Archive for the 'Year round' Category

May 29 2019

Horsehoof Station Tramps

Published by under Lambing Sep-Nov,Trampers,Year round

No. 1 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Maugatua Microwave. J Roy. Year Round.” Permissions from Horsehoof.
Distance from car-park: 24 km.
29/5/2019. Horsehoof, – Maungatua. M. Arthur.
21. 27/2/2019. Maungatua. M. Leader: Gordon.
A Fairy Tale.

Once upon a time 12 happy trampers set out to climb the big mountain of Maungatua. They wanted to get to the top, and were very determined.

But the nasty rain came just as they set out, and the cold wind joined in to make things unpleasant for the 12 happy trampers.

The cloud came down too, to hide the top of the mountain, but that was no deterrent either. Jackets and gloves kept them warm.

Uphill they went, on the good 4WD track, into the cloud and with the wind and rain attacking them.

In time they were high up on the mountain, and stopped to have their morning tea in the slight shelter of a little hut, beside some aerials.

After a brief stop to enjoy their hot cups, discretion was decided upon, and the 12 happy (still) trampers returned back down the mountain to their cars.

But the 12 happy trampers had had a good morning’s exercise, covering more than 6 km and the rain and wind had given a good test to the weatherproofness of their clothing.

Feeling a bit wet and cold, the 12 happy trampers drove back to Mosgiel, returning safely to their homes.

And they all lived happily ever after! – Art.

20. 10/5/2017. Trampers. Maungatua trig via Horsehoof. M. Leader: Arthur.

Clear skies, a light breeze, and lots of sunshine gave perfect conditions for our tramp up onto Maungatua. The cars were left high up beside the farm road on Horsehoof, a group of 13 happy trampers setting out from here on the uphill dozed farm track.

About halfway up morning tea was taken, with stunning views to enjoy at the same time, in the clear air.

Onward and upward, we reached the top boundary of Horsehoof Station, and climbing through the fence were in the DOC reserve which encompasses all of the top of Maungatua. It was then single file through the tussock and turpentine shrubs on the faint track.

We stopped to admire the Big Rock,

The beautiful rock. (Helen pic and caption.)

photos being taken of the group.

The group of 12 plus me. (Helen pic and caption.)

Just as we were preparing to move on a pair of N.Z. falcons flew in and landed on top of Big Rock just above us. They weren’t at all worried by us humans, and it was marvellous to see them there.

In single file we moved on, and eventually came to the summit post at 12 noon – perfect timing for lunch.

From here, on the highest point (895 metres) we could see in all directions – 360 degrees. A huge fog bank right down the coast totally hid the sea and the Otago Peninsula, but the land was in clear view as far as the eye could see. What terrific scenery.

Margreet pic.

Lunch over we began the return journey, which meant retracing our steps. With an occasional brief rest/regroup stop, we were back past Big Rock, through the fence onto Horsehoof again, and down hill with a brief uphill bit to reach the cars.

A group of 13 happy trampers had had a great day, walking a total of 12 km. The perfect weather certainly added to the enjoyment of the day.

But, the tramp finished too soon (obviously too short), as it was necessary to stop in Outram for a while on the way home so that discussion that hadn’t had time to be had during the tramp could be concluded.

The leader was particularly pleased to have such a good turn out of trampers today – thank you to all. – Arthur.

19. 11/1/2017. Hikers. Maungatua Big Rock and Trig via Horsehoof. M. Leaders: George and Ian.

It wasn’t the best tramp to ease into after the relaxing holidays. However the easier programmed Kuri Bush beach walk had not taken the tide times into account. What to do? Something inland. George scouted Saddle Hill (summit not tackled by the Hikers since 2010) and Horsehoof (last done by the Hikers 2011). Relevant property owners for Saddle Hill could not be reached, so Horsehoof and Big Rock then.

Seventeen turned out on the day. A respectable number, given that some members were still on holiday. Admittedly the road entrance to Horsehoof is easily missed, as happened to some on the day, but eventually all the cars arrived and drove on up to park in the high paddock where the FWD track to the top corner of the station starts. At about 690m here, we had already made good inroads on Maungatua’s Big Rock elevation of 880m.

It was still a bit early so we trudged through that first unavoidable gully to merelyregain the cars’ height a kilometre or two further on, finding a bank to sit on for morning tea.

(Clive pic.)

No more gullies now but it was up, steadily up, with frequent regrouping stops to eventually reach the Horsehoof Station’s top corner. At 865m effectively all climbing was behind us. We had gained 225m since leaving the cars. One of us elected to stop here and await the return of the others, and Mollie, who hadn’t wanted to miss the chance of revisiting Horsehoof, was happy to keep her company.

Now it was 15 who scrambled through the fence onto the Maungatua reserve to push on through the tussock and dracophillum (turpentine bush) till we reached a point opposite to the Big Rock.

(Clive pic.)

Here, along with George, ten were happy to make this their destination stop,

(Clive pic.)

while a remaining group of five carried on with an assurance it was only another half hour to the trig. W-e-l-l not exactly. More likely three quarters, as one found the going harder than others. But we got there! Or rather two did.

Made it! 895m.(Ian pic and caption.)

Too bad,the other three had stopped off short of the last rise and lunched. However with the encouragement of the trig returnees (or is it returners?) they were encouraged to push on so that they could say they had made it too. And they did!

On the return we discovered the hypotenuse short-cut that avoids a right angle in the fence and which we had missed on the way in due to overgrowth disguising it at its other end. A shame. It needs a fence indicator.

When we arrived at Big Rock, we discovered the ten others had long since given up waiting for us, and were back waiting for us when we straggled up the last weary slope up to the cars – at least weary for this writer.

So there it is. A good traditional tramp perforce resurrected for the hikers by an unfortunate tidal assesssment. And an enjoyable stop and chat at the Wobbly Goat to finish it off. And roll on the better weather. – Ian.

18. 10/2/2016. Maungatua Summit. Leader: Arthur H.

Horsehoof Station to maungatua peak. GPS of route, courtesy Ken. (Ken pic and caption)

Horsehoof Station to maungatua peak. GPS of route, courtesy Ken. (Ken pic and caption) 13.2km; 3.7km/h; 3h 33m moving; total ascent 409m; max height 900m

Nine trampers set out in ideal conditions to conquer Maungatua. The day was sunny with some high cloud. The breeze was light all day – westerly, then changing to southerly for a while, and then died away altogether.

We drove in through Horsehoof Station, up the road towards the microwave. A car shuttle was set up by taking one car back 2-3 km, leaving it at the top of the hill above the woolshed.

We took the dozed farm track that winds its way up to the top of Maungatua, stopping for morning tea at a suitable spot.

We reached the top of the track, where the small shed and various aerials are situated, at 10.50 a.m. Climbing over the fence we were then in the DOC Reserve, which covers a large part of Maungatua.

From here there is a faint track heading to the summit, which is some 2.5 km away. This is undulating country.

We soon came to the large tor, and stopped for several minutes to inspect and photograph it.

Side trip to rock tor (Helen pic)

Side trip to rock tor (Helen pic)

Continuing on along the track, which follows the fence line, we gained the summit a few minutes before 12.00 noon. A black and white painted post now marks the spot, …

"Trig" post (Helen pic)

“Trig” post with rock placed on top by one of the party. (Helen pic)

… and is visible from a short distance. Sitting down in the tussock, we had a relaxed lunch on the spot. The slight breeze was just a tad cool, we noted.

Lunch at the "trig"

Lunch at the “trig”

From the summit there is a great 360 degree view, but unfortunately haze in all directions spoiled this somewhat.

Half of the group had a look over the brow, down in the direction of the 3 Kings -which isn’t visible. All of us then picked our way through the rough vegetation, in an easterly direction, to get a better view down on the Taieri Plain and Airport.

Making our way back up to the track, we returned along it to the shed and aerials, and over the fence. A brief stop here, where it was noted the altitude was 865m, compared to the 895m at the summit.

We now walked down a 4WD track through the tussock, following the western spur.

On fence llne track well down to the Lee Creek gully

On fence line track well down to the Lee Creek gully showing ‘uphill grunt’ on other side. (Helen pic)

A restful stop was made at the bottom, in the shade of the beech trees at the north branch of Lee Creek. A short uphill grunt gave a “tang” to the end of our tramp, and we were soon back at the “shuttle” car.

All agreed that it had been a good tramp and an enjoyable day. This had been a first time for most.

Seven held a debrief at Outram on the way back home.

Coffee at Outram. (Helen pic)

Coffee at Outram. (Helen pic)

The tramp distance was 13.2 km. – Arthur H.

29/3/2010. Private. Horsehoof, Maungatua Trig.
GPS of route from car to trig

GPS of route from car to trig

At the Maungatua Trig (1)

At the Maungatua Trig (1)

At the Maungatua Trig (2)

At the Maungatua Trig (2)

17. 4/5/2011. Both. Horsehoof upper paddock to Big Rock. Medium. Leader: George.

George had recceed the programmed McKendry Road tramp and found the mud too squishy and the undergrowth too thick so elected to fall back to Horsehoof Station again.
We took the cars on through several gates to the paddock that gave us a shorter walk up to the paddock corner at the top.
It was a misty day, but at our tea-break the weather cleared to reveal the wind turbines beyond Lake Mahinerangi.
Beyond the fence at the top corner, we went on to negotiate the turpentine shrub (dracophyllum longifolium), tussock and alpine moss to reach the large rock for an early lunch.
A cool westerly wind drove us to shelter in a cleft in the rock’s SW side.

A sheltered lunch spot.

An interesting bank of fog in the west.

The tarn beyond the big rock.

Obviously scientific, an exclosure on the tarn.

After all that, we returned the way we had come back to the cars. A good outing. – Ian.
16. 15/9/2010. Trampers. Horsehoof to Big Rock. Medium. Leader: George.
Walked up the 4WD track that went by the Microwave.

Morning Tea break. George. (Emma pic)

Lunched at the Big Rock.

Keith and George at the Big Rock. (Emma pic)

Returned back down through the Woodside Creek gully.
15. 6/5/2009 Both. Horsehoof Station. Bridge over Woodside Creek, top corner, back down the more regular farm road. Medium. Leaders: Bruce, Wendy.

Many were discouraged by the wet morning start, but 8 of us enjoyed a farm walk on what turned out to be an cold overcast day (which we were well wrapped up against) interspersed by sun at morning tea and lunch. From the regular parking spot, for a change we turned down steeply
click to enlarge

Descent to bridge

Descent to bridge

to cross the Woodside Creek upper tributary nearby

Woodside Creek

Woodside Creek

and to then climb steeply

Climb ahead

Climb ahead

to enjoy a cuppa at the set of rocks a little way up.

Cuppa.

Cuppa.

Then to carry on up to the top corner of the station. This was a route the club hasn’t taken for five years and more. We forewent going on to the big rock and tarn through the rather heavy wet dracophyllum we would have had to struggle through, so lunched at the top under the shelter of a bank

Lunch in sun

Lunch in sun

and returned by the more regular farm track.

Rock and Pillar Range in sun

Rock and Pillar Range in sun

Recycled car bolstering bridge. Wee waterfall behind.

Recycled car bolstering bridge. Wee waterfall behind.

We all enjoyed a good tramping day but regretted there were not more to share the walk with. Bruce stood in for Marjorie who was indisposed on the day. Our thanks to Wendy and Bruce for their leadership. – Ian.

14. 12/11/2008 Trampers. Horsehoof Station, Maungatua Trig. Leaders: George, Ria.

This turned out to be a tramp from Horsehoof Station rather than from the advertised Allendale Farm. So it was simply up by the regular farm road to the Maungatua Trig and back.
click to enlarge

Decorated Trig. George, Hazel, Ria, Emma

Decorated Trig. George, Hazel, Ria, Emma

Saddle Hill from Maungatua

What was different was the wind measuring masts

Mast for measuring wind?

and various markers presumably installed by Trustpower. A breeze pleasantly tempered the heat of the sun and 8 of us enjoyed a tramp in the tussocks and Maungatua top with the George making it easier and shorter by having the two cars parked further up the hill than on previous tramps. – Ian

13. 27/8/2008 Trampers. Horsehoof Station Upland road-walk Leaders: Ian, Ken
Winter conditions decreed a firmer road walk in place of the anticipated soggy ground we would have encountered at the Flagstaff big rock. So it was Horsehoof Station for a look at the fast disappearing snow conditions.
click to enlarge

Drift snow remains. Ken

Seven of us set off from our cars parked down at the shearing shed and walked steeply up in the general Maungatua direction. It was a good walk in the fresh air with general sunny conditions turning to threatening clouds later. The breeze was fresh but sheltering in the lee of a gully made for a comfortable morning tea.

Lunch was on the sheltered side of the repeater station,

Emma and Glenys approaching the Microwave. George ahead.

reached by cutting across a couple of wet gullies swollen with fresh snow runoff.

The return. Bill, Pat, Emma
A shorter day but the sun was out most of the time and the views and company were good. – Ian

The return. Bill, Glenys, Emma.

12. 18/6/2003 Horsehoof Station walk. Leaders: Shirley M, Bill & Pat.
1

Lex, Doug J, Arthur, Doug M

2

Snow on NE Maungatuas

11. 16/2/2005. Both. Maungatua with Summit option. Leaders:  Val and Brian, Arthur  and Barbara.
10. 18/9/2002. Microwave – Maungatua Summit. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Barbara and Arthur.
9. 21/11/2001. Maungatuas Summit from Microwave. Medium. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Shirley R.
8. 27/6/2001 Leaders: Claude, Bill, Pat
7. 8/12/1999. Maungatua, Microwave. Leaders: George, Hazel, Graham.
6. 18/8/1999. Microwave to Maungatuas. Leaders: George, Doug M, Hazel.
5. 3/12/1997. Microwave to Maungatua Summit. Leaders: Bob H, Judy C, Sabina.
4. 18/9/1996. Maungatua Trip, Micro Stn, Loop and return. Average+. Leaders: George, Ian, Nelson.
3. 6/12/1995. Microwave to Maungatua Summit. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Jean, Ria H, Jack R
2. 26/8/1992 Leaders: George, Les W, Peggy A, Peggy M
1. 10/2/1989 Leaders: Graham, Shirley, Wendy

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May 22 2019

Kuri Bush Forestry, Daphne/Margaret Road, Kathleen Road, Big Stone

Wenita permit.
No. 75 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Kathleen Rd – Big Stone Return Forestry Farm”
Distance from car park: 21 km.

18. 22/5/2019. Hikers. Forestry  walk Kuri Bush. Dave and Liz.

A little bit nippy for a start

L.1.Start of the dayc

Start of the day. Liz pic and caption.)

but 2o hikers and 3 Ramblers set off what was to be a  pleasant gradual climb amongst  pine trees and bush.

K.2.IMG_2002c

(Kevin pic.)

A 9.50am morning tea was  taken with sun shining brightly which warmed all and accepted. From here the Hikers took the Daphne Road

K.4.IMG_2005c

On pine needle carpet. Easy on the feet. (Kevin pic.)

and Ramblers the Isobel Road. The Hikers continued until reaching Big Stone Road

L.2.Lunchc

Lunch. (Liz pic and caption.)

and then onto the downward trip via Katherine Road. The Ramblers did very well reaching the top of Isobel Road and then down Katherine Road. Total distance for Hikers was about 12 Kilometres. Off to Brighton  Beach  Cafe went very weary but happy Hikers and Ramblers. Thanks to all Liz and Alex.

17. 16/5/2018. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Jim and Betty.

pine needle carpeted walk into the forest. (Clive pic and caption.)

On the way to the top. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch on Big Stone Rd. (Phil pic and caption.)

Homeward bound along Big Stone Road. (Clive pic and caption.)

Conditions were a pleasant cool day for the hike in the Allanton Block of Wenita Forrest south of Brighton. The majority of 22 hikers stopped off at the Brighton Cafe for refreshments on the return trip to Mosgiel.

It was a successful late change to the planned hike.

Betty & Jim

16. 17/6/2015. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Liz and Dot.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce. 12.2 km. [N.B. Bruce has commented on the interesting difference between the 2012 (q.v. below) and 2015 Google maps. – Ed.]

The Google map for yesterday was taken in 2015 and was a little different from that from Ken’s report in 2012 with imagery taken on 17 Sept 2011.

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers, courtesy Ian.

About twenty Hikers did the now more customary route of climbing the Daphne Road’s gentler but longer route and descending by Kathleen Roads shorter but steeper. We morning-teaed in the sunny spot at the foot of Daphne Road where the Club has always stopped, and lunched …

Lunch on a sunny level.

Lunch on a sunny level. (Looking back along the road).(Ian pic and caption.)

… on a level stretch of the road, but still some distance from the top. Older members, presumably familiar with the route found they had failed to recollect the many gully dips on the road. They also appreciatively noticed the rubbish collection by the top gate had been cleared. …W-e-l-l perhaps not all!

Made for each other.

Made for each other. (Ian pic and caption.)

Reaching the top of Kathleen  Road, a substantial number struggled around and under the closed and apparently locked gate before Les noticed that it was not locked at all. … Sigh.

It was yet another good-weather Wednesday, tempting some to to wonder whether a Higher Power must look after the Club. (Well, it was colder on Tuesday and Thursday promised snow.) Admittedly a cold breeze had driven us into woollen hat and gloves when we emerged from our cars, but this eased in the shelter of the forest and in the patches of sun the trees permitted us from time to time. It was a great Winter’s day tramp and a great location – a metalled road rather than a sloshy paddock or slippery track. (Pity the poor trampers! – see their report.)

Mention must be made of the occasional great views of the coast and down gullies that we stopped to enjoy from time to time.

A misty vista in the 'dista'

A misty vista in the ‘dista’, looking up the coast from Kathleen Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

It was further remarked that tramps like this get us to see the other sides of properties that mere car travellers never get to appreciate.

So, thank you leaders, for a well-reconnoitered and led tramp. We were well looked after, with thoughtful stops for regrouping. – Ian.

15. 13/2/2013. Hikers. McLeods Farm. Leaders: Wendy and Peter.
14. 22/8/2012. Trampers. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We did 11.7 km at 4.7 km/h.

13 . 4/7/2012. Both. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km. Leaders: George, Lex.

Morning Tea at bottom of Daphne climb. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at the top of Daphne where joins Big Stone

12. 27/8/2009. Trampers. Queen Street, Highland Street, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road, Isobel Road, beach return. Medium Leaders: George, Hazel.

Starting at the home of George and Elizabeth, George and Hazel led us along to the corner of Queen Street and up across several paddocks to reach Highland Street where we sheltered from the wind for morning tea. Once we reached Big Stone Road, we paralleled it on a forest track just across the fence, which was much more interesting, if slower, than walking the road. We were amazed to see the extent of forest harvesting on the other side of the road, cleared, replanted and now for sale as lifestyle blocks.

Recently Maori forestry cleared. Now for sale as lifestyle blocks.

Maori forestry recently harvested.

Later we came across a couple of pig skins on a fence.

George inspecting a pig skin.

George inspecting a pig skin.

Shortly after passing the McLaren Gully Road turnoff on our right we turned off onto Kathleen Road on the left and then again on the right into Isobel Road where we stopped for lunch.

Lunch sheltered from the wind. Doug, George, Ria.

Lunch sheltered from the wind. Doug, George, Ria.

Isobel Road provided a pine-needle-strewn softer surface for walking down to the coast. There we joined the beach, nice and firm on an ebbing tide, but oh so loooong to get back to Brighton and the cars again. 18 km in all, and were we glad to reach the cars again!

There were only six of us, three of whom from Mosgiel who, vehicle-less as it turned out on this occasion (Doug would have gone back for his car had he been required to), depended on first-time visitor Susan who was surprised into having to provide the transport to Brighton, but who most graciously provided it. – Ian

11. 6/8/2008. Both. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot M, Chris.
10. 15/3/2006. Hikers. Margaret Road, McLeods Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Dot T
9. 29/6/2005. Hikers. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. (Brighton). Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
8. 18/6/2003 Hikers. Kathleen Road, off Taieri Mouth Road. Easy Leaders: Joan and Dot
7. 25/7/2001. Alt. Margaret Road, Katherine Road, Kuri Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Chris H
6. 18/2/1998. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road to McLeods. Leaders: Ray and Diana.
5. 14/5/1997. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road via McLeods to Coast Road. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, George.
4. 10/7/1996. Margaret Road, Big Stone Road, McLeods. Average. Leaders: Graham, Eric and Dot.
3. 30/11/1994 Margaret Road, Wenita Forestry, Big Stone Road. Medium. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Joan H, George
2. 4/8/1993 Big Stone Road to Smooth Hill to Kathleen Road – return beach. Leaders: Eric & Dot, George, Chris
1. 8/6/1988 Kathleen Road from Big Stone Road. Lots of pines and the ocean. Leaders:

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Apr 24 2019

Taieri Mouth

Published by under Year round

No. 78 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Knarston Park Sth Coast (Ask Jean Young) Farm”
Location: 31.5 km.
9. 24/4/2019. Hikers. Taieri Mouth Area. Leaders: Chris, Dot, Alex and Liz.
I.RouteIMG_3563

Route map, courtesy Ian. 8km limited to the 7 who returned after lunch. (The rest did 4km more not travelled by this Nike app!) The “8km” indicator hides the points on the map where the route started and finished.

About 26 Hikers and Ramblers mustered under a cloudy sky by the Taieri Mouth Bridge to walk through hidden nooks and crannies of the Taieri Mouth area, led by Liz and Alec.

We started off along Riverside Road and cribs that are only a stones throw from the flowing river.   A living history was related by Alec and Liz as we went past the cribs telling us stories of past and present inhabitants.   We eased along a lower part of the Millennium Track to a sheltered glade where we sat down for morning tea. More stories were told of holidays spent along these banks and of income gleaned from whitebait or discarded beer bottles.

C.1) Morning Teac

After morning tea we returned along Riverside Road to Hanning Place.   This is a turn off that is easily passed without discovering Picnic Gully.   Picnic Gully is a walk that used to be frequented by travelers from Dunedin more than a hundred years ago before the bridge was put across the Taieri.

C.3) Picnic Gullyc

Picnic Gully. (Clive pic and caption.)

We didn’t miss it this time and were soon into the thickly covered bush walk

K.1b.IMG_1895c

which ended in a scramble up a bank onto a newly bulldozed track up onto Finlayson Road.   This track was very steep and soon had us all stopping to catch our breath.

K.3a.IMG_1903c

We learnt that this gully walk crossed the land of Alan Gorton who allows us to cross other parts of his land when going to the old sawmill.  We also acknowledge the work done on the track by the children of the nearby Taieri Mouth school.

Down the hill saw us entering Knarston Park and led us onto the beach.   It was now close to low tide and we could see it would have been easy to walk out to Moturata Island, but not today.   We continued along the beach and passed a recently erected old tree and masses of toa toa and pipi shells.   Charlie and Jess had recorded their presence in Toa toa shells which would last only until the next king tide.K.4aIMG_1907c

Lunch was now in sight.   We arrived at Livingstonia Park as the sun broke through.   There was discussion over lunch as to the name for the park be it Livingstone or Livingstonia.   Those in the know confirmed it as Livingstonia and was a living war memorial to returned servicemen and women with amputations and other injuries.

After lunch we headed up Coutts Gully Road to a walk up through bush at Livingstone – Green bush walk and lagoon.   Someone had taken a lot of time and trouble writing notices along the path explaining the history of the bush area.  There was a great view from the top along the beach to North all the way to Saddle Hill.

C.8) The view from the topc

The view from the top. (Clive pic and caption.)

Once down the hill we skirted the lagoon to see geese spoonbills and ducks before heading back to the cars by the Taieri Bridge.   We had walked nearly 12 kilometers in 4 1/2 hours.   Some wished they could have taken longer as there was such a lot to see and enjoy.   Maybe something to do on another day.   Thanks Liz and Alex.

– Clive

8. 5/12/2017. Both. Livingstonia Park. Moturata Island. M. Leaders: Bob and Phil.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. (Ian pic and caption.)

A combined 32 Trampers and Hikers ventured down  through Brighton to Taieri Mouth , certainly not expecting traffic lights at Kuri Bush!  Livingstonia Park was the starting point after being warmly welcomed by Bob and we set off towards Akatore passing a range of new property developments; just prior to moving on up the rise to the highest point of the walk, Bob detoured us onto the lawn, surrounded by sheltering trees, at the old NZ Forest HQ.

Morning tea at Forestry HQ. (Phil pic and caption.)

Some of us pondered the thoughts of this site having a ‘second coming’ with the new governments initiative of a billion trees…….

We then headed south with the breeze at our back, up the gradually increasing rise, enjoying the views of forest and farmland and sea, interrupted regularly by shouts of ‘truck’ and ‘car’. before Bob again turned us off ( clearly a man with great local knowledge and contacts!)   and headed down through farmland to the seaside.  Here we mounted the stile and various scouts attempted to find their way onto the beach.  This was more easily achieved by Bob when his hands were free after helping at the stile!

A mix of short beach walks, interrupted by rocky headland became the norm, requiring some inventiveness to move through the formations,

Into the promise land? (Phil pic and caption.)

as well as some rather intimate team bonding as some larger rocks were mounted!  Well done everyone!

Eventually the main Taieri Beach came into view and on we set following the curve of the surf to the ‘bar’; nothing changes when tramping, initial hesitancy to getting the feet wet to plain old just barge on in or take the boots off.  Rumours of a channel were probably proved correct as a ‘minor river’ was crossed before the main bar being traversed …

Sand bar, not showing heavy-flowing channel needing to be waded. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and we reached the Island at around 12.30pm, to be greeted by large numbers of nesting gulls;

 

Birds nesting on Moturata Island close up. (Ian pic and caption)

apparently the island was used to collect guano in the good old days, and you could understand why.

Colours on the rocks over on the Island. (Helen pic and caption.)

With low tide being over half an hour past, it was decided to return to Knarston Park for lunch, and shelter from the incessant sea breeze.  This was a good decision as the ‘minor river’ had increased in volume, requiring river crossing techniques for some.

The scale of the bar was impressive, being much larger than thought, as were the patterns in the sand and rock formations both at the island and on the rocky headlands.

Following a late lunch, (more so because of the early morning tea!) everyone safely made their way back to the cars and met up with others who had completed a shorter walk.

I am reliably informed  the full walk was 11.4 km and well, we won’t specify the altitude will we….

The day was very satisfyingly repleted at the new Brighton Café, where it seemed we had more than 32 folk chatting away!

New coffee bar in Brighton.(Helen pic and caption.)

( Ice creams from next door more than welcome, as both shops are apparently owned by the same folk).

Ho ho and have a happy festive season. – Phil.

7. 26/6/2013. Hikers. Knarston Park. Moturata Island. Leaders: J Knox, P Clough
Route

GPS of Route

It was a treat of a day. Well, yes, a bit of a cold wind, but – the sandbar!

We parked, morning-tead at Knarston Park on concrete picnic table seats that were not at all warm.

Then out to the sandbar. The tide was super-low, half a metre below sea-level. The bar was broad as broad. And dry. We walked and walked. This writer was overwhelmed with the experience of being on such a wide and long stretch of sand so under the waves at other times.  Eventually we reached the island.

There

At Moturata Island

We sauntered round. The tide was so-o-o low we were assured of plenty of time before heading back. We headed to the rocks the north end of the islands and scrambled over them to see the surf breaking on the seaward side of the island.

Rock

Rock at northern end of island.

And then we sauntered back. Marvellous, as John Campbell would say.

The wind was still a bit sharp however, so we went back to the cars and on round the road past the fishing boats. A couple of fisherfolk said they had already noticed us and it was good to hear that locals keep a sharp eye out for the sandbar trekkers. Then on further to the start of the John Bull for lunch. (5km marker on GPS route map).

Lunch

Lunch at terminus of John Bull track.

Back down and across the bridge to walk round the beach on the river’s true left. Yes, back to the cold wind, but it was behind us. We observed the cliffs below the houses until we thought it best to get off the beach.  We climbed a set of steep large steps and up through a property and a wire fence to reach the highway at the top. (7km on map)

Onto road

Onto road

We took the road back, crossed the bridge and reached our cars at near the 10km mark. Thanks to Judy and Pam carefully checking out our chances the day before and their leadership on the day.

A most satisfying day. – Ian

6. 5/9/2012. Both. Knarston Park. Moturata Island – NOT! Leaders: Ian, Margaret.
Click to get full photo.

Morning tea time – when we were still optimistic of a successful outcome!

Tide, wind and flood were all against us.
Tide – Even though we had got the low tide time exactly as we had wanted, we failed to take in consideration that minimum low tide was still o.9 metros. Must aim for nearer 0.0 next time!
Wind – Although a boisterous wind was from off the land, whipping up sand and breaker spray, the waves were still coming in stronger than we had expected.
Flood – The Taieri River was in quite flood mode, breaking two channels across the sand-bar we had hoped to traverse.
S-o-o-o-o-o. We had morning tea. We walked down the beach to where the rocky part begins and back. We waited. And waited. Some more hopeful than others. Some more resigned to failure. We early lunched. Then walked down the beach again, aiming for a round trip through Livingstonia Park and back along the road, but short-cutted through a bit before that.
And then behold. KB contractors drilling a pipe-line for fibre-optic (we think) alongside the road with a wonderful machine. Complete with GPS guidance showing on a screen to the operator, it automatically screwed and push-drilled successive pipes through alongside the road and  under the ground, with a clever drill-head (we learnt on asking) that could tilt the pipe’s direction left and right, and up and down on the operator’s bidding. Marvellous! (To the technically-minded anyway.)
We were now close to the cars again. The day had been wind, but grew warmer as it progressed. Everyone was philosophical about the way the day had turned out.
Perhaps, as was suggested, a low-tide day late summer or autumn, when the Taieri is NOT in flood would be a much wiser day to tackle the Island next time.
5. 7/8/2011. Both. Taieri Mouth. Knarston Park. Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Graham.
There was a full tide around 11.30 a.m., which we cunningly exploited by negotiating the narrow beach parts before and after its peak.
The beach walk down river however, was rather constrained by the rising tide at one brief point, splitting the ‘(Fool(?)-Hardy Paddlers’ from the ‘Off-Beach-Detourers’ before we could make it to the large beach seen on the next pic.

The Taieri Mouth in the distance behind us.

Inevitably, we had to come to the rocky outcrops and were forced to make our way up a rope-lined track to paddocks.

A careful steep climb.

The track climbed. (Elaine pic.)

A view from the paddocks. (Elaine pic)

Further on, we were able to descend to another beach.

At one point, we were treated to a swimming seal lumbering its way out of the water to sun itself on a rock

Then it was time for lunch before retracing out steps back to our cars.
While we were seated, our President read out a text sent to us by Leslie S from hospital, saying she was feeling better and sitting up. (Today’s trip was a replacement for the scheduled trip to Waipori with Leslie and Bill as leaders.)

The lunch stop.

4. 30/6/2010. Hikers. Taieri Mouth. Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lesley G, Neil.
A bitterly cold wind to start with. – Bill.

Taieri Beach, well wrapped up. Early lunch lunch stop. (Bill pic and caption)

Guess whose knees. (Members only.) (Bill pic and caption)

A necessary warm-up coffee stop. (Bill pic and caption)

3. 17/1/2007. Hikers. Taieri Mouth Easy. Leaders: Chris, Ray.
2. 14/6/2000 Taieri Mouth – Beach Walk. Leaders:Dot B, Joan H, Pam H

1, 8/2/1989. Moturata Island.

Moturata Island. Peg Chisholm, Molly Vaughan.

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Mar 27 2019

Karitane beach to Huriawa Pa, Beach walk

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 12 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karitane to Maori Pa and Beach Walk. C Tither. Year Round.”

Pa accessed from Karitane wharf. 2 hr ret. Walking Track. – Manager: DOC.

If you want a history of Huriawa Pa, Sir Truby King or early Methodist missionary James Watkin, it’s all just a click away here.

57 km from car park.
5. 27/3/2019. Hikers. Huriawa Pa Peninsula, beach walk. E. Leaders: Clive and Alex.

The week leading up to this walk at Karitane had threatened all kinds of extreme weather.   So it was surprising to muster at least 26 Hikers and Ramblers at the start of the walk outside the local fishing club.   First things first it was nearly 10 o’clock so fortification of morning tea was taken before setting off.   We headed to the prominent headland , whose history has been recounted in earlier visits and reports.   Alec who had spent many a happy hour in Karitane had extensive local knowledge and immediately tried to put it to good use by taking a little known short cut  …  over a cliff ….   So not that way.   The views from the headland are spectacular and a couple of more intrepid hikers made it further out on to the headland.  See photos attached.

C.3c

(Clive pic.)

C.4c

(Clive pic)

After the headland we made our way down through the bush to connect up with the road.    Although it was high tide there was enough beach to walk on and we made our way to the basalt rocks at the far end of the beach in time for lunch.

C.5Beach walkc

(Clive pic)

C.6c

(Clive pic)

A number of the hikers were able to recall holidays spent at Karitane over lunch.

Just as we finished lunch a cool wind came up heralding rain.   It was behind us so we made a faster return down the beach and up onto the main road.    By the time we reached the local dairy the rain had set in in earnest so we didn’t hang about but made it back to the cars just as the heavens opened.

We followed the scenic route over the hill past Seacliff to Warrington.  We had a short stop at St Barnabas’ church, which had been built in 1872 and is a tribute to the caring local community who keep it in such a fine state.

C.7.St Barnabasc

(Clive pic)

To end the day, with the rain lashing down,we made it to the Blueskin Nurseries cafe at Waitati for afternoon tea. – Clive.

Five Ramblers did a leisurely stop and start 2 km circuit of the Peninsula, rewarded with seeing a White Heron on a small outcrop while lunching. Avoided the worst of the rain while awaiting the Hikers’ return from the beach. – Ian.

4/10/2017. Both. Huriawa Pa Peninsula, beach walk. E. Leaders: Jan and Bev.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Started recording late, so true distance 7 km. Trampers did 8 km.

A large contingent of trampers and hikers (40 in total) set off from the rivermouth area  along the edge of the estuary to the Huriawa Pa  peninsula.  Track then headed upwards, and we had morning tea on a bank under a large marcrocarpa tree.

Morning tea on the start of the walk up the Huriawa peninsula. (Clive pic and caption.)

Track climbed steadily tho not steeply up to a totem pole, then along the edge of the cliffs to the blowhole.  A group of trampers went up a steep little track to the highest point on the headland with great views.  Past the blowhole we  detoured off the main track along a mown pathway which looped round a newish planting of natives.  Then took another detour down to the water’s edge and back up to the main track which led on to the beach.  The weather had turned warm and sunny with no wind, so perfect beach conditions.

There’s a hole in my tooth. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

Came across a sea lion sunbathing on the beach, but he eventually trundled his way back to the water.

Basking sealion. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Walked to the end of the beach, and came back a little way to a lunch spot.

Cape Karitane launching pad. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

There were  lots of large slips along the bank which runs along  the edge of the beach and one of these slips provided good seating on the various tree trunks, rocks etc.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Some of the hikers carried on back down the beach to the cars, whilst the rest took a track off the beach and meandered round the streets of the Karitane township before returning to the car park via the main road.  The tide was well in by  then, so quite a different look to the estuary.  The majority stopped off for coffee at the Blueskin Nursery  Cafe on the way home, but the staff coped well with the rather large crowd. – Jan.

10/12/2014 All. End of year Christmas shared lunch. Karitane Fishing and Boating Club Hall. Tramp: Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Elaine and Eric
Route

Route

Elaine’s planning for the day did not disappoint us. Eric, obviously under precise instructions, ably led those who came for the tramp around the peninsula…

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

last climb as we approach saddle near ocean end of peninsula.

Last climb as we approach saddle near seaward end of peninsula track.

…and along the beach and return to get us back to the hall right on the dot of the appointed time of 11.30 a.m.to meet up with those who were able to come only for the occasion. Well done Eric, for someone who had never done the route before! So thanks, Eric – and Elaine, who stayed behind. And what was that for?

Surprise! Yes, meantime Elaine had been busy secretly putting up countless photos with questions attached, pens and slips of paper to write the answers down on, not forgetting bags to put them into. What preparation! What inventiveness! What tramper was the child in the photo? In what year was the camp in the photo held? Identify the car. How many pages in the day’s ODT? The puzzles went on and on, around the walls of the small hall, inside and out.

Of course there was wonderful food in all its variety…

The spread. (Helen pic)

The spread. (Helen pic)

After we were all satiated, came the declaration of the winners. from the bags accompanying their respective photos, Elaine drew answers, correct, facetious and otherwise.  Each winner was awarded a Christmasy-wrapped present fetched and delivered by Eric from a large bag of presents donated by – who knows who? Where does Elaine get her sponsors from? Present after present. And we mustn’t forget the lucky numbers handed out when we first went in. It seems every number holder was awarded a present also.

After this was all over, Elaine got the Four Jolly Tramping Mates to perform their song, a song which has now come to be sung on one or two previous occasions. Well, it’s really Peter’s song as he has written the lyrics and chosen the tune. Over the years,  the membership has perforce had to slightly change, with Heb now replacing Ray who has retired from the Club. And that’s not the only change either. Peter had added two further brillian verses to include Fred’s chocolates and Margaret’s red brolly. The lyric’s subjects are so pertinent, cheeky and entertaining, it has stood up well to repetition over the years. Thanks, Elaine, for arranging this part too.

The Three Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

The Four Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

Well, that was it, unless you include the coffee stop (another of Elaine’s innovations) at Blueskin Cafe on the way home for some.

Well, Elaine. You have certainly put your stamp on the social side of our Club’s activities. Thank you, and Eric, for providing a most enjoyable finish to the year’s activities. – Ian.

28/5/2014 Hikers. Karitane, Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Bev and Lesley
GPS of route

GPS of route

Here we were at Karitane, all ready to set out, with Leader Bev out there on the right waiting for us to follow.

Before tramp. (John, Panorama)

At cars before tramp. (John, Panorama)

And as you can see from John’s second panorama below,

Tramp ending

Tramp ending (John panorama, showing both ending and starting points)

at either end of the pic you can see both the the tramp’s end on the left and its entrance point onto the peninsula. We made our way along right on the harbour inlet’s edge to a lovely spot for the morning tea cuppa. We we surprised by the occasion whiff of warm air which accompanied us for the day, until a norwester blast hit us just as we were returning to the cars, a trace of which can be seen on the above panorama.

Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa alongside inlet’s entrance  (John pic)

Following the leisurely sit down, was a bit of moderately steep climbing to reach the top of the track where it returned  back on the peninsula’s southern side. We admired the following blowhole.

 

Cavern (John pic)

Blown out blowhole. (John pic)

Les recalled how once he and Ivan McIntosh had braved the ledge along the top. Not now!

By various stops and starts (part of a track we found too flooded to negotiate so had to find another way) we made it back to the peninsula’s beginning, and onto and along the long firm beach, to lunch at its southern end. Here John and Elaine combined to make this stunning photo.

Elaine

Elaine

After another leisurely break, we made our way back along the beach, across the peninsula’s neck and back to the cars.

A great day out for some 30 hikers, well led by Bev and Lesley, to whom much thanks. – Ian.

22/3/2006. Hikers. Karitane, Maori Pa. Leaders:  Graham, Arthur & Barbara
25/9/2002. Alt. Karitane – Maori Pa. Leaders: Mary Y, Jean, Chris.
14/4/1999. Karitane – Maori Pa – Beach Walk. Leaders: Catherine, nancy, Lesley S.
20/8/1997. Karitane Maori Pa and Church. Leaders: Catherine, Nel K, Denise.
15/2/1995. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Mary Y, Denise P.
1/6/1994. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Mary Y.
3/3/1993. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Mary Y.
27/1/1993. Karitane. Round Trip. Average. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Marie.
/9/2002 Mary Y, Jean A, Chris
19/8/1992. Karitane Beach to Maori Pa. Round trip. Average. Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Marie F
8/4/1990. Karitane to Maori Pa. Also beach walk. Interesting history. Easy walking. Leaders:  Peg C, Joan A, Audrey, June W
14/4/1989 Catherine, Nancy, Lesley S

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Feb 06 2019

Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth

No. 47 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Toko Beach. M Young”; also No. 65 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Chrystalls Beach Farm”

Location: 59 km from the car park.

Directions: On SH1, before Milton, at Helensbrook intersection, left onto Forsyth Road, right onto Back Road, left onto Glenledi Road.
Best in Summer. The stock winter over.
19. 5/2/2019. Both. Cooks Head. Farm walk. Took Mouth. Return beach. M. Leaders: Arthur H. and Lester.
It was a 50 minute drive for the 7 cars transporting our group of 31 Trampers and Hikers (combined), to reach Chrystalls Beach which is out at the coast from Milton.
A rather chilly wind coming up the coast greeted us, so it was jackets or windbreakers on. A semi-sheltered pine plantation was our morning tea stop – in the sunshine.

Morning tea in sun out of the wind. (Gordon pic and caption.)

A little later, as we passed the cowshed on the dairy farm, a light shower arrived necessitating sheltering in the lee of some trees for 5 minutes.

A shelter-belt of trees on our left gave good shelter as we walked down the farm lane in a southwest direction.

Eventually we crossed the last paddock and negotiated the two-wire electric fence (turned off, thankfully) to arrive on the bank of the Tokomairiro River, and followed it to the sea.

Part of Toko township. (Gordon pic and caption.)

IMG_1735c

Jim and Keith comparing sticks or contemplating the distance to China. (Kevin pic and caption.)

The wind had eased somewhat by now, and it wasn’t quite as cold. After a rest stop we began the Beachwalk on the return part of our circuit, but now with the wind coming from behind it was much more pleasant.

Heading off along the beach. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After about half a kilometre we stopped to eat our lunch at the top the beach. It was low tide, and the surf was endlessly roaring.

Lunch on the beach. (Gordon pic and caption.)

No lingering over lunch, and then onward again. Chrystalls Beach is not a particularly pleasant beach to walk on because the coarse sand does not pack down hard. Nevertheless the group made good time up the beach, with the only thing of note being, sadly, the dead body of a very young Little Blue Penguin.

Heading off to Captain Cooks Head Rock. (Gordon pic and caption.)

All were very glad to reach Cooks Head, to have a breather in its shelter …

The Rock. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… while admiring its volcanic origin.

The rock makeup. (Gordon pic and caption.)

IMG_1743

(Kevin pic.)

Strangely no one wished to climb to the top today.

Will we climb it or not? (Gordon pic and caption.)

A short walk through the sand dunes, and on the road soon had us back at the cars, having covered just over 9 km for the day.

We had had only the one shower during our tramp, but there had been rain inland, and it was raining at Milton as we travelled homeward.

A refreshment stop was made at Waihola, before arriving back in Mosgiel at 3 p.m. – Art.

18. 21/9/2016. Trampers. Cooks Head. Farm walk. Took Mouth. Return beach. M. Leader: Arthur H.
We had a day at the beach.
Seven trampers left Mosgiel at 9.00 a.m. and travelled for 50 minutes to reach Chrystalls Beach, which is out at the coast from Milton.
After parking behind the beach, we walked back up the road we had just descended, – “Irishmans Road”. The overcast sky was beginning to show some blue patches now, the day becoming quite sunny.
An easterly breeze was coming in from the sea, and was noticeably cool. We had dropped Helen off at the top of the hill to find us a sheltered morning tea spot. The rest of us were nicely warmed up by now, and morning tea in the sunshine was most welcome.

Onward we walked, and were soon on one of the lanes of the daily farm. Downhill towards the cowshed …

Towards Toko Mouth. (Helen pic and caption.)

Towards Toko Mouth. (Helen pic and caption.)

… and then followed the main farm lane heading south.

The lanes were dry, and perhaps not too interesting themselves, but it was a pleasure to walk through the farm and enjoy the colour of the fresh spring grass. We had passed the large mob of dairy cows soon after leaving the cars, grazing in their paddock beside the road.
Eventually we came to the end of the lane, and crossing one paddock, arrived at the bank of the Tokomairiro River. Under the electric fence and along the specially cleared track through the gorse and we were at the water’s edge.
We could look across at the Toko Mouth houses as we followed the river for half a kilometre or more to the mouth.

It was getting close to low tide, but just a little early for lunch, so we began  the beach walk, coming to our dining seat before too long. A nice smooth log was perfect, plenty of room for all of us to sit side by side while munching away happily – like a row of birds on a wire.

H-114941Lunch on beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

H-114941Lunch on beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

We could watch the endless waves breaking on the beach and listen to the surf. Sea birds were noticeably absent, however.

Lunch over, we resumed our northward beach walk. The sand conditions were rather trying (and tiring), being a bit soft to walk on. It is about 3.5 km along the beach, and all were glad to eventually reach “Cooks Head” rock.

Rock and then close up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Rock and then close up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Time was taken to inspect the volcanic formations, similar to the “organ pipes” near Mt Cargill, which form the rock. Two were keen enough to climb to the summit …

Arthur and Eleanor on top of Cooks Rock. (Janine pic and caption.)

Arthur and Eleanor on top of Cooks Rock. (Janine pic and caption.)

… and admire the view.

The view. (Arthur pic.)

The view. (Arthur pic.)

The others were content just to watch.

Ten minutes more and we were back to the cars soon after 1.00 p.m. Not a long tramp, at around 10.5 km overall.
An historical note – In 1907 a French sailing ship, the Marguerite Mirabaud ran aground in fog on Chrystalls Beach. No lives were lost and the cargo was auctioned off behind the beach after being recovered. The sea broke up the ship though.

On the way back to Milton we stopped to inspect the sign erected by the Milton Rotary Club on the roadside, to mark where Richard Pearse had lived for 10 years from 1911.

Sign. (Arthur pic.)

Richard Pearse Sign. (Arthur pic.)

He is credited by some as flying a powered aircraft in 1902 or 1903,  before the Wright Brothers.

The cars then made an essential stop at Waihola on the homeward journey. All seemed to have enjoyed their day at the beach. – Arthur.
17. 19/3/2014. Trampers. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy.
 Chrystalls Beach to Toko Mouth & farm walk was the destination for our outing this week. Quite a few of the six who turned up had not done this before, so it was especially enjoyed by them. This time, to make it a bit different, I decided that we would do the trip in reverse, so walked back up the road to the farm house, where we were met by a overfriendly young dog that wanted to follow us, so we tried tying it up, but it went absolutly berserk, so we had to untie it, & really growl at it to make it stay at the house.
There has been quite a change to the look of the farm, with new roads, & the top paddocks bare of vegetation, but the lower paddocks are still the same. We had a lunch break …
Lunch

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

… along the beach a bit from Toko Mouth, then walked along to Cooks Head & inspected …
Cooks Head rock formation. (Heb pic and caption)

Cooks Head rock formation. (Heb pic and caption [Ed note: on the seaward side of the ‘Head’])

… the rock formations, before walking back to the cars.
The weather was very nice all day, with bright sunshine, & mostly calm conditions, which was enjoyed by all. – Ken.
16. 25/9/2013. Trampers. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy.
Chrystalls Beach Circuit. GPS of route courtesy Ken.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm, circuit.

On a day that looked threatening weather wise, 5 of us travelled to Chrystalls Beach, & after parking the cars away from some loose wandering cattle, we made out way across to Cooks Head where we had morning tea.
Morning Tea stop in the shelter of Cooks Head. (Ken pic)

Morning tea stop in the shelter of Cooks Head.

Then we rugged up for the very windy walk along the beach to Toko Mouth. The sand was just as soft & hard to walk on as I remembered it from last time I was there.
We had a regroup around the corner of the Toko estuary out of the wind, then made our way along there to the point where it is possible to climb through the gorse, & up onto the farm paddocks. It was then a case of deciding which way to go to find the big hay shed where we had lunch the last time. After locating this we walked along the muddy track to where our route turned off into the paddocks, to head back up to the top road again. We had lunch out of the wind, hunkered down behind a large stack of trees that the farmer had torn out of the ground, & stacked up in piles along the new fence line. After lunch, it was just a matter of walking back up the slope that leads past the house on the property, & then along the roads back to the cars.
We all agreed that it was a good walk, despite the wind, & the very occasional light spot of moisture.

15. 14/7/2010. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy. Leaders: Ian, Ken.
Because of low tide at 11.00 a.m., we walked the beach first for the first tiime instead of doing the tramp the more usual other way round. So it happened that we came upon Cooks Head from the north instead of the south and discovered a cave we had never noticed before.

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Jan 09 2019

Deep Creek Weir from Old Dunstan Road past Rocklands

No. 2 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Deep Stream [Stream crossed out and replaced by Creek] (Rocklands). R Lippers. Cattle.”
No. 56 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Deep Creek from Old Dunstan Road. (Rocklands. Year Round”
Est, 50 km from car park.
See Deep Creek Water Scheme Pipeline history.
See further background information behind Deep Stream project

16. 9/1/2019. Deep Creek Gorge Pipeline. Leaders: Theresa and Clive.

Route map, Deep Creek railed walkway and weir, courtesy Ian.

31 Trampers, Hikers and Ramblers set out across the tussock of Te Papanui Conservation Park. It was an ideal day for a walk on the tops as there was high cloud keeping what can be a scorching sun off our backs. The 16 degree temperature was just right to get things started after the Christmas/New Year break. 13 of the participants had not been on the walk before and were looking forward to the gorge.
Morning tea

(Clive pic.)

found us being observed by a large herd of cows who seemed very interested in what we were all doing there.
After a twenty minute break we headed on up hill

(Clive pic.)

to the hut at the mouth of the gorge. Having made sure everyone was accounted for it was across the 40 ? or 41 ? bridges and board walks to the weir at the top of Deep Creek.

(Kevin pic.)

(Clive pic.)

(Kevin pic.)

This gorge is a feature that makes this walk so interesting. As an aside, the DoC blurb advises that there are over 500 species of native insects; plus a wide variety of plants and animals (including pigs and red deer), in the Te Papanui park.
Lunch was taken back at the mouth of the gorge, sheltering from the cool breeze that had sprung up. After lunch the Trampers headed off in a more Easterly directing to add a bit more distance to the completed walk. The hikers and ramblers headed back the way we had come in the morning. The hikers covered about 9.5 kms by the end of the day and were happy to sit down for afternoon tea at the Wobbly Goat about half an hour ahead of the more exercised Trampers group. The consensus was a ‘gorge’-ous days outing! – Clive

15. 26/4/2017. Deep Creek Gorge Pipeline . Leaders: Theresa and Arthur.

Nike app route map, courtesy Ian.

Leave the car park and go up SHWY 87 until Clarks Junction. Turn left onto Rocklands Road. Travel on excellent tar seal until you pass the Rocklands Station complex. Now you will be on gravel and at the beginning of the Old Dunstan Trail. Turn left off the Old Dunstan Trail and proceed on farm track for 2 kms. Park cars at the trees. Cross over farm land for a period of time — only down and up one gully,

Morning tea in gully, sheltered from a breeze. (Clive pic.)

going in a west / north direction towards the gorge. A gate in the middle of a paddock with a faint track going in the right direction. Two  small newish huts with a solar powered panel on roof mark the beginning of the Gorge  track. This is part of the Te Papanui Reserve. Traverse  pipe line for approx 1/12- 2 kms.

New section at start,  replacing broken single wooden planking. (Keith pic.)

The pipe line is suspended  off the cliff high above the Gorge .The track is narrow  on the pipe line …

(Clive pic.)

… but is easy and in the main flat. There are many foot bridges to cross. (An in-house challenge to count the number, caused differing results/) One  dedicated tramper even ticked them off on a piece of paper .WHO  are we to disagree!! A small dam was at the head of a very picturesque Deep Creek Gorge.

(Keith pic.)

(Keith pic.)

Repeat the trip back to the road just beyond the huts. From then it is an easy road tramp back to the cars. 12 very happy trampers enjoyed a WOW 😳 kind of a day out. Approx 10 kms  in length. Debrief and coffee at Outram. -Theresa.

14. 9/4/2014. Trampers. Deep Creek. (A replacekment for ‘The Gap’, programmed for the day, which would have turned out extremely muddle.)
 The first thing we struck was hundreds of sheep by the trees where the cars normally park.
so we parked just before that spot and skirted the trees on the other side so as not to disturb the sheep.  We left morning tea till we got to the old hut …
Morning tea in the sun (Heb pic and caption)

Morning tea in the sun (Heb pic and caption)

… sitting on some concrete pipes there. From there we followed the track taking us onto the pipeline …
Looking upstream toward the weir (Heb pic and caption)

Looking upstream toward the weir (Heb pic and caption)

… right up to the weir.
Ria and Eric at the Deep Stream Weir (Heb pic and caption)

Ria and Eric at the Deep Stream Weir (Heb pic and caption)

About halfway back we enjoyed lunch in the sun sheltered in a gully with no wind. It was great. From the hut on the way out, we followed  white pegs indicating the pipeline which helped us avoid getting our feet wet in a muddy creek. Then it was back to the cars. A great day for tramping. – Heb.
13. 31/8/2011. Trampers. Deep Creek.

GPS

Five of us battled a strong wind on the tops, really icy and straight from the antarctic, to a late cuppa at the cave part way up the road from where we park the car. However the cave faced straight into the wind so we nestled behind it in the shelter of its lee.

The cave, with light chinks in the ‘bricked up’ rear.

Wrapped up in wind-breakers, gloves and woollen hats we struggled onward and upward to at last the crest of the slope and escape down into the shelter of Deep Creek’s gully and onto the walkway.

Looking downstream at start. (Ken pic and caption)

Ian, Linzi, Ria and Doug at start of creek track. (Ken pic and caption)

There was quite a lot of water in the creek. (Ken pic and caption)

Part of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

Doug, Ria, Linzi and Ian at the weir. (Ken pic and caption)

A large flow of water over the weir. (Ken in the background disappearing up the ladder.)

Creek above the weir. (Ken pic and caption)

Looking down on the weir from the control hut. (Ken pic and caption)

Looking back along the track from the control hut. (Ken pic and caption)

View of further downstream from the control hut. (Ken pic and caption)

On the way back out, we remained to lunch in the shelter of the gully before getting back out to expose ourselves to the wind again. We examined the old hut, little changed from last time, before making the return back to the car, this time thankfully with the wind behind us. – Ian.

12. 10/11/2010. Hikers. Deep Creek. Medium. Leaders: Evelyn C, Graham.

11. 12/3/2008 Hikers. Deep Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce S, Lesley G

The adventure for the 14 Hikers this week was a drive via Rocklands Station and the Dunstan Old Road, turning off to the Te Papanui Reserve. There was a cold S.W. wind that kept us in woolly hats for the day, even although we had sunshine as well. A walk up the hillside to a cave amongst the rocks was earmarked for coffee by Joyce S, our leader.
Then on to the gorge of Deep Creek, a tributary of Deep Stream, and the path following the pipe line to the weir.
A Deep Creek Gorge

Gorge in Deep Creek. Looking upstream at beginning of walkway.

Bob H told us about the water race used in the gold mining days and the pipeline to supplement the Dunedin City’s water supply, built in the 1930s. The farmland had been former tussock country but the gorge was not modified and still supported many alpine plants, including gentians in flower. We had several sightings of NZ Falcons, which are now considered to be diminishing in numbers. It was an exciting area to be hiking in,

as the river was a long way below us and the sides of the gorge very steep. Ian F was making mental notes for the retrieval of anyone who miscalculated their step, but fortunately the plan wasn’t needed. We were back at the cars by 2pm and home to Mosgiel 3pm. An exhilarating day. – Lesley G

10. 13/6/2007 Leaders: George, Abe

Snow at top

Snow at top

Lwr Crk

Deep Creek in lower reaches.

Grp

On pipeline. George, Leonie, Tash, Ria, Pat, Ian, Glenice, Arthur.

UprXCrk

Upper Deep Creek showing railed walkways.

9. 23/8/2006. Hikers. Deep Creek, Old Dunstan Road. Medium. Leaders: Val, Arthur & Barbara

8. 24/11/2004. Both. Deep Creek, Lammermoors. Leaders: Evelyn C, Ian, Peter and Wendy

Deep Creek Pipeline Track

Deep Creek Pipeline Track. Evelyn, Wendy, Peter.

Deep Creek Weir

Deep Creek Weir. Evelyn, Wendy, Peter

7. 17/4/2002. Alt. Rockland and Deep Creek. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Bev McI.

6. 21/10/1998. Deep Creek from Old Dunstan Trail. Leaders: George, Les S.

5. 24/3/1998. Deep Creek, Rocklands. Leaders: Shirley McN, Ria L, Bev H.

4. 15/10/1997.

3. 8/2/1995. Deep Creek from Old Dunstan Road. Easy. Leaders: Jack R, Bob H, Ted, Dot T.

2. 20/3/1991. Deep Creek Dam and Pipeline. Great viewing and interesting country. Easy+. Leaders: Dave and Jean, Margaret D, Janice.

1. 1/2/89. Deep Creek.

1/2/1989. “Pumping Station.” Deep Creek. (Ian pic, scanned from Peg Chisholm photo collection.)

Background.
The Deep Creek Water Scheme was built during the depression of the 30s.
The Pipeline is 58 years old and 64 km long.
The intake is 675m above sea level.
The catchment is 5420 hectares; mainly tussock with some grassland.
The steel pipeline, lined with bitumen, was in a bad state of repair by the 80s and the leaks were constantly plugged with tapered wooden plugs until it resembled a porcupine.
The authorities were eventually persuaded to renew the worst section, this being done with the aid of a helicopter in 1992. It is a useful supplement to Dunedin’s water supply.
The Pipeline is made of bitumen-lined steel excepting the first 1.4 km which was replaced in 1992 with concrete pipes.
Water quality is variable and often discoloured.
Over the 58 years the yield has dropped from 11,000 cubic metres to 6,800 cubic metres a day.
The water goes to Booth Road Treatment Station and Sullivans Dam.
Replacing the rest of the pipeline is estimated at $20,000,000 and would increase the flow to 17,000 cubic metres a day.
– From a hand-written record in the President’s file and supplemented with other data.

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Nov 28 2018

Nicols Creek, Swampy, Pineapple Track, Moon Track, Booth Road

Published by under Trampers,Year round

(David Nicol was an early settler and dairy farmer. He reputedly bought land here in the hope that the railway line woould be routed north through Leith Valley.)

Click here for Antony Hamel’s YouTube video showing his exploration of the 5 falls of Nicols Creek.

Click here for an EXCELLENT MAP of Nicols Creek showing the location of The Basins (called the Cup and Saucer on the map), and the 5 waterfalls. (It also shows the Pepper Tree track location.)
Neighbours at War Click here for background and photos to the Finnerty Family and their house site on the Moon Track by Nicols Creek.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
No. 17 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Nicols Creek. D McCabe. Year Round”
 Nicols Creek circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group.
DCC land.
Booth Road 16.1 km from car park.
22. 28/11/2018. Trampers. Nicols Falls, Pepper Tree Track, and beyond circuit. M. Leader: Arthur.
A cool north-east breeze greeted us when we parked our cars at Booth Road to begin our tramp. The cloud was down on the higher hills, Mt. Cargill for example was hidden to us.
There were 7 in our group today, and we began with a one kilometre, or so, road walk before going up to Nicols Falls.

[And if you haven’t already done so, Art recommends you click here now for Antony Hamel’s YouTube video of the OTMC exploration of Nicols Creek’s 5 falls – Ed.]

Today’s circuit was to take in some of the older tracks, beginning with Nicols Falls. A short trip was made in to the glow-worms to familiarise all with their location.

We stopped to talk to two young Frenchmen who were returning from the falls. After crossing Nicols Creek we climbed up to have our smoko at Finnerty’s house site.

From here the old, original walking track was followed through the area now somewhat spoilt by cycle tracks.

A brief stop was made at the big macrocarpas to admire the rocks, then on up the Moon Track following the old cart track, and then the fence line further up.

Eventually we turned left onto the Nicols Creek track and followed it to find the junction with the Pepper Tree track, which took us to the Pineapple Track.

It was getting close to lunchtime now, so going up the Pineapple Track allowed us to lunch in the same spot as we had four weeks ago – only we sat on the other side of the track, as the breeze was from the opposite direction today.

It was all downhill in the afternoon. Going down we soon turned aside …

The intersection of the present pineapple track and the original. (Dave pic and caption.)

… to follow the Original Pineapple Track through the beautiful bush. Conditions underfoot were muddy, as they had been all day, so care was exercised by not hurrying.

The team down the original, well worn, Pineapple track. (Dave pic and caption.)

The old track is worn in places, by many feet and much water, to something resembling a trench. One was saying we were stuck in the groove!

At the bottom we followed McGouns Track to have a rest stop at the Forestry Plaque and seats,

At the cairn commemorating forestry in the Dunedin area. (Dave pic and caption.)

before finishing back at the cars at 2 p.m.

The sun was shining back in Mosgiel on our return, where we Blended in.

It had been an interesting and enjoyable day in the bush, with new (to most) tracks to enjoy. – Art.

21. 31/10/2018. Hikers. Moon – Nicols – Pepper Tree – Pineapple – circuit. M. Leaders: Ian and Jim.

Twenty-one Hikers plus two Ramblers parked at Booth Road. From there they walked down Islay Street to Leith Valley Road and up to Thomson’s Bridge over Nicols Creek. The two Ramblers left to trek on their own account further up Leith Valley Road, with the Hikers setting off up the Nicols Creek Track. A wee way up, we turned off to take the track on the right down to the 14.5 metres high first of the five Nicols Creek Falls for Morning Tea.

The promise of the day was to walk the old Moon Track that was there before the Mountain Bikers in 2006 carved it up almost beyond recognition. So after our cuppa, we crossed the creek to climb steeply up on the other side, first to pass by the empty Finnerty’s house site, of which there remains little indication except a flat area alongside the left of the track and a few bricks.

The going was easier now until reaching and crossing the first of the many zig-zag mountain bike tracks to wend our way through bush and over some other zig-zags up to the big boulder clump among some macrocarpas, where we stopped to briefly look around the area. Beyond here the track followed the the old fence through some bush, gorse and grass to come back on another “zig” of the trail. Avoiding the trail above us to the right we took the lower one along to where it dropped slightly to the left. Here we took the route straight ahead. We were back on the old track again. A bit along this one, it swung uphill to the right. Here was the almost straight up, but moderately graded, old cart track that returned us to the fence again, happily avoiding the steep hill on our right in the process.

Back alongside the fence again, was a grassy track which first dipped and then rose up and yet up to the corner of the fence’s paddock where there was a welcome table and plank seat to rest on and regroup. Going was now more level but muddier, not helped by the rain two nights ago, but eventually the track led out, over an old large log to the sign posts. One indicated yet father up to Swampy, another indicated our Nicols Creek Track route ahead, and the third back down the way we had come. But on it was the lettering: Moonlight!!! It’s Moon, not Moonlight. Where did the printing instructions get it wrong? Anyway, it was now lunchtime, which made for a leisurely stop.

The  old cart track, now well wooded in, led us along the the contour across the Nicols Creek headwater tributaries. Again there was that rain-worsened mud In places. A major creek crossing we encountered was through a steep-sided rocky ditch, with the climb-out on the further side one or two paces along a wet but fortunately not slippery rocky forty-five degrees slope and then into a brief dip with a steep drop below before clambering out onto the reassuringly safer part of the track again. We all made it across safely.

And then on, across another creek tributary, until we reaching on our right the Pepper Tree Track turn off. This was the junction we had come to a year ago from the other way, when we had climbed the  Nicols Creek track  from the other end. Well, on then, on the hew track, another creek crossing, and finally gradually up, out of the bush, into grassy area and out onto the Pineapple Track.

The intention here had been to complete the original track circuit by crossing over to where the old fence post on the edge of the bush indicated the entrance to the top of the old Pineapple Track. The bush is nice and open, although the track is steep and deeply clay-trenched in places, but today was out of consideration after all the rain we had had lately. The writer has fond memories of it being route to Flagstaff in his youth.

But back to the newer track opened in 1975, which we were now on. The cars were at its foot, on Booth Road, waiting to whisk us off to coffee at Sunnyvale. So down we went now, each at our own pace to the bottom. The old track had been a revelation to all but a few older hikers. The most ambitious one for them in a long while. Challenging? Yes. Regrets? No. Satisfying? Yes, – to the writer, especially. Now over to the club to keep this old track alive and back on the programme again. – Ian.

20. 11/10/2017. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Pepper Tree Track, Pineapple circuit. M. Leaders: Ian, Clive.
The programmed Deep Creek Tramp was out because of Lambing. Where to go instead? Well, Nicols Creek had not been programmed since 2004, (Except for one calendared for mid-winter but not carried out). So a last minute recce, relying on one old man’s 13-year-old-memory, (helped by an above-listed clickable excellent map q.v.), rediscovered the route, – a new tramp for most of the club’s current hikers. Contrary to last month’s Trampers’ route, ours was up the Nicols Creek true right side, uncomplicated by the newer Mountain Bikers’ zigzag track on the other side.
18 Hikers had turned up, after some unnecessary precautions taken by the leaders about helping drivers locate the parking spot.

We set off, and there we were, after first stepping out of the wide smoothy graded Glow-worm route, (nostalgically for the writer) on the old, steep, boulder- and root-strewn track, taking us up and yet up. But it wasn’t too long before we could gratefully turn off to the right and follow an easy side track taking us down to the first of the stream’s 5 waterfalls. We morning-teed there,…

Unpacking for tea break. (Ian pic and caption.)

…drinking in the scenery of this local rival to Fiordland’s fabled attractions. A 15 metre bush waterfall!

(Clive pic.)

Refreshed, we forewent the opportunity afforded to us by the track continuing on across the stream that would have led us up the further side and out into the zigzagged area. Such a venture to disentangle the original track from the new zigzags could wait another day.

So we returned back out to our original track, which was now taking an easier grade. Soon a fork ahead gave us an option of continuing ahead on the original track or swinging level and wide on a newer one to our left. We took the latter. Both would lead out into open grassland on our left, with our choice swinging out further before returning into the bush. Now it was just steady up and up and up, with many regrouping stops for rest and recovery, but there was plenty of day ahead of us, anyway. Eventually we were on a part of the track that was newer and wider, and that just alluringly continued on straight up. However, an old memory had prompted the writer, on the reece, to turn off this, when discovering an insignificant narrow side track on the right, which he recognised as the actual original track, the other newer one leading who knows where.

At this point, stern reminder to the writer! On realising an intended regrouping immediately following the turn-off was proving impracticable due to broom restricting vision, he neglected leaving a guide at the fork for any late-comers.  This oversight led to a potentially serious consequence, because a little further along the track, we noticed the absence of 3 of our number. Back-marker Clive went back and eventually found them, returning back down the newer track. They had become distanced from both us ahead and those yet further behind being looked after by Clive, and, seduced by the newer track, had carried on up it, failing to notice the side track’s orange marker, its significance. and with no guide there to prompt them.

Reunited again, we went on. Here, the writer’s memory failed him at a critical point. He was looking for yet another  fork, this time to the left, and in his mind had pictured it as an obvious T-junction, but which in reality was much less significant, and he led right past it! It was only when descending to cross one of Nicols tributary crossings that he realised his oversight. About turn! Retrace!

Back at the aforementioned junction, we lunched…

(Clive pic.)

.. and the leaders did a short reconnoiter of the turn-off and reassured themselves it was indeed the route they had planned.

Lunch consumed, legs rested, it was now Clive’s turn to take up the leadership. So it was along, through, and eventually up, out of the forest, past the bushes of the well-named Pepper Tree Track, across the grass…

(Clive pic.)

…and onto the wide well-paved Pineapple Track.

(Clive pic.)

All downhill now and out onto the Booth Road entrance. A few here opted to wait for Bob to drive back and pick them up. The rest of us carried on, down Islay Street, out onto Leith Valley Road, up past the Old School Building and around a last corner to the Nicols Creek Bridge and the cars. And  to the start of the afternoon’s rain! We had completed our 8 kilometre tramp in the dry.
A wet drive to Mosgiel and a coffee-break finish. And behold, just as we were draining our last mugs, in trooped the Trampers, who, poor things, unlike us, had had to finish their tramp in the wet! – Ian.
19. 27/9/2017. Nicols Creek, Pineapple. M. Leader: Jill.

15 trampers set off up the Switchback Nicols Creek Mountain bike track from Leith Valley on a mild overcast morning. Originally we were going to visit the waterfall but the track was suffering the effects of the recent stormy weather we’ve experienced. The MBT was of  a gentle gradient with some very narrow areas following washouts but generally in good condition. We walked through native bush and often accompanied with pleasant birdsong.

Note the rock that looks like a Kea!!!(Margreet pic and caption.)

Morning tea was in a open area a  with lovely vista over  Dunedin all looking pristine.This mountain bike track continued for approx 6 kms up,  round and round again, at 1 stage  passing through a glade of very gnarly old macrocarpa trees. .Eventually the mountain bike track disappeared and is being prepared for a further extension of same so very much like a mini river bed at present. There was much evidence of pig rooting at the higher end of the track. Eventually we traversed tussock land coming along the Moon track to Swampy ridge track. The sun came out to allow a pleasant lunch break…

Lunch on the tops. Swampy.(Helen pic and caption)

…before continuing in a southerly direction to the junction of the Flagstaff, Pineapple track. Down the Pineapple track provided us with again amazing vistas of Dunedin. 2pm saw us back at the cars having completed approx 14.5 kms. The day finished with our coffee fix

Coffee at Roslyn Fire Station.  (Helen pic and caption.)

(and a  big  thanks to Eleanor’s Uncle) at the Roslyn fire station. – Jill.

18. 22/4/2015. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track.
Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track

Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track. (GPS courtesy Ken)

A good turn out of eight trampers, including one new member, met up at the car park on Leith Valley Rd. to start the tramp up Nichols Creek. We walked up to where the glow worms hang out [pardon the pun], but of course there were none to be seen at that hour of the day, so we then went & had a look at the Nichols Falls, which were really quite spectacular, after all the recent rain.
1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind

1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind. (Ken pic and caption)

We crossed the creek here & made our way up the track on the other side, to find ourselves on the cycle tracks that had been made in this area.
The original idea was to go up Nichols Creek, onto Moon Track, then along to the pole line track, & back down there. After making our way up the numerous cycle tracks in the bush above Nichols creek, where none of us really knew where we were going, except we all agreed that UP was the correct way. We eventually found ourselves on what Dermot assured us was the Moon Track, which is badly overgrown, has lots of gorse, & has very deep ruts in it, many containing water, which caught a few members out, as it was very slippery, & easy to slide off the sides into these pools. 
On arriving at the top, at the junction with the Swampy Ridge Track, we had an early lunch, while I contemplated the weather over Swampy, where we would be going. It was completly covered in cloud, almost down to where we were sitting at times, & I decided that it wouldn’t be much fun going that way, so after a consultation, it was decided that we would go over to the Pineapple Track, & back down there. I think this was a good decision, as when we got down to McGouns Track, we went along there to the seating area with the monument, & had a lengthy break sitting in the sun.
3 Happy group relaxing in sun

3 Happy group relaxing in sun. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was back out to the road, & along to the cars.
A reasonable day, & a bit of a challenge in places.
 Walked 10.1 km
3.7km/hr
2 3/4 hr walking
Climbed 463mtrs. – Ken.
17. 22/8/2007. Trampers. Booth Road, Moon Track circuit. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Sabina.
16. 25/10/2006. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track. Medium. Leaders; Ian, Arthur H
15. 3/11/2004. Both. Nicols Creek, Basin. Leaders: Lex, Ria L, Val and Brian, Irene.
14. 24/9/2003. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, Skyline, Pineapple. From Booth Road. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Irene.
13. 27/11/2002. Both. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, to Skyline. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Ria L, Eleanor, Joyce.
12. 17/3/1999. Nicols Creek, Basins. Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
11. 20/2/2002. Alt. Nicols Creek – Moon Track to Skyline Track. Start Booth Road. Medium+. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
10. 27/1/1999. Pineapple Track – Swampy area. Leaders: Shirley R, Lance and Lois.
9. 28/5/1997. Leith Valley, Nicols Creek return Skyline. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Molly.
8. 9/10/1996. Nicols Creek, Basins from Booth Road. (Park Booth Road.) Average. Leaders: Jack R, Dot T, Patricia J.
7. 18/10/1995. Nicols Creek, Swampy. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Barbara McC, Mairie and Doug.
6. 6/7/1994. Nicols Creek/Moon Track, Alternative – Pineapple Track.  Medium. Leaders:Nancy, Bob H, Shirley R, Joyce.
5. 27/5/1992. Nicols Creek from Booth Road to Swampy Pineapple. Average. Leaders: Marie, Nel, Les W, Margaret D.
4. 3/7/1991. Pineapple Track carpark round snow trip. Wrap up well for this mountain trip. Average. Leaders: Jack M, Mary McG, Bev McI, Shirley.
3. 6/6/1990. Pineapple carpark round trip.Average+. Leaders: Marie, Mary McG, Shirley, Helen.
2. 17/3/1989 Barbara M, Irene, Sabina
1. 26/7/1989. Swampy round trip from Pineapple Track carpark. Average+. Great views. Leaders: Denise P, Mary McG, Peggy M.

 

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Nov 28 2018

Woodhaugh Gardens and Leith

Published by under Hikers,Year round

19 km from car park.

8. 28/11/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Judy and Elaine.

Nike map of route, courtesy Ian.

After an overdose of rain, 23 hikers and four ramblers abandoned the planned Flagstaff/Swampy hike in favour of the Botanic Gardens area.

We parked in the gardens car park and wandered by various paths to the Rhododendron dell for a leisurely morning tea. The sun shone and the birds sang.

(Judy K. pic.)

 Eventually we headed off over the road, into the northern cemetery where a successful search was made for Elaine’s ancestors.

(Judy K. pic.)

  Leaving them undisturbed we headed off down the hill, and the steps, to Logan Park and around to the stadium for lunch. (Quite a relief to have toilets available at both morning tea and lunch!)

Lunch time. (Adrienne M pic and caption.)

  The sun shone and a one-legged seagull enjoyed lots of titbits.  From here it was a stroll across the road into Anzac Ave, then across to follow the Leith up through the University

(Judy K. pic.) [Inserted only at Judy’s request. Ed.]

(Judy K. pic.)

and so back to the Gardens, coffee, and the cars.

Judy and Elaine

7. 15/8/2018. Hikers. Gardens / Leith Street. E.  Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Edinburgh stone memorial. (Clive pic and caption.)

 

Calm day on the harbour. (Clive pic and caption.)

Après déjeuner scene, Upper Garden. (Ian pic and caption.)

Nancy Syme fountain, Botanic Garden. (Lester told of Nancy Syme long time Mosgiel resident who dontated the fountain. (Clive pic and caption.)

6. 28/6/2017. Hikers. Leith walk Mouth to Woodhaugh. E. Leaders: Jan Y and Jan B.

Calm yachts where parked cars. (Ian pic and caption.

Albatross wing bridge. Wired head and body difficult to discern. (Ian pic and caption.)

Woodhaugh lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Grafitti on lower Leith concrete way. (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 25/6/2008. Hikers. Woodhaugh – Botanic Gardens. Easy. Leaders: Marjorie, Carmel.
4. 17/7/2002. Alt. Bullock Track – Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders:Denise, Shirley R, Bev McI
3. 12/9/2001. Alt. Bullock Track, Woodhaugh Gardens. Leaders: Arthur & Barbara L, Winifred
2. 27/10/1999. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Betty.
1. 15/5/1996. Woodhaugh, Leith Valley. (Alternative to Quoin Point.) Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

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Nov 16 2018

Tramps Incorporating Three Kings

Published by under Hikers,Trampers,Year round

No. 26 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Wesleydale – Maungatua – via 3 Kings. L Wiffen. Year round.”

Abt 25 km from car park.

24. 14/11/2018. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Thirty of those who weren’t away at the Hollyford Camp turned out to tackle the 4WD track up to Three Kings. Three Ramblers, who have chosen for themselves the name “The Eighties Plus” dropped back to continue at their own pace, getting ultimately as far up as the last gate on the track. The rest, with occasional rest stops and regroupings,

Morning tea with views of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.)

Ian explaining part of the history of the Taieri. (Clive pic and caption.) [Pointing out the original route up from Wesleydale Camp. – Ed]

made it up the steadily graded track, overcoming the last very steep bits to reach the rocks high up on the Maungatua Range at its southern end by lunch time.

The day was fine and calm with only a little sharp wind up here persuading us to find our own sheltered but sunny spot for lunch. Quite a number of us were newer members and for many this was their first visit to these prominent rocks. Well done.

Lunch at Three Kings. (Ian pic and caption.)

Our leaders Ian and Doug. (Clive pic and caption.)

After a leisurely lunch, it was back down the track again, this time each at their own pace now that  it was a known route, and into the cars, to regather for coffee at Outram. A successful outing. – Ian and Doug.

23. 17/5/2017. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Route map courtesy Ian. Nike pp not turned until 1km into trip so add 1km to all distances. (Ian pic and caption.)

We navigated our cars to what for the Hikers was a new entry spot. Back in 2006 the Todd Group had denied us access through the paddock next to the old Wesleydale Camp which gave us access to a lovely track through the bush above it opening to gorse leading to the FWD track above. Now, back at the bottom of a big dip in  Heenan Road, there was an entry point to a parking spot up at the very bottom of that track, thanks to a hospitable owner’s permission.

Only 13 were able to turn out for the day. A first long-grassed paddock was the only steep effort, the track thereafter proving a delightfully modest steady gradient elevating us soon to impressive views over the Taieri plain. We stopped for morning tea at one such view,

Viewing the plain. (Ian pic and caption.)

but low cloud below us was  beginning to condense obscuring the former clear air.

Later, where we at last emerged from the bush part of the route, we stopped to point out to newer members the old way by which we used to reach this point. Beyond here, the track now steadily steepened the nearer we got to the Three Kings. We took it slowly, with frequent rests and regroupings. Until behold, there was a new track cut right across an extensive cleared area, changing the whole aspect of what we used to experience eleven and more years ago. The new track was even steeper, but at last all got there.

We hunkered down for lunch beneath the principle rock, sheltering from a brief but wetting rain shower.

Shelter for some. (Ian pic and caption.)

A clever perch. (Ian pic and caption.)

But that was it. The day remained calm, if cool. We returned back down the way we had come, all very pleased at having achieved our object. One older member expressed their delighted at achieving a return to the rocks after such a long absence, having given up all hope of ever making it again.

We stopped for coffee at George’s ‘hairy’ goat cafe, delighted to meet up there with the Trampers’ other half of the club, returned just before us.

A satisfying day. Roll on the wintry weekend ahead. – Ian.

22. 8/2/2017. Trampers. Maungatua Summit from Heenan Road. M. Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Tony. Trampers Maungatua trip.

I believe this tramp was a “first’ for the club. We have been up to the “3 Kings” area many times in the past, but today we continued on to the summit.

A small group out today, only 4 of our regulars, 1 potential member and  1 guest: 6 in total.

We left the cars parked up a farm drive off Heenan Road. Our tramp began at 9.00 a.m. on the uphill farm road which goes around the south end of Maungatua, and out towards Mahinerangi.

It was a fine day, sunny but with many clouds. A cool S.W. breeze kept the temperature down.

Morning tea was taken in the last available sheltered spot, the leader being rubbished for stopping 5 minutes early though!

Up a farm track and then in to the tussock taking us up more steeply to trig “F” at 702 metres, from where we could look down onto the “3 Kings“.

Onward on a farm track, before turning off into the tussock for the last 3.25 km, single file following the fence line.

Beautiful moss. (Helen pic and caption.)

The summit was reached at 12.05 p.m. for our lunch stop. Sitting down in the shelter of the vegetation was necessary to get out of the wind. The sunny periods were very welcome as we ate and rested.

Before taking our leave, the obligatory photo of the group at the summit marker post was taken.

Arthur Carol Neil Helen and Neil. (Helen pic and caption.)

Plaque on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Just at this time the red helicopter flew over us at low altitude, our waves being returned.

Red helicopter giving us a wave. (Helen pic and caption.)

No rescue needed today, though, thankfully.

After about 2 km on the return journey we took to the farm track for the remainder. It was somewhat easier going, and also gave a little variation from the inward track.

The wind had eased early afternoon, and then changed to a southerly breeze. Showers were visible in the Balclutha-Milton direction, but were then going out to sea and not towards us.

Lower down we stopped briefly to admire the view out over the lower Taieri Plain. The whole area was bathed in sunshine, and was a real picture. The views from the top of Maungatua had been spoiled a little by all the cloud shadows on the landscape.

Back at the cars at 3.00 p.m. it had been a neat 6 hours from go to whoa. A very satisfactory day’s tramp in the leader’s opinion. Total distance was 17 km, and an altitude climb of 800 metres.

The timing was absolutely perfect!

As we sat down after ordering our drinks at “The Hairy Goat” the rain arrived!

Thanks to all who participated in the day’s very successful tramp. – Art.

21. 22/10/2014. Trampers. Three Kings. M.
This weeks tramp was to the “Three Kings” at the south end of the Maungatua’s. Six trampers travelled to McLaren Rd, drove around past the Lavender farm to our parking place just inside the farm yard gate. Jill went & got the key for us, & then drove back home again, leaving us to find our way up to the tops. The walk was on farm 4WD tracks all the way up, with just a short walk through tussock to the Three Kings where we had lunch in the shelter from a strong cold wind. Then it was a quick retreat back down again out of the wind, & back to the cars. Walked 12km; 4.1 km/h ave; 3hrs moving; climbed 690m.
The view from the top was very good, but the cold wind didn’t make for pleasant viewing. We practised our Coffee Club by calling into the Outram coffee shop on the way home where a good chat session was had. – Ken

18/10/2006 Jeff Todd of Todd Group 477 8902 (10/06). Todd Group had bought Wesleydale and paddock and allowed it to be used for army live firing! Access through all this area denied.

20. 26/4/2006. Trampers. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Evelyn C, Sabina.
19. 24/8/2005. Both. Wesleydale, Three Kings and option of Trig. Leaders: Ria, Irene, Val and Brian, Eleanor B.
18. 19/11/2003. Both. Three Kings from Farm sheds. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Bill and Pat; Hikers: Les and Margaret, Carmel.
des

Down through Gorse. Wendy? Pat

Geo

George on rise, below Trig above Three Kings (19/11/2003)

17. 17/7/2002 Three Kings, Mill Creek, Kowhai. Spur Leaders: Bob H, Doug M, Wendy B
Long. Hard. Water. Steep down Kowhai Spur.
16. 10/7/2002. Wesleydale Methodist Youth Camp to 3 Kings. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Frank.
15. 22/11/2000 Leaders: Lex, Ian
14. 22/9/1999. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Lex, Bill H, Lesley S.
13. 12/8/1998. 3 Kings, Maungatua. Leaders: Irene, Shirley R.
12. 19/11/1997. Wesleydale to 3 Kings and Trig. Leaders Judith and Hugh, Ian.
11. 12/3/1997. Three Kings – Mill Creek Reserve – Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Graham, Barbara McC.
10. 1/5/1996. Duncan’s Farm Road and return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Les S, Graham S, Doug M
9. 3/4/1996 Three Kings from Heenan Road to McLaren Road Start past Little Creek. Medium.
Seek permissions
Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Nelson and Dot.
8. 20/4/1994. Three Kings. Medium. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ivan, Les W.
7. 6/10/1993. Mill Creek (back of the Maungatuas.) Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Ria L, Nel, Betty H.
6. 26/5/1993. Wesleydale Camp – uphill following 4WD track to Maungatuas. Great views. Medium. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Nola, Judith.
5. 9/9/1992. Wesleydale Camp to the Maungatuas. Follow 4WD Track. Average. Leaders: Joan, Betty, Jean, Diana.
4. 29/7/1992. Wesleydale Camp, up the hill following 4WD track to the Maungatuas. Lovely views. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Dave and Jean.
3. 23/10/1991. Maungatuas – Wesleydale to ‘3 Kings Rocks’. Steady up hill grade, but not a long tramp. Average+. Leaders: Nancy, Ray, Ted, Jack R.
2. 27/6/1990 Wesleydale to Three Kings. Average, if taken in easy stages. Don’t rush hill please. Leaders: George, Margaret D, Margaret B, Ria.
1. 8/3/1989. Three Kings. Good tramp up the Maungatuas. Great views of Lower Taieri. Leaders: Denise, George, Peggy.

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Oct 24 2018

Woodside Glen, plus to top of Maungatuas

Published by under Trampers,Year round

No. 30 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Woodside Glen to Maungatuas. E Blackburn, D McEwan. Summer”

Short and long options.

(Maungatua climb fairly steep. 5-7 hours. Heavy tussock on top.  Route only. Manager: DOC.)

11. 24/10/2018. Trampers.Woodside Glen to Maungatua. H. Leaders: Gordon and Art.

13 determined trampers left their cars at Woodside Glen, to begin their tramp.

Ready to cross. Gordon pic and caption.)

Once across the Lee Creek it was uphill all the way until we reached the tussock.

Other than a short distance at the bottom, the track was good and dry, and non slippery. We were in light bush, with some large and obviously very old Broadleaf trees to be seen. Mahoe (white wood) were there in abundance, and many other species.
A level area beside the track at the appropriate time was the smoko stop.

Onward, the track was ever upward, and the perspiration flowed freely. A couple of steeper and trickier bits were safely negotiated,

The last steep pinch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and in due course we all reached the first viewing point above the bush -and where the tussock began. Two of the group elected to wait here for our return.

Into the tussock now,

Traversing tussock country before the gale got up. (Phil pic and caption.)

the height of which reduces with altitude. We lost 5 more at the next rocky knob.

Lords and ladies surveying their domain…. (Phil pic and caption.) [[Ed: N.B. Not necessarily among the “lost 5”]

The remaining 6 trampers carried on for another 20 minutes before eating their lunch (10 minutes early) in the shelter of a rocky knob, with great views out over the Taieri Plain, and far away.

Last stop.Lunch & great views. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Shelter was absolutely necessary as it was quite windy up here.

Frequent clouds of pollen could be seen being blown out of the native bush, down in the Lee Creek area. Lots of pollen around this year.
As we packed up to begin the return, the wind was rising, becoming very strong and blustery. Hold onto your hat weather. At least one hat got blown away, but safely retrieved. It had cooled down too.
A fast return was made down through the beautiful tussock, which was waving in the wind.
Once back in the shelter of the bush the temperature rose notably, a bit hot in fact. Several clumps of the lovely white clematis could be seen as we reached the bush line.
Down, down, down now, all the way. We met two chaps coming up with a large number of dogs, out for exercise. Birdsong was heard all day in the bush and I heard my first Shining Cuckoo of the season.
No one was wasting any time for the descent, and the whole team were back together by the time we crossed Lee Creek again. It ended up a shorter day as we were back at the cars at 1-35.
A refreshment stop was made back in Outram.
Thanks to all. – Art.
10. 28/9/2016. Trampers. Woodside Glen to Maungatua. H. Leader: Arthur H.
Good weather had been ordered for this tramp, and it was delivered. The sky was partly cloudy with some wind from the west. (Down at Outram it was a northeaster.
Six trampers left Mosgiel with high expectations for the day’s adventure. We parked our cars at Woodside Glen, starting from there at 9.25 a.m. Only ten minutes or so brought us to Lee Creek which was a little tricky to cross. I think all made it with dry feet.
The work then began. It is a relentless climb upward through the bush, broken only very briefly by following an old water race. We had a good rest period at morning tea time though.
As the bush thinned out, a patch of low cloud was flowing down the gully to our right – coming in almost from the southwest. It didn’t affect us and soon cleared.
The track up through the bush was good and dry, thankfully, but would have been very slippery if wet.
The upper track had been well cleared as far as a rocky knob where the tussock began. We reached this position at 11.00 a.m., which was a good effort.

The westerly wind was cold here, but a brief stop to admire the view was made.

View of Saddle Hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

View of Saddle Hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

We were up in the tussock now (great) where the track is not well defined. Taking our time, as some found the tussock was a little slippery underfoot, we continued up the eastern spur of Maungatua.

A few minutes before 12 noon we reached a hugh knob from where the view was magnificent. This was our lunch spot…

Lunch Spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch Spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and in Antony Hamel’s book is marked as being at an altitude of 686 metres. (See his map on page 9.05).

The sky was rather hazy, with cloud down on the hills to the north and northeast – on Swampy, for example. But the climb had been well worth it for the view nevertheless.

Outram in distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

Outram in distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

No wind spoiled our lunch, which was quite a leisurely affair, stretching out to 45 minutes in fact – but don’t tell Neil! He would be horrified if he knew!
We began our return, taking care in the downhill slippery tussock. The trouble was that vegetation overhung the little used track and one could not see where one was putting one’s feet.

Out of the tussock and down…

Down, down and more down. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down, down and more down. (Helen pic and caption.)

…into the bush, where there are two or three difficult patches – not to be rushed.

Eventually we reached the creek, crossed without incident, and were back at the cars at 2.45.
The outward journey had been 2.25 hours moving, and a neat 2 hours returning. Distance? – From the map, an estimate of 7 km is all I can come up with.
The mandatory debriefing took place in Outram. All were enthusiastic about the day’s tramp and wanted it to be on our list of ones to do again in the future.
There is something special about being out in the tussock.
9. 23/10/2013. Hikers. Woodside area. Easy. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

Woodside Route

Woodside GPS of Route. 10.5km in all. (GPS recording started rather belatedly.)

We started from the West Taieri Cemetery and walked directly down Woodside Road to the intersection at the old Store and Post Office building, where we stopped for morning tea on an inviting lawn.

We then turned left and walked down McDonald Road past the grand Beardsmore property gates …

Gate

Gate

.. till we made a right turn up Mann Rd (3 km on route map) before returning the way we had come back to the old store corner.

Now a different route was to go left up Berwick Rd, right onto Helvellyn St and to almost complete the circumnavigation of the block, right again down Crossfeld St to then go left up Ravensburn Rd and finally left again via Mountain Rd into Woodside Glen. We entered the walking track alongside the Lee Creek (name?), finding it rather dangerously narrowed in places by slips, to discover it connecting with a newer, wider track further up which led eventually down to the Maungatua tops track stream crossing, where we lunched.  (6 km on route map). Three of our group ventured to rock-hop across the stream to lunch on the far side,…

Lunching across the stream.

Lunching across the stream.

… the rest judging the nearer side a safer spot.

Our return route to the Glen was by the safer new track which we found kept further up and more safely around the ridge (but made less  interesting by its divorce  from the stream) before descending to the Glen.

Here we met the group supporting blind trampers, who were just about to set off up the track, with much happy greeting exchanges. We went back out along Mountain Rd, down Ravensburn Rd to the old store again, to return back up Woodside Road to the cars.

Obviously a Woodside Glen walk needs a lot of road walk to fill out a decent day. Thanks to Barbara and Arthur for planning this well filling the day with much interest.  – Ian.

8. 30/4/2008. Hikers. Woodside Glen. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M.

7. 16/4/2008. Traquair/Whare Creek Track & Woodside Glen.

Viewing Traquair Creek

Viewing Traquair Creek

With inclement weather threatening the joy of a beach walk (Purakanui and Canoe beaches) and only 2 hikers along with 2 leaders, a decision was made to seek dry bush cover instead, and so we headed for the recently-upgraded Outram Glen walk. Neil B. diverted us however to a nearby track he had lately helped to clear  – the Whare (or Traquair) Creek track – starting at the Historical Museum. This turned out to be a great delight as it echoed with bird song and followed a dry-clad, benched course through both native and deciduous trees beside still waters and sometimes beside falling waters over large, mossy boulders.

Neil was an informative guide too, giving us the history of the track, showing us the site of the first flourmill in the country and noting features such as an underground water source, a high, man-made retaining wall, and origins of one of the first reticulated water supplies. We had morning tea back at the Museum and rewarded Neil for his services with freshly-picked mushrooms. We then proceeded to an ‘urban crawl’ through the streets of Outram, with a particular focus on new, spec houses. A decision to lunch at the West Taieri cemetery was thwarted by our driver whose momentum carried us on to Woodside Glen where we were

Lunching by Lee Stream

Lunching by Lee Stream

led up a different creek (Lee Creek) without a paddle, and took lunch beside the stream where the track crosses it. A nice spot indeed. Neil then took us on a ‘conducted tour’ of the once-thriving metropolis of Woodside, noting old shops, churches,

 

 

Old church?

Old church?

school and houses from one of which 2 sisters daily used to bike to the railway station and catch the train to Factory Road and thence to Mosgiel Woollen Mill to work. How times have changed!! So, we didn’t get to the beach or the river or the cemetery, but we did enjoy our varied walk. – Bob

6. 11/7/2007. Hikers. Woodside Glen. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M
5. 8/8/2001. Alt. Woodside Glen. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Mary Y.
4. 20/1/1999. Woodside Glen. Leaders: Joyce, Bev S, Les S.
3. 16/9/1998 Trampers. Woodside Glen to top of Maungatuas. Leaders: Bill H, Graham
2. 20/11/1996. Trampers. Woodside Glen to top of Maungatuas. Leaders: Jack R, George, Eleanor
1. 22/4/1992. Trampers. Woodside Glen Bush track leading to Maungtuas. Average+. Leaders: Bob H, Jack R, Doug & Ngaire
16 km from car park.

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Oct 17 2018

Craiglowan Falls

Published by under Trampers,Year round

9. 17/10/2018. Trampers. Steve Amies – Craig Lowan Falls. M. Dave.

13 keen trampers left their cars not far from the Whare flat school house and started on the Tunnel track.

Starting out on Tunnel track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

This track was fairly flat and one couldn’t help but marvel at the amount of work done by the early water race workers. After reaching McRaes Weir we turned up a somewhat steep track

Heading up to Steve Amies track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to reach the Steve Amies ridge.  The climb along the ridge was very pleasant, with manukas/kanukas dominant, with lush green undergrowth.
We stopped at the memorial Bryan Freeman seat – he used to be a good friend of Eleanor and her late husband.

The Bryan Freeman memorial seat- a good place for a break. (Dave pic and caption.)

Near the top of the track it was obvious the amount of tree planting and track maintenance that Steve Amies and his mates did many years ago.
We then walked down Rollinsons Road and entered the bush that leads to the Whare lake loop track.  It was in this area that a vote of thanks was passed to Arthur and Neil for the obvious work on track maintenance that they continually do (you no longer get your boots wet)!!!

Neil & Arthur’s Bridge. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After having lunch on Smithys’ track it was then down through the bush and back onto Rollinsons road. Round the corner and off the flagstaff – whare flat road we followed an un-named track through scrub up to a pine plantation on a ridge.  On the sides of the ridge were sycamore trees – a pest – but a pretty sight as the trees were coming into leaf. This improved track lead along the ridge finally ending high above McQuilkan’s creek.  Everyone talk care descending steeply down to the creek.
5 minutes up the creek we were at the Craig – Lowen falls – quite a sight!

Craig Lowen Falls. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Another half an hour down the streamwe were out in the open and back to the cars.

We covered 21,319 steps, 15.9km in 5.5hrs and gained a net height of 349 metres.
A good round trip!  Dave

8. 24/9/2014. Trampers. Craiglowan Falls. M.
Enter via MacQuilkin Road up from Whare Flat Schoolhouse.
Craiglowan route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Craiglowan-Bullring-Aquaduct. We walked 15km; ave 4.3km/h; moving time 3 h 30m; climbed 531m.

This week’s tramp was to Craiglowan Falls. We started off at the locked gate on McQuilkans Rd & followed the marked track across numerous creek crossings [where one member got her feet wet at the first crossing] & up over the large rocks just before reaching the falls. We had morning tea break in the bush above the falls, & then retraced our steps for a short distance back to where a side track led off up the LH side of the stream. (Ed note: This was our original, and only, route down to the falls.) We were not sure where this went, but decided to investigate it anyway, as it looked like it had just had some work done on it. I climbed steeply up until we came to some pine forest, & at this stage I was quite sure that it would come out on the Whare Flat-Flagstaff Rd via Sanitarium Rd, which proved to be correct.
At this time it was only about 11:30, so we decided to walk up to the Bull Ring, & go down Longridge Rd to join up with Smeatons Rd,[where stopped for lunch] …
Lunch on Smeatons Rd - Ken pic and caption.

Lunch on Smeatons Rd – Ken pic and caption.

… – McIntyres Rd, [so we could view the remains of Smeatons shack] then down to the Aquaduct. This proved to be more difficult then would seem, as there were a lot of big trees down over the track in places, which made it necessary to detour around them. From the Aquaduct, we walked around to join up with McIntyres Rd. again, & then crossing straight over here onto the next part of the track leading to Longridge Rd. then back to the car.
Some of the tracks were quite muddy & slippery, but all made it safely back, & enjoyed the day. it was new territory for some in the group, & for others it had been a long time since they were there.
7. 30/5/2012. Trampers. Falls, Goat Point, Smeatons Shack, Aqueduct, Longridge Road.
We reached the Falls OK, but stream crossing on wet rocks and climbing over mossy rocks proved rather dicey. (Note: This tramp best done in summer.)

Craiglowan Falls. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning Tea at Craiglowan Falls (Ken pic and caption)

A cautious descent on way back down over large mossy rocks.

Well, to this point, so far, so good. Back at the stream crossing down below the confluence, we failed  to locate the track up to Goat Point, despite knowing its general area. So we climbed in faith and hope. Finally we came across track markers, leading left and right. After exploring left, we went right, until they led relentlessly down. So we retraced back up because Ian had it fixed in his mind that we had to go up to reach the pine plantation. Mistake one.

Encouragingly however, Ken found a track indication on his GPS, and it did promise to reach a forest road. So we kept to this, despite no track appearing, only plenty of scratchy blackberry brambles. But we did reach the road, finally.

This we walked down until we reached a junction, with signs indicating that we were on Smeatons Road, crossed by McIntyre road. Hooray. McIntyre was what we had originally wanted. Ian felt we still had to go down so we turned left and down McIntyre road. Mistake two. We should have taken McIntyre road to the right. More of that later.

Anyway we made the long walk down McIntyre Road, left, to where the race crosses it, and turned right, along the race to lunch, as planned, at the Aqueduct.

Linzi at lunch.

Now, have a look at Ken’s GPS of our route. Click to enlarge. Start at the top, and follow to the right to reach Craiglowan Falls at the extreme right.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Start returning to the left a bit. The zigzag you see is where we starting climbing away from the stream. A further zigzag a little further along is where we started following the track markers. The little tail to the left there, is where we turned back, before going back up again. CRITICAL MISTAKE. Notice, however,  the short gap beyond to a tail coming up from below. This is the gap we should have traversed.

Now turn to page 8.07 of Antony Hamel’s Tracks and Trails, and find on the map of Flagstaff Forest at the top right, the circled number “seven”. See how it ascends first before turning right along a contour, below Goat Point and then DOWN to meet McIntyre road at its other end next to Smeatons Shack.

That tail from below is where Ken and Ian climbed up at lunch time to check where we should have come down. And lo and behold, we found not only Smeatons Shack but also the marked track next to it where we should have exited from. An aha moment. And it all became clear, as the GPS map confirms.
Ken and I returned back down the end of McIntyre Road to find the others had left, leaving Doug waiting for us. Of course we should have consulted with everyone to get mutual agreement with what we proposed to do and to arrange a meeting place should the others proposed not to wait. But in our excitement at solving the mystery, we had neglected to do so.
Anyway, going on out to the bottom of McIntyre Road at its other end, we didn’t know whether the others had simply turned down there and back along Long Ridge Road to the cars, or carried on along the race. In the absence of any indication, we set off along the race, as that had been the original intention of the tramp. We were relieved to catch up on them enough to see them further beyond us, but stopping to don parkas as the drizzling rain got heavier, lost sight of them again.
Emerging from the race end further up Long Ridge Road, we saw them again rounding a corner further down and caught up on them at the gate at the end. So all was well that ended well.
Quite an adventure and some interesting unplanned bush-bashing. A lesson in how bush conditions can change over two years and a reminder that our smaller numbers means that all our tramps now amount to a recce, – unlike the hikers, whose “reconnoiterers”  go through our experience and sort things out first. – Ian
6. 10/2/2010. Trampers. Falls, Goat Point, Smeaton Shack, Aquaduct, Longridge Road. Leaders: Ian, Sabina.
Down Whare Flat Road 1.5 km. Sanatorium Road second on left after Bullring. – Track no longer locatable from top by us.
It all got a bit complicated. First the leaders failed to find the track down from the Sanatorium Road extension track. Many, many fallen trees had obliterated all trace of the track where it first descends steeply down. Well, the leaders couldn’t find it anyway.
However the start of a new track closer in from the gate had been pointed out by a local landowner so that was followed on the day.
It was fairly well cleared but markers petered out down the middle of a steep bouldery stream (the McQuilkin way upstream from the falls?) so after a morning tea rest, we prudently retreated back up and began all over again, this time back at the old school-house. Up McQuilkin Road. Right-fork into bush and across the McQuilkin on a wire hand-hold. On up and eventually back across to the true right and to the stream junction. Interesting notice points to “Watar fall”. Up over the large rocks and now it was lunch-time at the falls.

Ken, Doug and George before Craiglowan Falls

Lunch at Craiglowan Falls. George, Ria, Hazel (hidden), Sabina, Ian, Doug. (Ken pic)

Back down and across to the true left but now up steeply to Goats Point. Across through the bush and down to Smeatons Shack on McIntyre Road.

Smeatons Shack. Ian, George. (Ken pic)

Down the road , down the track to emerge on the cleanly excavated concrete access race near the aqueduct. (Thanks, track clearers.)

Artistic shot through race gate. Doug, Ria, Ian. (Ken pic)

Rusted up flow meter. Ian. (Ken pic)

Aqueduct top. (Ken pic)

Aqueduct. Collapse section showing. Stone pillar. Ian, Doug, Ria, George. (Ken pic)

Then following out along the race to the other end of McIntyre Road, and across it to the far end of the race where the track comes out on Longridge Road. Down the road and back to the cars. What could have been a very short day comfortably filled out to be more satisfyingly longer. Must ask those landowners how that other track gets you to the falls. And must check out whether the old track is still navigable. – Ian
5. 3/8/2005. Both. School House, Craiglowan Falls, – Whare Flat. Leaders: Judy, Jacqui, Hazel
4. 6/8/2003. Both. Craiglowan Falls. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Hazel, Barbara L, Mary M.
3. 19/7/2003. Craiglowan Falls.
Craiglowan Falls

Craiglowan Falls

Craiglowan Falls. Ian

Craiglowan Falls. Ian

Upstream from top of Craiglowan Falls.

Upstream from top of Craiglowan Falls.

Overlooking top of Craiglowan Falls.

Overlooking top of Craiglowan Falls.

Old Aquaduct. Doug.

Old Aqueduct. Doug.

Top of old aquaduct.

Top of old aqueduct.

2. 30/8/2000 Craiglowan Falls, Whare Flat. Leaders: Mavis, Winifred, Val
1. 16/4/1997. Craig Lowan Falls from Bull Ring. Leaders:Hugh, Val, Judy C

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Oct 10 2018

Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip

Published by under Trampers,Year round

click to enlarge
Cloud Forest and Escarpment

Map: Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Telegraph (Old Bridal) track to Pigeon Flat, Escarpment Track, Cowan Rd, Short Cut to Fox Rd, down to Sullivans Dam

8. 10/10/2018. Sullivans Dam. Cloud Forest, Transmission Line. Return. M. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.

Morning tea at Sullivan’s Dam. (Clive pic and caption.)

Up through the trees. (1) (Clive pic and caption.)

Up through the trees. (2) (Clive pic and caption.)

At the top before the rain set in. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch sheltering from the rain. (Clive pic and caption.)

7. 20/7/2016. Hikers. Sullivans Dam. Cloud Forest, Transmission Line, Round trip to Lookout and Leith Saddle. Return. M. Leaders: Pam, Ian.
22 Hikers turned up. 14 went to Transmission line, 11 did ‘Leith loop’ (a first for us). – Ian.
View of some of the stepping stone steps.

Some of the multiple ‘stepping stone’ steps – on one of the easier gradients. [Ed: Have seen such nowhere else.]

Lunch at Transmission line.

Lunch at Transmission line at top of Cloud Forest track.

Bluesman Bay view from Transmission Line lunch spot. (Adrienne pic.)

Blueskin Bay view from Transmission Line lunch spot. (Adrienne pic.)

Dunedin view from lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Dunedin view from lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Dam view from where? - Lookout? (Adrienne pic.)

Sullivan’s Dam view from  Lookout point. (Adrienne pic.)

Ends of track down from Lookout, on Leith Saddle end of Pigeon Flat Road. (Adrienne pic.)

Ends of track down from the Lookout Loop, on Leith Saddle end of Pigeon Flat Road. (Adrienne pic.)

6. 9/3/2011. Trampers. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip.

Pines up ahead, through which and around we have to go.

At the foot of a rocky bluff we had to climb around.

On the top of the bluff. (Apologies for badly aimed shot.)

It was an great tramp. Some challenges, like having to crawl on knees over the huge rocks, crawling under some gigantic fallen trees, going through bush so dense that we couldn’t see the ground, pushing our way through gorse and holding on to trees to swing through a few muddy patches. A couple of times there was some discussion on which way to go, but with our two awesome experienced leaders, Ian and Doug, we were soon headed in the correct direction.
A small problem for the ladies was some cattle in a paddock we had to go through, first Dawn was too nervous to move when the beasts started coming towards her, but Ian assured her they were only curious.   After waiting for Pam and Jill to appear, Ian decided to investigate, so he climbed back through the fence and went back up the paddock to find two more ladies nervous of the cattle.  He confidently escorted them down the rest of the way.
The tramp took 6 hours but didn’t seem that long with great company and the best escorts, it was a wonderful experience and I look forward to many more. – Dawn.

It was disappointing to find much of the Escarpment Track so overgrown. It had evidently not been tramped very often lately.

But thanks to those who have looked after the short-cut from Cowan Road through the trees down to Fox Road, and further on, to those who had trimmed back the gorse from the track down through the regenerating forestry. – Ian.

(5.) 12/8/2009 Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests, Escarpment, Cowan round trip. CANCELLED. BAD WEATHER. Leaders: Bill, Doug.

The following photos taken on RECCE!:

Sullivans Dam

Sullivans Dam. (Bill pic)

Blueskin Bay from Telegraph Track

Blueskin Bay from Telegraph Track. (Bill pic)

Track notice

Track notice. (Bill pic)

Boulders

Boulders recently climbed. (Bill pic). Doug.

Vert. Escarpment

Mud on Escarpment. (Bill pic). Doug.

4. 22/7/2009 Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forests of Leith, Lookout, Leith Saddle, Pipe Line back to Dam. Leaders: L Gowans, B Harvey.
3. 18/7/2007 Leaders: Abe, Ian

From Sullivans Dam, we made our way through

Tea Break. Ian, George, Tash, Helen.

Cloud Forest, crossed Pole track, crossed Telegraph/Bridal Track, North face of Mt Cargill, down Cowan Road, Short-cut to cross Bridal Track,

Down Cowan Road. Keith, George, Arthur H, Glenice, Diane (obscured), Helen, Tash, Ian.

through cleared forestry,

Down through cleared forestry. Ian, Helen, Diane, Arthur, Keith, Tash

McCutcheon paddocks, up pipe line back to dam.

2. 30/11/2005. Trampers. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Escarpment, Cowan Road. Round trip Leaders: Bill & Pat, Bruce
1. 20/7/2005. Sullivans Dam, Cloud Forest, Escarpment, Cowan Road. Round trip. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Bruce.

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Sep 26 2018

Taioma, Parera, Viaduct

No. 96 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Parera Taioma (Transrail & Wenita Year Round”

Wenita permit. Require 6 weeks notice, but less from us.

Taieri Gorge Railway. Phone 477 4449 for details.

14. 26/9/2018. Trampers. Taioma, Parera, Viaduct. Leader: Keith.

Eight trampers left the car park and drove to the carpark near the Wingatui viaduct.
A strong tail wind helped push us up the hill on the forestry road before we found a sheltered spot  for morning tea, behind a bank with sun and no wind.
We continued on up a long ridge before tracking off road through some newly planted pine trees until we reached the Taieri River.
Following the railway around to the Parera tunnel,

The Parera railway crossing. (Dave pic and caption.)

Old railway house well maintained. (Dave pic and caption.)

where we climbed up Bacon track and did some bush bashing to get past a washout,

Makin Bacon track. (Dave pic and caption.)

The team at the tunnel!. (Dave pic and caption.)

Jill sees the light at the end of the tunnel!. (Dave pic and caption.)

we followed the railway again, then onto  “Garraways” track where we had lunch then under the viaduct

(Janine pic.)

Railway viaduct – magnificent engineering! – pic.. (Dave pic and caption.)

and back to the vehicles.
Coffee for 6 at Blend. Distance 9.3 km. – Keith

13. 20/6/2018. Hikers. Wingatui Viaduct, Taioma. Leaders: Jenny, Shona.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Top of tunnel climb. A track washout stopped us getting very far down the other side. (Ian pic and caption.)

The tunnel we climbed over. (Ian pic and caption.)

lunching on a new breakout of portable seats. (Ian pic and caption.)

12. 12/4/2006. Hikers. Taioma, Viaduct, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Lesley G.
11. 5/10/2005. Both. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Doug J, Jacqui, Lesley G, Anne R
10. 1/9/2004. Both. Taioma, Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Molly

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

x

Lunch at Parera. Judy, Pat, Dorothy, Ria, George, Peter

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

9. 4/9/2002. Combined. Taioma, Wingatui Viaduct. Medium. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Wendy J.
8. 16/1/2002. Combined. Taioma – Parera. Medium. Leaders; Molly, Pat and Bill.
7. 8/11/2000. Taioma – Parera – Wingatui Viaduct. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Shirley McN.
6. 5/5/1999. Taioma – Parera – Viaduct. Leaders: George, Hazel, Ian.
5. 26/11/1997. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor, Ted.
4. 9/8/1995. Taioma. Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Bill and Lesley, Jack R.
3. 25/8/1993. Taioma, Viaduct to Parera, up the hill to Mount Allan Road and return. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Penny & Peter, Jack M
2. 14/10/1998. Hindon Railway Viaduct. Leaders: Hugh and Judith.
1. 20/4/1988 Taioma to Parera. Leaders: Bob H, Denise

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Aug 22 2018

Signal Hill tramps

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Distance Chingford from carpark: 20 km.
Follow Old Main North Road to Cleghorn Street which has the best view of the harbour. Walkway sign.
Walk starts starts at the gate on right, up McGregors Hill. Beyond stile Pine plantation on 3rd stile at summit.
Gravel road 10 minutes to end. Locked gate. Last stile. Signal Hill road.

16. Signal Hill Tramp 22/08/2018. Leaders: Neil and Margreet

A large contingent of 21 trampers set out from the Otago Yacht Club in a ‘lazy’ southwest breeze and threatening rain. We walked to Ravensbourne on the cycle/walk way admiring the recently completed landscaping and fitness course. Crossing SH88 we climbed the steep zig zag track from the WW2 Memorial to Manuka St and the beginning of the Signal Hill track.

Morning tea was at the nearby playground

Morning tea with Harbour views. (Gordon pic and caption.)

and then, in light rain, we climbed steadily to break out of the bush at the ‘Plateau’. A sharp right turn onto the nuggety but sheltered Telecom track soon had us at the Monument.

Monument view. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Great views over Dunedin up there, and we checked out the Centennial Memorial with its bronze male and female figures representing ‘History’ and ‘The Thread of Life’. 

To add interest to the tramp we then walked down the road and turned off onto a vehicle track which climbed steeply

Steep pinch to summit Signal Hill. (Gordon pic and caption.)

to the communication complex on top of Signal Hill. There we stopped for lunch

Sheltered lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

sheltering from the cold wind and taking in the sweeping views

View from lunch stop. (Gordon pic and caption.)

from Taiaroa Head to Mt. Cargill and Forrester Park.

The return hike was via a 4WD track that crossed all the formed downhill mountain bike trails.

Not far to cars now. (Gordon pic and caption.)

The track ended up at Logan Park High School and it was then an easy stroll past the Stadium back to our cars. Of note was the old Fever Hospital near Logan Park which finally closed its door in 1952 and was then bought by the University as accommodation for medical students.

After the 15km trek, we all enjoyed a coffee or ‘cuppa’ at Emerson’s Brewery.

Neil and Margreet Simpson.

15. 14/2/2018. Hikers. Cleghorn Street to Normanby Pub via Signal Hill and Centennial Memorial. M. Leaders: Pam and Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Clive pic.

Clive pic.

14. 14/8/2013. Hikers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip. M. Leaders: Lex and Graham.
We parked near Chingford Park and walked up the hill on the Mt Cargill Rd to the turn-off to Signal Hill.  Morning tea on the side of the road about halfway up.  It was blowing a gale and pretty cold but with everyone rugged up well there were no dramas.  Margaret and Les chose to turn back – it was hard going and I don’t blame them!
Elaine in bath. (Judy pic).

Elaine enjoying bath. (Judy pic).

 Lunch in the shelter of the trees near the top …
Lunch. (Judy pic)

Lunch break. (Judy pic)

… then across to the masts, and down to the road.  135 steps on the steep descent and a few stiff knees. – Judy
13. 29/6/2011. Trampers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken

We enjoyed the harbour view as we walked along the rather wet and muddy 4WD track after leaving Cleghorn Street.

The view down the harbour was wonderful

With younger members among the trampers now, we are making a faster pace than formerly and reached the ‘signals’ on Signal Hill a bit half an hour earlier than lunch time, so decided to carry on. We found a sunny calm spot on the Signal Hill Road side to enjoy lunch.

Lunch on Signal Hill roadside

12. 8/7/2009 Trampers Chingford Park, North Road, Cleghorn Street, McGregors Hill, Signal Hill, Signal Hill Road round trip. Medium. Leaders: Pat & Bill
Start

First view of harbour and Peninsula. Bill, Pat, Wendy, Ken.

 

St Leonards

St Leonards below.

Charles Cone

Mount Charles and Harbour Cone on Peninsula

Heads

Roseneath, Port Chalmers and Heads

Lunch

Lunch at top of hill. Doug, Arthur, Wendy, Ian, Pat, Bill. (Ken pic)

Dunedin

Down from Signal Hill with Dunedin beyond. Wendy, Ken, Arthur, Pat.

11. 13/5/2009 Hikers. Signal Hill, Cleghorn St. Leaders: Bev H, Joyce

10. 20/7/2005. Trampers. Cleghorn St, Signal Hill.
Harbour view. "Hi Shirley". Bob, Pat, Who?

Harbour view. “Hi Shirley”. Bob, Pat, Dot.

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

9. 14/8/2002 Logan Park High School, Signal Hill, Cleghorn St, NEV Road. Leaders: Molly, Hazel, Barbara McC
8. 22/5/2002. Alt. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Betty, Colleen.
7. 24/1/2001. Normanby, Signal Hill, Opoho. Leaders: Lance and Lois, Shirley R.
6. 16/8/2000 Bethunes Gully, Opoho. Leaders: Jack & Rosemary, Shirley R.
5. 26/4/2000. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Denise.
4. 24/1/2000 Chingford Park, Old Brown House, Signal Hill, Opoho, Leaders: Lance & Lois, Peter R
3. 22/4/1998. Chingford Park, Brown House, Signal Hill. Leaders: Shirley McN, Shirley R.
2. 16/6/1993. Bethunes Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Round Trip. Easy. Leaders: Shirley, Doreen, Diana, Nel.
1. 1/7/1992. Bethune’s Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Marie, June, Ray.

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Aug 15 2018

Post Office Creek, Reid’s Station

Published by under Trampers,Year round

 No. 27 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mahinerangi – Post Office Creek. J Shaw. Year round.”
Impassable gorse-infestation beyond old Waipori School building (aft 2008).
33 km from car park.
16. 15/8/2018. Trampers. Verterburn Station. Leader: Jill.

11 trampers enjoyed a beautiful day on Andrew Reid’s property.  We parked at the woolshed and headed downhill before walking along a water race created by gold miners, to a now empty dam.

10409112nd—Quick stop morning tea. (Gordon pic and caption.)

On old water race above Post Office Creek. (Phil pic and caption.)

We marvelled at how this race had been dug into the hillsides – and can barely imagine the living conditions of the early miners, one must certainly hope their toiling brought rewards!!  There were a few fences to climb

Another Bloody fence. (Gordon pic and caption.)

but we were rewarded with nice views over Post Office Creek and then Lake Mahinerangi.

Surveying the Post Office Creek arm of Lake Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

We then walked away from the lake, across a dam, and through paddocks up to the farm boundary with DCC forestry.  Lunch was eaten in the shelter of the trees.

A very welcome lunch break. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Then a few more ups and downs but we basically walked through the paddocks beside Mahinerangi Road back  to our cars.
A most enjoyable day.

Distance walked 15.5 km. – Jill.

15. 17/1/2018. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Leader: Jill.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

13 trampers met at Reid’s woolshed on Mahinerangi Road.  We walked down the hill to Post Office creek, and had morning tea at the “camp” before taking the track through gold mine sluicings to the top end of Lake Mahinerangi – a very low lake today!  After viewing the old Waipori school (which had been moved to this site to use as a musterer’s hut before Waipori village was drowned) …

School inspection. The “old” Waipori School moved to Post Office Creek before the raising  of Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

… we backtracked about 1 km and shortly after went up a very steep stock lane …

Onwards and upwards to the trig. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and lunched by the trig there, enjoying expansive views of the area.

Trig A4GT -618 m altitude. (Phil pic and caption.)

We continued up the farm track towards the back of the Maungatuas – the intention had been to look over to Waihola, but it was decided that was a bit far on this occasion!  It was an easy return down hill to the bridge over Post Office creek – and to our cars.

 

Jill proudly displaying the new charging station for e bike travellers. (Phil pic and caption.)

An 18.5 km tramp enjoyed by all. – Jill.

14. 7/5/2014. Both. Reid homestead, Verter Burn to Post Office Creek and old school buildings. Leaders: Ken and Peter.

GPS

iPhone GPS distance: 12.1 km. Garmin stats: We walked 12.9km; Moving ave 4.3km/hr; Moving time 2h 58mins; Climbed 342mtrs; Max elevation 572mtrs. Allow a further km or two for the pedometer distance recorders, and then pick the figure that suits you!

21 of us parked in the Reid’s homestead backyard and made our way through one or two fences down to a bridge over the Verter Burn (near ‘1’ on the map) for morning tea.

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

We followed a road on the stream’s true left, which begs the question as to where originated the pond with its beautiful reflection on our left. (About ‘2’ on map.)

Reflection

Reflection

Between 3 and 4 on the map, is where we approached the Verter Burn ford, into which we were to plunge later, but at this stage we swung off to our left to make our way through early gold-sluiced cliffs (8/4 on map) to finally cross the Post Office Creek and arrive at (5) the former Waipori School building (as reported to the writer) of the one-time but now submerged Waipori Township.

 

Waipori Township

The Township of Waipori. The valley is now flooded and the town site is inundated. Photograph taken in 1890 by Charles Kerr.

We climbed the steep hill alongside the Post Office Creek’s true left to skirt on our right a forestry of densely branched trees  (larches? [and unpruned!] with a scattering of eucalypt among them) for a lunch where the forestry road levelled out at the top (6).

Then it was back down to the school building and out to the aforementioned ford, which this time we crossed with variously successful attempts in keeping feet dry, (but mostly wet).

Beyond that, was the further challenge of the BIG CLIMB, of un-fond older members’ memory. A taranaki gate at its top was new to us, but Neil successfully unscrambled its complexity. Three more paddocks and gates took us out to the Mahinerangi Road ( 11) and along it to the homestead (12.1) again.

At Outram, the majority of the (now well-established) coffee club socialised at the Wobbly Goat, …

 

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

although some betook themselves to the No 8 w Herbs cafe across the road. And that’s it. – Ian.

13. 28/11/2007. Trampers. Post Office Creek, fishermen huts return. Skyline track was closed on the day. Working on roads, trees. Easy. Leaders: Bill & Pat.
The day was fine and not too hot for
13 of us to tramp the Lake Mahinerangi water-race track to the fishermen huts. We had morning tea at the Post Office Creek Old School.
Tea Break

Tea Break. Hazel, Wendy, Doug, George, Ken, Shirley, Pat, Joyce, Arthur L

Immediately beyond that, the leaders had found for us the clearest approach to the larch forest that borders the lake, the tussock and bog being now badly infested with gorse. A leisurely lunch in the sun at the fishing huts and the return back. The Verter Burn barring the way in and out, as always, inspired a variety of creative crossing techniques, from direct plunging through the water boots and all, to bare feet, to plastic bags over boots and even to gumboots carried in.
Crossing

Crossing techniques. Abe (bare feet), Peter, Pat (getting plastic bags), Doug (bags), Barbara and Wendy (boots on rocks), Arthur (gumboots)

The long hill climb back out of the Verter Burn gets no easier with age, but all agreed it was another good day out. – Ian

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

12. 8/11/2006. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Doug M
11. 18/5/2005. Both. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Doug J, Bill M, Joyce S, Lesley G
10. 29/10/2003 Forestry roads return. Leaders:
Hut

Crib by the ford. Bob Peter Arthur Barbara Who? Molly

Crss

Crossing Verter Burn. Peter Who? Molly

gate

The gate beyond Verter Burn.

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

Art

Lunch stop. Arthur & Barbara on a tea break on forestry road back out.

9. 25/4/2002 Leaders: Joyce S Shirley, Wendy B
8. 30/1/2002. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce, Bob H, Donny.
7. 25/4/2001. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Shirley McN, Wendy.
6. 5/4/2000. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Bill McL, Nancy.
5. 26/5/1999. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Nancy, Patricia.
4. 26/8/1998. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Pat.
3. 4/2/1998. Post Office Creek to Huts and return from Robert Reids. Leaders: Denise, Ria L, Nel K.
2. 30/4/1997. Post Office Breek (sic) to huts round trip. (Robert Reids). Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H.
1. 8/4/1992. Post Office Creek – off Mahinerangi Road. Average. Leaders: Hartmann, Ted, Barbara M, Mary M

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