Archive for the 'Hikers' Category

Jul 18 2018

Allans Beach

27 km from car-park.

5. 18 July 2018. Hikers. Allans Beach. E. Bruce and Marjorie

28 hikers set off from the car park at the end of the Allans Beach road by crossing the style at approximately 11 am and had morning tea

Morning tea in the sand dunes. (Clive pic and caption.)

near the end of the track to the beach, reached by crossing a second style. Our transit time from 9.30 am at the Bush Road car park was longer than usual because of the work associated with the widening of the road from Broad Bay to Portobello with fill from the Clearwater quarry near the south side of Papanui Inlet. The fill is transported in large truck trailer units and for safety the Allans Beach road is one way during the week at present (apart from for residents) from Allans Beach to Portobello. We were not aware of this when we did the recce on Saturday 7 July. The route that remained open to Allans Beach, which most of us followed, was proceeding through Portobello on the Harrington Point road and turning right, after 1.3 km, into Weir Road, right onto the Papanui Inlet road and then taking the second road on the road that passes between Papanui Inlet and Hooper’s Inlet, and between Gearys Hill and Mount Charles, to join the Allans Beach Road. Most of us also explored Sheppard Road between Papanui Inlet and Hoopers Inlet to find that it was one way and did not allow a left turn into Allans Beach road.  The entrance to the Clearwater quarry is on the Papanui Inlet road about 0.8 km past Sheppard road between Varleys Hill and Gearys Hill. 

We proceeded to explore the northeast end of the beach until we reached the rocks and then turned to travel southwest along the beach

A sunny walk along the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

and around the corner to the right to have lunch at 12.15 near the north end of the first bay on the right.

Some of the group made their leisurely way back after lunch while the main group proceeded around the shoreline until 1.10 pm to the fence which comes to within 1 m of the water just around the point where the inlet shoreline turns from north to north east. 

A 1-year-old sea lion appeared to observe our arrival at the fence area and flapped its way across a boggy area from about 150 m away to the east, wriggled through a fence and swam down the channel to stop adjacent to our party to observe us.

a sea lion poses for everyone. (Clive pic and caption.)

We had endeavoured to remain a safe distance from the wildlife, which a regular observer of the wild life informed us later was 20 m, but this young sea lion proceeded to emerge from the water opposite us a distance of less than 20 m and display some sea lion dentition. We retreated appropriately in the face of this gesture and proceeded to retrace our steps to the end of the beach near the outlet, pausing to watch a mother-child pair

Mother and calf in the sand dunes. (Clive pic and caption.)

approximately 3 m into the sand dunes from the inlet, about 300 m from the fence. Some other sea lions were observed on the shore on the opposite side of the inlet

We proceeded north east up the beach for about 100 m to approximately 25 m past a pine tree in the dunes to a track whose entrance was marked by an upright post and a surf board shaped portion of boat. 

We followed the track through the sand hills, past a grassy clearing, with tree segment seats arranged around the inverted remnants of a copper, and through an open gate into a paddock with approximately 100 cows on the grass whom we passed on the left between the grassy and boggy areas.

When we reached a fence we turned right for about 100 m past a circular water trough to open a gate on the left. We proceeded to follow the track past the farm house of Christine and Sam Neill who had kindly given permission for us to traverse their property.  We opened two gates to cross the drive way to the farm house, passed the cattle yards on the left, went through another gate and were reunited with our cars by opening the gate leading to the cars, about 80 from our first style, at 2.15 pm.  

The group that returned earlier arrived shortly before the main group via the beach or past the cattle. The distance travelled was approximately 8 km and the route was similar to that shown in the map for March 2016. The weather was relatively calm, cloudy and reasonably comfortable for walking. Low tide was at approximately 2 pm, about 30 minutes before low tide in Dunedin. (The tide at Taiaroa Head is approximately 13 minutes before Port Chalmers which is approximately 14 minutes before Dunedin). 

Afternoon coffee was at Nichols. The Allans Beach has the possible disadvantage of being at some distance from Mosgiel but offers a soft terrain to walk on, some variety between beach and farm walking, flattish terrain and, potentially, glimpses of wild life.

Bruce and Marjorie

4. 23/3/2016. Hikers. Allans Beach. E. Leaders: Bruce, Marjorie.

Mar 23 Allans Beach route. (Bruce pic and caption)

Mar 23 Allans Beach route. (Bruce pic and caption)

Allans Beach tramp report 23 March 2016

Twenty-two hikers set off from the car park at the end of Allans Beach road at 9.40 am. Low tide at Dunedin was 11 am and at Allans Beach (between Taiaroa Head and St Clair) approximately 10.30 am. We went over the stile and down the track to the beach before turning left and proceeding to the end of the beach …

At eastern end of Allans Beach (Bruce pic and caption)

At eastern end of Allans Beach (Bruce pic and caption)

… where we observed a couple of sea lions

Sea lion eastern end of beach (Bruce pic and caption)

Sea lion eastern end of beach (Bruce pic and caption)

before returning a little to have morning tea at the base of the rocky cliff, where a sign indicated that no dogs were allowed.

Morning tea break. (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Bruce pic and caption)

After morning tea we went to the other end of the beach and looked at the channel with the outgoing tide running quite swiftly.

We then went up the left bank of Hoopers Inlet walking on quite firm sand and seeing a few more sea lions.

Sea lion left bank of inlet (Bruce pic and caption)

Sea lion left bank of inlet (Bruce pic and caption)

We stopped at the fence which stretched to within a metre of the water’s edge and then returned to have lunch in the shelter of the lupins.

Lunch break (Bruce pic and caption)

Lunch break (Bruce pic and caption)

After lunch we returned to the beach and took a track into the sand dunes about 150 m from the end of the beach. The track came out on the farm of Sam and Christine Neill and we went across the farm, past the house, through two gates on the road leading to the house, and back along the paddock to the stile by the carpark, reaching this at 1.30 pm. Distance covered approximately 8.5 km. Morning tea was designated for the Portobello Café but we ended up at the Penguin Café, Portobello.

It would have been difficult to walk along the edge of the inlet on the sand unless the tide was reasonably low.

–  Bruce and Marjorie

3. 11/1/2012. All. Allans Beach. Leader: Fred.

GPS of Allans Beach Walk, courtesy Ken.

View of the fog that was around all day. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch 2. (Ken pic and caption) (Lex at left, sitting)

Diamond Wedding.

Rocks at nth end of beach. (Ken pic and caption)

Displeased boss of the beach. (Ken pic and caption)

Busy as main street. (Ken pic and caption)

2. 20/4/2011. Hikers. Allans Beach. Leaders: Molly, Graham.
1. 29/9/1999. Allans Beach. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Peggy M.

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Jul 18 2018

Sandymount – Sandfly Bay Tramps

Published by under Farm,Hikers,Trampers,Year round

No. 24 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lovers Leap – The Chasm – Sandfly Bay. N Strang. Farm. Year Round.”
No. 73 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sandymount – Lovers Leap. Year Round”
29 km from car-park.
See Sandymount for area background information.
Sandymount closed for lambing Aug-Oct. Track unformed in places, grassy, slippery when wet. (See also article on pingao planting.)
21. 2018-07-18. Trampers. Sandymount. Leader: Phil.

Eager anticipation of another day ‘just like yesterday’ saw 12 keen trampers travel to the Sandymount carpark, to be greeted by great views to all points of the compass.  People could be seen walking and congregating down below  at the N end of Allans Beach – could it be the Hikers and could they see us?  One of the day’s and life’s enduring questions!

Despite promises of a morning tea at Lovers Leap we ascended the steep track to the Trig and view point, made more challenging by sand; the view point ( and much of the track overall) had been cleared and tidied since the recce.  View shafts abounded including to the Lammerlaws, Silverpeaks, Saddle Hill and the Kakanui and beyond…aah all was well with the world.

Morning tea at Trig. ( Phil pic and caption)

We then retraced our steps back to the carpark and followed the start of the track through the avenue of Macrocarpa

Macrocarpa in stone. (Phil pic and caption.)

and followed the markers down to the lookout over the Chasm which was not unlike ‘staring into the Abyss’.

One was left wondering how and when the volcanic basalt collapsed into the sea to create the formation since formed 10-13 million years ago.

Moving onto Lovers Leap vertigo again made it’s presence felt across the group.

Lovers a leaping. (Phil pic and caption.)

and we pondered another of life’s mysteries such as how could the farmer get his ploughing equipment to the pastures far below?

We then completed the loop track of Sandymount and started our descent down the long sand dune towards Sandfly Bay (made a wildlife refuge in 1908); some ‘young at hearts’ (Guess who?) needed to try sliding on plastic down …

Some wanted to slide down. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… the dunes, but with no success, due to the laws of physics, lack of suitable toboggans but probably more importantly the shape of the protagonists’ backsides that were no good for backsliding! (oh dear)

We approached the beach with some caution due to the strong smells and compressed grasses, and yes we were proved right with 20 sea lions, large and small scattered along the beach.

Three is company. (Phil pic snd caption)

Lunch was taken on a well placed grouping of logs, and then circumventing the wildlife we set off down the beach (where the sand was not flying) finally turning inland and tip-toing across the stream a few times ( with Dave demonstrating how to walk on water) we crossed and ascended farmland to Ridge Road.

On Ridge Road. Phil caption; Gordon pic.)

From here we completed the round trip UP the roads back to the carpark …

Trump’s Toupee hung out to dry? (Phil pic and caption.)

… where it was agreed coffee should be taken at Nicolls; and lo and behold to be greeted there by the large contingent of Hikers – who the barista informed the writer must have been the fast pack! – Phil

20. 15/6/2016. Trampers. Ridge Road. Farmland, Bay, Sand-hills, Sandymount and road return. M. Leader: Jill.
On a pristine winter’s morning 11 eager trampers left from the cars on Ridge Rd and traversed through farmlands to Sandfly Bay. Here we had a later morning tea on the beach listening to a very noisy sea.
We progressed along the beach giving wide berth to 5 sea lions 2 of them were a sandy colour and we wondered if they were the youngsters.

White seal. (Helen pic and caption.)

White seal. (Helen pic and caption.)

Went to a locked up viewing hide before plodding our way through sand-hills, sand-hills and more sand-hills till we finally climbed through coastal scrub emerging at the Sandymount car park. From the car park we had a very panoramic view of the Otago Harbour, Hoopers, and Papanui Inlets that were surrounded with Harbour Cone and Mt Charles with Allans Beach at its base. Lunch

Helen & Judy. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Helen & Judy. (Margreet pic and caption.)

was sheltered at the entrance to the macrocarpa  avenue of trees

Beautiful canopy of trees. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beautiful canopy of trees. (Helen pic and caption.)

which we walked through after lunch to view both Lovers Leap

Lovers Leap platform. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lovers Leap platform. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lovers leap. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lovers leap. (Helen pic and caption.)

and the Chasm. Venturing around Sandymount we finally spotted the trig just above us on the track where some wandered  up but the scrub was rather high blocking the view which was better at a lower level. The final stage of our trip was on the Sandymount road back to the cars. We covered 11kms and felt we deserved liquid refreshments at the St Clair salt pool cafe enjoying the last of the winter sun. – Jill.

19. 28/1/2015. Hikers. Lovers Leap, The Chasm. Leaders: George, Alex.
Hikers Sandymount Route

Hikers Sandymount Route – anticlockwise from car-park. But application stopped working at the Chasm. W-h-y??? Bother, bother!!

Thirty-nine of us, yes THIRTY-NINE (did include a number of school children due back at school the following Monday) turned up at the Sandymount car park for what was promised to be a shorter walk with not too much climbing. George and Alex had recceed a round trip clockwise, deciding to lead us in an anti-clockwise direction on the day. So we set off.

New (well, to the writer at least) signs at the first junction indicated that Lovers Leap was via Sandymount Hill,

Signs like this have proliferated around Sandymount now.

Signs like this have proliferated around Sandymount now. (John pic)

the other sign indicated Sandfly Bay. BUT! The writer has never climbed the hill before, as on previous occasions we have always gone on round and past the entrance to the fence-lined Sandfly Bay track, a MUCH less hilly route. Had George forgotten that? I DID query George’s choice of the hill option, but didn’t press the matter.

So it was up, up a track that got quite steep in places. However all made it, even the hiker who had requested assurance of not too much climbing. (He’s not coming out next week, when we do the Leith Saddle track, which except for one wee saddle, is all climb.)

The hill summit rewarded us with the foggy view  we had expected, but it was good to stop here for the morning cuppa.

Cuppa time

Cuppa time (John pic)

Steeply down the other side, sidle further round the hill, soon to arrive at Lovers Leap. (I wonder if they really do, or is it their personal possession. It’s fun omitting the apostrophe [before or after the ‘s’?] to allow for the ambiguity.)

Lovers Leap

Lovers Leap. Some of the 39 plus fog.

We pushed on. Bit of a climb till we reached the open gate giving entrance down through paddock, new style and paddock to the Chasm. Too much of a drop for some to even go near the viewing platform.

Back up onto the track, further around, past the sheep shed and a stop for an early lunch

Lunch. (John pic))

Lunch panorama.. (John pic))

at the beginning of the impressive double macrocarpa-lined avenue.

Then through the avenue, and, for some never here before, the shock of the cars’ sudden appearance at the avenue’s end.

There were some sheltered areas and some areas exposed to the cold wind that never stopped blowing.

Elaine had designated Nichols Cafe again for the last cuppa, and 25 of us adjourned there for coffee and company.

Coffee at Nichols. 25 of us.

Panorama of coffee at Nichols. Some of the 25. Remainder still to arrive.

Thanks to George and Alex for leading a record number of us, (39!!) with nary a one missing or going over the edge. – Ian.

18. 31/7/2013. Trampers. Ridge Road, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay.
We were all expecting it to be a bit windy on the coast, but when we got there it was very mild, & dead calm, so off with some clothing was in order. We had all forgotten how far the road walk from Ridge Rd to Sandy Mt. Rd was, but undeterred we pressed on to a morning break at the normal place in the paddock on the LH side of the road.
pack

Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

From there it was a leisurely walk around the Chasm & Lovers Leap viewing platforms, to marvel at the very flat sea conditions. The inlets were like a mirror, it was so calm.
Then off up the climb to the top of the track, where we had lunch at the top of the sandhills, before the easy conditions of the downhill slide onto Sandfly Bay, where we did the obligatory side trip to the viewing hide, only to discover that there are now two hides there, one of which is locked, & is for the tourist operators use only. We did see a sample of the wildlife that inhabits this coastline, one of them didn’t bother with us at all,
Grandad snoozing

Grandad snoozing. (Ken pic and caption)

but the other one was a bit wary of the strange quartet walking past.
Why are you annoying me?

Why are you annoying me? (Ken pic and  caption)

We all enjoyed the walk, although it wasn’t a very long day, as we arrived back at the car around 2:30pm. Distance – 10km, @ 4km/h. – Ken

17. 18/4/2012. Trampers. Ridge Road, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Cars parked half-way along left of route. Long sand-hill descent clearly depicted.

There were 12 of us. A record in recent memory.

Morning Tea, sheltered from the wind. (Ken pic.)

Lunch spot at the top of the lovely long sand-hill descent. (Ken pic)

16. 7/7/2010. Both. Sandymount, Sandfly Bay return, Lovers Leap, The Chasm. Medium. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Look at those five animals lined up at a trough. (Joyce caption, Bill pic) 7/7/2010

New signs at Sandfly Bay track turn-off 7/7/2010

Picturesque grove (from south side) 7/7/2010

The Chasm 7/7/2010

15. 13/8/2008 Trampers. Sandymount summit, Lovers Leap, Chasm, Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Tash, Pat.

Large sandhill. Pat Leonie Ken Tash. 13/8/2008

A wonderful tramp on the peninsula… A small but enthusiastic group of 5 parked our cars at the end of Ridge Road, and then walked back up to the junction, where we turned up towards Sandymount. Near the top we had morning tea in a sheltered spot whose first discovery was attributed to George. At the carpark at the top, the gate to the left said “track closed”, so we took the track to the right instead and made our way back round to Lovers Leap. The views were amazing and as 4 of them stood on the platform, there was much discussion as to who would do the “Leap”. There were no volunteers so we retraced our steps and ended up above Sandfly Bay. Here we had our lunch with beautiful views in all directions. We discussed the fact that lunch stops are a very important part of the tramp and that that spot is often what we remember. And then down, down ,down the wonderful sand hills that looked like scenes from Lawrence of Arabia. Running down like kids… A quick visit to the Penguin hide and then onto the beach where some very large sea lions were lolling about on the sand. Two large ones emerged glistening black from the sea, reminiscent of when the first creatures left the sea to live on the land all those millennia ago. Near the end of the beach we came to a stream where Leonie suggested we sit and take in the great surroundings we were in, with powerful waves in the background crashing onto the beach amidst a surge of foam.

Leonie, Pat, Tash on Log

Leonie, Pat, Tash on Log 13/8/2008

And then after some cunning navigating by Ian we were onto a poled track through a farm, up a small hill and back at the gate, beyond which magically were our cars. I wouldn’t have missed it for the world. – Tash

14. 14/3/2007. Trampers. Sandymount, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Bruce & Marjorie, Doug M
13. 6/7/2005. Trampers. Sandfly Bay, Lovers Leap, Chasm. Leaders: Bob H, Ian, Frank
12. 6/7/2005. Hikers. Sandymount, Sandfly Bay. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Grove of trees and ongaonga

Grove of trees and ongaonga

Belted Galloway cattle beast. Who?, George, Hazel

Belted Galloway cattle beast. Who?, George, Hazel

11. 17/3/2004 Trampers: Ridge Road, Sandymount, Sandfly Bay Leader: Ria L
LL

Lovers Leap

VP

L-Leap Platform. Bill, Pat, Ria, George

V

L/Leap Platform. Ria, George, Glenice, Doug M

S

Sandhills at top. Ria, Glenice

10. 17/3/2004 Hikers: Sandfly Bay, Sandymount, Ridge Road. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
9. 20/8/2003. Hikers. Ridge Road to Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Anne R.
8. 27/2/2002. Sandfly Bay – Lovers Leap – Chasm. Leaders: Bob H, Shirley McN, Ria L
7. 29/8/2001. Lovers Leap – Chasm – Sandfly Bay. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Ian, Elaine.
6. 29/3/2000. Sandy Mount, Lovers Leap, Lime Kilns. Leaders: Chris, Jean, Ngaire.
5. 25/8/1999. Sandfly Bay. Leaders: Doug and Myrie, Irene.
4. 10/3/1993. New Track – Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Bev H, Les and Margaret, Ivan and Bev.
3. 16/10/1991. Sandfly Bay. Seals Sand and sun. Average. Leaders: Betty, Wendy, Shirley, Mary McG.
2. 17/7/1991 Lovers’ Leap – The Chasm – Sandfly Bay. Easy. Merle H, Diana B, Nancy, Pam M
1. 27/11/1996. Sandy Mount Road – Lime Kilns – Lovers Leap.Leaders: Chris, Jean, Ria H.
 
 
 

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Jul 11 2018

Frasers Gully

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 92 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Frasers Gully – Brockville Rd Year Round”

16 km from car park.

27. 2018-07-11. Hikers. Fraser Road Dalzier Road round trip. M. Leades: Jay and Jan B.

Map of route, courtesy Ian.

23 Hikers gathered in lovely sunny weather in Frasers Road . From there we trudged up the steep zigzag track …

Up the zig zag track beside Fraser’s Gully Track. (Clive pic and caption.)

… which took 30 minutes with many stops on the way to admire the city views or so was the excuse to
have a breather. At the top we stopped for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

… and then followed the track up to Mooltan Street. From Mooltan Street we turned into Ashmore Street until we reached Taieri Road.  From there we made our way along Dalziel Road to Townleys Road for our lunch stop. The weather by this time took a change and it was very windy and cold so we didn’t dally too long.

A cold place sheltered from the wind for lunch. (Clive pic and caption.)

After lunch we made our way down Brockville Road, with the weather improving again, admiring the lovely city and beach scapes. We turned into Glenross and went through a lovely park and over a quaint little bridge …

Across the bridge in Fraser’s Gully. (Clive pic and caption.)

… that then took us back to our cars in Frasers Road. A very pleasant ten and a half km walk with plenty of variety. We had coffee at Sunnyvale Stadium. – Jay and Jan

26. 12/10/2016. Both. Frasers Gully area. E+.  Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Route Map

Route Map, Roslyn-Frasers Gully Recreational Reserve: 1. Fresh Choice; 2 Ann St; 3. Falcon St; 4. Frasers Rd return; 5.  side track Frasers Road to grassy Tilburn St; 6. Tilburn St; 7. different return track Tilburn St to Frasers Road; 8. side track Frasers Road across to  Glenross St; 9. Glenross St; 10. Brockville Rd; 11, Kaikorai Vly Rd; 12. Falcon St; 13. Ann St; 14. Fresh Choice. – Ian.

Frasers Gully walk was enjoyed by Trampers and hikers together owing to Trampers leader away.

Frasers Gully "Road".

Frasers Gully “Road”. (Liz pic.)

Barred

A forceful “Barred!” near the top . (Helen pic.)

Weather held off, however some of the track was a little bit slippery but support from all concerned worked well.It was interesting that one track was a new experience for some old members which made it even more enjoyable.

Lunching on the flat. (Helen pic)

Lunching on the flat. (Helen pic)

Steep climb ahead.

Steep climb ahead. “Why do we do this?” (Ian pic and caption.)

Plodding up Falcon Street steps. (Keith pic and caption.)

Plodding up Falcon Street steps. (Keith pic and caption.)

You'll reach the top eventually. (Helen pic.)

One step at a time will get you to the top e…vent…ual…ly. (Helen pic.)

The walk was not long but seemed to be accepted by all concerned. Coffee to follow at Roslyn worked out well which had a good attendance of 24.

Coffee. (Helen pic.)

“We’re not sitting with that lot over there.” (Helen pic.)

The total numbers to start the walk was 32, with the main group leaving from Fresh Choice Roslyn car park.  (Permission to park there was appreciated.) – Liz and Alexander.

25. 18/2/2015. Hikers. Frasers Gully Area. Leaders: Bev and Adrienne.

GPS of route

GPS of route. Kms: 1. Frasers Rd Gully. 2. Brinsdon Rd Cnr. 3-4. Brinsdon & Halfway Bush Rds. 5. Three Mile Hill Rd. 6. Taieri Rd. 7. Ashmore and Mooltan Sts. 8. Track rejoining Frasers Gully nr its foot.

Bev and Adrienne led us through two of Dunedin’s Recreational Areas, up through the Frasers Gully and the down through the Tilburn Street reserve, the latter incorporating a very steep track, entailing an unavoidable recce UP it to ascertain its top entrance off Mooltan Street, imperceptible between two properties.

Anyway, for 27 Hikers, it was up the Frasers Gully ‘road’ as it says on the map

Up the Frasers Gully track.

Up the Frasers Gully track. (John pic)

and along Dalziel Rd to stop for morning tea in welcome shade at the corner of Brinsdon Road (2 km on map).

Cuppa

Cuppa time panorama

Then it was on up the road to join with Halfway Bush Road.

Ascending Brinsdon

Ascending Brinsdon Road (John pic)

Along Halfway Bush Road, down Three Mile Hill Road and surprise: around the corner by Ashburn Hall and onto Taieri Road and behold: a new (to this reporter) lovely grass-mown reserve. (Nr 6 km point on map.) Time for lunch.

Lunch panorama

Lunch panorama (John pic)

A little further on, a turn into Ashmore Street and further on still the bus stop.

Bus stop

“Room for one more” (John pic)

On, into Mooltan Street, around and the insignificant grass strip between two properties that would take us into the Tilburn “Street” Reserve. Well, paper-street, then. This took us around below the back of Moultan Street’s properties for some distance before plunging into some bush and out again into the scene below.

Steep down

Steep down

And was it steep, with careful shuffling by the more cautious. Zig-zags back and forth eventually landed us out on the flat of the Frasers Gully track within sight of the cars.

Thanks to Bev and Adrienne for a well-planned walk through two of Dunedin’s reserves bringing the bush into the town, and interspersed with welcome shady stops on a hot day. – Ian.

24. 5/6/2013 Both. Frasers Gully. Leaders: Evelyn and Fred.

Frasers Gully

Frasers Gully. 8km as crow flies, 9km with ups and downs. Cars parked at Ashmore St.

Friends Hill

Lunch finished. Top of Friends Hill.

Apple

Judy feeds apple to horse with very fashionable cover. At Halfway Bush Road exit.

23. 26/9/2012 Hikers. Frasers Gully Leader Evelyn
16 of us met at Frasers Road. Heading on up towards the start of the Frasers Gully track at 9.26 a.m. the word “Earthquake” was called out we stopped looked at each other and decided the ground wasn’t shaking so didn’t rush out to the field and “Drop, Cover and Hold On”, as workman were using machinery on the field, and decided we were more likely to get hit by a machine than a falling tree so carried on. We passed the newly opened up track going up to Mooltan Street which we would come back down on the way home. This track has been there for many years but had become quite overgrown and hard to find but after the tree felling took place it has been opened up resurfaced with gravel and had many plants and shrubs planted up both sides making it a very pleasant walk up the hill.
We stopped for morning tea about 20mins up the track at a clearing, but by the time we had finished it was starting to rain lightly but on and up we carried on. Alas the rain decided to get heavier the further we went but we were reasonably sheltered by the trees on the track but eventually had to stop and put on rain-gear. When we reached the top of the track it was raining quite heavily and didn’t look like stopping so a decision was made to go back down the track with the shelter of the trees (instead of carrying on as planned up past the water treatment station to the top for lunch then back along Halfway Bush Road down Three Mile Hill Rd around Ashmore & Mooltan Street and back down the new track to Frasers Gully).
When we did get back to Frasers Gully the rain had stopped so we decided to go up the new track for a bit to see the view, some of us found it quite steep going so came back down and had an early lunch while some of the others carried on to Mooltan Street then carried on around the road and came back down a clearing further on to meet up with us all at the bottom then back to the cars. Distance travelled was aprox. 8 km.
A good walk was had by all even though we didn’t cover the original distance.
22. 16/7/2011. Hikers. Frasers Gully. E. Leaders: Bev, Chris.
21. 18/11/2009. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Mount Grand Water Treatment Station, Brockville, Dalziel Road. Leader: Evelyn.

Dalziel

Dalziel Road. Evelyn, Bill, Bev. (Elaine pic)

Garden enhancement?

Garden enhancement? (Elaine pic)

20. 25/3/2009 Hikers Frasers Gully,Townley Rd E+ 30km ret. Leaders: Les & Margaret, Bev H

19. 16/7/2008 Frasers Gully

Fraser's Gully

Frasers Gully

Those who assembled at the car park on a cold and foggy morning all went on the hikers walk today. This began at Townleys Road on Kaikorai Valley Road and, thanks to Peter’s detour, took us along the recently-established Stream track as far as Donald St. Very picturesque and a worthwhile addition to the Dunedin walking landscape. 5km along KV Road we turned into Ellis Park and had morning tea on the steps of the changing rooms.

Morning Tea

Morning Tea

The next section of the walk up Fraser’s Gully follows a vigorous and attractive Kaikorai Stream as it foams and musically cascades over weirs and rocks overhung by beautiful bush. The wide, well-gravelled track winds through stands of fuschia and broadleaf trees and under the occasional old totara, and slowly climbs to the road. The fog still wrapped the heights but warblers’ song penetrated. Very picturesque. You can tell that the writer has never been there before and really appreciated the opportunity! At the top we were still in a shroud of mist as we skirted the invisible reservoir at the Mt Grand Water Treatment Station.

Lunch in the mist

Lunch in the mist

Our lunch stop was roadside in an avenue of ‘grand’ old pines on Dalziel Rd. Bob sneaked a swing on the neighbouring property – he thought the owners wouldn’t detect him in the fog. Then on down Townleys Rd, at times quite steeply, the cool mist growing even cooler, until back to the start some 12km later. Thanks to Neil for not losing any of us (well, we did find Joyce again after not too long!) – Bob

18. 16/7/2008. Hikers. Frasers Gully from Townley Road. Easy+. Leaders: Neil, Ray.
17. 9/5/2007. Townley Road, Frasers Gully. Easy+. Leaders:

16. 10/1/2007. All. Frasers Gully far end, Dalziel Road. Easy+. Leaders: Lex, Bob H, Joyce, Eleanor B.
15. 19/4/2006. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Townley Road. Easy+. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Peter.
14. 9/3/2005 Mary M, Les W, Ray
13. 23/7/2003. Hikers. Frasers Gully, Townley Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris.
12. 31/7/2002. Alt. Frasers Gully – Townley Road. Leaders: Les W, Mary M.
11. 21/3/2002 Betty B, Denise
10. 19/9/2001. Alt. Frasers Gully. Leaders: Jean, Mavis, Denis.
9. 21/3/2001. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Leaders: Mavis, Betty, Denise
8. 28/6/2000 Frasers Gully – Brockville Road. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary L, Eleanor
7. 31/3/1999. Frasers Gully – Brockville Road. Leaders: Margaret D, Betty, Peg C.
27/5/1998. Frasers Gully, Brockville. Leaders: Les and Mavis.
6. 16/7/1997. Frasers Gully, Brockville. Leaders: Judith D, Denise, Jack M
5. 14/9/1994. Frasers Gully, Circle Hill, Southern Reservoir.Medium. Leaders: Eric and Dot, Peggy A, Chris.
4. 24/3/1993. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Return via Townley Road. Long, but easy. Leaders: Evelyn M, Wendy, Eric and Dorothy.
3. 11/9/1991. Frasers Gully to Brockville. Native Bush. Good views. Easy. Leaders: Margaret S, Bev H, Bev McI, Janice.
2. 28/3/1990. Brockville from Frasers Road. Interesting tramp. Leaders:  Nancy, Norman, Peg M
1. 24/5/1989 Fraser’s Gully into Brockville Road. Unusual views. Meet at Ellis Park sports ground. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, George

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May 30 2018

Waikouaiti: Matanaka, Beach Walk

Published by under Hikers

Distance from car-park: 57.5 km.

10. 30/5/2018. Hikers. Hawkesbury Lagoon area. Leaders: Judy K and Elaine

After a frosty start in Mosgiel, 25 hikers parked at the end of Beach St, Waikouaiti and walked along to the river mouth, enjoying the views and watching the horses training on the beach. The track up through the pines was followed to a morning tea stop just before the Reserve, where a leisurely break was enjoyed in the sun.

Clive pic.

The walk into the Reserve …

Clive pic.

… showed us plenty of bird life – especially ducks, geese and swans. At the end of the first causeway we turned right to cross the little bridge to follow the track round the edge of the water, across a stile, up through the paddock, and across another stile to Dumbarton St.

We turned left here, and followed Dumbarton St to the T junction at the end, turning right into Nairn Stand then left into Inverary St, which took us to the northern entrance to the Reserve. Just before the bridge we made a right turn onto the causeway which was followed out into Scotia St. A left took us into Beach St, with a toilet stop at the Camp and so back to the cars.  Lunch was had on the grassy area just below the car park. 

Clive pic.

Some new signage in the Reserve, and good track surfaces, show that this special place is really being cared for.

After lunch the majority opted for a quick visit to Matanaka, which was new to about half of the group.

Clive pic.

Arriving at Blueskin Nurseries for the obligatory coffee stop, we found we had been pipped at the post by the trampers, who were cosily huddled inside.  The more intrepid hikers chose to brave the elements outside (well, most of them).  A great day out for the last 9 0’clock start of the season.

– Judy and Elaine

9. 30/11/2016. Hikers. Hawksbury Lagoon and beach. E. Leaders: Judy K and Jay.

Hawksbury Lagoon route map courtesy Ian.

Hawksbury Lagoon route map courtesy Ian.

A blustery sou-wester did not deter 30 hardy souls from the drive to Waikouaiti where we gathered at the end of Beach Rd.  Along the road to the pines we had the wind behind us so it didn’t feel too bad, and the walk through the pines brought us to a sunny spot for a leisurely morning tea break.  Then it was out into the open again, across the first causeway to the bridge, observing a variety of bird life on the way – mostly paradise ducks and their young, and plenty of black swans and cygnets …

Black Swan on nest. (Ian pic and caption.)

Black Swan on nest. (Ian pic and caption.)

Another black swan and nestlings. (Ian pic and caption.)

Another black swan and newly young. (Ian pic and caption.)

… learning foraging skills.

A short detour over the bridge to the right, and on round the inlet proved to be rather rough and overgrown, but provided an interesting diversion.  We went back to the bridge, turned right and then left, to cross the next causeway, with a brief stop to decide whether to pass the female swan sitting on an egg right in the middle of our path.  With some reluctance she let us by, with a blustery display of spread wings to protect her nest.  A little further on another nest with two eggs lay unprotected.

A brief rain squall caught us just before the end and we were pleased to find the shelter of the trees.  A gentle road walk followed, out to Beach Rd and back to the cars just before midday.  Lunch was had in a sheltered spot on the grass between the car park and beach.

After lunch 17 members opted for the beach walk, while some of the others headed for home and some up to Matanaka to explore.  The beach walkers …

Waikouaiti to Karitane beach walk route map, courtesy Ian.

Waikouaiti to Karitane beach walk route map, courtesy Ian. Only remembered to start app 1 km after leaving lunch spot!

… strode out into the head wind to reach the end of the spit in 45 minutes. Here we had quite a different view of Karitane.

The old Karitane wharf high and dry. (Ian pic and caption.)

The old Karitane wharf, but high and dry at low tide. (Ian pic and caption.)

New Karitane wharf, still high, but wet.

New Karitane wharf, also high, but wetter. (Ian pic and caption.)

The return walk with the wind at our backs was more pleasant, as was the coffee stop at Blueskin Nurseries. – Judy and Jay.

8. 4/11/2015. Hikers. A walk around Waikouaiti’s back streets. Leaders: Jan, Jay.
GPS of route

GPS of route

28 Hikers and Trampers parked at the car park down at the corner of Beach Street and Matanaka Road. We walked down to the beach and along to its northern end. We were struck by the damage heavy seas had made to the beach edge.

Devastated beach verge. (John pic)

Devastated beach verge. (John pic)

The Lagoon had completely sanded up.  We stopped for morning tea at the car park at the beach end. We walked back along the beach to reach the sanded-up outlet of the Hawksbury Lagoon Wildlife Refuge area and entered by the forest edge.

Up into the Lagoon (John pic)

Up into the Lagoon (John pic)

We followed the path up and across the lagoon onto the end of the Nairn Street track which led us out of the Lagoon where we turned right onto Inverary Street, which took us along the back of a long large building under repair which some thought might be Waikouaiti’s chicken farm, left down Cromaty Street, right on Clackmannan Street and a look-in passing the back gate of the Waikouaiti Racecourse.

Grandstand. (John pic)

Grandstand. (John pic)

Left along Edinburgh Street, left again along Glasgow Street and left along SH1 at its end. We stopped along the way to look into, and some to shop in, Beano’s Pies and Artisan Bakery.

Artisan Bakery (John pic)

Artisan Bakery (John pic)

A little further  up and across SH1 (opposite the end of Mount Street) into a park beside the Events Centre with seating to have lunch,

Lunch in gardens beside the East Otago Events Centre. (John pic)

Lunch in gardens beside the East Otago Events Centre. (John pic)

placed conveniently behind very new public toilets, with sliding doors operated from within by lighted buttons, ridged to the touch and promising to have locked the door only by faith.  Cross SH1 again at crest of the rise, a little further up and into Kildaire Street. At next crossing, right along Collins to its end and go down Henry Street to its end. Down Henry Street and left around corner at the bottom into Fell Street and right at its end out onto Beach Street with only a block further down it to arrive at the car park again.

Thanks to Jan and Jay for looking after us and taking us on a new and interesting back-streets-walk to open up a Waikouaiti few if any of us had known of before. Garden flowers and trees bright with colourful blooms

Colour in garden. (John pic)

Colour in garden. (John pic)

and houses new and old made interesting viewing. – Ian.

7. 31/10/2012. Hikers. Matanaka. Leaders: Fred, Judy.
6. 17/10/2012. Hikers. Matanaka. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
5. 28/3/2012. Trampers. Matanaka, Cornish Point. Easy.

We clockwised the Lagoon loop and antied the other. GPS courtesy Ken.

We set off from the cars directly across Hawksbury Lagoon

Looking back on sharp straight ledges

Lovely old stable at Matanaka

4. 10/3/2010. Hikers. Matanaka. Coast Walk. Leaders: Barbara, Molly.

3. 6/5/2009 Both. Waikouaiti. Beach walk: Waikouaiti – Karitane. Easy+. Leaders: Lesley S, Bill H, Bill M, Pat.

We parked on Beach Road between the tavern and camping ground and walked to the north end of the beach where we had morning tea.
Tea Break. Waikouaiti beach

Tea Break. Waikouaiti beach. Bill, Evelyn, Bob, Who? Chris, Peter, Lex, Bev, Elaine, Pat, Lesley, Doug, Wendy, Lesley, Neil, Fred, Barbara, Ken, Bob

Then followed the nice long flat beach walk to the Karitane spit, admiring along the way the distant view of Huriawa Peninsula and a bunch of OGHS girls practising their surf canoeing skills under their coach’s supervision.
Walking to Karitane

Beach walk to Karitane

Wave and Karitane peninsula

Wave and the Karitane Huriawa peninsula

OGHS Coach and canoer

OGHS Coach and canoer

We rounded the spit to lunch on its landward side to admire the settlement of houses and the two (cray-fishing – Ken thought they might be) boats and the splendid view up the river of Mount Watkins.

Lunch at Karitane

Lunch at Karitane. Bill, Pat, Doug, Peter, Who? Angela, Neil, Lex, Wendy, Barbara, Who? Lesley, Margaret, Bev, Joyce, Elaine, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob,

Fishing boat at Karitane

Mt Watkins from Karitane

Mt Watkins from Karitane

After the leisurely lunch, it was a leisurely strung-out amble back along the beach to the cars. A good day and thanks to Bill H and his team for this variation on the usual Matanaka walk. – Ian

2. 9/4/2008 Leaders:

Trotting horses being exercised along the beach

What a glorious day for hiking it was and 11 hikers were really looking forward to their day when we parked our cars in Beach St, Waikouaiti, and set off to the beach. We walked a short distance along Beach St, then turned right into Fell Rd and from there went into the Forest where we sat in a lovely patch of sun and had our morning tea. Then off down to the beach. Couldn’t have had a more perfect day for walking along the firm sand, lapping up the sun and really soaking up the beautiful views. Great to see several lots of horses being exercised along the beach. Some trotting behind a vehicle, attached to a cart, others with riders in sulkies. At the end of the beach it was up the hill to Matanaka. A fascinating and very interesting place to visit. We spent a bit of time looking in the old school house and

The schoolhouse

The schoolhouse

Coming away

Coming away

inspecting the other old buildings which are all very well maintained and looked after. Then it was a leisurely lunch, sitting in the sun and taking in the view, really making the most of a super day. Then it was back down the hill and along Matanaka Rd. and then Matanaka Dr. to the back of the Motor camp which we walked through back to our cars. We all agreed we had had a fabulous day. – Bev

1. 17/10/2007. Matanaka, Cornish Head. Medium. Leaders: Graham, Glenice
Tea break in pines. Graham, Ken, Lex, Hazel, George

Tea break in pines. Graham, Ken, Lex, Hazel, George

Down to skirt bottom of steep face. Glenice, Hazel, Doug, Pat, Bill, Graham

Down to skirt bottom of steep face. Glenice, Hazel, Doug, Pat, Bill, Graham

Down round point. Lex, Who?, Pat, Ken, Graham, Doug M, Glenice

Down round point. Lex, Who?, Pat, Ken, Graham, Doug M, Glenice

Swans

Swans

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May 23 2018

Silverstream Water-Race, Racemans, Weir

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 40 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Silverstream Weir. Racemans. Winefields. Year Round”
No. 107 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Whare Flat – Silverstream Weir Year Round “
Origins and History of Racemans Water-race and Weir

19. 23/5/2018. Racemans to he Top Weir. Leader: Arthur.
Due to weather concerns we trmped up the Silverstream instead of the tramp on the programme.

It was raining lightly as we began our walk from the car ark by the Pump Shed.
The moisture desisted in a while, but skiffy showers passed over at times.

The “Hump” Track in from the Pump Shed was quite wet and muddy, and had slumped in one place on the stream bank.

From the swing bidge we climbed up to the Tunnel Track, and turned left. At the appropriate time (10 a.m.) we stopped trackside for smoko.

Around to McCraes Weir to climb the rope, and continued to eventually follow Racemans Track.

The tracks themselves were generally in good condition, although there were muddy patches at times with only one really bad patch to contend with.

We reached to top weir at 12-15,

At the weir – still very misty. (Margreet pic and caption.)

and after inspecting it, retreated a short distance to eat our sandwiches.

A half hour passed quickly, and then it was back down Racemans

River crossing. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Stopping for a catch up. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Ferns spectacular beside the track. (Margreet pic and caption.)

… to its beginning, taking the short route back. Over the swing bridge, and wading the ford (quite shallow) we were back at the cars around 2-45.

All had enjoyed the day’s tramp, which was of a reasonable distance – one member had been suffering “cabin fever”, but all were glad to have had their day out in the bush.

On returning to Mosgiel, 9 of the 12 who had been out adjourned for refreshments, as is the usual custom. – Art.

18. 3/9/2014. Both. Pump House to Weir. E+ Leaders: Judy, Ian.

Route

Route

(I took no pics. Photos please!) There were 30 of us out. We avoided the McRaes Weir track because some of the hikers can now no longer cope with the rope-assisted climb out of the McRae’s Stream.
From the pump house we took the track on the true left, thus avoiding the wetting of the road ford right at the start of the tramp. Of course this takes us steeply up and over and steeply down, but we all emerged safely by the swing bridge. The 4WD took us on beyond the old weir onto the board walk and up the seemingly never ending ascent of the Racemans track up to the levelness of the water race track itself where it emerges from the McRaes Track. We stopped for morning tea, letting seven of the trampers head off at their own pace to the upper weir.
Our remaining group of 23 took its time waiting out regroupings as we each negotiated wash-out bottlenecks on the way. The day was pleasant. The track otherwise level, pleasant and with varied aspects from bush to fallen tree clearances to slips.
But slips and washouts there were. Till finally an extremely muddy four metre boot-covering piece of slosh put most off from going any further. We were now only one kilometre short of the weir, so eight undaunted males slopped through and on to reach the weir. En route, they encountered the seven trampers returning to lunch back down the track with the remaining hikers. At the weir, Jim discovered Betty’s lunch was in his pack so we all accompanied him back to rendezvous with the others. Upon arrival, we found all had already lunched and were ready to move back. However Betty and Elaine elected to remain and enjoy a further leisurely lunch break, lolling in the lovely sunshine. …

“On the way back on Wednesday, we took the track that goes over to Powder creek, walked along past the entrance to Powder Ridge track, then back across the weir & onto the 4WD track again. This made a good detour, that some had not done before. The ladies got their feet wet, but the guys managed to stay dry.” – Ken
… Setting off again, we caught up with the hikers again at the swing bridge where it was obvious they intended returning via road and ford, the much easier if wetter alternative to the other route. And so back to the cars and some of the remaining trampers who were tied to hikers’ cars. A lovely day out. – Ian.

17. 23/1/2013. Trampers.
There were 4 of us today, we walked along the Tunnels/ Racemans track for 8km, had lunch at a nice spot, & then returned by the route that goes down to the weir just above the pump house, then back up onto the Tunnels track & back to the cars. so we did 14.3km in 3h 26m @ 4.2km/h. – Ken.
16. 9/5/2012. Trampers. Pump House to Weir. abt 15 km return.
A promised wet day nudged the three trampers who turned up at the car-park away from the scheduled Lawsons Farm to the Whare Flat tramps.
We parked at the Pump House, crossed the swing bridge and elected to do the loop track. This had been magnificently cleared.

Doug on cleared Loop Track

We passed the Powder Ridge track without being tempted to climb any part of it.

Sign

The end of the Loop Track led to a crossing of the Silverstream on some very slippery stones, followed by a long ascending track up to the Racemans.

Silverstream Crossing at end of Loop Track.

We passed the entrances to Coal Creek and Upper Coal tracks and on to somewhere short of the first of the two slips before the magnificent track-clearing gave way to a more usual narrow track. We reached the weir at 11.00 a.m., collected up an empty beer bottle, the only insult to the lovely surrounds and made our way back down the Racemans, stopping en route for lunch at noon.
The weather. There was no need for parkas at all! The intermittant very light drizzle was shrugged off by the sheltering bush.
We returned via McRaes Weir and further along took the straight steep track which emerges at the end of the board-walk of the lower track.
Back over the swing-bridge and we stopped to photo the new deer-fenced-off property on the north side of the Chalkies entrance.- Ian

New (to us) deer-fenced property. (The cross marks the grave of an obviously loved dog.)

Entrance to the house and buildings

15, 22/12/2010. Trampers. Tunnels to Weir. 3 with a visitor.
14. 4/10/2010 Recce. Tunnels to Weir. Ken, Ian.

GPS tracking of Tunnels to Weir, return, courtesy Ken.

We reconnoitred the Tunnels to Racemans, then on impulse, detoured up to the weir

Silverstream weir. (Ken pic)

before returning to complete the  round trip recce in preparation for the Hiker’s trip on the 6th. Turned out we did 18km in all. Whew!  Thanks to the DCC who had done a marvellous job of clearing the track almost all the way up to the weir. Also for a new track across the old slip. P.S. Les Murcott’s team had done a marvellous job with steps and rail around another large slip near the beginning of the Tunnels entrance up by the old school house.- Ian
14. 14/10/2009. Hikers. Whare Flat, Silverstream Weir. Medium. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn.
13. 8/10/2008. Hikers. Whare Flat, Racemans. Easy. Leaders: Neil, Tom
12. 19/10/2005 Leaders: Nancy, Eleanor B

11. 10/11/2004 Leaders: Bob H, Nancy

Group

The broken Silverstream Weir. Lance, Lois, Ann, Who? Dot B, Who? Pat, Bill, Sabina

10. 9/7/2003. Hikers. Racemans to Weir. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret.
9. 7/11/2001 Leaders: Bob H, Winifred, George
8. 10/10/2001. Racemans Track. Leaders: Ray and Diana, Les W.
7. 17/11/1999. Whare Flat, Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Margaret D, Judy C, Eleanor.
6. 25/11/1998. Silverstream, Weir – Racemans. Leaders: Peg C, Judy C, Eleanor.
5. 13/5/1998. Whare Flat to Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Judy , Eleanor.
4. 12/2/1997. Whare Flat to Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Evelyn M, Jack and Rosemary.
3. 31/7/1996. Whare Flat Water-Race. Silverstream. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Eleanor, Betty B.
2. 22/11/1995. Whare Flat – Silverstream Weir. Leaders: Margaret D, Colleen, Evelyn M.
1. 22/7/1992 Silverstream Weir from the Pumphouse. Two parties – Easy or average+. Leaders: Margaret S, Ivan & Bev, Nel

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Apr 18 2018

Deep Stream, Rocklands Station. Welshs Road. Lawlors Old Farm.

Published by under Hikers

Background Information to Deep Stream project
No. 60 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lawlor Farm”
Closed for lambing Sept-Nov.
50 km from car park.
Seek permissions.

14. 18/4/2018. Trampers. Welshs Road, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leader: Keith and Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

It was a beautiful autumn day as 14 trampers travelled for about 40 minutes, out past Clarks Junction to Welshs Road.

The cars were parked by the woolshed near Deep Stream on Steve Nichol’s farm. We all had to sign the visitors book on arrival, for “elf and safety” reasons.

The sun was lovely, but the breeze was decidedly cool, as we made our start.

To be different, the leaders had planned on a clockwise circuit, and also climbing uphill through the paddocks to extend the distance.

The steeper beginning warmed all the participants nicely, before having morning tea in the head of a gully – somewhat sheltered from the breeze.

Morning tea towards Deep Stream. (Phil pic and caption.)

Continuing up through the paddocks the scenery was magnificent wherever we looked. At the highest point of our day we came back to Welshs Road. The wind was keen here, but there was a good view over to the Lammermoors – the “ship at anchor” was visible.

Now it was downhill all the way to Deep Stream, road at first and then following the farm’s boundary fence.

The “Te Papanui Conservation Park” was just over the fence which we had to climb through at the last. The views looking down in to Deep Stream were great as we descended to the weir.

Time for some photographs …

The weir! (Phil pic and caption.)

… before walking the 4W.D. road above the stream.

Follow the leader. (Phil pic and caption.)

Near the mouth of Deep Creek we stopped for an early lunch on a long table thoughtfully provided. A nice spot in the sunshine, and ideal for the occasion.

….and if one should accidentally fall there would be…….sitting on the wall! (Phil pic and caption.)

The 4W.D. road was up and down a bit, but took us back to the cars, after having walked 9.8 km.

All agreed that the walk down through the Deep Stream gorge, below the weir, was the highlight of the day. It had been another very successful and happy day’s tramp for our group.

And so back to Outram, to stop at a the ‘Goat’ for water, food, tea, coffee, hot chocolate, cold beverage, etc (tick the boxes applicable please). – Art.

13. 17/2/2016. Hikers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leaders: Bob and Peter.

GPS of route alongside Deep Stream.

GPS of route alongside Deep Stream.

The leaders considerately stopped the cars about 3k short of the old farm house to give some level walking to those who didn’t wish to tackle, beyond there, the climbs over the three steep ridges on the way into the weir. (As matters turned out, they did tackle a further climb or two after all.) We all stopped first, a kilometer or so along the road, for a cuppa.

Hikers. Cuppa. A km or two from the cars.

Hikers. Cuppa. A km or two from the cars.

Eight of us went on  to reach reached the barb-wired locked gate, (some getting further)!

A nostalgic shot (yet once again, couldn't resist it) of the 'confluential' point where the Deep Creek tributary enters Deep Stream.

En route, a nostalgic shot (yet once again, couldn’t resist it) of the ‘confluential’ point where the Deep Creek tributary enters Deep Stream.

En route, (whoops, too many ‘en routes’), we passed a couple of bee hive sets of frames, with Betty getting stung several times from one of them. Happily Lester was there to help remove the bees and their stings.

On our return, we stopped in the a patch of shade for lunch.

The leaders (& Doug) lunching in the shade.

The leaders (& Doug) lunching in the shade.

The day grew warmer but fortunately not nearly as exceptionally hot as it was a fortnight ago. We enjoyed a brief cooling passing shower when getting close to the cars on our return.

The ridges are getting higher and steeper than ever to climb over and the tramp extension by the extra three or so kilometres gap between cars and house wearied this reporter a bit but for the others it was a breeze. A good day out. A good reminder of a tramp the club has enjoyed many times before. – Ian.
12. 23/4/2014. Hikers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS

GPS of route. The tail with “2” in it was a false uphill recce with none of the necessary downhill bits one or two of us had remembered.

A good memory is an attribute we came to wish we collectively had more of. Driving down Welshs Road, we  made two false stops before plucking up enough courage to take our cars yet further on to the actual Holiday Camp yards. (However, from recollection (what’s that again??) the “Both” 8/2009 group [indicated below] walked virtually the length of Welshs Rd just to reach the HP, well-notified on its gate).

Neat Caption (John pic)

Neat Caption editing, John! (John pic)

Well, we eventually made it there by car and walked on and up a bit to stop for our morning cuppa.

After that stop, taken briefly because of a strong cold wind at the time, memory let us down again. A few recalled the road had several ups and downs in  it, but the road that we then took led us only up and up and up. After some confused conferring, with nervous hope of finding the right way, we retraced our steps back down the way we had come, to a gate just adjacent to our morning tea stop. Soon the reassuring ups and downs emerged, and a morning tea spot taken on an earlier tramp confirmed we we on track. (See Trampers 11/2009 for the morning tea break pics)

However the earlier uphill foray had served to discourage four of our 22-strong group from further uphill struggles and they returned to the cars. That was too bad. But eighteen still persisted.

The stream views were most rewarding. The view of the Deep Creek (exit/entrance?? – well, confluence, then) into Deep Stream looked better from an angle different from that of a pic below taken on an earlier trip.

 

Confluence

A more picturesque view of Deep Creek debouching into Deep Stream. (See “Deep Creek Tributary” below for the other one)

A locked gate (part of which can be seen at the right in the pic below) just prior to the weir proved a further deterrent, and only five persisted beyond it. On rejoining the other twelve they found them already getting into their lunch. It was the right time too.

Lunch

Lunch by the locked gate. (John pic)

We straggled back to the cars in a long drawn out string of ones and twos, but all eventually made it, to unsurprisingly  find the earlier four long gone.

Then it was only for a dwindling ten (did Elaine deliberately hide herself behind Pat?) of us to reunite at the No 8 w Herbs cafe for a drink of …

Cafe

After tramp coffee at Outram.

… – you’ve guessed it – coffee, not to mention a tasty treat of chips and dips, courtesy Elaine. – Ian

11. 26/2/2014. Trampers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir.
GPS of route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We only walked 7.6 km; 1 hr 57 mins moving time, 3.9 km/hr; climbed 318 mtrs; max elevation 544 mtrs.

This was a tramp that most of the 9 that turned up had never done before.
We walked up the gorge all the while looking down to Deep Stream to see if we could find a more interesting walk than on the road with it’s quite steep climbs. Once again most of the ones who are going on the Motatapu trip next week were carrying their big packs with some weight in them.
We found some nice rocks to sit on for morning tea …
Morning tea breakHeb

Morning tea break. (Heb pic and caption)

… at the top of one of the hills we had to climb, so we got a good view of the countryside. Then it was further into the gorge, until we arrived at the weir.
The weir. (Heb pic and caption)

The weir. (Heb pic and caption)

After a look around there, & a drink to freshen up …
Topping up the fluids at the weir. (Heb pic and caption)

Topping up the fluids at the weir. (Heb pic and caption)

… it was decided that we would go up the steep road opposite to where we were sitting, & walk back through the paddocks. George & Rea both remembered doing this in earlier times, so we set off, & headed away from the gorge up into the paddocks where we split up a bit & had lunch in two groups. Then it was down a gravel road that George assured us we would find, & back a short distance to the cars. The stream looked inviting, as it was a reasonably hot day, without a cloud in the sky, but nobody was game to get wet !!
After examining some peoples’ packs, & the way they were wearing them, we had an adjustment session to see if we could improve the fit for one member of the group, & I’ll also be looking at mine before next week, as it seems to be sitting too low on my hips.
We are becoming the Coffee Club No. 2 as we once again called into Outram for a chat over a cuppa on the way home, although Rea, & Hazel walked  all the way around to the Berry Farm shop for a Yoghurt Ice Cream !!
Everyone agreed that it was a good walk with interesting scenery along the way. – Ken.
10. 25/11/2009. Trampers, with a lot of Hikers! Deep Stream Holidays.  Pipeline Road. Deep Stream Weir. Easy+. Leaders: Bill and Pat.
It was 10.00 a.m. before our cars reached the Deep Stream Holidays Park. So we walked on along the pipeline road before stopping for a delayed morning tea in a sheltered corner of the road.
cuppa

We stopped for a late cuppa.

Other group at tea break

Other group at tea break. (Bill pic)

The road wound on up and down as the pipeline followed up beside the stream.
road

The road stretched on.

A point of interest was to see the Deep Creek confluence point with Deep Stream.
Deep Creek tributary.

Deep Creek tributary.

Eventually we arrived at the weir.
Weir. (Ken pic).

Weir. (Ken pic).

We climbed the steps from the weir to the road above. Some of us found a way up to the rock looming behind.
Steps up from the weir.

Steps up from the weir. (Ken pic).

From the rock buttress, we had a grand view of weir and dam.
dam

View of dam from the rock buttress. (Ken pic)

On the way back, Bill pointed out a rock wall built by Chinese goldminers to divert the stream.
wall

Old diverting wall from Chinese goldmining days.

9. 5/8/2009 Both. Welshs Road, Deep Stream, Lawlors Old Farm now Deep Stream Holidays. Easy+. Leaders: George, Bev.

click to enlarge

RomdalesB4

Romdales. Where there’s a wool…. (Bruce pic and caption)

RomdalesAftr

….there’s away (Bruce pic and caption!)

Climbing Welsh Road by Deep Stream. (Bill pic). Molly

Climbing Welsh Road by Deep Stream. (Bill pic). Molly

Another view of Deep Stream

Another view of Deep Stream. (Bill pic)

Deep Stream above the weir. (Bruce pic and caption)

Deep Stream above the weir. (Bruce pic and caption)

In holiday mood.

In holiday mood. (Bruce pic and caption). Evelyn, Pat, Bev, Molly, Fred, Bill, George

Pot of Gold

If we just keep straight ahead we should hit a pot of gold (Bruce pic and caption)

8. 14/4/2004 Hikers. Deep Stream. Lawlors Old Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Joyce , Jim & Thelma
7. 15/5/2002 Alt. Deep Stream, Lawlors Old Farm. Easy. Leader: Mary L, Margaret and Les.
6. 23/9/1998. Lawlor Farm, Deep Stream. Leaders: Mary L, Sabina.
5. 25/9/1996. Deep Stream from Rocklands Station to Dam. Leaders: Jack M, Diana and Ray
4. 10/5/1995 Lawlor Farm. Medium. Leaders: Peg C, Mary L, Sabina, Diana W
3. 2/12/1992 Welsh Road, Deep Stream, Lawlors Farm. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A, Peg C, Peg M
2. 25/4/1990 Welsh Road, Deep Stream. Great tramping area. Easy+. Only one small hill. Leaders: Mary Y, Diana B, Hugh D, Betty B
1. 1/2/1989 Deep Stream. Rocklands Station. A long but not difficult walk. Follow pipeline to dam. Leaders: Daphne, Denise, Mary

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Jan 31 2018

Scroggs Hill Road, Seaview Road, McIntosh Road

Published by under Hikers

Distance from Bush Road  carpark: 15 km.

11. 31/1/2018. Hiker. McIntosh/Scroggs Hill Roads. M. Leaders: Alex and Liz.

On a very record hot day 22 hikers reported to Brighton Surf Club to start the weekly Hike. Because of the excess heat to be had it was decided that different hikes would take place to suit individuals.

Three to the beach, Three  to meet at a display shop in their car soon after morning tea break. The rest 16 hikers off to McIntosh road.

From here we would judge distance to walk depending on the day’s temperature .Morning tea break was held at the very interesting display shop where we met the three car members.

Cuppa in stable by the gallery. (Ian pic and caption.)

Sun brolly hat? (Ian pic and caption.)

From here we carried on a further distance where some walkers felt it was a bit too warm and 5 decided to head back.

Route map, courtesy Ian, of the five for whom discretion was the better part of valour. The eleven accomplished the round trip of something over 10 km.

Eleven carried on to the top of hill where lunch took place. From here we made a slow walk down Scroggs Hill road till we arrived back at car park and of to the new Brighton Beach cafe and a well deserved rest.  – Liz and Alex.

10. 15/10/2014. Hikers. Scroggs Hill Road, McIntosh road. M. Leaders: Dorothy, Pat R.
Route

Route

Horse

Horse

Lunch

Lunch

9. 31/7/2013. Hikers. McIntosh Road, Scroggs Hill Road. M Leaders: Liz and Janice
8. 30/9/2009. Hikers. Brighton River Road, (McIntosh Road), Scroggs Hill Road. Easy. Leaders: Neil, Lesley G
Not for nothing is Bill our artistic photography genius. Drainage ditches on the lower parts of the Otokia Stream.
Mr Coutts Canals (Bill pic and caption)

Mr Coutts Canals (Bill pic and caption)

And here is another gem. Trust Bill to notice this. I didn’t.

Goat Tableau. (Bill pic)

Goat Tableau. (Bill pic)

On the climb up McIntosh Road, some sharp-sighted members spied this female Shelduck on a nest when their attention was drawn by the male flying off from it.

Paradise Duck nest in tree trunk.

Paradise Shelduck nest in tree trunk.

Yet further up, we stopped to regroup.

Rest Stop up McIntosh Road

Rest Stop further up McIntosh Road. (Bill pic). Les, Pat, Elaine, Marjorie, Lesley.

Nearing the top of McIntosh Road, a friendly goat proved receptive to any feeding it could get.

Chris feeding goat

Chris feeding goat

This picture says it all. Shed right at the top of Scroggs Hill road.

Shed collapsing on base of boulders

Shed collapsing on base of boulders

Further down Scroggs Hill road, the 15 of us stopped for an early lunch on a lawn – a lawn that had accommodated us on previous occasions as well.

Lunch on lawn

Lunch on lawn

Further downhill again, and there were these friendly pigs. While we were there, the owner tipped food over a far corner of the paddock, and cupboard love triumphed over the affection earlier shown to us.

Kumi Kumi pigs

Kumi Kumi pigs

Thought this gate caption was worth shooting.

A whimsical gate sign.

A whimsical gate sign.

The ancient sod hut looks yet more derelict each time we view it.

The deteriorating sod hut

The deteriorating sod hut

An attractive entrance.

Horse heads on gate

Horse heads on gate

And another one.

Fine stone wall entrance

Fine stone wall entrance

Some enterprise children putting their holiday opportunity to good use, were doubtless surprised and pleased when we brought them considerable custom.

Roadside stall

Roadside stall

A pleasant relaxing day with very little wind. Thanks to Neil and Lesley for a most enjoyable walk.
BTW, the only Tramper turning up for the Rollinsons Track tramp decided to throw in his lot with the greater sociability of the Hikers’ walk. – Ian

7. 2/9/2009 Both. Scroggs Hill and McIntosh Rd Leaders: Chris, Dot.
Otokia Creek mouth from Scroggs Hill Road

Otokia Creek mouth from Scroggs Hill Road

Starting Climb of Scroggs Hill Road

Starting Climb of Scroggs Hill Road. Recognisable: Fred, Pat, Les

Brighton's watertower?

Brighton’s watertower? Chris goes to check gate.

A 'slot' of letterboxes

A ‘slot’ of letterboxes

The souwesterly wind and rain came over in waves, until shortly after the morning tea stop, most of the 19 decided to turn back at the sod hut, with only 5 of us venturing on to the top and down McIntosh Road, to enjoy what sun there was for the day.

Looking down McIntosh Road

Looking down McIntosh Road

Snow on Maungatuas

Snow on Maungatuas

A lovely farm notice

An attractive farm notice

Sunny sheltered lunch spot.

Sunny sheltered lunch spot. Doug, Marjorie, Bruce, Lesley

Peek at Otokia Creek behind lunch spot

Peek at Otokia Creek behind lunch spot

Not far now back to cars

Not far now back to cars

6. 21/5/2008. Brighton – Scroggs Hill Road.

 Once again Wednesday turned up trumps with a very pleasant perfect day for hiking. 11 hikers met at the Brighton Surf Club car park and headed off round the walking track behind the Surf Club, up the hill and round the Big Rock to the Brighton-Scroggs Hill Rd.
Horses or ponies?

Some animals

As we walked up the hill we saw some interesting things, some animals and great scenery and views. Then it was through a farm, onto a farm track which we followed down to the bottom of the hill, along into a gully where we sat and enjoyed out morning tea stop. It was a bit windy but we were quite sheltered in the gully. From there our leader Dorothy took us for an interesting and informative walk through a new and just being established development called Taylors Creek Estate. What wonderful views from most of the sites, but of course, fully exposed to the wind. However, that’s usually the price you pay for your views in coastal areas. Well worth it I would say.

A beach walk

A walk along the beach

After a good look round up there it was back down Scroggs Hill Rd, across Brighton Rd and onto the beach where we found a nice sheltered spot to sit and savour our lunch and the view. A walk along the beach, back onto Brighton Rd, round Big Rock and along the track to our cars ended a very happy and interesting hike. – Bev.

5. Leaders: Dot B, Chris
4. 22/8/2007. Hikers. McIntosh Road, Brighton. Easy+. Leaders: Carmel, Anne R.
3. 25/1/2006. Hikers. River Road, Brighton, Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Chris, Lesley G.
2. 26/3/1997. Brighton Road – Round Trip – Lookout. Leaders: Les W, Mary Y, Evelyn M.
1. 15/7/1998 Seaview Road to Scroggs Hill and McIntosh Rd Leaders: Denise, Peggy M

 

5/7/1989 Seaview Road, Brighton. Average Tramp. Leaders: Eric & Denise, Peggy M, Jean A

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Jan 10 2018

North Taieri Church, Salisbury, Taieri River Lookout off Taioma Road

Published by under Hikers

Background information on Salisbury property
10. 10/1/2018 Hikers. Taieri River view lookout. E. Leaders: Doug and Ian.
Twenty-one Hikers turned out for the first tramp of the new year, parking the cars at the lay-by on Taioma Road beside the entrance  to the Taieri View Road. This tramp was to differ markedly from the last one we had done back in 1915.
First, a couple of the private forests along the forest road on the left had been ‘harvested’, as they say, the first one now replaced with paddocks.
Second, the former FWD track was now a road, much more heavily metalled and heavily dented by the double wheels of forest trucks carrying heavy loads.
And third, road’s end was now in the middle of the branch-and-trunk-strewn cleared second forestry. No longer a gentle grass-covered FWD track ending in a rough honeysuckle and gorse encroached track. A shock. A big shock.
Yes, the shocking new way of getting to the lookout was to have to pick our way through a debris of tangled branches down along a left-leaning bench-sort-of-slope that was marginalised by a messed-up fence line on  the right and a steep fall-off on the left.
The goal ahead of us was to be a line of small Manuka and gorse bush, a middle part of it dead. Just where the dead changed on its right to the dark green, the leaders knew to be the sturdy post at the end of a fence, alongside which was the track down through to the lookout. This they had found only after well over half an hour’s reconnoitring the previous week.
Seventeen of us reached the lookout unscathed by the sharp-ended broken branches we had to negotiate, with four electing, a short distance in, to prudently head back and wait for us near the safety of the road.

At the lookout, despite some reluctance to leave the wonder of the view,

Taieri Lookout. (Clive pic and caption.)

but it being still only eleven o’clock, we eventually turned back to retackle the cleared (??) forestry slope.

The hills denuded of pines made for heavy going in places (Clive pic and caption.)

This time, with leadership guidance no longer needed to find a way, a wonderful variety of routes back up to the road were found.

Back right up near road’s entrance, we stopped for lunch under power lines with the cleared area affording us a pleasant view.

Along the short distance of Taieri View Road, and out onto Taioma Road, and leaving our parked cars on our left, we headed down the road to a gate onto Salisbury property. We headed down through a couple of paddocks,

A walk down the hill with the Taieri Gorge railway in the background. (Clive pic and caption.)

the route getting steadily steeper until its very steepest part got us down to the relief of the flat. Many elderly knees didn’t enjoy that last part one bit.

A nice flat lane led us to the wonderful restored stone cottage where we stopped to again admire the beautiful work done to it both inside …

Glen Lyon Cottage inside(Clive pic)

Glen Lyon Cottage inside (Clive pic)

… and out.

Glen Lyon Cottage established 1862. (Clive pic and caption)

Then out to Wairongoa Road where two shuttle cars  ferried drivers back to their cars in the lay-by to allow everyone to return home, some by a coffee break en route.

The day was cloudy and not too hot. Just right.
The normal route would have both started and ended on Wairongoa Road, the tramp beginning with the steep climb through Salisbury paddocks to Taioma Road, morning tea half way up, and lunch at the lookout. All agreed however that through a car shuttle saving the Salisbury paddocks for just a return downhill journey and for a shorter first tramp of the year was the way to do it. – Doug and Ian.
9. 26/7/2017. Trampers.  Showgrounds, Taioma Rd, Taieri flood views. Leader: Eleanore.
Walked all but 17km and averaged 4.8km an hour.
We drove and parked at the Showgrounds.  Ten of us were eager to get out for a walk without rain.  We headed up Taioma road and had smoko at the bottom of the hill.  Then a steady uphill climb took us to the Taieri View sign, a few stops along the way were had to look at the flooding of the lower Taieri (which occurred after heavy rain on Friday and Saturday). Also, picking out landmarks and where some of us live on the Taieri.

Nice view over mosgiel. (Helen pic and caption.)

We turned left at the Taieri View sign, then veered left again onto a Forestry road that took us to where trees had recently been milled. Looking across farmland, down to the Taieri river, cleared forest and 4 goats grazing in the distance we enjoyed the vista while eating lunch.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

After lunch we walked back to the junction and decided to carry  on down the road that we veered off, where we were looking further down the Taieri towards Henley at the floods.

Water on the plains. (Helen pic and caption.)

Once we headed for home, it was down hill all the way to the cars.  We parked  back at the car park and strolled round to Blackstone where we enjoyed coffee and cake.
The weather was calm and mild, which made our outing most enjoyable. – Eleanore.

8. 2015 Aug 26. Hikers. North Taieri Church, Salisbury and Taieri Lookout. Leaders: Pam, Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Where to start with all the happenings in this report? Well, first, when the cars arrived at North Taieri Church some of the Brighton people failed to turn up. It transpired, as was later report, their car load turned back to just walk around Mosgiel on seeing the “Road Closed” Taioma Road notice. Twenty of us set of along and up…

The paddocks were as steep as ever.

The paddocks were as steep as ever.

…the Salisbury farm paddocks to emerge onto Taioma Road just above the zig-zag and stop for morning tea on the road edge,

Cuppa

Morning tea cuppa on Taioma Road in the ditch, sheltered from the wind.

nicely sheltered from the cold southerly.

Incident two. After we had trudged up the road to the Taieri View side road, we looked back to see a small group stopped back down the road. The leaders went back down to find that Peter B. was experiencing one of his very occasional breathless spells (his last one, this report recalls, was on Traquair, but that time he recovered to continue afresh again.) Cell phone arrangements were made for a one of the leaders’ spouse to drive up and take Wendy and Peter back down. This was satisfactorily achieved.

Incident three. John had driven up to meet us at the side road turn-off. But under the unwise earlier advice of this reporter, had parked just beyond the turn-off at the edge of a logginh-truck lay-by  area, but had been reprehended by a logging driver for possibly impeding their movements, so got his car neatly parked in the side road.

Incident four. Keith espied a cast sheep in the paddock over the road. Mastered the barbwire fence and righted the sheep which staggered, trotted, ran off. Bravo.

On up the road, into the forestry road

4WD

The track is wide and open for much of its way. (John pic)

and down,

Diversion

The 2013 snow dump’s legacy of fallen trees on the track forced us to to divert through the forestry occasionally. (John pic)

steadily down

Track. (John pic)

From the road end, taking the track down to the lookout rock. (John pic)

to the river look-out rock. The bold (reckless?) stepped out onto the large rock to admire the view, the timid (prudent?) stopped well back from the intimidating drop.

Lunch,

Lunch

A candid lunch pic a little bit up from the rock.

snugly tucked in among grass and gorse against the wind. The leaders shortened the lunch-stop for fear of approaching rain but it failed to eventuate. In fact, sunshine and the climb back out proved a even a bit over-warming.

Incident five. Back at Taioma Road, Mollie and George graciously accepted the invitation of a ride back in John’s car.

Incident six.. Trudging back down the Salisbury paddocks, someone remarked that Dot (of the returning car, alas) had intended sharing her big-birthday chocs with us. Sigh.

Next a stop at Mr McElwee’s beautifully restored cottage, an eye-opener for some of our newer members. Then out to the cars where we were found a cheerful Peter waiting to greet us, none the worse for his setback earlier. Relief all round! Then off to Topiary for some for their accustomed coffee fix.

A great day out, with Salisbury’s steep paddocks testing breathing on the way up and knees on the way down. A day full of interesting incidents. A tramp very well led by Pam and Dawn. A good day. – Ian.

7. 2013 Apr 3. Both. North Taieri Church, Salisbury and Taieri Lookout. Leaders: Fred, Ian.

 We started out from beside the North Taieri Church, numbering 20. We admired some black sheep along the way. Mollie pointed out that the hill ahead was Vaughan Hill, once owned by her late husband’s parents. We admired the restored stone cottage, of course. Mr McElwee had determined on everything being authentic to its old age, including …… donated from the Vaughan farm. We then set about climbing the hill ahead, this time via  a gentler track (only slightly) from around its back. At a water trough, well up the hill, we stopped for morning tea and to admire the view, and to increase our number by Lex arriving down from his car parked in Taioma Road. Light rain came on, and so did our parkas. By the time we arrived at the “No Exit” entrance to Taieri View Road we found our numbers had dropped to sixteen, five opting to seek car and home rather than carry on in the rain. On taking the forestry road turn-off, some found water off the wet grass soon got into  wet boots making for a gentle sloshing sound as they moved. But we carried on to successfully reach the Taieri River lookout, and return up that steep part o the track at its end to lunch under the shelter?? of some forestry pines. It was at this point that we had reached the dispiriting point for many. We found we had only  exchanged the fine rain outside for large forestry drops that soon soaked any part of us that was not already wet. And here any respect for the leadership vanished. It wasn’t too long before the leaders discovered numbers had now dropped to four, the rest having returned up the track to shorten what had turned into a miserable experience as quickly as possible. The leaders caught up briefly at Taioma Road, only to see the majority head off down to make a road-walk, regardless of traffic,  back to the cars. This left the leaders now with a group of only six, who returned back down through the Salisbury farm the way we had ascended, for a grand meet-up with those under their care back at the cars. So all’s well that ends well, perhaps. – Ian.
6. 2012 Jun 13. Trampers. North Taieri Church, Salisbury and Taieri Lookout.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We did the loop anti-clockwise. We did 16 km in all. A good day’s walk. Total altitude climbed: 500m.

Relying on Ria’s memory to guide us, 7 of us did the more extensive Salisbury walk,
which took us climbing, climbing to join the Taioma road at the very top.

Morning tea stop, halfway up the loop, on the right.

Then we had to make our way back around Taioma road to get back down to Taieri View Road. We tried to avoid the road, busy with fast, heavy rumbling logging trucks, but paddocks proved eventually too boggy.

Shortly into Taieri View Road, we stopped for a late lunch. At this point George didn’t want to go any further, so he and his car-load took the short way back to his car. The remaining trampers made their way on down the forestry track turn-off from Taieri View Road to the Lookout. The track was much more overgrown and forestry-shaded than when the writer remembered it. However this gave us good shelter from the blustery cold wind that made itself felt when we emerged out onto the Lookout.

 

Lester views the Taieri from the Lookout.

Smile please

An imaginative use of old tractor tyres on Salisbury near the end of our return

We were lucky with the weather, which held off till we reached the car. A good tramp for a cold-weather day. The tramp also had a sentimental side, as it was the last day Linzi was to be with us, before departing back home to Cornwall three days later, after tramping with us for a whole year. Farewell, Linzi. – Ian.

5. 2009 Apr 8. Hikers. Taieri View, Mount Allan Road. Medium. Leaders: Chris, Dot B.

Taieri View Rock

Taieri View Rock

4. 2008 Feb 27. Leaders: Bev.

A bit cloudy but still 15 hikers parked their cars in Taieri View Rd. and set off on a very pleasant hike along forestry roads and through the forest to another Taieri Lookout. We had our morning tea sitting on a grassy bank before we headed into the forest itself. Very enjoyable walking and only some fairly easy down and up grades to keep us from having it too easy. Got to the lookout area which was a big rock jutting out over the Taieri river. Great view of river and surrounding areas. By now the sun had come out so made it more pleasant for our lunch break which we enjoyed relaxing and taking in the view. Then the sun disappeared and it turned a bit cool and looked very much like it would rain in the very near future. So we set off back to the cars. We found a few interesting things

George by wrecked car

George by wrecked car

 

to look at and photograph for fun on the way. A goats skull and horns which made an appropriate photo for an ‘old nanny goat’! A rusty old car body which had to be sat in, also for the obligatory photo. A really lovely big bush of ripe blackberries, much enjoyed by those who took the time to pick and feast on them. A lonely little pansy, (not a petunia!), in the middle of some blackberries and long grass. George managed to knock over the post of the electric fence after holding it down for us to step across. Luckily he didn’t short circuit himself or anyone else! Back to the cars before the rain came after another happy and enjoyable day out. Bev.

3. 2007 Feb 28. Trampers. North Taieri Church, Salisbury, Lookout. Medium. Leaders: Ria, Glenice.

The View from the Taieri Lookout.

The View from the Taieri Lookout.

Abe at Taieri Lookout.

Abe at Taieri Lookout.

2. 2005 Nov 2. All. Farm Walk from North Taieri Church. Easy. Leaders: Ria, Jacqui, Graham, Eleanor W.

1. 1992 Aug 12. Taioma Road. Turn off just before Salisbury L.H. side. A hill walk, good views. Average.

    Leaders: Hartmann, Ted, Jack M, Ray

 

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Nov 08 2017

Flagstaff forest walks.

Published by under Hikers

No. 37 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “DCC Forest. Three Mile Hill. W Bathgate. Permit DCC. Year Round”

Location: 10 km.
Click Flagstaff Creek Walking Track for background information.
Park at Three Mile Hill lookout, or Bullring or Pottery, Whare Flat.
Permit from City Forest, Dunedin 455 5512.
Flagstaff Forest road map

Map of all Roads

click to enlarge

Flagstaff Forest Tracks

Map of lower tracks/roads

Jack Roy's Map of Flagstaff Forest roads/tracks

Jack Roy’s Map of Flagstaff Forest roads/tracks

21. 8/11/2017. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest. Stuart and High Streets. M. Leader: Adrienne.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

A dozen Hikers set out from the Taieri Lookout Car Park, crossed the Three Mile Hill Road and turned down the Flagstaff Creek walking track, crossed south road and descended the occasionally steep recently well-stepped track to the weir and the old, well-rusted flow wheel,

Can you detect it? Try enlarging.

now almost completely obscured by undergrowth where we had morning tea. The closed wooden bridge across Flagstaff Creek being now blocked off with its access track fully obscured by undergrowth, we had to climb back up to South Road the way we had come down, and follow the road around, past Durham and High Streets to climb the unsigned (where’s it got to?) Stuart Street to where it joined up with High Street. Sheltered hitherto for most of the tramp from a strong cold wind, we found ourselves now well exposed to it. We went up High Street a little way and turned up a track labelled Tank Surge Road <?> to the partial shelter of its narrow tank for lunch. Then, it was back down High Street and along South road to where it crosses Flagstaff creek by the piped concrete bridge, and up the  Douglas Fir Grove track leading across to the car park again.

Although the cold wind back at the Bush Road car park had been a bit discouraging, we all agreed at the end it had been a most enjoyable energetic day out, pleasantly completed with companionable coffee at the Aurora. With co-leader Bev laid aside through illness, (and the locator beacon still in her car boot!) Adrienne did a text-book perfect leadership job, faultlessly grouping us at each fork in the route. Thanks, Adrienne. – Ian.

20. 14/10/2015. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest. Stuart and High Streets. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.

GPS of the route

GPS of the route

Nineteen hikers parked at the Lookout. Lesley led us in at the upper entrance and down the track to South Rd. Then along South Rd …

A study in verticality

A study in ‘verticality’

What appears to be a chipper - for transforming forestry rubbish into pellet fire product, perhaps.

What appears to be a chipper – (saw-duster?) for transforming forestry rubbish into pellet fire product, perhaps.

… to the foot of Stuart St whose road sign at its foot is now unhelpfully missing. Up Stuart St which gets only steeper each time we tackle it, but now cleared of all trees on either side. Where Stuart St ends at High St, the leaders took eight of the party down High St, entrusting the balance of eleven to the leadership of Keith to take them up High St to lunch at its end at Longridge. The two parties met again on South Road where it crosses Flagstaff Stream and returned to the cars via the large steep steps taking them up along the Douglas Fir Grove track. – Ian.

19. 17/7/2013. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest. Leaders: Les and Margaret.

Wed. saw us park up at the lookout at three mile hill road.
We walked into the forest and around a few of the roads like High St, Stuart St, etc.
It turned out a great day with lots of sun between the trees.
the douglas firs are so TALL in the forest I wonder if they will mill them.
It was very sunny at the lunch stop. Fred supplied the usual chocs so all was well for us all.
We made our way back up some huge steps {made by a Big Man?}
There are a lot of felled trees in there and I wonder what they are going to do with it all.
With so many families crying out for wood and the price it is… and here is all this wood just rotting away. – Elaine.

18. 12/9/2012. Trampers. Flagstaff Forest Tramp. Leader: Ria.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Unaccountable lapse in record. Deduce omitted route yourself!

A pic from earlier in the tramp before we got to the top.

Fast melting snow on route back down from top.

17. 28/4/2010. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest walk. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Thirteen hikers parked at the Taieri lookout and set off on the bush track opposite which was a very pleasant walk. Although it had rained, pine needles made a soft dry carpet. The variety of trees and bird calls, including rosellas, provided interest and we admired the tall straight trunks of the giant trees.
We had morning tea and lunch at the same spot by the Flagstaff stream but between we did a circular walk around forestry roads. These provided us with good walking underfoot and although it was quite a grind up Stuart Street we all managed it with ease by taking our time and stopping to admire the view of the Taieri Plains and Saddle Hill. After lunch we completed the bush walk back to the cars.
It was quite a short walk, although no-one took up the offer to go round again. Another time a further circle could be added on at the top of Stuart Street. The weather was ideal with not a breath of wind and mild temperatures. – Marjorie

16. 1/7/2009 Both Hikers and Trampers. Flagstaff Forest. South Rd, High St, Laings, High St, Stuart St, South Rd.
Leaders: Neil, Ria

It was a good day for 20 members of the club from both groups. We entered the forest from opposite the Taieri Lookout car-park and made our way down to where the track comes out at South Road. We followed this around to turn up High Street, but before doing this we stopped for
our morning tea break in a rare sunny spot.
click to enlarge

Morning Tea on South Road.

Morning Tea on South Road. Lex, Bob, Who? Wendy, Who? Neil, Ria, Peter, Mollie, Pat, Bill, Bev, Evelyn, Angela.

We made our slow way up, up, up High Street, stopping for frequent rests to eventually reach Long Ridge Road only to immediately turn back off it to travel along Laing Road until Ria judged it time to stop for lunch.

Lunch

Lunch. Evelyn, Bob, Chris, Glenice, Who? Ria, Neil, Wendy, Peter.

Returning back we enjoyed great views of the Taieri Plain,

Taieri Plain

Taieri Plain

turned back down High Street and then off to the right and down Stuart Street. When it reached South Road, we turned left, passing the foot of High Street to reach the bridge/culvert over Flagstaff Creek. Here we turned down the Flagstaff Creek Walking Track to at last cross the Creek on a fine wooden bridge to reach a water race

Race Entrance

Race Entrance

Weir and Overflow

Weir, water-race entrance and Overflow

containing an old water meter wheel stiffened up with age and rust.

Upside Water Meter

‘Up-race’ of Water Meter

Downside Water Meter

‘Down-race’ of Water Meter

Back up the track a bit we turned up to the right to climb a many-stepped track up to cross South Road and back up the initial track to the car park again. Thanks, Ria and Neil for a most enjoyable, if wrapped-up, winter’s day out. – Ian

15. 25/2/2009 Trampers. Three Mile Hill Lookout. Flagstaff forest walk, Three Mile Hill. Round trip. Lookout, South Rd, High St, Longridge Rd, Whare Flat Rd, Laings Rd, High St, South Rd. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

The misty overcast day left  ground wet and muddy underfoot and ruled out the planned tramp on Swampy. So Ria had sought permission for the six of us to walk the Flagstaff Forestry roads. It was a good work-out, extended by a climb from the Bullring to near Flagstaff summit to fill in time before lunching in the welcome shelter of Ria’s daughter Ingrid’s property’s haybarn down Whare Flat Road.

Lunch in Ingrid's Haybarn. Ian

Lunch in Ingrid’s haybarn. Ian

Lunch in daughter Ingrid's haybarn. Ria

Lunch in daughter Ingrid’s haybarn. Ria

Lunch in Ingrid's haybarn. Hazel, Glenice

Lunch in Ingrid’s haybarn. Hazel, Glenice

Lunch in Ingrid's haybarn. Bill, Pat

Lunch in Ingrid’s haybarn. Bill, Pat

Then it was back up Whare Flat Road to Laings Road and so back to the Lookout where we had parked the cars. Thanks to Ria and Hazel for a good alternative tramp.

14. 20/9/2006. Hikers. Three Mile Hill area. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Anne R, Eleanor B.
13. 30/3/2005.DCC Forestry Walk.
Water wheel

Water wheel

12. 11/9/2002. Alt. Three Mile Hill. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Peg C
11. 27/6/2001 Three Mile Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Eleanor, Mavis
10. 25/4/2001. Three Mile Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Peg C, Mary M.
9. 19/7/2000. D.C.C. Forestry Circuit. Leaders: Shirley R, Arthur and Barbara.
8. 18/8/1999. DCC Forestry Walk. 3 Mile Hill. Leaders: Margaret D, Winifred, Joan H.
7. 11/11/1998. DCC Forest – 3 Mile Hill. Leaders: Betty, Joan H, Winifred.
6. 28/5/1997. Flagstaff Forest Walk. Leaders: Peg A, Peg M, Margaret D
5. 22/1/1997. Flagstaff – Creek Forest. Leaders: Peggy M, Margaraet D, Peg A.
4. 26/6/1996. D.C.C. 3 Mile Hill Forestry Round Trip from Coburns. Medium. Shorter alternative in some areas. Leaders: J Roy, Ian, Catherine.
3. 30/3/1994. D.C.C. Forestry, Whare Flat, Look-out, Three Mile Hill Road. WET FEET! Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Wendy B, Evelyn M, Doreen
2. 9/12/1992 DCC Forest. Round trip. Cars meet Three Mile Hill Lookout. Average. Leaders: Marie F, Nel K, Doreen, Lesley S
1. 22/6/1988 Three Mill Hill from Taieri Lookout. Pleasant pine walks. Leaders:

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Aug 23 2017

Gardens to Surf

Published by under Hikers,Uncategorized

2. 23/8/2017. Hikers. Gardens to Surf. E. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.

We Parked our cars in Duke Street, near the Woodhaugh gardens.  22 members started off.  We walked through the Varsity and had morning tea at the Polytech outdoor area.   Walked along Portsmouth Drive to Queens Drive down to St Kilda beach.   Walked along playing fields and some track to picnic area above beach, where we had our lunch.   We then continued on to St Clair, via street and caught the bus back to the Botanical gardens where we enjoyed a hot drink. Back to our cars and home to Mosgiel by 3.45pm.  A very enjoyable day was had by all. – Dawn.

1. 19/8/2015. Hikers. Gardens to Surf.
We had a good day walking from the Botanic Gardens…

Gardens (John pic)

Gardens (John pic)

Lunch panorama (John pic)

Morning tea behind the railway station. Panorama. (John pic)

…to St Kilda beach…

Sand logs? (John pic)

Sand logs? (John pic)

…and along the beach to St Clair. I had not been on the beach since the June storms and was blown away by the damage to the beach.

Rocks (John pic)

Rocks (John pic)

The piles…

Groynes (John pic)

Piles (John pic)

…are nearly all bent over by St Clair. Thank goodness I have done 3 paintings of the piles. Judy Knox was on TV Wed. night and did a very good interview on the local TV channel.
We all went back on the bus to the Gardens and all (I think) 27 of us didn’t pay. I think the bus driver got a bit of a surprise. – Elaine. [An unintended report, purloined from an email. – Ed]

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Jul 19 2017

West Harbour Recreation Trail

Published by under Hikers

20 km from car park
6. 19/7/2017. Hikers. Boat Harbour to St Leonards ret. Leaders: Bev and Judy.
21 hikers parked at the Otago yacht Club and walked the cycle/walkway to St Leonards and back, a total of 11 ks.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

21 hikers parked at the Otago yacht Club and walked the cycle/walkway to St Leonards and back, a total of 11 ks – not bad for a mid-winter day with planned hikes cancelled due to illness of leaders.  Morning tea was had on the yacht club verandah as it was still a bit chilly.  With a cold breeze in our faces we stepped it out briskly …

Walkway name. (Ian pic and caption.)

A ship. (Ian pic and caption.)

… to St Leonards where lunch was eaten with a bit of sunshine to help.  The return trip saw us well spread out with unfit ones like myself dragging the chain a bit at the back of the pack.  We were reunited at the University coffee shop where a pleasant social hour was spent. – Judy.

5. 13/1/2016 Hikers. Ravensbourne – Burks – St Leonards. Leaders: Judy and Adrienne, Helen.
Route map

Route map

We parked cars down below the Ravensbourne Hotel and took the walkway to Burkes where we morning-tead.

Cuppa in bus shelter

Cuppa in bus shelter

Cuppa on lawn

Cuppa on lawn

We took the old road to St Leonards reflecting on its probably origin as just a track through the bush following the easiest gradient. We turned up Kiwi Street, along Kaka Street, admiring well-kept properties there, down Pukeko  and along past St Leonards Hall and the school. Up Ruru to view the mock Tudor House.

Tudor house by the harbour

Tudor house by the harbour

Down again  to front past the University Lodge  Gates, and next it, St Leonards Lodge. Then along to St Leonards Park for lunch.

Ready for sun or shower

Sun/shower security.

Ladies on the lawn

Ladies on the lawn.

Returning back to the cars we were relieved the cold southerly had abated somewhat. Thanks to Judy, Adrienne and Helen for excellent leadership. – Ian.

4. 29/10/2014 Hikers. Ravensbourne Walkway. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

On the 29th October a very good group of hikers started off from the boat club on from the stadium. The day was cool to start with then got warm and sunny.
Pub

Harbour View Hotel (John Pic)

What a pleasure it is to walk on this wonderful walkway. There was so much going on in the harbour and train tracks. A very large goods train sped past us
Train

Train (John pic)

and a not very tidy rail car …
Shabby railcar (John pic)

Shabby railcar (John pic)

… I thought was up and down the track a few times.
The $12million Otago tug
Tug

Tug (John pic)

chuffed along the channel following [Tug illustration chosen shows the tug going the other way earlier. Sorry. Ed.] a cargo ship …
Ship. (John caption)

Ship. (John pic)

… going to the Dunedin wharf.
Lunch stop was very sheltered, with plenty to watch on the walkway – runners … cyclists … mums with prams …
Two of our group caught the eye of another group and had their photo taken which was published in the Star local paper on Thursday 30th.
I was very taken with a stone sofa on the side of the walkway.
Looking very nonchalant (John pic, Fred caption)

Looking very nonchalant! (John pic, Fred caption)

Who made it and how long has it been there?
All up we walked over 10km Lets hope this walkway does find its way to Port Chalmers in the future.
We spoke to a young girl on the track from Uni. She was part of a group of students from the Mining dept. She was amazed when Mollie told her how old she was. Then Doug came striding along and I said he was the same age. She was very impressed with us.
We had a coffee at the Plaza which is the cafe at the stadium in the uni part.
Have a good week everyone. – Elaine.
3. 27/3/2013 Hikers. Pedestrian-Cycle Track Rowing Club to St Leonards. E. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
GPS

“GPS” of route.

ship

LPG tanker viewed from walkway

2. 9/3/2011. Hikers Pedestrian/Cycle track North End Rowing Club to Maia E. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

1. 17/6/2009 Hikers Pedestrian/Cycle track North End Rowing Club to Maia E $4.00 Leaders: Lois & Lance

7 members (Molly, Neil, Lois, Lance, Bev, Margaret and Angela) set off at 10am from the University Aquatic Centre (just north of the Boat Harbour, via Leander St- opposite Butts Road on the way to Port Chalmers beside Palmers Quarry – now known as Shiel Concrete) for a brisk stroll to the Ravensbourne Yacht Club, stopping a while for morning tea.

From there we proceeded to Maia crossing the railway line at Hume Pipeworks, opposite the Ravensbourne Hotel, which looked closed for the winter.

There are extensive notices in yellow & red advising one NOT to cross the railway line but in this case we had no alternative as the walkway from the Ravensbourne yacht club proceeded on the left-hand side of the yacht club on the site of the second railway line which has since been removed.

Upon leaving Maia we proceeded up Ascog Road & along Totara St and down Adderley Terrace to the Ravensbourne Hotel, across the road to the overbridge at the Ravensbourne Yacht club and back to the cars.

The walk took approx 1 1/2 hours and because of the cool temperatures and accompanying wind chill factor it was decided to go home for lunch.

An enjoyable walk taking 3 hours (includes an hour travelling time) – Angela.

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May 31 2017

Street walk, Green Island, farm walk

Published by under Farm,Hikers

4. 31/5/2017. Hikers. Green Island street walk. E. Leaders: Elaine and Chris.

Nike app map of route, courtesy Ian.

The above route map gives some indication of the intricacies of Elaine’s   planned route, designed to cross and recross, by way of tunnels and bridges galore, the barriers of railway line, stream and motorway dividing  Green Island from Abbotsford. It was a street-walk, most suitable on the day for an off-and-on light morning drizzle. We were treated to a whole gamut of lower Abbotsford house designs, most instructive of fashions favoured in different decades, complete with one or two older ones looking very old and very neglected. At the latter part of the hike, we also got to peek into some of the large industrial goings-on at the north end of the town, not least Harraways. All most impressive.

At one point where a railway line once crossed the old main road (remember it?), Elaine stopped us to point out how it once served a coal-mine of her grandfather. She has a photo of a small steam engine about to head north across the road.

Drizzly morning tea at the gardens. Most of the 22 who came out. (Ian pic and caption.)

Newly decorated railway underpass (newly decorated since Elaine’s recce), essential for linking homes and school. It was deemed safer for children than a bridge. (Ian pic and caption.)

a dry-seated lunch at the Green Island Rugby Football Club pavilion in Miller Park. (Ian pic and caption.)

18 of us at Coffee at Agnes’, where we got to enjoy a separate room all to ourselve, complete with en suite. (Ian pic and caption.)

Many were the remarks appreciative of the cleverness of the route. A big thank you to Elaine and Chris for a great day out. – Ian, (for Elaine [without her knowledge – yet!] whose recent rapidly failing eyesight prevented her from tackling a report.)

3. 25/2/2009 Hikers. Green Island. Farm Walk. Leaders: George, Dot B
2. 10/5/2006. Hikers. Green Island street and farm walk. Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
1. 8/2/2006. Hikers. Street Walk: Green Island Street and Farm Walk. Leaders: Dot B, Chris.

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May 03 2017

Outram – Allanton Flood Bank

Published by under Hikers

Outram 10 km /  Henley 21 km – from car park.

3. 3/5/2017. Both. Outram-Allanton Flood Bank. E. Leaders: Judy K, Lester.

Today’s tramp saw a very special milestone for the Club, with a celebration of life member Molly Vaughan’s 90th birthday.  Molly has been a member of the Club for 30 years and still tramps regularly.

In recognition of this great achievement 28 members, including Molly and her son Marty …

Clive pic.

… from Busselton in Western Australia, walked the stop-bank from Outram to Allanton, …

Morning tea. (Clive pic.)

Mollie with Saddle Hill in background. (Helen pic and caption.)

Taieri Times, 10/5/2017 Mollie article (Ian scan and caption.)

… to join another 20 at Scurr’s woolshed for a shared lunch.

The rain held off for most of the morning, although there was cold southerly breeze, and the walk, completed in two hours, was enjoyed by all.  The walkers were greeted at the woolshed by the rest of the group eying trestle tables groaning with food.

Clive pic.

This disappeared amid a great deal of noisy chatter and fun.

Clive pic.

Card, cake …

Mollie cutting 90th Birthday Cake. (Ian pic and caption.)

ODT 12/5.

ODT 12/5

… and candles followed, and an ODT reporter appeared to record the event, including a picture of Molly outside in the pouring rain.  I hope there were no ill effects!

Many thanks to drivers who helped ferry people to and from Outram, to Elaine and Colin Scurr for the use of their woolshed, and to all members for the yummy food.  It was great to see such a good turn-out. – Judy K.

2. 29/4/2015. Hikers. Allanton-Outram Flood Bank. E. Leaders: Lester, Fred and Jim.

GPS of route

GPS of route

The feature of this tramp was the wind. Wind? A gale, A GALE.

The walk began from the Allanton Saleyards Road. A car shuttle was arranged – for those who didn’t want the road walk back. We set off.

We walked alongside the Allanton Road and turned into Ken Scorgies yards to stop for morning tea. Then we headed along and up onto the flood bank…

apres cuppa

On the trek after morning tea stop.

…to which we kept for practically the whole of the morning with only a few diversions to the flats alongside the Taieri River.

The day started off fine with only a moderate cold breeze, presently followed by a brief shower of rain, and a bit later another short shower. Some donned parkas early on, others waiting out the light showers. We made our way along, sometimes on the bank, sometimes off it. A wealth of mushrooms were a sore temptation for some.

mushrooms

Bags and bags of mushrooms.

stretched

Stretched out along the flood bank.

As we progressed the wind intensified to the extent that we couldn’t keep a steady footing. Along with the wind, a third, and this time, persisting shower, forcing everyone into parkas this time. This was complicated by a misjudged bit of the route which led us along the edge of a turnip paddock into a corner fence, with its electric wire, barring access back onto the flood bank. However with the help of poles lifting the wire and boots lowering the barbed wire fence we all in turn got through the narrow-neck eventually.

We were on the bank again. This time there were now walnuts galore. We ended up with enthusiasts lugging their plastic bags of mushrooms, walnuts, and even one lugging a bag of cow pats for their rhubarb patch. Somewhere about here we passed a small transformer station, and houses were appearing. We came off the bank onto a back street of Outram…

letters

A distinctive letter box in the back streets of Outram.

…and negotiated our way to a large shed which afforded us both lodging and shelter. Most welcome. We lunched. We hung around. We pondered doing the return road walk in the rain and wind. Eventually decided against. A car-load of drivers set off to be ferried to their cars and come back and rescue us. Car-load by departing car-load, the trip ended.

This reporter forgot to say that there were thirty-one of us. At least half that number resorted to Outram’s 8 on 87 cafe for a social coffee. Our number included aa earnest small group around a table end, complete with pen and paper finalising details for their impending overnight at Luxmore Hut on the Kepler Track, on Monday, I think, overseen by Hut Wardens for the week, Judy and Elaine. We lingered. A warm dry finish to a fearsomely windy day, aggravated by a big rain shower as well. (No surprise that there were no photos taken during the bad parts of the day.)

Thanks to Lester, Fred and Jim for their planning and leadership. – Ian.

18/5/2011. Hikers. Outram – Allanton Flood Bank. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

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Apr 26 2017

Waldronville

Published by under Hikers

10 km from car park.

9. 26/4/2017. Hikers. Waldronville. Beach. Easy. Leaders: Dot, Chris.

8. 22/6/2016. Hikers. Waldronville. Beach. Easy. Leaders: Dot, Chris.
Waldronville Beach route map.

Waldronville Beach route map of the day’s walk.

The sandbar across the mouth of the Kaikorai Lagoon was innocent of the usual streamlet across it, giving us the opportunity to  walk south dry-shod to ‘morning-tea’ at the 2 km mark on the map.

Consequent  to that, a steady 3.5 km walk back north brought us to a lunching-spot under Blackhead quarry. This 3/4 hour easy walk along the flat wide low-tide beach saw our 23-strong group strung out in little clusters of twos and threes, all happily engaged in social intercourse – yes, social, – a perfect illustration of the oft-repeated aspect of the Club’s “Recreational” side.
Back south again and at the 7 km mark we turned off the beach to find ourselves in the Island Park Recreation Reserve at the rear of the Beachlands Speedway. At this point the leaders took us south behind the sandhills on a route they had only recently discovered on their recce.  Unfortunately it was blocked by a red flag at the back-gate entrance to the Dunedin Clay Target Club through which our walk had been intended to go. There had been no public notice given on their website that this was to be a shooting afternoon.
What to do? A frustrated recconoitre of alternative routes of interest in the surrounding area left the leaders with no option but to find a way back out onto the beach instead, and complete the remaining 2 km back to the cars that way. Which we did. And all ended well.

A good 10 km day out (as measured by this  reporter’s nike app), but inflated (!) to either 11, – or 12 km, by other measuring devices present). Take your pick. (Huff!). – Ian.

7. 16/9/2015. Hikers. Waldronville. Easy. Leaders: Dot, Chris.
Route map

Route map of the day’s walk.

The leaders reversed the usual route this time, starting from the Beachlands Speedway entrance. So for the 28 of us, it was back along Friendship Drive, across Brighton Road and down Wavy Knowles Drive to reach the Kaikorai Stream backwater at its end. Then downstream alongside the water, into the Island Park Golf Course and across it to a morning tea stop well-sheltered by pines from the cold wind.
Morning Tea (John pic)

Morning Tea (John pic)

The leaders had gained permission to cross the course, and cooperated crossing the course before play started.
After morning tea, we were relieved to find the wind had abated, and continued  on along the edge of the course, out onto Brighton Road, along to the Lagoon, along it and down to the beach. Once on the beach the extent of the sand dunes’ erosion due to recent high tides was impressive.
We walked. Nearer Blackhead we stopped for lunch…
Lunch panorama. (John pic)

Panorama pic of lunch by large fallen rocks. (John pic)

…and then returned to one of only two exits…
Struggle

Struggling up the beach access track carved out of the eroded dune’s steep bank. (John pic)

…that had been carved through the high steep dune banks. Now outside the fenced perimeter of the Beachlands Speedway, our leaders took us into a new (to this reporter) interesting track that looped off Friendship Drive and led us…
Loop track (John pic)

Loop track along the back of the properties.  (John pic)

…along behind the backs of properties (that fronted Viscount  Road at their other ends), before reemerging back onto the Drive and on out to the cars.
A well-planned day, and helped by weather that turned out much better than feared. Much thanks to Dorothy and Chris. – Ian.
6. 18/6/2014. Hikers. Waldronville. Easy. Leaders: Dot, Chris.
GPS of Waldronville route

GPS of Waldronville route. Moving time: 1hr 57.39mins; fastest 4.19 km/hr; slowest 3.86 km/hr.

The route start was the carpark by the Kaikorai Estuary road bridge. A newly built path along the Brighton Road conducted us safely to the foot of the Island Park Golf Course. Fortunately for us, if not for the club, the greens were deserted in honour of the funeral of one of the club’s members. We skirted the edge between the greens and the stream. Of interest to this reporter, partway up was a small embankment on our left dividing two stretches of water. Which, or where, was the stream?

Two Kaikorai streams?

Kaikorai stream backwater

From the above pic, it appears that both were, creating an ‘island’ really. The nearer channel was crossed with three embankments linking the ‘island’ to our side. We were at the lower one. The middle embankment formed the end of Wavy Knowes Drive, where we were to stop for morning tea, and there was a top one as well, as you can see from the above map.

Enjoying the morning tea stop, in the sun, at the end of Wavy Knowles Drive.

Enjoying the morning tea stop, in the sun, at the end of Wavy Knowes Drive.

While at the stop, a goat entertained itself and us by perching precariously on the wires of the supermarket trolley.

Goat on supermarket trolley

Goat on supermarket trolley (John, pic)

The leaders took us out to the other end of John Knowles Drive, along the Brighton Road a little bit and down Friendship Drive, past the entrance to Beachlands Speedway …

Beachlands

Beachlands Speedways Sign above the entrance to the Reserve beyond. (John, pic)

into the Island Park Reserve.

Island Park Reserve Notice

Island Park Reserve Notice (John, pic)

The track took us along the back fence of the Speedway and through the dunes to the beach. The tide was only halfway out, waves blocking the beach below rocks beyond, so the leaders resolved on an 11.30 a.m. lunch stop, a bit short of the beach end at Blackhead.

Lunch on beach

Lunch on beach (John, pic)

After lunch, we enjoyed returning the length of the beach back to the estuary mouth, up through some dunes and back to the cars.

Estauries

An ‘Estuaries’ notice explaining the significance of the environs. (John, pic)

Thank you to the leaders for another enjoyable outing together in this familiar area, but still new to recently-joined members. We numbered 29, now becoming a regular total for the hikers. The coffee hounds resorted to Blend Espresso for a further get together. – Ian.

5. 16/1/2013. Hikers. Waldronville. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Elaine.
We parked by the estuary, walked the beach to Blackhead, stopping for a cuppa on the way, returned along Blackhead Road to Waldronville and back to the cars via the golf-course. Distance: abt 8 km. – Ian.
Preparing for lunch at corner of Blackhead Road.

Preparing for lunch at corner of Blackhead Road.

4. 6/7/2011. Both. Waldronville, Beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Chris, Dot.
We were ably led by Chris and Dot from the Brighton Road bridge over the Kaikorai Lagoon, where we parked our cars.  We started down the edge of the Kaikorai Lagoon to the beach.
The lagoon is the habitat of black swans and spoonbills, and apparently, according to Wikipedia is home to to two species of small shrimps (mysids).
Then it was north along the beach, to a tea-break stop by a beach access track. From there, it was up the track, alongside the Brighton Road for a short distance and across to skirt the Island Park golf course, having to negotiate a couple of troublesome fences by the estuary on the way. We exited on the Wavy Knowles Drive, enjoying the variety of large houses to be seen. Left onto Brighton Road again, across and right, took us along Friendship Drive and into the Island Park Recreation Reserve and out onto the beach. We lunched just by Blackhead. An early afternoon low tide gave us a wide beach to ourselves. Woollen hats and gloves had given way to sun hats for a mild lunch spot. A weather forecast for rain later in the day and a few lowering clouds failed to deliver any wetness. The leaders let us return south along the beach to our cars in our own dribs and drabs time. Thank you, Chris and Dot for a very pleasant winter day’s tramp. – Ian
3. 14/7/2010. Hikers. Waldronville, Kaikorai Estuary. Easy. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
2. 29/3/2006. Hikers. Waldronville and golf course. Leaders: Dot B, Jim & Thelma
1. 12/3/2003. Hikers. Waldronville, The Beach, Blackhead. Easy+. Leaders: Dot T, Betty.

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Mar 29 2017

Murrays Farm, Hoopers Inlet

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm,Hikers

No. 93 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Murrays Farm – Sandymount (Chris Hughes) Farm”

Distance for carpark: 31.5 km.

Map supplied by the owner. (Keith pic.)

11. 29/3/2017. Hikers. Murrays Farm. M. Leaders: Keith and Shona.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

It was a foggy, misty morning when 19 Hikers met at the gateway bel0w Murrays Farm before ambling up the road to having morning tea in the implement shed.

We then followed the fenceline up and across the paddocks before descending to explore around a container being used as a crib.

George investigates shower workings on new crib. (Ian pic and caption.)

We exited onto the coast …

We discover a new route from paddock to beach. (Eleanor W. pic.)

… where we had lunch …

Papanui Inlet mouth beach for lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

… out of the northerly wind.

We followed the water’s edge around past the old boat shed, climbing up the hill and visiting an old dwelling also being used as a crib and back along the farm tracks to the hole in the hedge and down the hill to the cars.

Coffee was at Macandrew Bay cafe. – Shona and Keith.

10. 20/2/2013. Hikers. Murrays Farm. Medium. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
Cuppa

Morning Tea at old homestead

ducks

Paradise Ducks in formation

tree

Waiting for others in shelter from the hot sun

9. 7/12/2011. Both. Murrays Farm. Medium.

GPS courtesy Ken. Track from distant spot anti-clockwise.

Comfort plus for morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

Five trampers scaled the almost vertical ascent to the Sandymount road before descending further by the bush.

Hoopers Inlet video

We sampled the beach at the mouth but a keen wind persuaded us up around the point to a boathouse in a more sheltered position.

Lunch stop. (Ken caption and pic)

Just along a little bit from the boathouse, we came upon this nest.

Black gull’s abandoned nest. Our bird expert explained they lay 2-3 eggs-in-nests before inclubating a further pair.

Then it was just a case of following our noses back across paddocks to the cars. – Ian
8. 10/2/2010. Hikers. Murrays Farm. Medium. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Fred.
7. 14/5/2008. Hikers. Murrays Farm. Easy. Leaders:Chris, Gwen.
Fine upstanding Hikers

Fine upstanding Hikers

An eye- and nose-watering wind greeted us when we stepped out of our cars at Hoopers Inlet. It was not a time for hanging around so our group of 13 set off at a brisk trot and soon reached the shelter of a shed which provided a good spot for morning tea.
Fuelled by hot drinks we ventured on and found that the hills and gullies gave good protection and we could enjoy this stroll through beautiful, peaceful countryside with the only other signs of life nearby the large number of paradise ducks. Perhaps they had discovered this place to be a refuge from duck shooters. In the distance sheep grazed and black cattle eyed us with interest.

Sheltered lunch spot

Sheltered lunch spot

We found our way down to the beach and a sheltered corner at the far end provided a comfortable lunch spot.

Seal among the lupins

Seal among the lupins

Margaret’s sortie into the sand dunes also brought to our notice a young seal hidden away under the lupins. We retraced our steps admiring the expansive views of the inlet and the winter colours on the hills.

It had been a short walk but a very pleasant country ramble.

Chris, who knows the area well, ably led us and, before returning home, some of us were lucky enough to stop off with her at a relative’s house on the hill and walk around the interesting garden, admiring both the plants and the panoramic views. – Marjorie.

6. 27/6/2007 Leaders:
Group

Group. Ian, Leonie, George, Tash, Pat, Hazel, Ria.

5. 1/2/2006. All. Murrays Farm, Hoopers Inlet. Leader: Chris.
4. 5/3/2003. All. Murray Farm. Leaders: Chris, Les and Margaret, Bev McI.
3. 3/7/2002. Combined. Murrays Farm. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Chris, Claude.
2. 6/2/2002. Combined. Murray Farm, Hoopers Inlet. Medium. Leaders: Chris, Jean, Colleen.
1. 2/5/2001. Murray Farm – Hoopers Inlet Road. Easy. Leaders; Chris, Jean, Colleen.

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