundles of logs being slowly craned into the bowels of a rather rusty looking ship. A passing ship towed a tug on up the channel heading presumably to the fertilizer or the petroleum wharves nearer Dunedin. We then crossed the point, steeply down this time to reach Peninsula Beach Road at the back, and to have an early lunch there. Happily the group supporting blind trampers passing by noticed us and came across for a chat, with a number in each group recognizing friends in the  other.

After lunch, we completed the circumnavigation of the peninsula, detoured off across a rugby paddock to walk alongside the railway to the railway crossing, and back along State Highway 88 to Sawyers Bay Station Rd and up to the cars.

A point to note is that Hiker numbers are growing larger, making group control by the leaders more of a task, as our wide range of individual fitness led to us becoming a rather straggled out band at times. However, the weather was pretty ideal, if a little windy at lunch time and draughty when walking alongside logging trucks, and the social chatting side was well attended to. Thanks to Pat and Mollie for a most satisfactory day. – Ian.

16. 10/8/2011 Hikers. Port Chalmers, Scott Memorial, Lady Thorn Dell. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn

15. 16/9/2009 Hikers. Aramoana, and Port Chalmers. Leaders: Lex, Marjorie.

15(?) of us set out on a fine, mild day with only light breezes – an ideal hiking day – led by Lex and Marjorie, to walk at Aramoana. As that was deemed to be too short, we called in first at Port Chalmers, where, from Mount St, we ascended Grey St, passing the grand old Presbyterian Manse whose 14 rooms, recalled Lex from his courting days, were occupied by bachelor minister George Jeffries and several student ‘tenants’ – hence its nickname “Holy Fryers (Friar’s?) Abbey”. Lex’s reminiscences of his courting days continued as we passed his wife’s old family home and pictured him sunbathing on the lawn. We discovered, again from the Learned Lex, why Meridian and Magnetic streets are so named. (Answers are at the end (1) if you need them). Morning tea was enjoyed at the top on a grassy knoll looking at the splendid view towards Portobello.

Morning tea in a 'room with a view". (Bob caption and pic).

Morning tea in a ‘room with a view”. (Bob caption and pic).

A couple of coneheads. .. or ... a couple of pointy heads. (Bob caption and pic).

A couple of coneheads. .. or … a couple of pointy heads. (Bob caption and pic).

The descent was by Fox St to Peninsula Beach Rd and back to the cars by Beach St past the stacks of logs and chips. On to Aramoana. We parked at entrance to the township, puzzled over three signs of a crossed-out “H” in a circle alongside an arrow head, (a prize for the one who answers 1st as the answer is NOT at the end (2) if you need it) and walked to the north end of the beach, and along the beach to the Mole and a self-satisfied sea lion basking on the sand. Lunch at the start of the Mole looking out across sparkling waters

Lunch by the Mole. (Bob caption and pic).

Lunch by the Mole. (Bob caption and pic).

and asking how far we could see was most enjoyable. (We didn’t know the answer but see the end (3) for an informed guess). Of course we walked along the Mole and stood by the new “lighthouse”

The new "lighthouse" at Molesend. (Bob caption and pic).

The new “lighthouse” at Molesend. (Bob caption and pic).

(What was the date inscribed in the concrete base – see the answer (4) at the end), and noted albatrossesses whitely plumped on Taiaroa Head and also saw one or more flying. The dredge entertained us as we tried to determine its movements (See (5) at the end for a guess), and one of the divers was pleased to chat.

The long Mole ... and ... (Bob caption and pic).

The long Mole … and … (Bob caption and pic).

The short Mole (?) (Bob caption and pic).

The short Mole (?) (Bob caption and pic).

Lesley reckoned she had found a clump of Capt Cook’s scurvey grass, but noted that there seemed to be much less of the rare plant than there used to be around there. (See (6) at the end for some more information). And so to the memorial to the Aramoana Massacre where we sat briefly and talked of the events and the film “Out of the Blue”. Chris had played a part in its production and recalled the actor playing the role of David Gray (See (7) at the end for the name)) being very empathetic in the role. Consensus was that it was a good film in being even-handed in its treatment of Gray. But did the police need to be stalking in white shirts? Perhaps they were taken by real surprise at such an event.

The memorial to the massacred 14 (Bob caption and pic)

The memorial to the massacred 14 (Bob caption and pic)

To the park and out along the boardwalks

Salt marsh boardwalk. (Bob caption and pic)

Salt marsh boardwalk. (Bob caption and pic)

and gravelled paths among flax to the salt marshes, where Joyce delighted in betting on the crab races.

Elaine and Bev conspire to push Joyce over the edge. (Bob caption and pic)

Elaine and Bev conspire to push Joyce over the edge. (Bob caption and pic)

And back to the cars. A view near Deborah Bay of a wee house wedged between road and water where the Lewis family lived with 17 children!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A pleasant walk. One learns new things every time one comes out with the TRTC. Thanks to all who share their knowledge and entertainment. Bob Answers 1 Magnetic Street points to the magnetic North, while nearby Meridian Street points to the geographical North 2 a prize for the 1st correct answer 3 on looking at a map, probably Shag Point or perhaps the more distant Katiki Point where the Moeraki lighthouse is situated. 4 March 2009 5 It appeared to dump its load, acquired from out by the buoys, near the Spit Beach as it returned to the sea so much higher in the water 6 on the following website you can see a picture of the plant Lesley found which looks very like Cook’s Scurvey Grass http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/documents/NZ%20Favourite%20Plant%202005.pdf 7 Matthew Sunderland

14. 27/8/2009. Hikers. Port Chalmers: Iona Church, Rangi Park, Cemetery, Scott Memorial, Lady Thorn Dell, Observation Point, Hotere Garden, Back Beach, Stinking Point, Walton Park, return.Leaders: Fred, Bob.

Eighteen keen hikers set off from around Iona Church (Peter claimed that we were moving in religious circles, and when Bob said “Iona Church” he wondered how he had come to be the “owner” ), and climbed up the Rangi Park track. We were diverted past the old cemetery

Graveyard

Graveyard Shift. (Bob pic and caption) Les, Peter, Wendy, Lesley G, Mollie, Bill, Lesley S, Evelyn

where we were regaled by stories of Lex’s youth, drinking there before the annual ball and being “late”. The steep track is well formed, though some of the steps are high, and passes through a most extensive grove of Brachyglottis Rangiora (or Rangiora )

Rangiora Row

Rangiora Row. (Bob pic and caption). Pat, Elaine.

that large-leafed, white-backed foliage you can write on with a ballpoint. Several lookout points were good for stops to admire the views across the port, harbour, islands and peninsula.

We descended from the Scott Memorial and Nineteen Fathom Foul anchor along Brailleys track to the new cemetery and thence into Church St and the Lady Thorn Rhododendron Dell

Rock Dwellers

Rock Dwellers. (Bob pic and caption). Lesley G, Evelyn, Les.

for a welcome morning tea – a warm and picturesque spot with early shrubs coming into blossom, and seats for all.

Round the church again (2 churches really with 2 spires – 1872 and 1883), down to the town centre,

Stopp Twins

Stopp Twins

up Grey, Scotia and Aurora streets to great views at Observation Point.  Neil was so engrossed there in pointedly chatting up a young lady that he made no observation that the rest of us had moved off.  A few moments were spent in the Hotere sculpture garden where Les and Peter tested the smacking law with some choice whacks of the inverted male’s bottom,

An inverted sense of humour

An inverted sense of humour? (Bob pic and caption. Les, Peter.

and there was a photo opportunity for some old hulks to pose by the old hulk, “Black Phoenix II”.

Old hulks

Old hulks pose by an old hulk. (Bob pic and caption). Fred, Bill, Peter.

Down the hill to the Yacht Club and the public toilet,

Revenge

Revenge: This is the woman who nominated me for Vice President. (Bill pic and caption). Margaret.

where there was much toilet humour, and then along the Back Beach walkway to a sheltered, planted picnic spot for lunch.

The Lunch Room.

The Lunch room. (Bob pic and caption). Bill, Neil, Lesley, Les, Dot, Arthur, Peter, who? Pat, Fred, Angela, Margaret, Elaine.

Now rested, we could complete the journey along the gravelled Peninsula Beach Road, past Russell Moses’ “Koputai” – the boat-shaped groyne sculpture,

The Groyne Sculpture

Groyne boat (Bob pic and caption).

round Stinking Point (where there was no smell but a useful seat) and the Pride of the Yarra Plaque (where there was a
plaque and another seat.) Along Victory Place and Wickliffe Terrace to the track above the school we strode, descending to Walton Park at Mussel Bay and along the grassy waterfront track to the railway line. A stack of uplifted tracks provided tiered seating for a wee rest out of the breeze,

Tiered seating

Tiered seating. (Bob pic and caption). Who? Evelyn, Fred, Lesley S, Pat, Bill, Les, Elaine, Peter, Lex, Dot, Joyce, Who? Margaret

and a garden filled with ornaments of all kinds offered a wee feast for the eyes.

An ornamented

An ornamented landscape. (Bob pic and caption).

The last stretch of the journey was along the George St shops and up Mount St to the cars. Less than 10km walking, but 4 hours of good exercise, and a route with some new ingredients for most.  Fred and Bob led luminously in the club’s fluorescent  jerkins. – Bob.

13. 26/11/2008 Hikers.Port Chalmers. Leaders: C. Hughes, G. Baxter

12. 16/1/2008. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Tash, Lex.


Scott Memorial

On a lovely calm and warm summer morning 15 hikers parked their cars at Sawyers Bay and set out for Port Chalmers. We went round the back road and then up the hill to the Scott Memorial and Centenary Lookout. Perfect place for morning tea break. Lovely views, shade or sun to sit in and the colourful company of the resident ‘free-range’ roosters and hens who are always very interested to check out the visitors! Then it was down the hill and through the Port Chalmers cemetery to the port itself. No cruise ships that day but two left recently and another due in that night. Up the hill then to the Conservation Point Flagstaff Lookout. Perfect day for great views all round. We sat in the recently developed little reserve that has a sculpture by Ralph Hotere as well as a couple of other rather intriguing and interesting ones, and enjoyed a restful and relaxing lunch break. Then, down the hill again to the back beach road. About half way along we went up a track that took us up to the top of the hill again. From there it was down the road, across the railway line and back along main road to Sawyers Bay and the cars. A happy and convivial day out. – Bev.

11. 16/1/2008. Hikers. Port Chalmers. Park cars at Sawyers Bay. Easy.Leaders: Lesley S, Eleanor B

10. 7/2/2007. All. Port Chalmers from Sawyers Bay – Cruise Ship. Easy.

 Leaders: Peter and Wendy, Molly, Lois.

9. 28/6/2006 Hikers. Sawyers Bay, Back Beach. Leaders: Jean A, Chris

8. 13/8/2003. Hikers. Port Chalmers, Careys Bay. Easy. Leaders: Lesley W, Denise.

7. 21/8/2002. Alt. Port Chalmers Careys Bay Back Beach. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Anne R

6. 17/10/2001. Alt. Port Chalmers, Back Beach. Leaders: Nelson and Dot, Mavis.

5. 6/6/2001.All weather. Overgrown. Port Chalmers, Deborah Bay. Easy+. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Winnifred

4. 8/11/2000. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Mavis, Peggy M, Catherine.

3. 7/6/2000. Deborah Bay. Leaders: Bev H, Les & Margaret

2. 8/1/2000 Port Chalmers Careys Bay Back Beach, Rangi Park walkway. Leaders: Mary M, Catherine T

1. 12/7/1995. Port Chalmers. Deborah Bay. Easy+. Leaders: Shirley, Bev H, Ria H, Jean A

No responses yet

Jul 25 2018

Street Walk: Town Belt areas.

Published by under Hikers

6. 2018-07-25. Hikers. Town Belt Ramble/bus ride. leaders: Dawn and Pam.
28 hikers left Southern cemetery…

Up hill from the oval. (Clive pic and caption.)

…and walked up Maitland Street to steps that led to Eglington Road.  Morning tea stop was at the Petanque grounds, above Zingari Rugby club.

Morning tea at the Petanque Club.(Clive pic and caption.)

We meandered through Queens drive and several side tracks,

Our leader and the view. (Clive pic and caption.)

arriving at Olveston to have lunch in their lovely grounds. Then walked through to the bullock track down to Malvern St…

Downhill to the bus stop. (Clive pic and caption.)

…and caught the bus from George Street back to our cars.  Had coffee at Kensington Hotel. A pleasant day was had by all. – Dawn.

5. 14/9/2016. Bullock Track, Town Belt, Ross Creek. E+. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.
Tangled route

Tangled route map.

22 happy hikers left cars at the bottom of the Bullock Track in Malvern St and crawled slowly up the trail to Stonelaw Terrace and around to Cosy Dell for a welcome morning tea stop. Leader Pam had access to the tennis club, with seating and toilets available.  Such luxury!
Cuppa

Cuppa at Cosy Dell Tennis Club grounds.

It was a beautiful sunny morning and we (mal)lingered for a while before raising the energy to proceed.
On round the Town Belt, down into Park St, a false start up the wrong set of Kyber Pass steps (ha ha to those in front!) then round Queens Drive and back up past Prospect Park into Cannington Rd and Pilkington St for an early lunch (nice seats again!) beside John McGlashan College.
Lunch

Lunch beside John McGlashan recreation field.

Looking up towards Flagstaff and Swampy, we wondered if we might sight the trampers, but no luck.  We guessed they were lunching further over, out of sight.

After lunch the trail took us back to Cannington Rd …

Mock assistance

Mock assistance back onto Cannington Road.

…  and onto the Ross Creek Track and a steepish descent through the bush to the pumping station.
Impressive waterfall

Interesting waterfall. (Ross Creek Reservoir overflow?) Taken across Ross Creek while gradually ascending creek’s true right track.

Down Ross Creek with steep cliffs on the right, bubbling brook and beautiful bird song, to the Leith and the wander back to the cars.  A coffee stop at the botanic gardens was enjoyed by all 22 and we were home early enough for a nana nap before dinner. – Judy.

4. 29/3/2015. Amenities Society Town Belt Traverse.
Elaine reports that some of the Club  went on the walk.
“It was a very good trip. Weather was fine and we had a good group. Someone said 600 people did the trip.” Elaine met up and went with Jim and Betty.
She reports on the bus ride back to the Oval. She “was so AMAZED … the bus driver … got out of his seat and helped mothers with prams. … believe it or not  the prams were in the bus. Also, and a lady with a walking frame – he helped in and her frame.” This led Elaine  to reflect: “I can get the bus when I get my walking frame, or if I have a baby I can get on the bus, baby and pram.”
“We did not win any prizes this year. It was a lot of fun.” – Ian.
3. 20/8/2014. Queens Drive. Leaders: Elaine, Fred.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Southern Cemetery, Eglington Rd, path to Maitland St (1km), Upper Stafford St, Alva St (2km), cross Serpentine Av, Jubilee Park Mountain Bike Circuit up to park, cross Maori Rd, steps up to Queens Dr. (3km), cross Rattray St (4km), cross Stuart St, Olveston (5km), Littlebourne Rd, q’s Dr., pat Drivers Rd, Q’s Dr. (6km), Prospect Pk (7km), Bullock Track, Duke St (7.61km)

The Town Belt Walk.

The town Belt walk was enjoyed by appprox 28 hikers on Wed 20th August.
Everyone met at the Southern Cemetery (1858) by the old morgue (1908).

It was a calm Dunedin day as we made our way up thru some very old grave sites and skirted around
to Steep St path. (Was this a street in the early days?)
We approached Maitland St which looked very steep but as we all took it fairly slowly everyone managed it.

Cuppa

Cuppa

Crossing High St was a mission for some. Some of us went to the crossing which proved a very safe option.
Passing High St School, which is now closed, it was interesting to read on a notice that 26 houses are to be built.
We followed the town belt as best we could, passing thru  Robin Hood Park and Littlebourne Grounds, skirted around the back of Otago Boys’ High School and again crossed a busy road – Stuart St – but this had lights so all was well.
We stopped for lunch at Olveston House which was built and owned by David Theomin in 1904.
We ate our lunch outside in the grounds where we had permission …

Lunch

Lunch

Last of the summer wine

Last of the summer wine?

… and admired the house and grounds.

Continuing on to Queens Drive we arrived at the Bullock Track (a track that was formed in the early days of Dunedin to take the cattle to the works).
This track was all down hill on to Malvern St, Duke St, and we made our way to a DCC bus stop. 26 of us all hopped on a bus, free for all of us, as it was before 3pm. Back to our cars which we had left at the south end of Princes St.    23 of us then went for coffee

Coffee

Coffee

at the Kensington pub which has been there since the 1890s. The Mine Host made us all very welcome.

Thanks to FRED for his great skills in leading us thru the belt and for the CHOCS once again.
There is a heap of info on Google if any one wants to find out about the town belt, Olveston, and any of the grounds like Robin Hood. Also the Dunedin Amenities Soc. have a wonderful web page as well. Worth having a look. – Elaine.

2. 15/1/2014. Start of year. Both. Combined streets and bush. Leaders: Pam, Pat R.
(Distance of Duke St from Car Park: 19 km.)
There were 20 of us out for our first tramp of the new year. Pam and Jill had recced the route only the Saturday before after find the scheduled Government Track had been closed due to fallen trees, as yet uncleared. We parked in Duke St and went up the Bullock Track by way of the gravelled route, taking our time to gather alongside Prospect Park under some tree shade while Pam gave us the history of the Bullock Track, originally a route from Leith Valley to Burnside Freezing Works for the poor bullocks. And initial date of 1803 was amended to 1903 after not sounding quite right.
Pam led us across Highgate into Queens Drive which we followed for a short distance before descending a track through the bush to arrive at the Cosy Dell Buckingham Tennis Club where we morning teaed (to coin a word), thanks to Pam being a member and having the key to let us in to the seating. That would be about the one km mark on the route map, perhaps the orange spot beyond the “1”. (Orange means slow or stopped, yellow means a little [perhaps not much] faster.)
Morning Tea

Pam addresses the Morning Tea group

And what a beautiful spot it was. Four courts, beautifully green with their artificial turf, surrounded by lovely bush. From there we made our way down some frighteningly steep steps onto Queen Street, up Park St into Heriot Row and up 103 steps, as counted by diligent Dawn onto Duchess Ave and out briefly onto Drivers Road. Then via Chamberlain St, Henry St and Stonelaw Tce, back to the corner of Prospect Park where we had emerged from the Bullock Track earlier. (Route detail here subject to revision.) But now it was straight along Cannington Rd to reach the John McGlashan Sports Field for an early leisurely lunch on seating aligning a running track that was in the process of having the lanes repainted. Here we were entertained by a father and his two little pre-school sons practising some very competent cricket with bat, ball and wickets.

Lunch

Fred distributing his luncheon lolly largess.

After lunch, we resumed our way along Cannington Rd, to turn off abruptly at its end down one of what turned out to be many confusing Ross Creek  Reservoir tracks, before, eventually, yes, e-v-e-n–t-u-a-l-l-y emerging onto Woodhaugh St, running alongside the Leith, and turning at the bridge along Malvern St back to the cars.  Well  done, Pam and Jill for the recce, and Pat doing a sterling job as back marker. – Ian.
1. 8/6/2011. Hikers. Street Walk: Town Belt. Leaders: Beverley, Chris.

We went anticlockwise round the ‘course’. (Bob pic and caption)

Town Belt walk 1. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 2. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 3. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 4. (Bob pic)

 

27/8/2008 Town Belt. Leaders: Carmel, Evelyn
Down from Maori Hill

Down from Maori Hill

Again we were blessed with another fine and pleasant Wed. Because the Pineapple track/Ben Rudd area, where we were supposed to hike, was very wet and muddy our leaders opted to take us on a ‘Street Walk’. This proved to be a good choice and the 11 of us that went had a very enjoyable day out. We started up at the Highgate bus terminus and then went down till we got to the Town Belt which we walked along via Queens drive. Lovely views,
A good view

A good view

interesting scenery and houses to look at made for a relaxed and pleasurable outing. Morning tea and lunch enjoyed sitting in the sun.
Restful surroundings

Restful surroundings

Our walked finished along Highgate, back to the cars. Thanks to our leaders for coming up with a very acceptable replacement. Bev.

No responses yet

Next »