Archive for the 'Year round' Category

Jul 11 2018

Frasers Gully

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 92 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Frasers Gully – Brockville Rd Year Round”

16 km from car park.

27. 2018-07-11. Hikers. Fraser Road Dalzier Road round trip. M. Leades: Jay and Jan B.

Map of route, courtesy Ian.

23 Hikers gathered in lovely sunny weather in Frasers Road . From there we trudged up the steep zigzag track …

Up the zig zag track beside Fraser’s Gully Track. (Clive pic and caption.)

… which took 30 minutes with many stops on the way to admire the city views or so was the excuse to
have a breather. At the top we stopped for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

… and then followed the track up to Mooltan Street. From Mooltan Street we turned into Ashmore Street until we reached Taieri Road.  From there we made our way along Dalziel Road to Townleys Road for our lunch stop. The weather by this time took a change and it was very windy and cold so we didn’t dally too long.

A cold place sheltered from the wind for lunch. (Clive pic and caption.)

After lunch we made our way down Brockville Road, with the weather improving again, admiring the lovely city and beach scapes. We turned into Glenross and went through a lovely park and over a quaint little bridge …

Across the bridge in Fraser’s Gully. (Clive pic and caption.)

… that then took us back to our cars in Frasers Road. A very pleasant ten and a half km walk with plenty of variety. We had coffee at Sunnyvale Stadium. – Jay and Jan

26. 12/10/2016. Both. Frasers Gully area. E+.  Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Route Map

Route Map, Roslyn-Frasers Gully Recreational Reserve: 1. Fresh Choice; 2 Ann St; 3. Falcon St; 4. Frasers Rd return; 5.  side track Frasers Road to grassy Tilburn St; 6. Tilburn St; 7. different return track Tilburn St to Frasers Road; 8. side track Frasers Road across to  Glenross St; 9. Glenross St; 10. Brockville Rd; 11, Kaikorai Vly Rd; 12. Falcon St; 13. Ann St; 14. Fresh Choice. – Ian.

Frasers Gully walk was enjoyed by Trampers and hikers together owing to Trampers leader away.

Frasers Gully "Road".

Frasers Gully “Road”. (Liz pic.)

Barred

A forceful “Barred!” near the top . (Helen pic.)

Weather held off, however some of the track was a little bit slippery but support from all concerned worked well.It was interesting that one track was a new experience for some old members which made it even more enjoyable.

Lunching on the flat. (Helen pic)

Lunching on the flat. (Helen pic)

Steep climb ahead.

Steep climb ahead. “Why do we do this?” (Ian pic and caption.)

Plodding up Falcon Street steps. (Keith pic and caption.)

Plodding up Falcon Street steps. (Keith pic and caption.)

You'll reach the top eventually. (Helen pic.)

One step at a time will get you to the top e…vent…ual…ly. (Helen pic.)

The walk was not long but seemed to be accepted by all concerned. Coffee to follow at Roslyn worked out well which had a good attendance of 24.

Coffee. (Helen pic.)

“We’re not sitting with that lot over there.” (Helen pic.)

The total numbers to start the walk was 32, with the main group leaving from Fresh Choice Roslyn car park.  (Permission to park there was appreciated.) – Liz and Alexander.

25. 18/2/2015. Hikers. Frasers Gully Area. Leaders: Bev and Adrienne.

GPS of route

GPS of route. Kms: 1. Frasers Rd Gully. 2. Brinsdon Rd Cnr. 3-4. Brinsdon & Halfway Bush Rds. 5. Three Mile Hill Rd. 6. Taieri Rd. 7. Ashmore and Mooltan Sts. 8. Track rejoining Frasers Gully nr its foot.

Bev and Adrienne led us through two of Dunedin’s Recreational Areas, up through the Frasers Gully and the down through the Tilburn Street reserve, the latter incorporating a very steep track, entailing an unavoidable recce UP it to ascertain its top entrance off Mooltan Street, imperceptible between two properties.

Anyway, for 27 Hikers, it was up the Frasers Gully ‘road’ as it says on the map

Up the Frasers Gully track.

Up the Frasers Gully track. (John pic)

and along Dalziel Rd to stop for morning tea in welcome shade at the corner of Brinsdon Road (2 km on map).

Cuppa

Cuppa time panorama

Then it was on up the road to join with Halfway Bush Road.

Ascending Brinsdon

Ascending Brinsdon Road (John pic)

Along Halfway Bush Road, down Three Mile Hill Road and surprise: around the corner by Ashburn Hall and onto Taieri Road and behold: a new (to this reporter) lovely grass-mown reserve. (Nr 6 km point on map.) Time for lunch.

Lunch panorama

Lunch panorama (John pic)

A little further on, a turn into Ashmore Street and further on still the bus stop.

Bus stop

“Room for one more” (John pic)

On, into Mooltan Street, around and the insignificant grass strip between two properties that would take us into the Tilburn “Street” Reserve. Well, paper-street, then. This took us around below the back of Moultan Street’s properties for some distance before plunging into some bush and out again into the scene below.

Steep down

Steep down

And was it steep, with careful shuffling by the more cautious. Zig-zags back and forth eventually landed us out on the flat of the Frasers Gully track within sight of the cars.

Thanks to Bev and Adrienne for a well-planned walk through two of Dunedin’s reserves bringing the bush into the town, and interspersed with welcome shady stops on a hot day. – Ian.

24. 5/6/2013 Both. Frasers Gully. Leaders: Evelyn and Fred.

Frasers Gully

Frasers Gully. 8km as crow flies, 9km with ups and downs. Cars parked at Ashmore St.

Friends Hill

Lunch finished. Top of Friends Hill.

Apple

Judy feeds apple to horse with very fashionable cover. At Halfway Bush Road exit.

23. 26/9/2012 Hikers. Frasers Gully Leader Evelyn
16 of us met at Frasers Road. Heading on up towards the start of the Frasers Gully track at 9.26 a.m. the word “Earthquake” was called out we stopped looked at each other and decided the ground wasn’t shaking so didn’t rush out to the field and “Drop, Cover and Hold On”, as workman were using machinery on the field, and decided we were more likely to get hit by a machine than a falling tree so carried on. We passed the newly opened up track going up to Mooltan Street which we would come back down on the way home. This track has been there for many years but had become quite overgrown and hard to find but after the tree felling took place it has been opened up resurfaced with gravel and had many plants and shrubs planted up both sides making it a very pleasant walk up the hill.
We stopped for morning tea about 20mins up the track at a clearing, but by the time we had finished it was starting to rain lightly but on and up we carried on. Alas the rain decided to get heavier the further we went but we were reasonably sheltered by the trees on the track but eventually had to stop and put on rain-gear. When we reached the top of the track it was raining quite heavily and didn’t look like stopping so a decision was made to go back down the track with the shelter of the trees (instead of carrying on as planned up past the water treatment station to the top for lunch then back along Halfway Bush Road down Three Mile Hill Rd around Ashmore & Mooltan Street and back down the new track to Frasers Gully).
When we did get back to Frasers Gully the rain had stopped so we decided to go up the new track for a bit to see the view, some of us found it quite steep going so came back down and had an early lunch while some of the others carried on to Mooltan Street then carried on around the road and came back down a clearing further on to meet up with us all at the bottom then back to the cars. Distance travelled was aprox. 8 km.
A good walk was had by all even though we didn’t cover the original distance.
22. 16/7/2011. Hikers. Frasers Gully. E. Leaders: Bev, Chris.
21. 18/11/2009. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Mount Grand Water Treatment Station, Brockville, Dalziel Road. Leader: Evelyn.

Dalziel

Dalziel Road. Evelyn, Bill, Bev. (Elaine pic)

Garden enhancement?

Garden enhancement? (Elaine pic)

20. 25/3/2009 Hikers Frasers Gully,Townley Rd E+ 30km ret. Leaders: Les & Margaret, Bev H

19. 16/7/2008 Frasers Gully

Fraser's Gully

Frasers Gully

Those who assembled at the car park on a cold and foggy morning all went on the hikers walk today. This began at Townleys Road on Kaikorai Valley Road and, thanks to Peter’s detour, took us along the recently-established Stream track as far as Donald St. Very picturesque and a worthwhile addition to the Dunedin walking landscape. 5km along KV Road we turned into Ellis Park and had morning tea on the steps of the changing rooms.

Morning Tea

Morning Tea

The next section of the walk up Fraser’s Gully follows a vigorous and attractive Kaikorai Stream as it foams and musically cascades over weirs and rocks overhung by beautiful bush. The wide, well-gravelled track winds through stands of fuschia and broadleaf trees and under the occasional old totara, and slowly climbs to the road. The fog still wrapped the heights but warblers’ song penetrated. Very picturesque. You can tell that the writer has never been there before and really appreciated the opportunity! At the top we were still in a shroud of mist as we skirted the invisible reservoir at the Mt Grand Water Treatment Station.

Lunch in the mist

Lunch in the mist

Our lunch stop was roadside in an avenue of ‘grand’ old pines on Dalziel Rd. Bob sneaked a swing on the neighbouring property – he thought the owners wouldn’t detect him in the fog. Then on down Townleys Rd, at times quite steeply, the cool mist growing even cooler, until back to the start some 12km later. Thanks to Neil for not losing any of us (well, we did find Joyce again after not too long!) – Bob

18. 16/7/2008. Hikers. Frasers Gully from Townley Road. Easy+. Leaders: Neil, Ray.
17. 9/5/2007. Townley Road, Frasers Gully. Easy+. Leaders:

16. 10/1/2007. All. Frasers Gully far end, Dalziel Road. Easy+. Leaders: Lex, Bob H, Joyce, Eleanor B.
15. 19/4/2006. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Townley Road. Easy+. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Peter.
14. 9/3/2005 Mary M, Les W, Ray
13. 23/7/2003. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Townley Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris.
12. 31/7/2002. Alt. Frasers Gully – Townley Road. Leaders: Les W, Mary M.
11. 21/3/2002 Betty B, Denise
10. 19/9/2001. Alt. Frasers Gully. Leaders: Jean, Mavis, Denis.
9. 21/3/2001. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Leaders: Mavis, Betty, Denise
8. 28/6/2000 Frasers Gully – Brockville Road. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary L, Eleanor
7. 31/3/1999. Frasers Gully – Brockville Road. Leaders: Margaret D, Betty, Peg C.
27/5/1998. Frasers Gully, Brockville. Leaders: Les and Mavis.
6. 16/7/1997. Frasers Gully, Brockville. Leaders: Judith D, Denise, Jack M
5. 14/9/1994. Frasers Gully, Circle Hill, Southern Reservoir.Medium. Leaders: Eric and Dot, Peggy A, Chris.
4. 24/3/1993. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Return via Townley Road. Long, but easy. Leaders: Evelyn M, Wendy, Eric and Dorothy.
3. 11/9/1991. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Native Bush. Good views. Easy. Leaders: Margaret S, Bev H, Bev McI, Janice.
2. 28/3/1990. Brockville from Frasers Road. Interesting tramp. Leaders:  Nancy, Norman, Peg M
1. 24/5/1989 Fraser’s Gully into Brockville Road. Unusual views. Meet at Ellis Park sports ground. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, George

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Jun 20 2018

Taioma, Parera, Viaduct

No. 96 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Parera Taioma (Transrail & Wenita Year Round”

Wenita permit. Require 6 weeks notice, but less from us.

Taieri Gorge Railway. Phone 477 4449 for details.
13. 20/6/2018. Hikers. Wingatui Viaduct, Taioma. Leaders: Jenny, Shona.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Top of tunnel climb. A track washout stopped us getting very far down the other side. (Ian pic and caption.)

The tunnel we climbed over. (Ian pic and caption.)

lunching on a new breakout of portable seats. (Ian pic and caption.)

12. 12/4/2006. Hikers. Taioma, Viaduct, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Lesley G.
11. 5/10/2005. Both. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Doug J, Jacqui, Lesley G, Anne R
10. 1/9/2004. Both. Taioma, Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Molly

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

x

Lunch at Parera. Judy, Pat, Dorothy, Ria, George, Peter

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

9. 4/9/2002. Combined. Taioma, Wingatui Viaduct. Medium. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Wendy J.
8. 16/1/2002. Combined. Taioma – Parera. Medium. Leaders; Molly, Pat and Bill.
7. 8/11/2000. Taioma – Parera – Wingatui Viaduct. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Shirley McN.
6. 5/5/1999. Taioma – Parera – Viaduct. Leaders: George, Hazel, Ian.
5. 26/11/1997. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor, Ted.
4. 9/8/1995. Taioma. Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Bill and Lesley, Jack R.
3. 25/8/1993. Taioma, Viaduct to Parera, up the hill to Mount Allan Road and return. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Penny & Peter, Jack M
2. 14/10/1998. Hindon Railway Viaduct. Leaders: Hugh and Judith.
1. 20/4/1988 Taioma to Parera. Leaders: Bob H, Denise

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May 23 2018

Silverstream Water-Race, Racemans, Weir

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 40 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Silverstream Weir. Racemans. Winefields. Year Round”
No. 107 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Whare Flat – Silverstream Weir Year Round “
Origins and History of Racemans Water-race and Weir

19. 23/5/2018. Racemans to he Top Weir. Leader: Arthur.
Due to weather concerns we trmped up the Silverstream instead of the tramp on the programme.

It was raining lightly as we began our walk from the car ark by the Pump Shed.
The moisture desisted in a while, but skiffy showers passed over at times.

The “Hump” Track in from the Pump Shed was quite wet and muddy, and had slumped in one place on the stream bank.

From the swing bidge we climbed up to the Tunnel Track, and turned left. At the appropriate time (10 a.m.) we stopped trackside for smoko.

Around to McCraes Weir to climb the rope, and continued to eventually follow Racemans Track.

The tracks themselves were generally in good condition, although there were muddy patches at times with only one really bad patch to contend with.

We reached to top weir at 12-15,

At the weir – still very misty. (Margreet pic and caption.)

and after inspecting it, retreated a short distance to eat our sandwiches.

A half hour passed quickly, and then it was back down Racemans

River crossing. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Stopping for a catch up. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Ferns spectacular beside the track. (Margreet pic and caption.)

… to its beginning, taking the short route back. Over the swing bridge, and wading the ford (quite shallow) we were back at the cars around 2-45.

All had enjoyed the day’s tramp, which was of a reasonable distance – one member had been suffering “cabin fever”, but all were glad to have had their day out in the bush.

On returning to Mosgiel, 9 of the 12 who had been out adjourned for refreshments, as is the usual custom. – Art.

18. 3/9/2014. Both. Pump House to Weir. E+ Leaders: Judy, Ian.

Route

Route

(I took no pics. Photos please!) There were 30 of us out. We avoided the McRaes Weir track because some of the hikers can now no longer cope with the rope-assisted climb out of the McRae’s Stream.
From the pump house we took the track on the true left, thus avoiding the wetting of the road ford right at the start of the tramp. Of course this takes us steeply up and over and steeply down, but we all emerged safely by the swing bridge. The 4WD took us on beyond the old weir onto the board walk and up the seemingly never ending ascent of the Racemans track up to the levelness of the water race track itself where it emerges from the McRaes Track. We stopped for morning tea, letting seven of the trampers head off at their own pace to the upper weir.
Our remaining group of 23 took its time waiting out regroupings as we each negotiated wash-out bottlenecks on the way. The day was pleasant. The track otherwise level, pleasant and with varied aspects from bush to fallen tree clearances to slips.
But slips and washouts there were. Till finally an extremely muddy four metre boot-covering piece of slosh put most off from going any further. We were now only one kilometre short of the weir, so eight undaunted males slopped through and on to reach the weir. En route, they encountered the seven trampers returning to lunch back down the track with the remaining hikers. At the weir, Jim discovered Betty’s lunch was in his pack so we all accompanied him back to rendezvous with the others. Upon arrival, we found all had already lunched and were ready to move back. However Betty and Elaine elected to remain and enjoy a further leisurely lunch break, lolling in the lovely sunshine. …

“On the way back on Wednesday, we took the track that goes over to Powder creek, walked along past the entrance to Powder Ridge track, then back across the weir & onto the 4WD track again. This made a good detour, that some had not done before. The ladies got their feet wet, but the guys managed to stay dry.” – Ken
… Setting off again, we caught up with the hikers again at the swing bridge where it was obvious they intended returning via road and ford, the much easier if wetter alternative to the other route. And so back to the cars and some of the remaining trampers who were tied to hikers’ cars. A lovely day out. – Ian.

17. 23/1/2013. Trampers.
There were 4 of us today, we walked along the Tunnels/ Racemans track for 8km, had lunch at a nice spot, & then returned by the route that goes down to the weir just above the pump house, then back up onto the Tunnels track & back to the cars. so we did 14.3km in 3h 26m @ 4.2km/h. – Ken.
16. 9/5/2012. Trampers. Pump House to Weir. abt 15 km return.
A promised wet day nudged the three trampers who turned up at the car-park away from the scheduled Lawsons Farm to the Whare Flat tramps.
We parked at the Pump House, crossed the swing bridge and elected to do the loop track. This had been magnificently cleared.

Doug on cleared Loop Track

We passed the Powder Ridge track without being tempted to climb any part of it.

Sign

The end of the Loop Track led to a crossing of the Silverstream on some very slippery stones, followed by a long ascending track up to the Racemans.

Silverstream Crossing at end of Loop Track.

We passed the entrances to Coal Creek and Upper Coal tracks and on to somewhere short of the first of the two slips before the magnificent track-clearing gave way to a more usual narrow track. We reached the weir at 11.00 a.m., collected up an empty beer bottle, the only insult to the lovely surrounds and made our way back down the Racemans, stopping en route for lunch at noon.
The weather. There was no need for parkas at all! The intermittant very light drizzle was shrugged off by the sheltering bush.
We returned via McRaes Weir and further along took the straight steep track which emerges at the end of the board-walk of the lower track.
Back over the swing-bridge and we stopped to photo the new deer-fenced-off property on the north side of the Chalkies entrance.- Ian

New (to us) deer-fenced property. (The cross marks the grave of an obviously loved dog.)

Entrance to the house and buildings

15, 22/12/2010. Trampers. Tunnels to Weir. 3 with a visitor.
14. 4/10/2010 Recce. Tunnels to Weir. Ken, Ian.

GPS tracking of Tunnels to Weir, return, courtesy Ken.

We reconnoitred the Tunnels to Racemans, then on impulse, detoured up to the weir

Silverstream weir. (Ken pic)

before returning to complete the  round trip recce in preparation for the Hiker’s trip on the 6th. Turned out we did 18km in all. Whew!  Thanks to the DCC who had done a marvellous job of clearing the track almost all the way up to the weir. Also for a new track across the old slip. P.S. Les Murcott’s team had done a marvellous job with steps and rail around another large slip near the beginning of the Tunnels entrance up by the old school house.- Ian
14. 14/10/2009. Hikers. Whare Flat, Silverstream Weir. Medium. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn.
13. 8/10/2008. Hikers. Whare Flat, Racemans. Easy. Leaders: Neil, Tom
12. 19/10/2005 Leaders: Nancy, Eleanor B

11. 10/11/2004 Leaders: Bob H, Nancy

Group

The broken Silverstream Weir. Lance, Lois, Ann, Who? Dot B, Who? Pat, Bill, Sabina

10. 9/7/2003. Hikers. Racemans to Weir. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret.
9. 7/11/2001 Leaders: Bob H, Winifred, George
8. 10/10/2001. Racemans Track. Leaders: Ray and Diana, Les W.
7. 17/11/1999. Whare Flat, Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Margaret D, Judy C, Eleanor.
6. 25/11/1998. Silverstream, Weir – Racemans. Leaders: Peg C, Judy C, Eleanor.
5. 13/5/1998. Whare Flat to Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Judy , Eleanor.
4. 12/2/1997. Whare Flat to Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Evelyn M, Jack and Rosemary.
3. 31/7/1996. Whare Flat Water-Race. Silverstream. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Eleanor, Betty B.
2. 22/11/1995. Whare Flat – Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Margaret D, Colleen, Evelyn M.
1. 22/7/1992 Silverstream Weir from the Pumphouse. Two parties – Easy or average+. Leaders: Margaret S, Ivan & Bev, Nel

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May 23 2018

St Clair Beach Walks

Published by under Beach,Year round

14. 23/5/2014. Hikers. St Clair street walk. E-M. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

A small group of around 14 hikers left the carpark in the rain bound for St Clair. It was raining hard on the motorway and it looked like it was going to be a trip into St Clair for a coffee only. However, the rain stopped when we arrived at St Clair beach where we parked our cars!

We then walked around a couple of streets to admire some lovely old homes along the way. We walked back onto Forbury Road for a couple of blocks before ascending the steps beside Frances Hodgkins Village where we stopped for morning tea on a small reserve – some sitting on the steps (in the sunshine I might add) and Bev was able to point out her new abode.

We continued up the steps after the morning tea break onto Easter Crescent and upwards to Middleton Road, turning left past the golf course and onto the reserve at the end of the new subdivision to view the cliffs

Noi pic.

on one side of the ocean and could only catch a glimpse of Cargills Castle

Jan pic.

to our left as a new house was being erected. We did a small circuit around the subdivision and then on down the hill back to St Clair beach where we ate our lunch on the steps and bench seats watching the waves crashing in. As it was a cold day we decided to finish our walk and headed back out to Mosgiel for a coffee etc at Blend to warm ourselves up. Our walk being 9ks approx.

Jan, Jay & Jenny

13. 30/4/2014. Hikers. St Clair – St Kilda. Easy. Leaders: Liz and Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route

This reporter was new to this particular hike and was most impressed with the clever planning of a satisfying route. 35 of us set out from our cars parked in Albert St, St Clair. We walked up it to turn right into Beach St, left into Sandringham St and right into Norfolk St to reach the foot of Jacobs Ladder. How many steps? 250? Well, MANY! And relentlessly steep as well (a red spot on the map, at abt 500 mtrs indicates our slower progress. We all eventually made it up to Ravenswood Rd where we had to negotiate a multi-holed footpath being prepared for broadband fibreglass cable. The views of suburb, beach and sea were rewarding. We carried on down, (1 km mark) crossed to briefly climb Cliffs Rd alongside its steep roadside banks and interesting variety of houses to finally emerge at its end by the beachfront and to turn (2 km) via Second Beach Rd (where did that name come from??) to morning-tea at its track’s end, in lovely sunshine.
Cuppa

Morning tea at Second Beach (John pic)

Back to St Clair (3 km) beach, or rather the sandhills track above it, before descending to walk along St Kilda beach (4, 5 & 6 kms) to its terminus at Lawyers Head, where we lunched.
Lunch

Lunch at end of St Kilda Beach.

After lunch, we struggled up a soft sandhill track nearby to reach the road above.
View from Lunch

Panorama of view from John Wilson Drive immediately above lunch stop (John – from 4 [slightly obvious!] pics)

We returned along the drive. (7 & 8 [hidden behind ‘5] kms) …
Race Course

Panorama of Forbury Race Course from John Wilson Drive. (John pic)

… to re-group at the St Kilda children’s playground. From there we climbed up to Kettle Park Road to descend again to cross Kettle Park behind the impressively large rear of the indoor Ice Rink. We turned down Moana Rua Rd, crossed Victoria Road to go down Moreau St (was it?) (9 km) to turn left into Richardson St (was it?) (10 km) and make our way back to cross Forbury Road and reach Albert St again. 10.5 km all told. Not too bad.
Then, under Elaine’s bad growing influence, a large number of us resorted to the Salt Cafe for the customary leisurely and companionable coffee or what have you before returning to the cars. Thanks, Liz and Dawn. You done good. – Ian.
12. 9/5/2012. Hikers. St Clair beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Betty and Jim.
11. 27/7/2011. Hikers. St Clair. John Wilson Drive  Lawyers Head and Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
10. 24/3/2010. Hikers. St Clair. Beach Walk. Lawyers Head. Easy. Leaders: Elaine and Jean.
9. 29/7/2009. Hikers. St Clair. Beach Walk. Lawyers Head. Easy. Leaders: Les and Margaret
8. 28/1/2009. St Clair Beach Walk. Leaders: Lance and Lois
7. 11/10/2006. St Clair – Lawyers Head beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Jim and Thelma
6. 31/8/2005. Hikers. St Clair: beach walk to Tomahawk/Lawyers Head Leaders: Chris, Jean.
5. 23/8/2000. St Clair – Tomahawk – Smaills Beach. Leaders:  Betty B, Eleanor B, Evelyn M
4. 5/4/2000 St Clair – Kew. Street walk Leaders: Colleen, Bev H
3. 12/5/1999. St Clair: beach walk to Tomahawk/Lawyers Head Leaders: Daphne, Margaret, Betty
2. 12/3/1997. St. Clair to Tomahawk Beach. Leaders: Denise, Margaret D, Jean.
1. 15/11/1995. Beach Walk – St Clair to Tomahawk. Leaders: Peg A, Peggy M.

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May 16 2018

Daphne/Margaret Road, Kathleen Road

Wenita permit.
Distance from car park: 21 km.

13. 16/5/2018. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Jim and Betty.

pine needle carpeted walk into the forest. (Clive pic and caption.)

On the way to the top. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch on Big Stone Rd. (Phil pic and caption.)

Homeward bound along Big Stone Road. (Clive pic and caption.)

Conditions were a pleasant cool day for the hike in the Allanton Block of Wenita Forrest south of Brighton. The majority of 22 hikers stopped off at the Brighton Cafe for refreshments on the return trip to Mosgiel.

It was a successful late change to the planned hike.

Betty & Jim

12. 17/6/2015. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Liz and Dot.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce. 12.2 km. [N.B. Bruce has commented on the interesting difference between the 2012 (q.v. below) and 2015 Google maps. – Ed.]

The Google map for yesterday was taken in 2015 and was a little different from that from Ken’s report in 2012 with imagery taken on 17 Sept 2011.

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers, courtesy Ian.

About twenty Hikers did the now more customary route of climbing the Daphne Road’s gentler but longer route and descending by Kathleen Roads shorter but steeper. We morning-teaed in the sunny spot at the foot of Daphne Road where the Club has always stopped, and lunched …

Lunch on a sunny level.

Lunch on a sunny level. (Looking back along the road).(Ian pic and caption.)

… on a level stretch of the road, but still some distance from the top. Older members, presumably familiar with the route found they had failed to recollect the many gully dips on the road. They also appreciatively noticed the rubbish collection by the top gate had been cleared. …W-e-l-l perhaps not all!

Made for each other.

Made for each other. (Ian pic and caption.)

Reaching the top of Kathleen  Road, a substantial number struggled around and under the closed and apparently locked gate before Les noticed that it was not locked at all. … Sigh.

It was yet another good-weather Wednesday, tempting some to to wonder whether a Higher Power must look after the Club. (Well, it was colder on Tuesday and Thursday promised snow.) Admittedly a cold breeze had driven us into woollen hat and gloves when we emerged from our cars, but this eased in the shelter of the forest and in the patches of sun the trees permitted us from time to time. It was a great Winter’s day tramp and a great location – a metalled road rather than a sloshy paddock or slippery track. (Pity the poor trampers! – see their report.)

Mention must be made of the occasional great views of the coast and down gullies that we stopped to enjoy from time to time.

A misty vista in the 'dista'

A misty vista in the ‘dista’, looking up the coast from Kathleen Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

It was further remarked that tramps like this get us to see the other sides of properties that mere car travellers never get to appreciate.

So, thank you leaders, for a well-reconnoitered and led tramp. We were well looked after, with thoughtful stops for regrouping. – Ian.

11. 13/2/2013. Hikers. McLeods Farm. Leaders: Wendy and Peter.
10. 22/8/2012. Trampers. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We did 11.7 km at 4.7 km/h.

9. 4/7/2012. Both. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km. Leaders: George, Lex.

Morning Tea at bottom of Daphne climb. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at the top of Daphne where joins Big Stone

8. 6/8/2008. Both. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot M, Chris.
7. 15/3/2006. Hikers. Margaret Road, McLeods Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Dot T
6. 29/6/2005. Hikers. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. (Brighton). Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
5. 25/7/2001. Alt. Margaret Road, Katherine Road, Kuri Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Chris H
4. 18/2/1998.
3. 14/5/1997. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road via McLeods to Coast Road. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, George. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road to McLeods. Leaders: Ray and Diana.
2. 10/7/1996. Margaret Road, Big Stone Road, McLeods. Average. Leaders: Graham, Eric and Dot.
1. 30/11/1994 Margaret Road, Wenita Forestry, Big Stone Road. Medium. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Joan H, George
 
 
 

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May 02 2018

Taieri Ferry and Finlayson Roads, Bells farm, Kennedys, Millennium.

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Read “Taieri River Geology” for some background information.
“Legends of the Lower Taieri” includes a section about John Bull if you persist in reading down far enough.

Wardells’ White House 25 km from car park.

13. 2/5/2018. Both. Millennium Track. Leader: Eleanor.

Trampers: Millennium/John Bull Tracks. M.

38 fit looking Trampers/Hikers and Ramblers  assembled at the car park for the combined tramp along to John Bull Gully and Taieri Mouth.  The day was calm and mild (after a lot of rain over the weekend).  On arrival at the White House at roads end, quite a lot of jostling of cars was necessary for the drivers to find a spot to park.

All of us set off along the very brown looking river bank for a short walk into the Picnic spot

Morning smoko. (Gordon pic and caption.)

where we had smoko.  The 25 Hikers were going onto John Bull Gully and the 13 Trampers were heading to Taieri Mouth and back.

We set off at 10:15 am  and after a short climb, the track levelled and wound along the bush covered banks of the river.  We then crossed a small spur which is where the 2 tracks meet.  After climbing into a gully with large tree ferns, the track emerged at the high point, with a welcome seat

½ way. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and good views.

View from the top. (Phil pic and caption.)

2 of our party were quite happy to sit and chat, so enjoyed the sun waiting 2 hours for our return.  Along the next section the native bush is slowly overtaking the gorse.  Another climb around Governors Point, where we got great views up and down the gorge.  By now it is downhill to the board walk across Muddy Gully, then finally the welcome sight of the bridge …

Nearly there. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and cribs come into view.

An enjoyable lunch and catchup was had at the picnic tables.

Cafe Taieri Mouth. (Phil pic and caption.)

A Kingfisher was spotted on the power lines near Jay’s crib.

Half an hour later we headed off back the way we came.   Was surprising the track was so dry, considering recent rain.  Quite a lot of bird song heard, also, a little Robin was spotted.

We walked 18.6 km’s.  Similar times of 2 1/4 hours each way.  Was a first for some trampers to do the return trip.  Followed by a very welcome hot drink at Wal’s @ 4pm by a few of us.  Ending a great tramp with great company. – Eleanore

Hikers. Millennium Track. E. Sub-Group Leaders: Bob, Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Supplementary Report. From the Picnic Spot, 22 Hikers, leaving 3 Ramblers behind to plan their own trip, eventually stirred themselves to trace the Trampers’ steps up to the regular winding-down-in (to gullies) and up-out (around ridges) Millennium Track to John Bull Gully

Ian explains about the old track out of John Bull Gully. (Clive pic and caption.)

– for an early lunch there, overflowing the two  eight-seater picnic tables in the process.

Shortly after our arrival, an informal small sub-group from among the Otago Tramping and Mountaineering Club, whom we had earlier met at the car park arrived, full of praise for our website which they regularly used for excursion ideas. They found their own spot seated among some obliging rocks.

The sun shone, the slight wind dropped, we leisured,

We leisured. (Ian pic and caption.)

and eventually stirred, to make our way back to the car park, there to find the Ramblers happily sunning themselves by the river.

We can echo the Trampers’ report on the state of the track. How surprisingly dry it was {mostly} and how wide and well kept too. A pity the occasional thoughtfully placed resting seat along its way has been denied its  river view by the relentlessly growing native bush.

A pleasant fulfilling walk topped off …

Relaxing coffee chat. (Ian pic and caption.)

… with a relaxing coffee chat. – Ian.

12. 23/8/2017.Trampers. Millennium Track, Kennedys, Bells. M. Leader: Arthur.

Galloway Road tracks map. (Map courtesy Arthur.)

Only 8 trampers were out today to enjoy the good weather and the  tramp. The Taieri Ferry Bridge was closed for ongoing (all winter, so far) repairs, so we travelled to the south end of the flood free highway before turning back onto Taieri Ferry Road.

Parking at the usual parking area, it was 10 am as we began walking. The low lying bits of the track were quite wet and muddy, as expected.

Looking at the damage from the rain. (Helen pic and caption.)

After 15 minutes we came to the picnic area on the riverbank for our smoko stop. It was about low tide and the river was very low.

Following the Millennium Track again, a side trip to the river was made at John Bull Gully where two DOC workers were cutting the grass around the picnic area. They had arrived by boat, which was sensible.

At John Bull gully where some maintenance was being done. They traveled by boat. (Helen pic and caption.)

From John Bull Gully it is rather a good uphill grunt for some way, but eventually the highest point of the track was gained – a 5 minute stop being taken here at the observation seat to admire the views.

View from the seat. Magic. (Helen pic and caption.)

We turned off the Millennium Track now, uphill beside the gorse, and then through the pine trees to reach the end of the deer fenced lane on the Kennedy Farm. It was up slope all the way but the lane took us up to Finlayson Road. It was 12.30 pm now, so was time for the lunch stop. High cloud was making the sunshine a bit weak, but with almost no breeze, so it was a pleasant, high up spot for the occasion.

We had to follow Finlayson Road towards Waihola before turning onto Galloway Road and followed it down to its end. We were high up here giving us very good views to enjoy.

The last leg was down through a recent logged forestry block.

Down through the felled forestry and lots of sticky mud. (Helen pic and caption.)

The going was good at first, but further down a digger rowing up the “slash” had left the dozed dirt track in rather a mess. But by taking care we negotiated this area safely. It was about 200 metres down through the standing pine trees to get to the bottom, where we emerged back at the carpark.

Today’s tramp was 12.7 km, and all were happy. On returning to Mosgiel THE BLEND coffee shop enjoyed our patronage.

It had been another good day’s social tramp for our group. Thanks to all. – Art.

11. 23/7/2014. Trampers. Millennium Track, Kennedys, Bells.

GPS

GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 13.4 km; moving ave 4.5 km/hr; moving time 2 hr 44 min; climbed 530 m.

Ignore the missing piece of track on the Google Earth view, as I forgot to reset the GPS before we started off.
With the day looking promising weather wise, 4 set off to walk the Millennium Track from Henley , then up through Kennedys property, & back down one of the ridges onto the river road again. We stopped at the Taieri Scenic Reserve picnic table for morning tea, & then went on to John Bull Gully, where we had a short rest before tackling the steep climb up to the seat on the John Bull track, & over the fence behind here to walk up past Kennedys house & onto Finlayson Rd. where we stopped for lunch in the shelter of some flax bushes.

Neil enjoying his cuppa at lunchtime.

Neil enjoying his cuppa at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

Arthur and Ian at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

Arthur and Ian at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

It was then a short walk along to the turn off onto Galloway Rd. We walked the full length of Galloway Rd. & climbed the fence into a very wet & sloppy grassed paddock, which was quite steep in places, but luckily nobody fell over. All this area was new to everybody on the tramp, so it was a case of following our instincts to find the way back to the cars, which was accomplished without any trouble.

10. 11/7/2012. Millennium, John Bull, Kennedy’s Farm, Finlayson Road, Galloway Road, Bell’s Farm ridge, Ferry Road. 12 km.

Kms indications 1 & 2 are Millennium, 3-4 is thru John Bull Gully, 5 is up Kennedys Farm, 6 is Finalyson Rd turning off into Galloway Rd, 7-10 is down ridge, 10 to end  is Ferry Road. (Phone died before completing circui!)

Seven of us enjoyed a good winter tramp, warm in the sun and calm, even on the top. Went down the same ridge on Bells Farm that we did last time. Note: the way to find it (better than last time!) is to turn down 4WD track adjacent to a large corrugated shed part-way down Galloway Rd before the road swings away over to the right. The track skirts the top of a gully before emerging onto the ridge. Then just follow your nose down.
We elected to do this ridge rather than the even better one at the end of Galloway road as the leasee had reported he was running bulls in a paddock near the bottom of the ridge! – Ian

9. 17/6/2009 Trampers Taieri Ferry Road, Millennium, Kennedys, Finlayson Road, Bells Farm. Leaders: George, Bill M
It was only at the carpark that we were sure that frosty road conditions were going to turn out safe enough for setting out. Four of us in Bill’s car met George at Wardells cottage. George had planned a clockwise walk this time, starting on the Millennium Track. We stopped off soon at the track turn-off to the river for morning tea.
Cuppa on Millenniu. Lex, George, Bill

Cuppa on Millennium. Doug, Lex, George, Bill

Snow on the track was more obvious as we ascended to the seat on the John Bull where we planned to turn off up to Kennedys farm.

Pause at seat on John Bull. Bill, George, Doug, Lex.

Pause at seat on John Bull. Bill, George, Doug.

As we got up near the house snow (and a chilly breeze) was at its thickest.

Snow thicker here. Doug.

Snow thicker here. Doug, George, Lex, Bill.

At this point George had already determined to ask at the house where we might lunch in a bit of shelter. “Boots off and come inside!” was the response, providing a lunch stop in the most civilised of surroundings.
A long time after, we (reluctantly?) resumed the tramp. Snow had been graded off Finlayson Road and only semi-melted slush was left. We turned down Galloway Road, but had gone only a short distance before George decided it was time to turn off to to descend a ridge. After descending the ridge for a considerable distance we were bushed out by heavy scrub and had to return up far enough to try another next-door ridge. This gave clear access to the marshy flats below.

Going down farm ridge.

Returning down farm ridge. Doug, Lex, Bill, George.

Matters got a little dodgy at the ridge’s base but we soon got onto a squelchy paddock yielding to a less squelchy track that led out alongside a drain to Ferry Road.
A final walk along the road back down to the cars ended a most enjoyable walk out on the snow.
I now realise there are at least three navigable ridges between Finlayson and Ferry Roads, although George seems to have done them all some time in the past. There was the one we did 7 years ago, the one we did today and a further one from the foot of Galloway Road that Bill recalled Mr Kennedy advising we take but which George must have failed to pick up on. – Ian.

7. 12/4/2006. Trampers. Henley, Waihola Road, Millennium Track. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Dot B.
6. 12/1/2005. Trampers. Wardells, Waihola Road, Millennium Track. Leaders: George, Bob H.
5. 31/7/2002 Taieri Ferry to Waihola Road and Bells farm. Kennedys, Millennium. Bell Farm. Seek permission. Lambing Aug to Oct. Cars park halfway down Taieri Ferry Road, end of forest. Up hill till lunch time. Wenita permit.  Wenita Map. Leaders: George, Bob H, Colleen
4. 13/11/1996. Henley Ferry to Waihola Road and return. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Bev McI.
3. 21/8/1996. Taieri Ferry to Waihola Road and Bell’s Farm. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Bev McI
2. 15/3/1995. Between Galloway Road and Waihola Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Margaret and Les.
1. 6 Apr 1994 John Bull track, over paddock to Finlayson Road, back on John Bull Track. Leaders: Les S, Bill H, Doug & Ngaire.

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Apr 18 2018

Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream

No. 89 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Outram Glen – Lee Stream Year Round”

11. 18/4/2018. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. H. Leaders: Clive and Jim.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to switch app on only at morning tea stop, so total distance more like 9 km.

26 Hikers and Ramblers set out from Outram Glen scenic reserve alongside the Taieri River to Lee Stream.   This was our first visit since the storm last year caused a lot of damage to the track and trail.   Repairs are on going, apparent from the pile of gravel on the track and washouts still to be repaired on the trail.   Several trees still block the trail.

We arrived at the end of the track about 10.15am and had morning tea on the rock strewn beach beside the river.

Morning tea at the end of the track. (Clive pic and caption.)

Several ramblers and a couple of the hikers then turned back to the start.   An intrepid 19 hikers continued over the trail, followed by fantails and tom tits to Lee Stream.   There seemed to be more hills to climb and they seemed steeper.   Maybe that’s an age thing!

Arriving at Lee Stream around lunch time we picked spots out of the wind to have lunch.

Lunch at Lee Stream – not quite there. (Clive pic and caption.)

It was pointed out by a senior hiker that we hadn’t actually reached Lee Stream and should continue to the stream.   Walking a further 100 meters got us there. (see photo)

Lee Stream. (Clive pic and caption.

Lunch of others at Lee Stream. (Ian panorama pic and caption.)

The return journey took longer than normal and unfortunately one member suffered a wound to her calf muscle on a broken bush stump whilst trying to cross a washout.

A tired crew arrived back at the carpark after 3.30pm.   It was intended to visit a local coffee shop, but when we got there it was closing,.so 2 cups of coffee next time!  Happy Tramping.  – Clive

10. 9/11/2006. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jennifer and Dorothy S.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Total elevation of 433m the product of  ALL the UPS on the track, – the by-product of all the downs!

Morning tea by the Taieri. (Ian pic and caption.)

Morning tea by the Taieri. Threatening rain cautioned some to don parkas but there were hot sunny periods in the day as well.  (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream “beach” at the confluence of the stream with the Taieri River. (Ian pic and caption.)

9. 10/8/2016. Hikers. Outram, Historical Park and Museum, Outram Glen. E. Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Nike GPS Route Map

Nike GPS Route Map

A good frost today but lovely and sunny for our hike around Outram

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

which was varied with a visit to the Museum,

Museum

Waiting in the sun outside the Museum to regroup.

Vintage Park and then onto the Glen track.

Wheelbarrow

Standing aside to allow a motorised tracked wheelbarrow returning empty from delivering gravel to resurface the track. A sunny spot. (Liz pic.)

Frost (Liz pic.)

And a shaded spot. Frost. (Liz pic.)

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point.

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point of the Outram Glen – Lee Stream Track.

We numbered 25 and finished off with the Local Coffee Shop.
It was a wee bit different owing to the unknown conditions from the nasty weather three days earlier but as usual the company was good and we achieved our goals thanks to everybody. – Liz and Alex.

8. 26/3/2014. Hikers. Taieri Musem, Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of track to Lee Stream

GPS of track to Lee Stream

We were met with a surprise variation to simply walking the Outram Glen track. The leaders took us first up to the Taieri Historical Museum via an interesting side track shortly up the George King Memorial Drive by the bridge over Traquair/Whare Creek. We were seduced by the machinery museum building at the top of the property with its wonderful variety of early Taieri farming implements. They found it hard to drag us away.
We made our way down the driveway this time, and past a surprising number of cars to the track beginning. Time had passed so the leaders made our cuppa stop at the crest of the track’s large rise just past the entrance and in a nice sunny spot.
Then on we went till we reached the great set of steps that took us up from the river side to the high undulating bush track, or more officially, ‘route’. From the top of the steps on to the end of the route was a long series of regrouping pauses, where the more able waited for the less able to catch up. But get to the end we did.
A note to the side: On our way to the start of the track, we noticed Bob’s ute had joined our parked cars while we were up at the Museum. Some knew that he did have a prior commitment and must have presumed he would have caught up with us somewhere on the track but knew nothing of the leaders’ plan to visit the museum first. Eventually we did meet him, towards the end of the track, returning. It was all just too sad a misunderstanding.
We discovered the reason for the group of cars at the start when we reached the end. By the Lee Stream mouth was a large group of young St Mary’s School pupils being instructed on safety measures pertaining to launching inflatable rafts drawn up nearby.

Launching

Launching the rafts

There were eight rafts in all, four setting out at a time to practise the art of paddling in the stiller waters upstream before heading off down over the first set of rapids below.
Afloat

The paddling rehearsal before negotiating the first rapids

By this time we had finished our lunch and just prior to entering the bush track again, were surprised again to see the rafts anchored against a cliff on the opposite side of the river, and each pupil being required to leap off a ledge in the cliff into the water, resurface, and to drift with their life jackets down to and be helped back into their rafts immediately downstream. They did this wonderfully, some choosing a yet higher ledge to leap from. Bravo.
We seemed to make much faster return time down the track than when earlier coming up, and were regaled from time to time by excited shouts and screams below us as the rafters made their way downriver.
As we neared the end, it was just a case of now of negotiating the rise at whose summit we had earlier in the day had our cuppa, (it’s steeper and more laborious on the up-track side of the rise and this reporter, at the tired end of the tramp, hates it) and we were back at the cars and en route to home.
Thanks to Betty and Jim for their imaginative planning of the day and careful looking after us. – Ian.
7. 5/10/2011. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Leader: George.
Lambing got in the way of the programmed Lee Stream ramble. The Outram Glen walk was a most successful replacement. 20 of us went. The first bit’s nice and flat in general. We stopped early for morning tea by the river. A cold wind drove us back up to shelter in the approach track.

Down-track view.

Up-track view.

Beyond the sign indicating the more difficult part of the track was the (never less) challenging (never-ending as well) set of steps. They are now well-worn but still very serviceable. We all made the ascent at our individual rates of speed. Beyond that, the various ups and downs are still well serviced by the sets of stone steps. They have stood the test of time and are firmly embedded. Well made. We all made our way to the Lee Stream confluence with the Taieri, some arriving earlier, others later. Again an early lunch enjoyed with the warmth of sun and calm, and cooler bits of  breeze. But still comfortable enough.

Some of us at lunch.

The confluence of the two streams at lunchtime.

Again, we wandered back each at our own pace. A pleasant day, sheltered by bush from the coolish wind. – Ian
6. 3/9/2008. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Easy. Leaders: Evelyn and Bob.

Nineteen of us walked the riverwalk from Outram Glen to Lee Stream. The weather was threatening but we had just a little rain, and with no wind and a mild temperature it was an enjoyable 12 kilometre expedition. Many of us had not seen the Taieri River so brown and surging for a long time.
The track in the upper reaches was quite slippery so we needed to watch our feet. Some birdsong from bellbird and fantail was appreciated as was the presence of wood pigeons. We had lunch at Lee Stream where a number could remember past picnics beneath willow trees.
Congratulations to Evelyn and Bob for leading the group. Evelyn did a stalwart job in trying to keep the group together, trying to both race ahead to hold back the fast movers and take care to see the rear guard were still with us. She even managed to end up with one more tramper at the finish than she had at the start. Well done Evelyn!
Bob provided us with some drama by taking a tumble. However he bounced back and even did it again to keep the medics on their toes. He finished the tramp in fine fettle and good humour, leading the bulk of the group on the homeward stretch. We hope the scratches and bruises do not cause too much discomfort.
George celebrated his 80th birthday and first great grandchild by handing out beautiful chocolates to all.
Altogether it was a satisfying day with a return to home base before the southerly caught up with us. – Marjorie

5. 6/6/2007 Ian, Doug M, Eleanor B, Joyce S

4. 3/5/2006. Both. Outram Glen. Leaders: Ian, Doug, Les & Margaret S, Bev H
3. 9/2/2005. Both. Outram Glen. Leader: Nancy
2. 19/8/1998. Outram Bridge, Taieri Gorge. Leaders: Nelson and Dot.
1. 25/3/1992. Outram Bridge – Taieri Gorge. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Doreen, Molly

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Feb 28 2018

McNally Walkway

No. 83 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “McNally Track, Milton. Year Round”

44 km from car-park.
Access: Milton M 91km ret. Opposite Presbyterian Church, turn left at Ossian Street and follow on down Moore and Tokoiti Streets to Cemetery near which is the entrance to the McNally Walkway. Park cars by the side of the road.

Combined potential.

16. 28/2/2018. Hikers. McNally Walkway. M. Leaders: Bob and Lesley.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

This was the walk up the hill we were all expecting it was the other three that were unexpected! (Clive pic and caption.)

The high point conquered by Ian. (Clive pic and caption.)

Paradise revisited. – Milton. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch at the the trig point with views to the Blue Mountains

 

15. 4/5/2016. Both. McNally Walkway. Leaders: Jennifer, Dawn.

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Lunch. (Margreet pic)

Lunch. (Margreet pic)

Margreet pic.

Sign. (Margreet pic)

Cold drinks at Waihola. (Helen pic and caption)

Cold drinks at Waihola. (Helen pic and caption)

14. 14/5/2014. Trampers. McNally Walkway.

GPS of McNally Walkway, courtesy Ken. We walked about 8 1/2 km. Climbed 476 mtrs. – Ken.

Wednesday morning, we burst out of the Taieri Valley mist into sunshine about 4 kms north of Milton and headed to the hills that lie between the coast and Milton cemetery.

McNally Track (which opened in 1980) took us up along the fence-line past the sheep, and further up past orange guide poles and over stiles to a well-placed seat, offering a panoramic view across Milton (and morning tea).  Continuing upwards we had the choice of a native bush track or ‘open’ track and opted for the former which presented some mud slipping and sliding.  None of this mattered, as through this part the birds’ songs rang through the trees; just beautiful.

Further on and up to the trig and sun-dial where at the top there was an awesome 360 degrees view which encouraged us to a further amble around the area and lunch under cover of the haybarn.

Lunch at the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

En route, a couple of us slipped and brought mud back to the car in places other than our boots….. but while parts of this track tested our lung capacity, the varied nature of the well-kept track made it a very pleasant tramp of Medium level, taking about two to 2 1/2 hours’ walking time. – Neil & Carol

12. 8/2/2012. Trampers. McNally Walkway.

Morning Tea on McNally Track. (Ken pic and caption)

Milton from morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop and view from the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

The plane table at the lookout at the top of the hill.

11.3/12/2008. McNally Walkway. Leaders: George, Dot B, Glenis

There had been no recce as of course it was a track well-remembered by many of us – not. Memories fade as we age. We started off well, climbing steeply through a couple of paddocks to morning tea on a steep slope with good views.

Our President's big strides

Our President’s big strides

A little further up, we were faced with a choice of direction around the top loop. We chose “main track” rather than “loop”, which resulted in us travelling anti-clockwise. Later on, on crossing a styled fence into bush, we found a track sign arrowed only backwards! What to do? Thinking the bush track must wrong for us, we came back out and pushed further up on open grass. But when we eventually reached the crest of the slope,

A breather stop

A breather stop

we were able to pick out some yellow track-poles a long way down on our left that indicating where that bush track emerged from the bush again. Ah well… So it was all the way down to rejoin the track in order to then climb back up on the other side of the gully to eventually reach the lookout and our lunch stop.
There was a great view. Signposts there helped clarify matters a bit, so with more enlightenment, and renewed confidence, we continued on our anti-clockwise loop, bravely ignoring now, any reverse-indicating arrows, and so arrived back at the loop’s stem.
There were 19 of us, and there was plenty of time so were able to unhurriedly manage the many steep bits. The weather was fine and it was good being all together. – Ian.

10. 8/9/2004. Both. McNally Track. Medium. Jim & Thelma, Evelyn C, Lance, Ria L

Lower McNally Walkway.

Lower McNally Walkway. Overlooking Milton. Recognizable in foreground: Helen, Evelyn, Lex.

9. 1/5/2002 Combined. McNallys Track. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Colleen, Ria L
8. 27/2/2002. Alt. McNallys Track, Milton. Medium. Leaders: Les W, Ray and Diana.
7. 12/7/2000 McNallys – Track. Milton. Leaders: Peggy M, Denise, Evelyn M
6. 21/7/1999. McNally Track, Milton. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Doug J.
5. 10/9/1997. McNally’s Track, Milton. Leaders: Ray and Diana, Peggy M.
4. 26/2/1997. McNeilly Track. Leaders: Betty B, Mary Y
3. 13/3/1996. McNally Track. Leaders: Ivan and Bev, Doreen.
2. 22/3/1995 McNally Track. Easy. Leaders: Daphne, Peg C, Peggy M, Joan H
1. 15/7/1992 McNally Track. Milton. Easy. Leaders: Nancy, Peg C, Jack & Rosemary

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Feb 14 2018

Cleghorn St, Signal Hill tramps

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Distance Chingford from carpark: 20 km.
Follow Old Main North Road to Cleghorn Street which has the best view of the harbour. Walkway sign.
Walk starts starts at the gate on right, up McGregors Hill. Beyond stile Pine plantation on 3rd stile at summit.
Gravel road 10 minutes to end. Locked gate. Last stile. Signal Hill road.
15. 14/2/2018. Hikers. Cleghorn Street to Normanby Pub via Signal Hill and Centennial Memorial. M. Leaders: Pam and Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Clive pic.

Clive pic.

14. 14/8/2013. Hikers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip. M. Leaders: Lex and Graham.
We parked near Chingford Park and walked up the hill on the Mt Cargill Rd to the turn-off to Signal Hill.  Morning tea on the side of the road about halfway up.  It was blowing a gale and pretty cold but with everyone rugged up well there were no dramas.  Margaret and Les chose to turn back – it was hard going and I don’t blame them!
Elaine in bath. (Judy pic).

Elaine enjoying bath. (Judy pic).

 Lunch in the shelter of the trees near the top …
Lunch. (Judy pic)

Lunch break. (Judy pic)

… then across to the masts, and down to the road.  135 steps on the steep descent and a few stiff knees. – Judy
13. 29/6/2011. Trampers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken

We enjoyed the harbour view as we walked along the rather wet and muddy 4WD track after leaving Cleghorn Street.

The view down the harbour was wonderful

With younger members among the trampers now, we are making a faster pace than formerly and reached the ‘signals’ on Signal Hill a bit half an hour earlier than lunch time, so decided to carry on. We found a sunny calm spot on the Signal Hill Road side to enjoy lunch.

Lunch on Signal Hill roadside

12. 8/7/2009 Trampers Chingford Park, North Road, Cleghorn Street, McGregors Hill, Signal Hill, Signal Hill Road round trip. Medium. Leaders: Pat & Bill
Start

First view of harbour and Peninsula. Bill, Pat, Wendy, Ken.

 

St Leonards

St Leonards below.

Charles Cone

Mount Charles and Harbour Cone on Peninsula

Heads

Roseneath, Port Chalmers and Heads

Lunch

Lunch at top of hill. Doug, Arthur, Wendy, Ian, Pat, Bill. (Ken pic)

Dunedin

Down from Signal Hill with Dunedin beyond. Wendy, Ken, Arthur, Pat.

11. 13/5/2009 Hikers. Signal Hill, Cleghorn St. Leaders: Bev H, Joyce

10. 20/7/2005. Trampers. Cleghorn St, Signal Hill.
Harbour view. "Hi Shirley". Bob, Pat, Who?

Harbour view. “Hi Shirley”. Bob, Pat, Dot.

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

9. 14/8/2002 Logan Park High School, Signal Hill, Cleghorn St, NEV Road. Leaders: Molly, Hazel, Barbara McC
8. 22/5/2002. Alt. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Betty, Colleen.
7. 24/1/2001. Normanby, Signal Hill, Opoho. Leaders: Lance and Lois, Shirley R.
6. 16/8/2000 Bethunes Gully, Opoho. Leaders: Jack & Rosemary, Shirley R.
5. 26/4/2000. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Denise.
4. 24/1/2000 Chingford Park, Old Brown House, Signal Hill, Opoho, Leaders: Lance & Lois, Peter R
3. 22/4/1998. Chingford Park, Brown House, Signal Hill. Leaders: Shirley McN, Shirley R.
2. 16/6/1993. Bethunes Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Round Trip. Easy. Leaders: Shirley, Doreen, Diana, Nel.
1. 1/7/1992. Bethune’s Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Marie, June, Ray.

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Jan 17 2018

Post Office Creek, Reid’s Station

Published by under Trampers,Year round

 No. 27 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mahinerangi – Post Office Creek. J Shaw. Year round.”
Impassable gorse-infestation beyond old Waipori School building (aft 2008).
33 km from car park..
15. 17/1/2018. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Leader: Jill.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

13 trampers met at Reid’s woolshed on Mahinerangi Road.  We walked down the hill to Post Office creek, and had morning tea at the “camp” before taking the track through gold mine sluicings to the top end of Lake Mahinerangi – a very low lake today!  After viewing the old Waipori school (which had been moved to this site to use as a musterer’s hut before Waipori village was drowned) …

School inspection. The “old” Waipori School moved to Post Office Creek before the raising  of Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

… we backtracked about 1 km and shortly after went up a very steep stock lane …

Onwards and upwards to the trig. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and lunched by the trig there, enjoying expansive views of the area.

Trig A4GT -618 m altitude. (Phil pic and caption.)

We continued up the farm track towards the back of the Maungatuas – the intention had been to look over to Waihola, but it was decided that was a bit far on this occasion!  It was an easy return down hill to the bridge over Post Office creek – and to our cars.

 

Jill proudly displaying the new charging station for e bike travellers. (Phil pic and caption.)

An 18.5 km tramp enjoyed by all. – Jill.

14. 7/5/2014. Both. Reid homestead, Verter Burn to Post Office Creek and old school buildings. Leaders: Ken and Peter.

GPS

iPhone GPS distance: 12.1 km. Garmin stats: We walked 12.9km; Moving ave 4.3km/hr; Moving time 2h 58mins; Climbed 342mtrs; Max elevation 572mtrs. Allow a further km or two for the pedometer distance recorders, and then pick the figure that suits you!

21 of us parked in the Reid’s homestead backyard and made our way through one or two fences down to a bridge over the Verter Burn (near ‘1’ on the map) for morning tea.

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

We followed a road on the stream’s true left, which begs the question as to where originated the pond with its beautiful reflection on our left. (About ‘2’ on map.)

Reflection

Reflection

Between 3 and 4 on the map, is where we approached the Verter Burn ford, into which we were to plunge later, but at this stage we swung off to our left to make our way through early gold-sluiced cliffs (8/4 on map) to finally cross the Post Office Creek and arrive at (5) the former Waipori School building (as reported to the writer) of the one-time but now submerged Waipori Township.

 

Waipori Township

The Township of Waipori. The valley is now flooded and the town site is inundated. Photograph taken in 1890 by Charles Kerr.

We climbed the steep hill alongside the Post Office Creek’s true left to skirt on our right a forestry of densely branched trees  (larches? [and unpruned!] with a scattering of eucalypt among them) for a lunch where the forestry road levelled out at the top (6).

Then it was back down to the school building and out to the aforementioned ford, which this time we crossed with variously successful attempts in keeping feet dry, (but mostly wet).

Beyond that, was the further challenge of the BIG CLIMB, of un-fond older members’ memory. A taranaki gate at its top was new to us, but Neil successfully unscrambled its complexity. Three more paddocks and gates took us out to the Mahinerangi Road ( 11) and along it to the homestead (12.1) again.

At Outram, the majority of the (now well-established) coffee club socialised at the Wobbly Goat, …

 

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

although some betook themselves to the No 8 w Herbs cafe across the road. And that’s it. – Ian.

13. 28/11/2007. Trampers. Post Office Creek, fishermen huts return. Skyline track was closed on the day. Working on roads, trees. Easy. Leaders: Bill & Pat.
The day was fine and not too hot for
13 of us to tramp the Lake Mahinerangi water-race track to the fishermen huts. We had morning tea at the Post Office Creek Old School.
Tea Break

Tea Break. Hazel, Wendy, Doug, George, Ken, Shirley, Pat, Joyce, Arthur L

Immediately beyond that, the leaders had found for us the clearest approach to the larch forest that borders the lake, the tussock and bog being now badly infested with gorse. A leisurely lunch in the sun at the fishing huts and the return back. The Verter Burn barring the way in and out, as always, inspired a variety of creative crossing techniques, from direct plunging through the water boots and all, to bare feet, to plastic bags over boots and even to gumboots carried in.
Crossing

Crossing techniques. Abe (bare feet), Peter, Pat (getting plastic bags), Doug (bags), Barbara and Wendy (boots on rocks), Arthur (gumboots)

The long hill climb back out of the Verter Burn gets no easier with age, but all agreed it was another good day out. – Ian

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

12. 8/11/2006. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Doug M
11. 18/5/2005. Both. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Doug J, Bill M, Joyce S, Lesley G
10. 29/10/2003 Forestry roads return. Leaders:
Hut

Crib by the ford. Bob Peter Arthur Barbara Who? Molly

Crss

Crossing Verter Burn. Peter Who? Molly

gate

The gate beyond Verter Burn.

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

Art

Lunch stop. Arthur & Barbara on a tea break on forestry road back out.

9. 25/4/2002 Leaders: Joyce S Shirley, Wendy B
8. 30/1/2002. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce, Bob H, Donny.
7. 25/4/2001. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Shirley McN, Wendy.
6. 5/4/2000. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Bill McL, Nancy.
5. 26/5/1999. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Nancy, Patricia.
4. 26/8/1998. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Pat.
3. 4/2/1998. Post Office Creek to Huts and return from Robert Reids. Leaders: Denise, Ria L, Nel K.
2. 30/4/1997. Post Office Breek (sic) to huts round trip. (Robert Reids). Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H.
1. 8/4/1992. Post Office Creek – off Mahinerangi Road. Average. Leaders: Hartmann, Ted, Barbara M, Mary M

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Dec 05 2017

Taieri Mouth

Published by under Year round

No. 78 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Knarston Park Sth Coast (Ask Jean Young) Farm”
Location: 31.5 km.

8. 5/12/2017. Both. Livingstonia Park. Moturata Island. M. Leaders: Bob and Phil.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. (Ian pic and caption.)

A combined 32 Trampers and Hikers ventured down  through Brighton to Taieri Mouth , certainly not expecting traffic lights at Kuri Bush!  Livingstonia Park was the starting point after being warmly welcomed by Bob and we set off towards Akatore passing a range of new property developments; just prior to moving on up the rise to the highest point of the walk, Bob detoured us onto the lawn, surrounded by sheltering trees, at the old NZ Forest HQ.

Morning tea at Forestry HQ. (Phil pic and caption.)

Some of us pondered the thoughts of this site having a ‘second coming’ with the new governments initiative of a billion trees…….

We then headed south with the breeze at our back, up the gradually increasing rise, enjoying the views of forest and farmland and sea, interrupted regularly by shouts of ‘truck’ and ‘car’. before Bob again turned us off ( clearly a man with great local knowledge and contacts!)   and headed down through farmland to the seaside.  Here we mounted the stile and various scouts attempted to find their way onto the beach.  This was more easily achieved by Bob when his hands were free after helping at the stile!

A mix of short beach walks, interrupted by rocky headland became the norm, requiring some inventiveness to move through the formations,

Into the promise land? (Phil pic and caption.)

as well as some rather intimate team bonding as some larger rocks were mounted!  Well done everyone!

Eventually the main Taieri Beach came into view and on we set following the curve of the surf to the ‘bar’; nothing changes when tramping, initial hesitancy to getting the feet wet to plain old just barge on in or take the boots off.  Rumours of a channel were probably proved correct as a ‘minor river’ was crossed before the main bar being traversed …

Sand bar, not showing heavy-flowing channel needing to be waded. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and we reached the Island at around 12.30pm, to be greeted by large numbers of nesting gulls;

 

Birds nesting on Moturata Island close up. (Ian pic and caption)

apparently the island was used to collect guano in the good old days, and you could understand why.

Colours on the rocks over on the Island. (Helen pic and caption.)

With low tide being over half an hour past, it was decided to return to Knarston Park for lunch, and shelter from the incessant sea breeze.  This was a good decision as the ‘minor river’ had increased in volume, requiring river crossing techniques for some.

The scale of the bar was impressive, being much larger than thought, as were the patterns in the sand and rock formations both at the island and on the rocky headlands.

Following a late lunch, (more so because of the early morning tea!) everyone safely made their way back to the cars and met up with others who had completed a shorter walk.

I am reliably informed  the full walk was 11.4 km and well, we won’t specify the altitude will we….

The day was very satisfyingly repleted at the new Brighton Café, where it seemed we had more than 32 folk chatting away!

New coffee bar in Brighton.(Helen pic and caption.)

( Ice creams from next door more than welcome, as both shops are apparently owned by the same folk).

Ho ho and have a happy festive season. – Phil.

7. 26/6/2013. Hikers. Knarston Park. Moturata Island. Leaders: J Knox, P Clough
Route

GPS of Route

It was a treat of a day. Well, yes, a bit of a cold wind, but – the sandbar!

We parked, morning-tead at Knarston Park on concrete picnic table seats that were not at all warm.

Then out to the sandbar. The tide was super-low, half a metre below sea-level. The bar was broad as broad. And dry. We walked and walked. This writer was overwhelmed with the experience of being on such a wide and long stretch of sand so under the waves at other times.  Eventually we reached the island.

There

At Moturata Island

We sauntered round. The tide was so-o-o low we were assured of plenty of time before heading back. We headed to the rocks the north end of the islands and scrambled over them to see the surf breaking on the seaward side of the island.

Rock

Rock at northern end of island.

And then we sauntered back. Marvellous, as John Campbell would say.

The wind was still a bit sharp however, so we went back to the cars and on round the road past the fishing boats. A couple of fisherfolk said they had already noticed us and it was good to hear that locals keep a sharp eye out for the sandbar trekkers. Then on further to the start of the John Bull for lunch. (5km marker on GPS route map).

Lunch

Lunch at terminus of John Bull track.

Back down and across the bridge to walk round the beach on the river’s true left. Yes, back to the cold wind, but it was behind us. We observed the cliffs below the houses until we thought it best to get off the beach.  We climbed a set of steep large steps and up through a property and a wire fence to reach the highway at the top. (7km on map)

Onto road

Onto road

We took the road back, crossed the bridge and reached our cars at near the 10km mark. Thanks to Judy and Pam carefully checking out our chances the day before and their leadership on the day.

A most satisfying day. – Ian

6. 5/9/2012. Both. Knarston Park. Moturata Island – NOT! Leaders: Ian, Margaret.
Click to get full photo.

Morning tea time – when we were still optimistic of a successful outcome!

Tide, wind and flood were all against us.
Tide – Even though we had got the low tide time exactly as we had wanted, we failed to take in consideration that minimum low tide was still o.9 metros. Must aim for nearer 0.0 next time!
Wind – Although a boisterous wind was from off the land, whipping up sand and breaker spray, the waves were still coming in stronger than we had expected.
Flood – The Taieri River was in quite flood mode, breaking two channels across the sand-bar we had hoped to traverse.
S-o-o-o-o-o. We had morning tea. We walked down the beach to where the rocky part begins and back. We waited. And waited. Some more hopeful than others. Some more resigned to failure. We early lunched. Then walked down the beach again, aiming for a round trip through Livingstonia Park and back along the road, but short-cutted through a bit before that.
And then behold. KB contractors drilling a pipe-line for fibre-optic (we think) alongside the road with a wonderful machine. Complete with GPS guidance showing on a screen to the operator, it automatically screwed and push-drilled successive pipes through alongside the road and  under the ground, with a clever drill-head (we learnt on asking) that could tilt the pipe’s direction left and right, and up and down on the operator’s bidding. Marvellous! (To the technically-minded anyway.)
We were now close to the cars again. The day had been wind, but grew warmer as it progressed. Everyone was philosophical about the way the day had turned out.
Perhaps, as was suggested, a low-tide day late summer or autumn, when the Taieri is NOT in flood would be a much wiser day to tackle the Island next time.
5. 7/8/2011. Both. Taieri Mouth. Knarston Park. Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Graham.
There was a full tide around 11.30 a.m., which we cunningly exploited by negotiating the narrow beach parts before and after its peak.
The beach walk down river however, was rather constrained by the rising tide at one brief point, splitting the ‘(Fool(?)-Hardy Paddlers’ from the ‘Off-Beach-Detourers’ before we could make it to the large beach seen on the next pic.

The Taieri Mouth in the distance behind us.

Inevitably, we had to come to the rocky outcrops and were forced to make our way up a rope-lined track to paddocks.

A careful steep climb.

The track climbed. (Elaine pic.)

A view from the paddocks. (Elaine pic)

Further on, we were able to descend to another beach.

At one point, we were treated to a swimming seal lumbering its way out of the water to sun itself on a rock

Then it was time for lunch before retracing out steps back to our cars.
While we were seated, our President read out a text sent to us by Leslie S from hospital, saying she was feeling better and sitting up. (Today’s trip was a replacement for the scheduled trip to Waipori with Leslie and Bill as leaders.)

The lunch stop.

4. 30/6/2010. Hikers. Taieri Mouth. Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lesley G, Neil.
A bitterly cold wind to start with. – Bill.

Taieri Beach, well wrapped up. Early lunch lunch stop. (Bill pic and caption)

Guess whose knees. (Members only.) (Bill pic and caption)

A necessary warm-up coffee stop. (Bill pic and caption)

3. 17/1/2007. Hikers. Taieri Mouth Easy. Leaders: Chris, Ray.
2. 14/6/2000 Taieri Mouth – Beach Walk. Leaders:Dot B, Joan H, Pam H
1, 8/2/1989. Moturata Island.

Moturata Island. Peg Chisholm, Molly Vaughan.

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Nov 01 2017

Pyramids, Victory Beach

No. 48 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Pyramids & Beach Area. (Victory Beach) Beach Walk only. Year Round”
Location: 38 km from car park.

Topo of Area

25. 1/11/2070. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders:  Bruce and Liz.

Route map of Hikers medium sub-group only, less the small pyramid, climbed by others, courtesy Ian. Trampers also climbed the larger pyramid.

Report 1 November 2017. Pyramids and Victory Beach.
Thirty-five hikers and trampers set off from the Pyramids car park in Dick Road at approximately 9. 45 am towards Papanui Inlet passing 7 Sheldrake ducklings and their parents in a pond on the way.

We entered into the saltmarsh at the sign and followed a path to the inlet, turned to the left, walked approximately 400 m around the edge of the inlet, and then climbed a small bank on the left to get on to the 4-wheel drive track. We went along this about 100 m to a relatively sunny spot for morning tea.

 

A great place for morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

After morning tea, we continued along the 4-wheel drive track towards the sea crossing a plank bridge and then the style into the DCC Okia reserve. We continued on the track to where it veered to the left into the scrub and went instead to the right down a small bank on to the sand bordering the inlet. The bank was about 10 m before where the concrete square on the bank used to be. The square has now fallen down the level of the inlet. We proceeded around the edge of the inlet on relatively firm sand. The tide was coming in, with at 2.0 m high tide due at 3.16 pm. We soon met our first sea lion sleeping in the sun and later sitting up in the water facing us and periodically giving us a view of its oral cavity.
Another sea lion was on the point and lumbered towards us before settling down to rest. After turning to the left around the point of the beach we proceeded up the beach. A group of four sea lions consisting of a mother and 3 younger members of the species where resting…

Sea lions and fur seals were on the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

…near the site of the 1861 Victory wreck, the upper crescent of the fly wheel of which was visible periodically when the waves subsided. We were strung out along the beach as we travelled north passing another sea lion and a dead sea lion or seal pup in a state of partial decomposition.

We congregated for lunch at the foot of the sand hills, about 70 m before the track leading to the pyramids, between approximately 12. 15 pm and 12.30 pm.

The birthday boy Clive in his 70th with chocolates. (Helen pic and caption.)

After lunch a group of 16, led by Arthur, departed slightly before rest with the intention of returning to the car park via the end of the beach, the large pyramid and then the small pyramid.

The remaining 19 went 70 m north to enter the track to the pyramids which is marked by a yellow and black pole, approximately 50 cm high, in a steel square framework. After passing a board referring to the wildlife we split into two further groups with 7 continuing on the grassy track straight ahead to the pyramids, and then the car park, while the other 12 turned to the right and followed a more circuitous route via some initially longish grass, the rosette, and the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff to the cave in the small pyramid which, uncharacteristically, had water covering the floor.

Cave flooded. First time ever for us. Extensive flooding of marshes and tracks never seen before. Wet winter! (Ian pic and caption.)

Approximately 6 members then climbed the small pyramid.

We were then met by the returning trampers and, after some more pyramidal ascents were mad,e we returned to the carpark and then, for most of us, had refreshments at the Bay Café, Macandrew Bay.

A pond was present just before the rosette and a temporary bridge and detour was present on the track just after the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff because the track was flooded. The track was partially built up for a few metres near the small pyramid, evidence of a wetter than usual winter. Some pot holes were present in Weir Road. The Pyramids/Victory beach area remains as a place where a level round walk with varied scenery in the country is possible.

The weather was good with some early mist, relatively high temperatures and a cooling breeze on the beach. The distance travelled, depending on the route chosen was approximately 10.5 to 13 km. Including the rosette and the small pyramid ascent the distance was 11.7 km.
My thanks are due to Liz Griffin for stepping in and performing admirably as co-leader/back marker at short notice.
– Bruce

Trampers’ addendum report.

16 trampers left the main group after the lunch stop, and continued along the beach to the north end. It was rather a scramble to get up the steep sand dune, to find that the track along the top was quite overgrown. However the leader unerringly led the group 100 metres or so until the mown track was reached, and easy going.

As we took a last look at the sea,

Bruce on his first tramp back after surgery . (Helen pic and caption.)

2 or 3 porpoises were spotted frolicking in the surf. The wildlife was wonderful today.

12 trampers climbed to the top of the big pyramid,

Both Pyramids. (Helen pic and caption.)

to gain the superb views on offer. Down again, we continued and caught up with the Hikers, the last of whom were just descending the small pyramid.

4 trampers also ascended it, to claim having climbed both pyramids today.

And so we returned to the cars together, after a most enjoyable day’s tramp. – Art.

24. 2/11/2016. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Thirty-one hikers and trampers met at the Pyramids car park on Dick Road at 9.50 am on a calm sunny morning. Low tide at Dunedin was 0.3 m at 1258 and the Papanui Inlet tide is about 1 hour later. Three of the group (Leslie, Bev and Molly) accepted the shorter route option of taking the direct yellow-marker route to Victory Beach via the Pyramids while the other 28 proceeded via Dick Road past some bovine mothers and children who found us to be of interest.

 

Bruce

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We entered the salt marsh by crossing the ditch opposite the sign

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

and walked straight ahead to the estuary before turning left for approximately 400 m …

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

… to have morning tea on the 4-wheel drive track approximately 200-300 m from the gate at the north end of the road. Overgrowth of the lupins and bank erosion made it easier to walk on the estuary for a distance to where the bank up to the 4-wheel drive track was less steep. A suitable morning tea site, with access to the pine forest and some logs for sitting on, was present after the barbed wire fence on the left stopped.

After morning tea we proceeded along the track, over the railway sleeper bridge and then the style into the Okia Reserve and followed the track with white markers to the estuary edge where a large concrete block was present. The bank was eroded here and most of us went down a slightly easier place a few metres before the block.

We then walked on the firmer sand near the water’s edge going to the end of the estuary, passing some Paradise (Sheldrake) ducks and then around the sandy point with dunes to Victory Beach. We paused to inspect two sea lions.

Sealions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Sea lions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

The fly wheel of the Victory was partly submerged.

[Scroll down to (20. 16/7/2014 tramp report) to view a new photo insertion (I’ve just learnt how to make out of a video frame), of Bruce standing on top of the Victory flywheel back at that date. (There’s also a video to click on just below it.) – Ian.]

At 12.05 pm the groups of 3 and 28 merged and we lunched on the sand at the base of the track marked by an orange pole and two green crayfish pot floats.

 

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After lunch Molly and Clive followed the shorter option path back to the Pyramids and cars while the other 29 took the 4-wheel drive track to the right and then when almost at the cliffs at the end of the beach turned to the left to follow the track around to the rock rosette.

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We continued on the loop track to the Margaret Hazel Slope track.

Margaret Hazel slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Margaret Hazel Slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Five of the trampers made a detour from here back to the cars via the top of the large Pyramid.

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.) [of smaller pyramid - Ed.]

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

The rest continued back to the junction near the small Pyramid where most waited while approximately 6 visited the cave in the small Pyramid to inspect the pentagonal and hexagonal basalt column crystal structures.

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Approximately 8 persons took the 10 minute track up to the top of the small Pyramid for the expansive viewbefore following the others back to the cars via Dick Road. Everyone was back at the car park by approximately 3 pm and refreshments were consumed at the Portobello Café.No major calamities occurred on the day. A potential problem may occur if the track up the small pyramid is strayed from because of the steepness of the terrain. The persistent sun may have caused some sunburn. The route followed requires the low tide to be at an appropriate time.

The distance travelled by the main group was approximately 12.3 km with the small and large pyramid ascents adding approximately another 0.15 and 1.2 km respectively. – Bruce.

23. 20/4/2016. Trampers. Pyramids, Victory Beach and Papanui Inlet. Leaders: Neil and Margreet.Ten trampers set out at 0945 on a warm autumn day to explore this scenic reserve and beach.  We stopped for morning tea at a well concealed cave

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.) [Note: Ed. recalls climbed by only an adolescent before.]

and then followed the undulating track to the beach. Even though it was still near low tide, we could only see a small part of the fly wheel of the wreck of the “Victory” at the South end of the beach. Much more impressive were all the seals …

One of many seals on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

One of many sea-lions on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

… lazing on the sand and gambolling in the waves. There was also a lone, grounded Mollymawk …

Mollyhawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

Mollymawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

… on the beach, seemingly injured.

Once we reached the end of the beach we turned into the Papanui Inlet and had lunch in a scenic spot where we were entertained by young seals frolicking in the water nearby.

We meandered around the inlet and then followed the gravel road back to the car-park.

As we had made good time, it was decided to drop our packs at this stage, and do some more exploring. Four trampers climbed Little Pyramid

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

and the other six went up the larger pyramid

Girls on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

Girls on top of big pyramid … (Margreet pic and caption)

Then nen on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

… then men on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

via Margaret Hazel Slope. It was worth the clamber to get great views of the beach and surrounding hills from the summits.

A coffee stop at Portobello completed an enjoyable day’s outing.

In total we walked 11.85 km. – Margreet and Neil Simpson

22. 13/5/2015. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leaders: Chris and Adrienne. Later: also Bruce.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

Today’s tramp was an alternative to Murray’s Farm which was deemed too wet following the previous day’s rain. After regrouping at the gate into the reserve, we resorted to the club’s habitual setting in the nearby cave for morning tea, happily in sunshine.
Then followed the trek out to the beach along along the usual, but surprisingly cleaned-up track, extravagantly cleared to a width greater than we had ever encountered before, complete with side bays as well. Obviously a scrub-cutter operator had enjoyed their job.
But at the beach entrance, whoa! Full tide! Even Keith and Ian’s trek along the narrow wave-touched strip of remaining sand ‘pour encourager les autres’ (to encourage the others) to reach less wave-washed sand further on, failed to inspire the leaders, indeed earned only their rebuke for ‘not staying behind the leader’. Sigh.
An alterative suggestion from Bruce to visit the viewing spot of the 30 metre wide circular geologically-formed rock “rosette” on the cliff-face of the larger pyramid found favour, so thence we trouped.
 This proved an occasion for some interesting discussions. “Where is it?” “There it is. Can’t you see it?” “No, I can’t”. “Look, it’s right THERE.” Well, I suppose we can’t all be brilliant.
Presently, returning the way we had come, we stopped on a slope of the track for an early lunch,
Lazy lunch. (John pic)

Lazy lunch. (John pic)

lazing enjoyably in the sun with not too much wind to disturb us. Following lunch, back on the main scrub-cleared track, came an early afternoon decision time. A goodly half of our number (of 28), elected to return to the cars, but not all …. Now, over to Bruce. – Ian
Loop group. After lunch a group of 13 headed out to the beach some distance north of our earlier entry point to the beach before lunch. A sand cliff was present where the track reached the beach due to sea erosion and we had to make a short detour on a less defined track, 20 m further north, and a short slide to the beach.  Going to the earlier entry point further south would, in retrospect, have been better. We proceeded down the beach…
Along the beach. (John pic)

Along the beach. (John pic)

…past 6 sea lions who were mainly at the southern end of the beach. The fly wheel of the Victory was partly visible between waves.
Flywheel. (John pic)

Flywheel. (John pic)

After rounding the point at the end of the beach we proceeded up a rather boggy narrow stretch of sand on the edge of the inlet until we reach the pine tree stump, approximately 500 m along the inlet, where we climbed a short slope of bank , beside a concrete slab on the top of the bank, to get on to the grass road…
Smile, please. (John pic)

Smile, please. (John pic)

…leading the style at the edge of the reserve. After crossing the style we passed the holiday homes on our right, in the Clearwater property, and then crossed the bridge providing vehicular access to the cribs. It had been repaired with macrocarpa sleepers since our last visit. We continued along this grass track until we reached the gate at the end marked private property (inverted). We then went down a diagonal track to the left of the gate, past Ian’s sheltered morning tea spot, and along the edge of the Inlet. Because of the high water level, approximately 25 cm  deep, it was necessary to cut across the corner of the paddock. We did not cross the water filled inlet/ditch leading to the Salt Marsh sign on Dick road until we were nearly at the road. We then crossed the next ditch parallel to the road beside the sign and walked 2 km along the road back to the car park arriving there at or slightly before 2.45 pm. Another idea for another time would be to consider walking from north to south along the beach to see the fly wheel and any sea lions that might be about and then returning along the beach to cut out the 2 km of walking on the gravel of Dick road. The weather today for this part of the hike remained calm and warm. – Bruce.
Hang on, P.S., BTW or whatever. The Loop Group coffeed at Portobello…
Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

…and the ‘others’ were going to go to Nichols. – Ian.
21. 12/11/2014. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leader: Bruce, with Bev as back-up.
Route

Route

Twenty-two intrepid hikers were undeterred by the forecast of an afternoon southwesterly change and after proceeding through Portobello to Weir Road turned left into Dick road and parked at the Pyramids and Victory Beach car park. They crossed the style and proceeded along the Riddle Road causeway, through the gate at the end and passing to the left of the little pyramid turned to the right on the beach track (not to the left on the loop) and, a short way along, took a short track to the right to have morning tea in the cave at the little pyramid.

 

Cuppa. (John pic.)

Morning tea. (John pic.)

We confirmed the basalt blocks were five rather than six sided.

After morning tea, we retraced our steps and turned to the left onto the loop track. We passed the Margaret Hazel slope (marker 4) noting that one can reach the top of the large pyramid by going up it and turning left. (Earlier we noted a 10 minute track to the top of the small pyramid started just after the gate at the end of the Riddle Road causeway). We continued to the right on the loop track and stopped at marker 6 to view the circular rock rosette feature …

Rosette (Bruce pic.)

Circular rock rosette (Bruce pic.)

… on the cliff face. Antony Hamel describes this as a 30 m wide pod of lava which is inaccessible to grazing animals and that it contains less common native plants such as the Easter orchid.

We should then have turned sharp right to the yellow marker pole and then a sharp left to the beach at markers 8 and 9 but ended up on a more circuitous route ending up with a short slide to the beach.

Slide (John pic.)

Short slide to the beach.  (John pic.)

We proceeded down Victory Beach noting one sea lion and a partially submerged Victory flywheel (1861) just before the end of the beach where we found sheltered spots for lunch at 12.10 pm.

Lunch (John pic)

Sheltered spots (more or less) for lunch (John pic)

Another sea lion was resting at the water’s edge between our lunch spot and the inlet. After lunch we travelled along the water’s edge to where a grass track leading to the cribs starts. It was marked on the bank by a concrete rectangle but one needed to climb up the bank to see it. It was just past the end of the pine trees between the cribs and Victory beach. Some of our party overshot the turnoff and rejoined the track further on while others backtracked a little to get onto the grassy track. We all met up again …

Met up (John pic)

Met up again. All ‘parkaed-up’ after the short storm blast. (John pic)

…  just before the locked gate and stile at the boundary of the Okia reserve.

After crossing the style we continued along the grassy vehicle track on the inlet side of the fence separating the inlet from the property of Jason Clearwater. We crossed over a somewhat rickety bridge containing a round fencepost alongside the rectangular hardwood decking. At the end of the grass track we came to a locked gate with an inverted Private Property sign. We went down a track then to the left of the gate and along the inlet beach until level with the sign, about 300 m on, marking the salt flat conservation area. We headed at right angles to the sign along a narrow path alongside a snail-containing water course to a corresponding sign next to Dick Road. We crossed the relatively firm ground in the ditch beside the sign on to Dick Road and then walked, mainly in the sun, back to the carpark where we arrived at 1.55 pm.

Distance travelled 11.73 km by Garvin GPS, 10.6 km by Iphone, 12.33 -12.48 km by pedometer. Overall the weather could have been worse. A cold wind blew for a short time near the end of Victory beach and some spots of rain fell shortly after lunch leading us to put on our coats but it soon stopped and it was not enough to get wet with. Several of the group stopped for coffee or fruit juice at MacAndrew Bay …

Coffee

Coffee

… on the return journey to Mosgiel. Thanks were expressed to Bruce for leading and Bev for backmarking. – Bruce.

20. 16/7/2014. Hikers. Victory Beach. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
GPS

GPS

A Herd

A Herd

Marsh start

A Marsh

Harbour Cone

A Harbour Cone pic

A log

A Log

Silhouette

A Flywheel. (of wrecked Victory)

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

And A rare extremely-low-tide video of the Victory Flywheel, with Bruce standing on the top

19. 24/11/2010. Trampers. Ryans Beach. M.
Since learnt: “Ryans Beach is entered legally only by the landowner (Penguin Place) and scientists.”

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

The climb out of Victory Beach up to the headland.

The descent to Ryans Beach.

Pam supporting the mast.

Close-up of the wreck.

Close-up of the wreck.

Smile please. Enjoying the view from the headland.

View from headland of Okia. Older beach lines showing.

18. 11/8/2010 Hikers Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Dorothy, Chris.

The Logarithmics ? – Lunch on an accommodating log. (Bill pic and caption)

17. 19/8/2009 Hikers Victory Beach, return road. Easy. Leaders: Mollie.
16. 29/7/2009 Trampers. Larger of two pyramids, Victory Beach, return lupins. Leaders: Arthur H, Ian.

click to enlarge

"Elephant" Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption)

“Elephant” Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption) Pat, Ian

"Large" Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

“Large” Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope. George, Pat, Sabina, Doug, Glenice, Bill, Arthur

Ascending Larger Pyramid

Ascending Larger Pyramid. Club members barely detectable on skyline.

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

Starting the descent

Starting the descent. George, Glenice, Pat, Sabina.

Striations on nearby cliff

Striations on nearby cliff

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

Through dunes to beach

Through dunes to beach. Pat, Sabina, Arthur

Paddle Wheel of Victory Ship

Fly Wheel of Victory Ship at low tide. (Arthur pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Returning to Pyramid

Returning to Pyramid

15. 1/10/2008. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Medium. Leaders: Bill H. Lesley, Molly.
14. 20/2/2008 Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Bob, Neil.

Another lovely Wednesday, as we have come to expect over the years. Large muster of 21 hikers today, due possibly because it was another beach walk and a very popular one at this time of the year. It was the Pyramids and Victory beach. After parking cars and getting everyone organised and over the stile, it was along to the Pyramids for morning tea. Refreshed and ready to go, it was on down the track to the beach. How very pleasant and enjoyable it was. The sun made the sea really sparkle, and the seals and sea lions were out frolicing or lying in the sun relaxing on the rocks or the sand as the fancy took them. We went to the left first as far as we could to the rocks. Then we turned round and walked to the other end of the beach, watching the seals and sea lions playing or resting as we went along. Cameras got plenty of use and I’m sure we’ve got some good photos to keep in our collections. Lunch was at the Papanui Inlet end of the beach and a very pleasant place to sit and relax it was. On round the end of the beach and back across the grass by the cribs and then the swampy bit to the road. Some of us didn’t have to walk all the way back to cars as Bob H. and Peter went and picked up drivers to save some of that road walking. Very good hike, enjoyed by all. – Bev

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

13. 15/2/2007. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Margaret D.
12. 15/2/2006. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Mary M.
11. 27/10/2004. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Graham, Ian, Ann R, Chris, Betty
Cave in Pyramid.

Cave in Pyramid.

Ships Wheel? of "Victory"

Paddle Wheel of “Victory” Ship

Drift wood. Dog?

Drift wood on Victory Beach. Dog?

10. 3/9/2003. All. Pyramids. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Catherine.
Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

9. 4/12/2002. All. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Evelyn C, Pam McD
8. 4/7/2001. Combined. Pyramids – Ryans Beach. Easy+. Leaders: George, Ray and Diana.
7. 21/7/1999. Victory Beach, Pyramids. Leaders: Chris, Sylvia, Diana.
6. 10/3/1999. Pyramids – Victory Beach. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
5. 18/2/1998. Victory Beach, Pyramids, Ryans Beach. Leaders: Chris, Bev H, Ria H.
4. 30/10/1996. Victory Beach – Pyramids. Average. Leaders: Joan H, Ria H, Jean
3. 31/5/1995. Pyramids, Victory Beach, Ryans Beach. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Mary Y, Betty B, Margaret D
2. 16/2/1994. Pyramids, Taiaroa Hill. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Denise, Alison, Mary Y. Easier alternative: Leaders: Bev McI, Frances M.
1. 23/3/1988. Victory Beach and Pyramids. Seals, penguins, rock formations. Leaders: Kath R, Dave M.

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Oct 11 2017

Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track, Booth Road

Published by under Trampers,Year round

(David Nicol was an early settler and dairy farmer. He reputedly bought land here in the hope that the railway line woould be routed north through Leith Valley.)
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
Click here for an EXCELLENT MAP of Nicols Creek showing the location of The Basins (called the Cup and Saucer on the map), and the 5 waterfalls. (It also shows the Pepper Tree track location.) Scroll further down below the map and click on the truncated video of all five waterfalls!)
No. 17 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Nicols Creek. D McCabe. Year Round”
 Nicols Creek circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group.
DCC land.
15. 11/10/2017. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Pepper Tree Track, Pineapple circuit. M. Leaders: Ian, Clive.
The programmed Deep Creek Tramp was out because of Lambing. Where to go instead? Well, Nicols Creek had not been programmed since 2004, (Except for one calendared for mid-winter but not carried out). So a last minute recce, relying on one old man’s 13-year-old-memory, (helped by an above-listed clickable excellent map q.v.), rediscovered the route, – a new tramp for most of the club’s current hikers. Contrary to last month’s Trampers’ route, ours was up the Nicols Creek true right side, uncomplicated by the newer Mountain Bikers’ zigzag track on the other side.
18 Hikers had turned up, after some unnecessary precautions taken by the leaders about helping drivers locate the parking spot.

We set off, and there we were, after first stepping out of the wide smoothy graded Glow-worm route, (nostalgically for the writer) on the old, steep, boulder- and root-strewn track, taking us up and yet up. But it wasn’t too long before we could gratefully turn off to the right and follow an easy side track taking us down to the first of the stream’s 5 waterfalls. We morning-teed there,…

Unpacking for tea break. (Ian pic and caption.)

…drinking in the scenery of this local rival to Fiordland’s fabled attractions. A 15 metre bush waterfall!

(Clive pic.)

Refreshed, we forewent the opportunity afforded to us by the track continuing on across the stream that would have led us up the further side and out into the zigzagged area. Such a venture to disentangle the original track from the new zigzags could wait another day.

So we returned back out to our original track, which was now taking an easier grade. Soon a fork ahead gave us an option of continuing ahead on the original track or swinging level and wide on a newer one to our left. We took the latter. Both would lead out into open grassland on our left, with our choice swinging out further before returning into the bush. Now it was just steady up and up and up, with many regrouping stops for rest and recovery, but there was plenty of day ahead of us, anyway. Eventually we were on a part of the track that was newer and wider, and that just alluringly continued on straight up. However, an old memory had prompted the writer, on the reece, to turn off this, when discovering an insignificant narrow side track on the right, which he recognised as the actual original track, the other newer one leading who knows where.

At this point, stern reminder to the writer! On realising an intended regrouping immediately following the turn-off was proving impracticable due to broom restricting vision, he neglected leaving a guide at the fork for any late-comers.  This oversight led to a potentially serious consequence, because a little further along the track, we noticed the absence of 3 of our number. Back-marker Clive went back and eventually found them, returning back down the newer track. They had become distanced from both us ahead and those yet further behind being looked after by Clive, and, seduced by the newer track, had carried on up it, failing to notice the side track’s orange marker, its significance. and with no guide there to prompt them.

Reunited again, we went on. Here, the writer’s memory failed him at a critical point. He was looking for yet another  fork, this time to the left, and in his mind had pictured it as an obvious T-junction, but which in reality was much less significant, and he led right past it! It was only when descending to cross one of Nicols tributary crossings that he realised his oversight. About turn! Retrace!

Back at the aforementioned junction, we lunched…

(Clive pic.)

.. and the leaders did a short reconnoiter of the turn-off and reassured themselves it was indeed the route they had planned.

Lunch consumed, legs rested, it was now Clive’s turn to take up the leadership. So it was along, through, and eventually up, out of the forest, past the bushes of the well-named Pepper Tree Track, across the grass…

(Clive pic.)

…and onto the wide well-paved Pineapple Track.

(Clive pic.)

All downhill now and out onto the Booth Road entrance. A few here opted to wait for Bob to drive back and pick them up. The rest of us carried on, down Islay Street, out onto Leith Valley Road, up past the Old School Building and around a last corner to the Nicols Creek Bridge and the cars. And  to the start of the afternoon’s rain! We had completed our 8 kilometre tramp in the dry.
A wet drive to Mosgiel and a coffee-break finish. And behold, just as we were draining our last mugs, in trooped the Trampers, who, poor things, unlike us, had had to finish their tramp in the wet! – Ian.
14. 27/9/2017. Nicols Creek, Pineapple. M. Leader: Jill.

15 trampers set off up the Switchback Nicols Creek Mountain bike track from Leith Valley on a mild overcast morning. Originally we were going to visit the waterfall but the track was suffering the effects of the recent stormy weather we’ve experienced. The MBT was of  a gentle gradient with some very narrow areas following washouts but generally in good condition. We walked through native bush and often accompanied with pleasant birdsong.

Note the rock that looks like a Kea!!!(Margreet pic and caption.)

Morning tea was in a open area a  with lovely vista over  Dunedin all looking pristine.This mountain bike track continued for approx 6 kms up,  round and round again, at 1 stage  passing through a glade of very gnarly old macrocarpa trees. .Eventually the mountain bike track disappeared and is being prepared for a further extension of same so very much like a mini river bed at present. There was much evidence of pig rooting at the higher end of the track. Eventually we traversed tussock land coming along the Moon track to Swampy ridge track. The sun came out to allow a pleasant lunch break…

Lunch on the tops. Swampy.(Helen pic and caption)

…before continuing in a southerly direction to the junction of the Flagstaff, Pineapple track. Down the Pineapple track provided us with again amazing vistas of Dunedin. 2pm saw us back at the cars having completed approx 14.5 kms. The day finished with our coffee fix

Coffee at Roslyn Fire Station.  (Helen pic and caption.)

(and a  big  thanks to Eleanor’s Uncle) at the Roslyn fire station. – Jill.

13. 22/4/2015. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track.
Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track

Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track. (GPS courtesy Ken)

A good turn out of eight trampers, including one new member, met up at the car park on Leith Valley Rd. to start the tramp up Nichols Creek. We walked up to where the glow worms hang out [pardon the pun], but of course there were none to be seen at that hour of the day, so we then went & had a look at the Nichols Falls, which were really quite spectacular, after all the recent rain.
1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind

1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind. (Ken pic and caption)

We crossed the creek here & made our way up the track on the other side, to find ourselves on the cycle tracks that had been made in this area.
The original idea was to go up Nichols Creek, onto Moon Track, then along to the pole line track, & back down there. After making our way up the numerous cycle tracks in the bush above Nichols creek, where none of us really knew where we were going, except we all agreed that UP was the correct way. We eventually found ourselves on what Dermot assured us was the Moon Track, which is badly overgrown, has lots of gorse, & has very deep ruts in it, many containing water, which caught a few members out, as it was very slippery, & easy to slide off the sides into these pools. 
On arriving at the top, at the junction with the Swampy Ridge Track, we had an early lunch, while I contemplated the weather over Swampy, where we would be going. It was completly covered in cloud, almost down to where we were sitting at times, & I decided that it wouldn’t be much fun going that way, so after a consultation, it was decided that we would go over to the Pineapple Track, & back down there. I think this was a good decision, as when we got down to McGouns Track, we went along there to the seating area with the monument, & had a lengthy break sitting in the sun.
3 Happy group relaxing in sun

3 Happy group relaxing in sun. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was back out to the road, & along to the cars.
A reasonable day, & a bit of a challenge in places.
 Walked 10.1 km
3.7km/hr
2 3/4 hr walking
Climbed 463mtrs. – Ken.
12. 22/8/2007. Trampers. Booth Road, Moon Track circuit. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Sabina.
11. 25/10/2006. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track. Medium. Leaders; Ian, Arthur H
10. 3/11/2004. Both. Nicols Creek, Basin. Leaders: Lex, Ria L, Val and Brian, Irene.
9. 24/9/2003. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, Skyline, Pineapple. From Booth Road. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Irene.
8. 27/11/2002. Both. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, to Skyline. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Ria L, Eleanor, Joyce.
7. 17/3/1999. Nicols Creek, Basins. Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
6. 20/2/2002. Alt. Nicols Creek – Moon Track to Skyline Track. Start Booth Road. Medium+. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
5. 28/5/1997. Leith Valley, Nicholls Creek return Skyline. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Molly.
4. 9/10/1996. Nicols Creek, Basins from Booth Road. (Park Booth Road.) Average. Leaders: Jack R, Dot T, Patricia J.
3. 18/10/1995. Nicols Creek, Swampy. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Barbara McC, Mairie and Doug.
2. 6/7/1994. Nicols Creek/Moon Track, Alternative – Pineapple Track.  Medium. Leaders:Nancy, Bob H, Shirley R, Joyce.
1. 26/7/1989. Swampy round trip from Pineapple Track carpark. Average+. Great views. Leaders: Denise P, Mary McG, Peggy M.

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Oct 04 2017

Karitane beach to Huriawa Pa, Beach walk

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 12 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karitane to Maori Pa and Beach Walk. C Tither. Year Round.”

Pa accessed from Karitane wharf. 2 hr ret. Walking Track. – Manager: DOC.

If you want a history of Huriawa Pa, Sir Truby King or early Methodist missionary James Watkin, it’s all just a click away here.

57 km from car park.

4/10/2017. Both. Huriawa Pa Peninsula, beach walk. E. Leaders: Jan and Bev.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Started recording late, so true distance 7 km. Trampers did 8 km.

A large contingent of trampers and hikers (40 in total) set off from the rivermouth area  along the edge of the estuary to the Huriawa Pa  peninsula.  Track then headed upwards, and we had morning tea on a bank under a large marcrocarpa tree.

Morning tea on the start of the walk up the Huriawa peninsula. (Clive pic and caption.)

Track climbed steadily tho not steeply up to a totem pole, then along the edge of the cliffs to the blowhole.  A group of trampers went up a steep little track to the highest point on the headland with great views.  Past the blowhole we  detoured off the main track along a mown pathway which looped round a newish planting of natives.  Then took another detour down to the water’s edge and back up to the main track which led on to the beach.  The weather had turned warm and sunny with no wind, so perfect beach conditions.

There’s a hole in my tooth. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

Came across a sea lion sunbathing on the beach, but he eventually trundled his way back to the water.

Basking sealion. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Walked to the end of the beach, and came back a little way to a lunch spot.

Cape Karitane launching pad. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

There were  lots of large slips along the bank which runs along  the edge of the beach and one of these slips provided good seating on the various tree trunks, rocks etc.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Some of the hikers carried on back down the beach to the cars, whilst the rest took a track off the beach and meandered round the streets of the Karitane township before returning to the car park via the main road.  The tide was well in by  then, so quite a different look to the estuary.  The majority stopped off for coffee at the Blueskin Nursery  Cafe on the way home, but the staff coped well with the rather large crowd. – Jan.

10/12/2014 All. End of year Christmas shared lunch. Karitane Fishing and Boating Club Hall. Tramp: Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Elaine and Eric
Route

Route

Elaine’s planning for the day did not disappoint us. Eric, obviously under precise instructions, ably led those who came for the tramp around the peninsula…

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

last climb as we approach saddle near ocean end of peninsula.

Last climb as we approach saddle near seaward end of peninsula track.

…and along the beach and return to get us back to the hall right on the dot of the appointed time of 11.30 a.m.to meet up with those who were able to come only for the occasion. Well done Eric, for someone who had never done the route before! So thanks, Eric – and Elaine, who stayed behind. And what was that for?

Surprise! Yes, meantime Elaine had been busy secretly putting up countless photos with questions attached, pens and slips of paper to write the answers down on, not forgetting bags to put them into. What preparation! What inventiveness! What tramper was the child in the photo? In what year was the camp in the photo held? Identify the car. How many pages in the day’s ODT? The puzzles went on and on, around the walls of the small hall, inside and out.

Of course there was wonderful food in all its variety…

The spread. (Helen pic)

The spread. (Helen pic)

After we were all satiated, came the declaration of the winners. from the bags accompanying their respective photos, Elaine drew answers, correct, facetious and otherwise.  Each winner was awarded a Christmasy-wrapped present fetched and delivered by Eric from a large bag of presents donated by – who knows who? Where does Elaine get her sponsors from? Present after present. And we mustn’t forget the lucky numbers handed out when we first went in. It seems every number holder was awarded a present also.

After this was all over, Elaine got the Four Jolly Tramping Mates to perform their song, a song which has now come to be sung on one or two previous occasions. Well, it’s really Peter’s song as he has written the lyrics and chosen the tune. Over the years,  the membership has perforce had to slightly change, with Heb now replacing Ray who has retired from the Club. And that’s not the only change either. Peter had added two further brillian verses to include Fred’s chocolates and Margaret’s red brolly. The lyric’s subjects are so pertinent, cheeky and entertaining, it has stood up well to repetition over the years. Thanks, Elaine, for arranging this part too.

The Three Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

The Four Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

Well, that was it, unless you include the coffee stop (another of Elaine’s innovations) at Blueskin Cafe on the way home for some.

Well, Elaine. You have certainly put your stamp on the social side of our Club’s activities. Thank you, and Eric, for providing a most enjoyable finish to the year’s activities. – Ian.

28/5/2014 Hikers. Karitane, Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Bev and Lesley
GPS of route

GPS of route

Here we were at Karitane, all ready to set out, with Leader Bev out there on the right waiting for us to follow.

Before tramp. (John, Panorama)

At cars before tramp. (John, Panorama)

And as you can see from John’s second panorama below,

Tramp ending

Tramp ending (John panorama, showing both ending and starting points)

at either end of the pic you can see both the the tramp’s end on the left and its entrance point onto the peninsula. We made our way along right on the harbour inlet’s edge to a lovely spot for the morning tea cuppa. We we surprised by the occasion whiff of warm air which accompanied us for the day, until a norwester blast hit us just as we were returning to the cars, a trace of which can be seen on the above panorama.

Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa alongside inlet’s entrance  (John pic)

Following the leisurely sit down, was a bit of moderately steep climbing to reach the top of the track where it returned  back on the peninsula’s southern side. We admired the following blowhole.

 

Cavern (John pic)

Blown out blowhole. (John pic)

Les recalled how once he and Ivan McIntosh had braved the ledge along the top. Not now!

By various stops and starts (part of a track we found too flooded to negotiate so had to find another way) we made it back to the peninsula’s beginning, and onto and along the long firm beach, to lunch at its southern end. Here John and Elaine combined to make this stunning photo.

Elaine

Elaine

After another leisurely break, we made our way back along the beach, across the peninsula’s neck and back to the cars.

A great day out for some 30 hikers, well led by Bev and Lesley, to whom much thanks. – Ian.

22/3/2006. Hikers. Karitane, Maori Pa. Leaders:  Graham, Arthur & Barbara
25/9/2002. Alt. Karitane – Maori Pa. Leaders: Mary Y, Jean, Chris.
14/4/1999. Karitane – Maori Pa – Beach Walk. Leaders: Catherine, nancy, Lesley S.
20/8/1997. Karitane Maori Pa and Church. Leaders: Catherine, Nel K, Denise.
15/2/1995. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Mary Y, Denise P.
1/6/1994. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Mary Y.
3/3/1993. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Mary Y.
27/1/1993. Karitane. Round Trip. Average. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Marie.
/9/2002 Mary Y, Jean A, Chris
19/8/1992. Karitane Beach to Maori Pa. Round trip. Average. Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Marie F
8/4/1990. Karitane to Maori Pa. Also beach walk. Interesting history. Easy walking. Leaders:  Peg C, Joan A, Audrey, June W
14/4/1989 Catherine, Nancy, Lesley S

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Sep 13 2017

Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully.

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Click Mount Cargill history for background information.

No. 11 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bethunes Gully to T.V. Mast Organ Pipes. Wiggins. Year Round.”

No. 100 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bethunes Gully – Brown House – Signal Hill – Chingford Park Year Round”

Cars meet at Bethunes Gully. A broad gravelled track from picnic ground. NB. Opposite Brown House corner is an RSA Memorial to First World War servicemen the old Junction School.

21 km from car park.

21. 13/9/2017. Trampers. Bethunes Gully. M. Leader: Eleanore.
A record number (9 female and 8 male) trampers drove to car park at Bethunes Gully and started the steady climb up, up and up some more on a well maintained track.

Firstly, alongside Lindsay Creek.  The track climbs steadily up the flank of Mt. Cargill, first through pine forest and then regenerating native forest.  We found a cosy spot and enjoyed a smoko break.  Once again we climbed steadily to the top of the ridge between Mt. Cargill and Buttars  Peak.  The intersection to the Organ Pipes Track was reached, by now we knew the mast was getting closer.  Only to find we had to climb steps to reach the top!

(Margreet pic and caption.)

The weather was calm and the views fantastic.

On top of Mt Cargill looking towards Taiaroa Heads. (Phil pic and caption.)

For quite a few members it was a first time visit to this track.  Also, the company of the intrepid adventurer Judy Knox was enjoyed.  We continued onto the A.H. Reed track where lunch was had.

Lunch view. (Helen pic and caption.)

The beauty of this track is the downhill—all the way to the car park!
We chose the little coffee shop near Baldwin Street for coffee, cake and a chat.

Coffee. (Helen pic and caption.)

We travelled 10.9km and climbed 676 metres to the mast on top of Mt. Cargill
Another great outing had by all. – Eleanore Ryan.

20. 28/9/2016. Hikers. Bethunes Gully. H. Leaders: Adrienne and Judy K.
Route map

Route map of trek only to the top. (Sorry, jammed up the app.)

21 hikers with an age range of 12 to 89 (is that a record?) gathered at the car park at the start of the Bethunes Gully track. It was fine (well, not raining anyway) when we left Mosgiel, and dry at the start of the track, but a nasty creepy little drizzle hung round us the higher we went. Loud bird calls accompanied us for the steady climb up the gully on a well-formed track, slightly muddy in places, across several bridges where the creeks were running a bit higher than usual, to a welcome morning tea break on the side of the track.

Morning Tea. (Adrienne pic.)

Morning Tea stop. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

Slow and steady was the order of the day, with plenty of stops to get breath back. Up – and up – and up. Several fell by the wayside – first two, then two more. When at last the junction for the Organ Pipes and the Mt Cargill summit was reached, 10 more subsided and declared “Lunch!”
An intrepid 7 continued another half hour to the summit (a first for some), up the steps in annoying drizzle. No views available from the top.

Cloud Mountain. (Adrienne pic.)

The misty summit. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

so it was down to the junction again for lunch.

Lunch in cloud. Where had the others gone? (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch in the cloud, back down from the summit and at the junction. Where had the others gone? (Ian pic and caption.)

By which time the other 10 had departed, it being a bit cold and damp to hang around.
Down – and down – and down – collecting strays as we went. Fred wasn’t present but his chocolates were, and much appreciated, thanks Fred. It was warm and sunny back …

Our welcoming crowd at the end. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

Our welcoming crowd at the end. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

… at the cars so parkas were discarded for the ride to the Botanic gardens and a well-earned (we think) coffee stop.  – Adrienne and Judy K.

19. 30/9/2015 Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Organ Pipes return.
Bethunes Gully track was the destination for the day, & 9 keen trampers arrived at the car park in Bethunes Gully, ready to tackle the continuous climb up to the transmitter mast at Mt. Cargill.
We arrived at the picnic spot about 3/4 of an hour up the track, but the leaders misread the sign, & decided that it wasn’t the correct place, but they were called back, & we all had a relaxing morning tea break in the sun. Then it was up the track some more, with a few rest breaks till we reached the junction with the Organ Pipes track, where we had another short break before heading off up the terrible track with the very large steps to arrive at the transmitter mast on top. This section is getting worse as time goes on, or is it just the mind thinking that way ??
After a good look around…
Top photo One (Ken pic)

Top photo One (Ken pic)

Top photo Two (Ken pic)

Top photo Two (Ken pic)

… & a chat with a guy from the university language department who had a group of very well dressed [all in black suits] Chinese visitors to the city, we made our way back to the Organ Pipes track. After a regroup here, we walked down to the Organ Pipes …

Eric (Ken pic)

Eric (Ken pic)

 … where I could see how my handiwork on the boardwalks was standing up from nearly 20 years beforehand. We had lunch at the Organ Pipes, then retraced our steps back down to the cars at Bethunes Gully. It was a very nice day for a tramp, with only the slightest breeze at the top, & some weak sunshine all day. I think everybody enjoyed the day, despite the grumbles about the steep climb, & those terrible steps !! We stopped off at the new cafe in the shop at the bottom of Baldwin Street for a coffee, just to keep up the tradition of the Trampers Coffee Club. This cafe is owned by the former owner of the ‘Flax’ cafe in Caversham.
Walked 10.9km
2h 53m moving
3.7km/h
climbed 679m
max height 672m – Ken.
18. 21/9/2011. Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes, Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully.

GPS of tramp, clockwise, courtesy, Ken

Nine of us did this tramp, the most we have had out for a while, and one that the club had not done since 2006!
We were surprised with the new (?) bike barriers, although we still met a biker further on up the track.

Cycle barrier

Doug (nice knees?) and this reporter (the eldest two in the group) elected to remain at the track junction, letting the others (one or two who had never done it before) go on up to the top.

Relaxing in sheltered comfort

Their only reward was to reach the summit. Mt Cargill was entirely cloud-capped. Too bad! Doug and I rested in complete shelter from the cold Norwester. Even down where we were, we could see the mist still briskly blowing across the saddle below us. See Moving Mist
It was a surprise later on, on the former main road and nearing the old Brown House site to see the lovely-but-misleading external sight of the cloud cover we had bracingly experienced from the inside.

Cloud over Mt Cargill. Mast just peeking above cloud, barely discernible to the left of the cloud’s apex..

Another good tramp. Bethunes Gully track is still no less steep at the beginning before easing off further up. – Ian
17. 27/10/2010. Hikers. Bethunes Gully, track junction with summit/Organ Pipes. Medium. Leaders: Lesley G, Joyce.
16. 5/5/2010. Both. Bethunes Gully, Bike Tracks. M-. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn.

We parked cars at by the toilets at the end of Cluny Street (that’s  what the Map said. Didn’t know that before.) in Bethunes Gully. Bob and Evelyn were  to turn on a delightful surprise for us all. They led us back down the road to the gate to discover for us on the left a bike track leading up through the trees. We admired the loving attention lavished on the system of tracks by bike devotees as we climbed up through the un-pruned Oregon plantation. After a morning tea stop we ascended yet further to reach the plantation’s NE corner. Then it was down to our left back into the gully.

Looking up at the tops

The tops of the tall Oregons.

Looking up at the tops.

Looking up at the tall Oregons. Wendy, Sabina, Peter, George, Lex, Ken.

We emerged at the head of the grassed part of the gully at the bridge across the Lindsay Stream.

Sturdy bridge
From here it was up the Mount Cargill walking track, stopping for frequent rests, one of which was by a small track on our left promising to lead eventually to Campbells Road in Pine Hill. (Bob and Evelyn had recced it, but it ends in dense gorse.) Eventually we reached the Lookout down on the right of the track where we stopped for an early lunch.
Bush view from the lookout.

Bush view from the lookout.

After the leaders had ascertained all seventeen of us were back up onto the walkway from the Lookout, (with Ken obtaining dispensation to carry on on his own to Mount Cargill, as he had come in his own car), they took us part way back down the walkway before striking off on the right up a rutted vehicle track through the bush,

Rock on rock

How did they lift the smaller on top of the larger? Leader Bob strikes a pose on the vehicle track

… from which eventually a track led off to the left and down to parallel the walkway back down the bridge and then it was just a short walk to the cars.

Thanks to Evelyn and Bob for finding us a new set of tracks in a Bethunes Gully we had thought we knew all about already. – Ian
15. 24/5/2006 Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully. Leaders: Judy, Tash
14. 15/6/2005. Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Leaders: Hazel, Ria.23/5/2007. Hikers. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Medium. Leaders: Betty, Dot T.
13. 5/11/2003. Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Buttars Peak, round trip. Medium. Leaders: D Jenkins, B McCabe
12. 10/9/2003. Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Buttars Peak, Round Trip. Medium. Leaders: Doug J, Barbara McC.
11. 28/8/2002 Bethunes Gully to Mount Cargill, Organ Pipes return. Leaders: Ray & Diana, Val
10. 16/5/2001. Bethunes Gully. Leaders: Nancy, Dot and Nelson.
9. 19/4/2000. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Leaders: Judy C, Mary M, Bev McI.
8. 27/5/1998. Bethunes Gully, Organ Pipes, North Road. Leaders: Hugh and Judith.
7. 25/3/1998. Bethunes Gully, Organ Pipes return. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
6. 25/3/1998 Bethunes Gully to Mount Cargill, Organ Pipes return. Leaders: B Bryce, D Pearce
5. 30/7/1997. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Catherine.
4. 9/7/1997. Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully, Opoho. Leaders: Shirley McN, Pat, Wendy.
3. 27/9/1995. Pine Hill, Mount Cargill Track, Waitati Road, Bethunes Gully, North East Valley. Medium+. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Ria H, Shirley R
2. 12/5/1993 Pine Hill Road, Cowans Road, Mt Cargill, Old Mt Cargill Main North Road, Return Bethunes Gully, North East Valley.  Back to Pine Hill Road. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine T, Penny & Peter
1. 11/4/1990 Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully. Leaders: Margaret S, Hartmann, Bev H, Peter R



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