Archive for the 'Farm' Category

Apr 04 2018

Quoin Point Bull Creek

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 79 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Quoin Pt – Bull Creek – Farmland (see George) Farm”
45 km from car park.
“quoin” definition: 1. An exterior angle of a wall or other piece of masonry.
2. Any of the stones used in forming such an angle, often being of large size and dressed or arranged so as to form a decorative contrast with the adjoining walls. Seek permissions.
Coast and farm walk. Bull Creek nature walk to waterfall (tiny!) recommended.
14. 4/4/2018. Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. M. Leaders: Ian,  Arthur and Bob.

Hikers’ Route map, courtesy Ian.

The day was fine when twenty-seven of us started down from a  busy shearing shed at the end of Quoin Point Road to morning-tea down by the Quoin Point rocks. Both we and a multitude of inquisitive young seals were amazed at the sight of each other.

Quoin Point at the sealions gathering. (Clive pic and caption.)

Morning tea at Quoin Point.(Clive pic and caption.)

Ten trampers set off first, closely followed by eleven Hikers…

(Kevin pic.)

… leaving seven Ramblers behind to enjoy a more leisurely walk, which they took as far as the first house, returning along the beaches before having to regain the paddocks. They got back to the cars at 1.15 p.m.

For the others, the route varied between the flats of rocks and beach where practicable, and paddocks and gates where necessary. Towards lunch-time the query of “how much further” was beginning to be raised by some of the newer hikers. The hut-on-the-paddock’s site had complicated matters with new electric fencing forcing skirting around it before reaching the familiar route again. (We did better on the return trip.)

The trampers arrived at Bull Creek …

Bull Creek. (Clive pic and caption.)

.. in time to get round to including the picnic area and the  Bull Creek Bush Walk.

Along the waterfall walk. Clive pic and caption.)

Along the waterfall walk. (Clive pic and caption.)

The Hikers, with their much later arrival, (their walk enriched however with much mushroom-picking) had time only to get through their lunch

Brief lunch. (Kevin pic.)

before the low-tide’s turn prompted getting back across the creek.

On the return trip, our two groups were mixed and strung out as people moved off from Bull Creek in their own time. Admirably, Bob, our back marker, kept his disciplined place, to ensure we all got back in one piece.
This time, at the second stile, fortunately Arthur remembered to remain on the flat until we had got past below the little paddock hut before resuming the paddocks.
So we straggled back to the cars, strung out in various groups, some faster, others slower as the weariness of a 12 km tramp set in. Bob’s sterling work as back marker, at this point really paid off.  Several paddocks short of our destination one of us found the going too much and needed rescuing. Gordon, a new member of the club who had accompanied Bob stayed back to keep watch, while Bob strode on to fetch his large four-wheel-drive ute back to the rescue.
So all’s well that ends well. with the day ending with a congenial “coffee” stop off at Brighton. – Ian.
13. 30/7/2014. Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good group of eight set out from the farm road at Quoin Point to walk along to Bull Creek. there was a bit of a wind blowing which kept the temperature down, & it was VERY muddy going across the paddocks. We didn’t get onto the beach very much as the tide was quite high, even although on the tramp program it was stated to be low at 11:30 approx. [Yes, a 0.3 m low tide i.e. on the higher side – Ed]
It was surprising to see that the gates along the coastal paddocks had “Walking Access” signs attached to them, so good on the land owners for allowing this.
We had morning tea in the shelter of some rocks, & lunch at Bull Creek. Lunch was a reasonably hurried affair, as the sandflies were eating more than we were!!! The exit of Bull Creek onto the beach was probably passable, but we didn’t fancy getting wet feet so we stayed on the Nth. side.
After lunch, it was just a return walk mostly back along the paddocks to the cars. The wind had started to dry out the very muddy parts, so it was only just a little less muddy going back. But, unfortunatly, one member slipped over at one point, & has some dirty washing to attend to !! We walked 12.3km in approx 4hrs. – Ken.
12. 5/3/2014 Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: Lex and Peter.
Failed to reach Bull Creek. Ed note.
11. 13/2/2013 Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. (9)
Nine of us enjoyed the tramp, three of us oldies, six newies, to show it off to. And they did appreciate it.
We saw lots of seals/sealions (?) on the way.
It was surprising to see such a high sandbar at Bull Creek.
Sandbar

A high extensive sandbar now. (Ian pic and caption.)

Backed up

Bull Creek water backed up by the sandbar. (Ian pic and caption.)

Although a souwester was very strong at times it was good tramping weather.
A feature of the tramp at its end was the discovery of a very flat battery in Ian F’s car, whose parking lights had been accidentally knocked on and left for 5 hours! With an AA call-out rescue, we got all got home by teatime. – Ian.

10. 2/6/2010. Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: George and Dot.

It was a most unusual start. Various reports had it that after the recent rainy period the paddocks would be too wet or the coast road would have been damaged. As it turned out, not – in either case. The upshot was though, that one of the leaders led a number on a round trip road walk up the Scroggs Hill from Brighton. 12 went on to Quoin Point. Of the 12, only 4 went to Bull Creek.

It was a nice low tide, but the Bull Creek flood waters were too deep to comfortably cross.

Packing up after lunch. Ken, Doug.

The remainder stopped for lunch a few gullies back.

Bull Creek minus 30 mins. (Bill caption and pic) Lex and who?

The day was brilliant with little wind.

How did this get here? Noticed on the way back.

It was a good day out. All the more enjoyable for contrasting with the previous week’s extended rain. – Ian
9. 23/12/2009. Trampers. Ken and George. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good walk on Wednesday, lots of rock hopping. It was a perfect day for it as well, with virtually no wind, and not too much sun either.
Returning from Bull Creek. George. (Ken pic)

Returning from Bull Creek. George. (Ken pic)

8. 4/4/2007. All. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Easy+. Leaders: George, Hazel, Eleanor B, Joyce S
7. 1/3/2006 All. Quoint Point, Bull Creek. Easy. Leaders: Dot B, Glenis, Frank & Lesley
6. 6/4/2005. Both. Quoin Point. Leaders: Hazel, Dot B, Anne R, Colleen.
Ian and Bob

Tea Break. Ian,  Bob H.

Seascape

Seascape (Ian pic and caption.)

High tide at Bull Creek. No crossing today!

High tide at Bull Creek. No crossing today! (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 22/1/2003. Both. Quoin Point, Bull Creek. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Bill and Pat, Denise.
4. 24/4/2002. Quoin Point Bull Creek. Medium. Leaders: Graham, Bill & Pat
3. 28/11/2000. Quoin Point. Leaders: George, Pam, Audrey K.
2. 29/3/2000. Quoin Point Bull Creek Leaders: George, Hazel, Bev J.
1. 15/5/1996. Quoin Point – Bull Creek. Return. Russell Road. Medium. Leaders: Jack M, George, Ted, Jack R.
Alternative: Woodhaugh – Leith Valley. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

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Nov 29 2017

Lamb Hill, Orbells Cave & Fiddlers Hut; ABC Cave & The Gap

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 10 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lamb Hill to 3 o’clock creek. Farm. Lambing.”
Farm walk. Lamb Hill Station, Hindon Road, Hindon. Seek permission. Check at house before you do any tramping.
Lamb Hill: 43 km from car-park.
Bendoran: 75 km from car-park.
8. 29/11/2017. Trampers. Bendoran over-night, Orbells Cave. H. Leader: Art.

Route Map, Bendoran to Orbells Cave/3 O’Clock Creek/Fiddlers Hut, courtesy Art.

This tramp was a First Time for our club.
Two cars(six trampers) left Mosgiel at 8.00 a.m. rendezvousing at Cherry Farm before travelling together to reach the Bendoran Huts at 9.30. Morning tea was taken, and five eager trampers set out just after 10 am on the day’s adventure. One stayed in camp to heat water for showers later.
The day was sunny and warm enough. High cloud drifted across after an hour, but it remained hot. We stopped several times to take on water – and we were going downhill!
We descended down to Orbells Creek, and followed it for some distance, being on a grassy 4WD track all day. Tussocky hills surrounded us, with many interesting rocks, such beautiful country.
A mob of grand Hereford cows with calves (beef) moved in front of us for a time, before going up a side gully.
Eventually we came to the first ascent of the day, leaving Orbells Creek for a time, the 4WD track going up and over a saddle. At the top we had a short descent and then a climb up to a second saddle.
But from here it was downhill all the way to the cave. We met Barney, the Bendoran Farm Manager, out with his dogs shifting a mob of cows and calves – black with white faces this time (Angus Hereford Cross).
We came back to Orbells Creek by the cattleyards, crossed over, and in a few minutes were at Orbells Cave (with Orbells Garden flourishing in profusion in front (foxgloves). It had been hot work, but to our great relief found that it was very pleasantly cool in the cave. The time was 12.20 pm. We sat and rested for half an hour here, while eating our lunch.

In the cave for a cool place to have lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

 Fiddlers Hut was our next objective, about 2 km further on. Was we left, bird calls from high above the cave alerted us to the presence of a N.Z. falcon circling there. We saw it – or another one –  later in the day, too. Crossing 3 O’Clock Stream, we arrived at Fiddlers Hut at 1.3. We admired the stone walls, very neatly constructed, and with a vey sound modern corrugated iron roof.

Fiddler’s hut. (Helen pic and caption.)

But sadly the interior had been badly neglected, birds obviously had been the only tenants for some years past.

As we began the homeward journey, a light and very pleasantly cool north-east breeze arrived to provide some relief, especially helpful on the uphill bits. Five tiny little Paradise duckings were on the water when we crossed back over 3 O’Clock Stream. All water bottles were refilled.
The same route was followed going back as we had travelled out earlier. It was a long climb back up to the two saddles. At the top of the first one, 10 minutes was well spent in resting, while taking on water, eating fruit, etc.
In time we came back down to Orbells Creek, and walked, the kilometres behind us, with an occasional brief stop (water).

One long hill awaited us – the climb out from Orbells Creek. The hill seemed to go on forever, but by putting one foot in front of the other, we found the top. But our legs were mighty tired now, and there was only a few hundred metres left to go. And so we arrived back at the Bendoran Hilton …

View of Bendoran huts. (Helen pic and caption.)

… just before 5 p.m. A good list down and rest seemed to be the logical thing to do now, so that’s what we did!

All five had thoroughly enjoyed the day. An energetic tramp to equal any other that our club has done. VERY SATISFYING.

Total distance was 20 km. Orbells Cave was approx. 8 km from Bendoran, and Fiddlers Hut a further 2 km beyond. Bendoral Huts are at an altitude of 500 metres, Fiddlers Hut about 200 metres. – Art.
On completing the tramp we had a lovely muffin and cup of tea before showers and liquid refreshments. Fire lovingly looked after by camp mum Jennifer. Eleanor our great organiser had Also arrived by this time.
Tea was prepared consisting of silverside, stuffed chicken, new potatoes, carrots and two salads. Dessert: chocolate brownie berries and yogert. All had bought some part of it.
Jill Arthur Phil Wyn and Helen the walkers.
It helped revive us. – Helen
75 km from car-park.

11. 8/3/2017. Trampers. The Gap, and ABC Caves. M. Leaders: Arthur and Eleanor.

After a one and a half hour drive from Mosgiel, we arrived at Bendoran Huts.  David Malloch the station owner arrived to welcome us and give us a brief history of the 5000 acre property.

Us with David Malloch. (Helen pic and caption.)

After unpacking and eating lunch, we walked in a cool s.w. wind, overcast with a few skiffs of showers to Mount Misery @ 714 metres.

Eleanor on Mt Misery. (Arthur pic and caption.)

A great view for those brave enough to tackle the wind on such a rocky peak.  From there we ventured onto “Terry’s Knob” (refer Hamel’s book page 7:13), …

Terrys Knob. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… before returning to Bendoran for drinks and muffins.  After lighting up the coal range to heat the water and apple crumble, we then enjoyed home baked Chicken, vege’s and salad.  Next job was firing up the open fire, sitting round chatting for the evening.

Before 8.30am next morning we were up and away tramping in ideal conditions for 3 hours to the “Gap” @ 670 metres.

The Gap from morning tea stop. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After numerous photo shots of surrounding valleys, peaks, ranges and the trig,  we then headed down onto a new track, where after a lunch stop, we approached the A.B.C. Caves.

Helen Janine & Eleanor at abc caves. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After a challenging tramp, we were impressed by the cave interior, …

From in ABC cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

… but were disappointed the “visitors book” left no room for our claims to reaching this  monumental milestone!   We then had to return steeply uphill a little before bush-bashing a track across a gully to join back onto our original track, leading us back to our cosy “Bendoran home”.

Bendoran where we stayed. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Arriving back @ 4.15pm, we found 2 members (who returned without going to A.B.C. Cave) had the coal range going with the kettle boiling for drinks and a HOT shower!!  All fresh and clean again, we dined …

Dinner. (Helen pic and caption.)

… in front of the open fire on beef casserole, new potatoes, peas and salad, followed by brownie and peaches—-not your average tramping food, and certainly above standard accomodation.

It was an exceptional tramping trip for Arthur, Neil, Carol, Helen, Janine and Eleanore, with new tracks and experiences for some of the party. – Janine and Eleanor.

10. 25/3/2015. Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

On a day when the weather was a bit suspect, we arrived at the Bendoran Huts to see fog in the valleys, but clear around the tops. Because of the distance travelled to get there, we decided to have a late morning tea break,…

Late morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Late morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

…at one of the high points on the track. After this, we walked around the road [farm track] to a point at the head of the valley leading to ABC cave, where we arrived for a late lunch in sunshine.
After lunch we more or less retraced our steps back to the cars, with a couple of refreshment stops on the way.
The day turned out ideal for tramping, with just a trace of breeze at times, a little bit of sunshine for lunch, & the temperature just right, & the fog actually lifted during the day.
Next time we do this, it would be a good idea to start early, as it’s a long way to drive, & the road in is all narrow gravel. – Ken.

9. 8/5/2013 Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 13.6km, 4hrs moving, 2hrs stopped, total ascent 839mtrs, max elevation 701mtrs.

There have been MANY new tracks bulldozed in around the area, making it very difficult to know which track to take. The original idea was to go to the Gap, & then down to the ABC cave, but we were running out of time, due to the distance travelling there, getting held up for about 1/4 hr by a very large mob of sheep with no sign of humans or dogs anywhere. Plus as we didn’t know where to go, we ended up bush-bashing our way down a ridge on the top side of the bush, as you can see by the Google pic. We eventually got down to the DOC track leading between the GAP & ABC, so just carried on to ABC, had a quick drink/snack, & left there at just on 2pm. Then we struggled up another ridge that was a lot clearer than the one we had came down, but it was steep, & it took us an hour to reach the top. From there, it was a relatively easy walk back to the 4wd track that we had left to go down past the bush. One or two of the climbs on the track back to the car were certainly a bit ‘trying’, but we all made it back to the cars OK, & after the drive back to town, got home at just after 6pm.

George didn’t go down the ridge to the cave, so he sheltered for a while, then wandered back to the cars, leaving suitable signs that he had passed that way. There were 7 of us in the group, one of whom was heard to say on the way in, “you think this group is a serious walking group?” so by the end of the day when I asked if they still didn’t think we were a serious walking group, the answer was ” that was a serious walk”. – Ken.

8. 22/2/2010. Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

It had been many years since any of us had done this tramp, and memories were hazy. So much so, that we parked the cars at the end of Blucher Road, mistaking the shearing shed location there for the actual Bendoran Huts site about six kms further on. So we walked the farm 4WD route to the huts, instead of driving it!

 

A hut ruin on the route. The fog was round us all the way. But it was dry! A fog, not a mist, as one of us distinguished.

An pic of interest on the way.

Lunch across from one of the Bendoran huts. (Ken pic)

Lunch in lee of the hut. (Ken pic)

We walked on beyond the huts on the track we should have originally started on, for a further km, but there was nothing to be seen through the fog which accompanied us all the way, except for only one brief respite. We then retraced our steps to the cars. About 14 km walked that day. – Ian
7. 30/1/2013 Trampers. Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.
Lunch at the old hut.

Lunch at the old hut.

Orbells Cave from the track.

Orbells Cave from the track.

Running repairs before we start the real climb back out

Running repairs before we start the real climb back out

6. 19/1/2011. Trampers. Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.

Small scale GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

If you look closly at the small scale pic, you can see the shed at the Nth. end of the airstrip, right at the bottom of the pic where the track starts. As you can see from the spacing of the GPS squares, we were still driving for a while till the squares become very close together. this is where we started to walk from. You can also see the track going off to the left of the airstrip at it’s south end, going down to the ford where the track peters out, & then starts again on the other side. That is where the 2003 tramp went (see below).

Large scale GPS map of route, courtesy Ken.

The large scale pic shows the decent via the wrong ridge, we should’ve been one over to the right. Anyway, we ended up just a short distance from Orbells creek, so walked into that valley, & up to Orbells caves which is the track on the RH side of the pic.

Cute cave we found on the way down to Three O’clock Stream. (Ken pic)

Orbells Caves. (Ken pic)

Dermot in the obviously lived-in cave. (Ken pic)

We then retraced our steps back to Three O’clock Stream, and went downstream to a crossing, where Dermot and I went to the old hut to have lunch (which is the track on the left side of the stream in the GPS pic).

Hut on the other side of Three O’clock Stream. (Ken pic)

Relaxation area of the hut. (Ken pic)

Then after walking across the river flats, we struggled up the very steep hills back to the cars.
The weather was fine, but VERY windy, and I nearly lost my footing a couple of times coming back up the steepest parts. BTW, the hut is not on Lambhill Station, it’s on the neighbours property.
Everybody did very well, including George, who didn’t go to the caves, along with Hazel. They just went over to the hut to have lunch there.

Hazel packing prior to leaving. (Ken pic)

George got a dose of cramp on the way back up the hills, but managed to overcome it ok, and carry on. – Ken.
5. 21/5/2006 Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.Leaders: George, Keith, Glenice, Hazel
4. 21/5/2003. Both. Lamb Hill to Three O.clock Creek. Medium. Leaders: Wendy B, Bob H, Nancy & Molly
View when we first arrived.

View when we first arrived.

Morning tea break.

Morning tea break.

Descent to creek

Three O'clock Creek

Three O’clock Creek

At creek ford.

Lunch at top of climb.

Lunch at top of climb. Pat, Lex, Doug J, Evelyn, Doug M, Bob, Arthur.

3. 17/5/2000 Lamb Hill, Three O’Clock Creek. Leaders: Wendy, Colleen, George
2. 15/4/1998. 3 O’Clock Creek, Lamb Hill. Leaders: Nancy, Wendy B
1. 8/11/1989 Lamb Hill to Three O’Clock Creek and old stone hut. Harder grade. George, Mary M, Molly, Catherine

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Nov 22 2017

Allans Beach, Cape Saunders, Puddingstone Rock, Mt Charles

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 99 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mt Charles Mr Neil Farm”

27 km from car-park.

Click here to read about Cape Saunders Lighthouse and the two graves

9. 22/11/2017. Trampers. Mount Charles. M. Leader: Phil.

Mt Charles – 22 November 2017 – Leader: Phil.

Following a quick rendezvous of 4 vehicles at Macandrew Bay it was follow the leader via Allans Beach Road, with the leader doing a feint turn the wrong way at Hoopers Inlet, just to test the following car drivers, before arriving and parking under the pine and macrocarpa at the end of the road.  There was then a few recounts on the numbers of intrepid trampers as I was reliably informed we had 16 when we left Mosgiel, but now we had 18!  Wow Mt Charles must have a reputation!

So off we set at 10 to 10 back down the road to the gate with ‘closed’ on it; there was a promise of the most well earned morning tea for the year at the stile at the top of the first paddock….this was achieved comfortably by all but clearly the steep start had an affect,

Up, up, and more up. (Helen pic and caption.)

with everyone sitting for a good 20 minutes…maybe it was the views?  This was said to be about ‘halfway up- yeah right!’

We then set off up a variety of knobs and farm tracks, and following the fence lines to ridges and little saddles and then via a track – commented to be the stairway to heaven –  that dissected some remnant native bush (and where the level of craic was very low), before we emerged on a little plateau, and veering left and with the help of some gentlemanly fence lifters to get under the barbed wire arrived and ‘summited’ Mt Charles at 11.30.

 

Group at the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

On the last part of the ascent we had been accompanied by a herd of inquisitive and very well conditioned cattle, that set about corralling and dividing us before realising we had no barley sugars to give them so off they bashed through the forest. At the summit we were greeted by the mist clearing and revealing 360 degree views, only to be tested by a swarm of bush flies and other flying objects, so after admiring the views and taking the obligatory photos

View from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

we headed off through the fences and along the ridge to start the descent down the sea side (East) of the mountain. Around half way down the lumpy and steep hillside we found a spot for lunch, where someone had nicely placed boulders and logs for us all to be comfortably seated and take in the surroundings,

Lunch stop. (Margreet pic and caption.)

including a top dressing plane, piloted by Snoopy. The plane  made numerous and continuous sorties along the coast

‘’Snoopy buzzing the team’’ (Phil pic and caption.)

and around the mountain for the duration of the rest of the walk. At about this time the sea mist moved back and the summit was shrouded in….

Gradually we descended and returned along the ‘flat’, parallel with the coast, and then over a small saddle and down to the road end and carparks, where we were warmly met at 1.15 by Jill D and Clive, who having completed 90% of the ascent, returned and undertook a walk along the beach.  Well done folks for the inspiring effort.

We then had sometime at the beach, walking to the headland, dipping toes in the sparkling seas, or just lounging and taking in  the peace and tranquillity, but for Snoopy! Then onto the Mac Café, where as a sign of the season, and in very Mediterranean like conditions,  there were probably more ice creams, and cold drinks consumed  than coffees and tea.

Although the walk was ‘only’ 5.7km it was 403 m up a mountain, and of course 403m down!

This was NZ walking at it’s best; a mountain, 360 degree views of land and sea scapes, and lovely weather followed by a walk on the beach and admiring wildlife, with great company. – Phil

 8. 8/4/2015 Trampers. Mount Charles M.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 7km; 2 hrs moving time; 3.1km/hr; climbed 452mtrs; max elev.412mtrs

Having met up with the others at the meeting place in Andy Bay, 6 of us travelled to the end of Allans Beach Rd. where we parked under the pines, & geared up for the climb up Mt. Charles. We walked back along the road for the 3-400m to the stile over the fence at the start of the climb, then it was up, up, & more up!
We stopped just after 10am for morning tea break, then resumed the climb. An hour later we reached the trig on top of Mt. Charles,…

1 At top of Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

1 At top of Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

…where we spent some time admiring the view, which was fantastic.

2 View from Mt. Charles, with Harbour Cone on left. (Ken pic and caption)

2 View from Mt. Charles, with Harbour Cone on left. (Ken pic and caption)

4 Allans Beach, & Hoopers Inlet from Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

4 Allans Beach, & Hoopers Inlet from Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

We also found the trig station was falling to bits, with all of the bolts securing the stays to the legs missing.

3 looking at he damaged trig. (Ken pic and caption)

3 looking at he damaged trig. (Ken pic and caption)

As there was a bit of a breeze blowing up there, we decided to go down the seaward side, & walk back around that area to the cars. So we set off following sheep trails through the bracken, & Onga Onga, down a steep slope until we were approx halfway down, where we had lunch in a pleasant spot with a great view.

5 Lunch stop with a view. (Ken pic and caption)

5 Lunch stop with a view. (Ken pic and caption)

6 Allans Beach with Sandy Mount in the background

6 Allans Beach with Sandy Mount in the background. (Ken pic and caption)

We then finished the descent,…

7 The clay road down there was our destination for the walk back out. (Ken pic and caption)

7 The clay road down there was our destination for the walk back out. (Ken pic and caption)

…& made our way back past Belmont House out to the cars.
As it was still quite early in the day, we then went out to the beach, where we had to detour around a sleeping sea lion on the track. There were others on the beach also, ignoring the presence of humans.
The trip up Mt. Charles is a serious climb to get to the top, but I think we all enjoyed the experience. And we stopped off at Mac Bay for a coffee & chat before driving back to town. – Ken.

7. 10/8/2011. Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock, return. Medium.

GPS of route from Allans Beach to Puddigstone Rocks, return, courtesy Ken. 13.8 Km. Total metres climbed: 690.

It was a brilliant winter’s day as can be seen from the pics.

Looking South at Allans Beach. (Ken pic and caption). – Sandymount beyond.

Looking north towards on Cape Saunder’s coast. (Ken pic and caption)

Cape Saunders ‘LightHouse’. (Ken pic and caption)

The site of the old Lighthouse Keeper’s house which was vandalised and later destroyed by fire. Site very tidily cleared.

Our intention had been to return via Mount Charles, but an early evening appointment of one of our party indicated a return by the way we had come would be more prudent than risking the – perhaps over-time commitment – of tackling Mount Charles as well. (Note: Making this a summer tramp would lessen such time constraints.) – Ian
6. 11/2/2009. Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock Cape Saunders Road, Mt Charles, round trip. Medium. Leader: Bill

45 minutes’ drive to Alans Beach by Hoopers Inlet. 37.5 km from car-park.
(Click to enlarge thumbnail pics)

Route Map
The trip this time was enhanced by a group from the Christchurch Over Forties Tramping Club joining us for the day. The day was pleasant as we made our way from the Belmont homestead over a ridge or two to our tea break spot with a fine view of a small beach and the Wharekakahu Rock islet.

Down to tea break

Down to tea break

Beach and Whatekakahu Rock Islet at tea break

Beach and Whatekakahu Rock Islet at tea break

A bit of a climb from there brought us to the experience of an abrupt cliff face

A cliff edge

A cliff edge

before climbing a fence line to make our way across to the Cape Saunders road and down to the Matakitaki Point lighthouse.

While there we showed our visitors the ancient grave site of two young children (see information at bottom of this post)

Picket fence grave site

Picket fence grave site

before climbing back up to the Kaimata Road and down to our lunch stop.
click to enlarge

Lunch time

Lunch time

Then it was down a paddock or two to view the seals on the Puddingstone Rock ledge,

Seal and offspring?

Seal and offspring?

Seals frolicking

Seals frolicking

before climbing the road back out to the Cape Saunders Road and along to the NE of Mount Charles to climb through paddock and bush to the trig.

Sandymount from Mount Charles

Sandymount from Mount Charles. Hazel, Angela

Last climb to trig

Last climb to trig

After that it was down the conventional ascent route, much steeper than the one we had climbed, and along to the cars.

5. 23/5/2007 Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock Cape Saunders Road, Mt Charles, round trip. Medium. Leaders: Bill, Pat
Keyhole in rock

Keyhole in rock (31/3/2004)

click to enlarge
Lunch time

Lunch time

4. 29/11/2006. Trampers. Allans Beach, Mount Charles, Cape Saunders. Medium. Leaders: Bill, Pat

click to enlarge

Off-shore islet

Off-shore islet

Surf on Cape Saunders

Surf on Cape Saunders

Cute gate

McLeods’ gate

Victory Beach from Mount Charles

Victory Beach from Mount Charles

Struggling against the wind up Mt Charles Pat, Wendy, Hazel

Struggling against the wind up Mt Charles Doug, Pat, Wendy, Hazel, Glenice.

Cresting Mt Charles. Who? Doug, Ian, Pat, Wendy, Hazel

Cresting Mt Charles. Who? Doug, Wendy, Pat, Hazel, Glenice.

Cautious descent in wind. Pat, Wendy.

Cautious descent in wind. Wind, Glenice, Pat, Hazel, Wendy.

Allans beach from Mt Charles. (Bill pic)

Allans beach and Sandymount from Mt Charles. (Bill pic)

Papanui Inlet, Otago Harbour from Mt Charles.

Papanui Inlet, Otago Harbour from Mt Charles.

3. 7/12/2005. All. Cape Saunders from Allans Beach. Leaders: Bill, Pat, Bob, Nadia
2. 26/1/2005 Mount Charles Hoopers Inlet, Allans Beach. Leaders: Dorothy S, Shirley
Prospect. Before the climb.

Prospect. Before the climb.

Mount Charles summit. Dorothy, Pat.

Mount Charles summit. Dorothy, Pat.

Lunch

Lunch lee Mt Charles. Peter, Lex, Ian, Dorothy S, Dot B, Ria, Pat Wendy, George, Margaret, Tom

1. 31/3/2004. Trampers. Cape Saunders, Puddingstone Rock. Easy+. Leaders: Bill, Pat
Tea Break. Pat, Molly, Bill, Joyce, Nancy

Tea Break. Pat, Molly, Bill, Joyce, Nancy

Peter, Bob & Bill on edge

Peter, Bob & Bill on edge

Wave surge. Lunch. Margaret, Who? Bev H, Peter. Old grave.

Wave surge. Lunch. Margaret, Who? Bev H, Peter. Old grave.

Keyhole in point.

Keyhole in point.

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Aug 09 2017

Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road

Published by under Beach,Farm,Trampers

No. 86 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Heyward Point – Melville’s Farm Farm”

40 km from car park.

Part: Tramping Track, Managed by DOC. Rest: Not during lambing Sept-Nov. Seek Permission.

15. Trampers. Hayward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road circuit. M. Leader: Janine.

On what looked like a lovely clear day, 15 trampers set off in from Mosgiel in 4 cars. Difficulties set in very early when 2 of the cars were delayed by a car accident on the motorway – 2 other cars were fortunate to be able to detour through Fairfield. Next difficulty was the further we drove, the thicker the sea mist became and on reaching the end of Heyward Point Road, after the 20 minute delay, visibility was extremely limited in the murky fog.

We set out through the mist and after a short walk stopped under some pine trees for a late morning tea

Morning tea under the trees.(Helen pic and caption.)

then pushed on to the coast edge above Aramoana- BUT still no view on offer!! Disappointing for those of us who knew what we should be seeing and unable to show those who hadn’t been to the location before just what a spectacular coastline we have!

With care we followed the cliff edge, passed through some pine trees, scrambled a short rocky hill to suddenly find the mist had lifted and we had a view. Along to Heyward Point we were able to see the Mole, Aramoana, 2 ships at sea, numerous seal and pups, and a multitude of seabirds.

(Margreet pic.)

Shags in a hole in the rock. (Helen pic and caption.)

Onward and we tackled a steep hill – up and down still skirting the cliff edge till dropping onto Kaikai beach area. Due to the late start and time limitations we didn’t venture to the sandy beach but cut accrss the paddock straight to the nearby cave/holiday home where groaning stomachs were replenished.

Lunch stop. (Helen pic and caption.)

With the late lunch, we were all delighted with the original Maori fantail legend told to us in real ‘storyteller’ style by Bob.

All refueled, it was another steep climb to the historic ‘Jennings house’- after a quick viewing and discussion on the sturdy foundations of this old homestead – we continued on through paddocks meeting young curious cows and arriving back to the road above Whareakeake beach. The road walk to us back again through thickening mist to where the cars were left. Despite all that water vapour the walk wasn’t too ‘wet’ and the 9.75km ramble appeared to be enjoyed by all. Each car then made their own arrangements for coffee / home drop offs. – Janine.

14. 10/8/2016. Trampers. Hayward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road circuit. M. Leader: Arthur H.
We parked the cars at the end of Hayward Point Road and walked for ten minutes to find our morning tea spot.
The ground was still hard from the frost. The sky was cloudless with just a hint of a cold southerly breeze. We could not have had better weather for our tramp, even if we had been able to arrange it ourselves.

Another short walk took us to the start of the DOC track to Hayward Point itself. Great views up here, of the Otago Harbour entrance, the Aramoana Mole and across to Tiaroa Head.

Mole and Heads. (Margreet pic).

Mole and Heads. (Margreet pic).

A large ship was heading into the harbour. A very scenic spot indeed.

Following the cliff-top track, we came to the grassy headland block on which were grazing a mob of hoggets. We descended down to Heyward Point but could see only two seals (usually twenty or more can be seen) and two shags on the little off-shore islet.

Rock with small and large gulls plus seals and shags. (Helen pic and caption).

Rock with small and large gulls plus seals and shags. (Helen pic and caption).

Plenty of seagulls about though.

We admired the rusty old winch, which had been used to bring up the acetylene gas bottles to power the beacon in years past (solar power now), before continuing.
Uphill next to get above the very steep face, which has recently been fenced off and put into a Q.E.II Covenant Reserve.
Going down again was a bit tricky, and it was necessary to hold on tightly to the fence so as to remain upright for a distance in the wet muddy conditions. Once out onto the grass paddock the going was much easier, but it is a long way down.

The tide was halfway out as we walked along Kaikai beach. A very beautiful place away from civilisation. At the end of the beach we turned inland to admire the holiday cave dwelling.

Cave dwellings (Helen pic.)

Cave dwelling. (Helen pic).

From sea level it is all uphill back o the cars, so we ascended the first hill to lunch at the old house (the Jennings house).

Old house where we had lunch. (Helen pic and caption).

Historic old Jennings house where we had lunch. (Helen pic and caption).

Some stomachs were complaining by then, but morning tea had also been late.

A close inspection of the house followed. Apparently it had last been used during the second world war by the army for coast watching duty.
Up through the paddocks, onto the road, which we followed, returned us to the cars at 2.25 p.m. We had covered 11 kms.
The fine day, together with the great views, had combined to give the seven of us a very enjoyable tramp.
On the way home, a diversion had to be made to observe the weekly ritual at Careys Bay. – Arthur H.

13. 11/5/1016. Hikers. Heyward Point, anti-clockwise loop return over paddocks. M. Leaders: Judy, Adrienne.

Heyward Point Route Map

Heyward Point Route Map

21 intrepid hikers parked at the end of the Heyward Point road and set off in beautiful weather after almost forgetting the Bathgate car load who took a wrong turning….
After a leisurely morning tea …

Morning tea panorama

Morning tea panorama

… in the first group of pines, Dorothy came to grief at the first hurdle (style), making a great job of scraping her leg.  She was ably patched up …

… by a bevy of nurses and returned to the cars with Chris for a quiet sit in the sun for the rest of the day.

Harbour Entrance

Harbour Entrance

The remaining 19 proceeded along the cliff path where the ups and downs tested our fitness in the rapidly increasing heat. Clothes were shed in all directions before we reached the paddocks above the point.  Six keen souls went down to the rocks

Split off 'island' adjacent to lighthouse

Split off ‘island’ adjacent to lighthouse

Birds & seals on 'island'

Birds & seals on ‘island’

and were rewarded by the sight of families of seals cavorting in the rock pools.  The bulk of the party proceeded to the style perched steeply on the hillside above Kai Kai Beach where we stopped for lunch and were soon joined by the other six.

Lunch

Lunch

Then it was a steady slog uphill and across farm paddocks for another hour, to reach the track a couple of hundred metres from the cars.
Fantastic weather, incredible views and good company made this a most enjoyable hike, concluding with a coffee stop at the Stadium Cafe.
-Judy and Adrienne.

12. 26/3/2014 Trampers. Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road.

We had 8 people today, our numbers were boosted by 3 young men from Israel, who were bought along by Hazel.
We had good weather apart from a strong wind on the way back up to the top road again, & all agreed it is a good walk. – Ken

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the cave accommodation (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the cave accommodation (Ken pic and caption)

11. 16/1/2013 Trampers. Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road.

We had a very good walk today, with great weather, a good mix of terrain, & we had a good chat to Sue & Partner. Judy is related to both Sue, & the woman who live at the very start by the gate, she is Sue’s sister. So lots of ‘catching up’ was done.

Morning Tea break. (Ken pic and caption.)

Morning Tea break. (Ken pic and caption.)

Continue Reading »

One response so far

Jun 14 2017

Clarendon Area, Stone Stables, Lime Works, Whale Museum and Lookout

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 82 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Old Stone Barn Clarendon Farm”
Background History of Stable and Cemetery
38 km from car park
Associated farm on Cullen Road has new owner requiring signing in and out, and therefore no longer viable as a round trip. [Edit.]
14/6/2017. Clarendon, Cemetery,Sinclair Wetlands, Berwick Camp. Leader: Eleanore.
Today 7 hardy (maybe silly) trampers drove to Phosphate corner at Clarendon, then along Berwick road, parked up and walked up the hill to the Cemetery (my Great Great and Great Grandparents,  some Siblings and Children from Sinclair family are buried there.
We then drove further along Berwick road, parked and proceeded up the track to the hay barn for smoko.

Shed for morning tea out of the freezing wind. (Helen pic and caption.)

Mud to get to the shed. (Helen pic and caption.)

We all decided it would be no fun climbing round and up Mary Hill with frequent showers and a bitterly cold wind.
On the way back we briefly stopped at Sinclair Wetlands then drove into Berwick Camp, a year 8 class was there on camp, talked with the Activity Coordinator and strolled up to the dam.

On a bridge at the Berwick camp. (Helen pic and caption.)

It was plain to see what fun the young students were having, particularly when having a turn driving round with a leader in an old converted type of Land Rover in the mud.
So after all this strenuous activity we journeyed on to eat lunch (and cake) at a little hilltop cafe in Clyde street. – Eleanore.

Lunch at Eleanore’s with a lovely warm fire and cakes which were enjoyed by us all. (Helen pic and caption.)

24/4/2013. Hikers – and a few trampers. Limesprings Farm, McNeil Rd, Whale Museum, and return back through Farm by a different route. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
Route

Route, unfortuately stopped at Whale Museum, for some inadvertant technical reason! Cattle track up middle, McNeil Rd and extension at top.

The overcast day succeeded a wet 24 hours, and several trampers joined us after cancelling their bush walk up Raingauge Spur for safety’s sake. We parked the cars halfway along Driver Road and walked on to enter Limespring Farm. Continue Reading »

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May 31 2017

Street walk, Green Island, farm walk

Published by under Farm,Hikers

4. 31/5/2017. Hikers. Green Island street walk. E. Leaders: Elaine and Chris.

Nike app map of route, courtesy Ian.

The above route map gives some indication of the intricacies of Elaine’s   planned route, designed to cross and recross, by way of tunnels and bridges galore, the barriers of railway line, stream and motorway dividing  Green Island from Abbotsford. It was a street-walk, most suitable on the day for an off-and-on light morning drizzle. We were treated to a whole gamut of lower Abbotsford house designs, most instructive of fashions favoured in different decades, complete with one or two older ones looking very old and very neglected. At the latter part of the hike, we also got to peek into some of the large industrial goings-on at the north end of the town, not least Harraways. All most impressive.

At one point where a railway line once crossed the old main road (remember it?), Elaine stopped us to point out how it once served a coal-mine of her grandfather. She has a photo of a small steam engine about to head north across the road.

Drizzly morning tea at the gardens. Most of the 22 who came out. (Ian pic and caption.)

Newly decorated railway underpass (newly decorated since Elaine’s recce), essential for linking homes and school. It was deemed safer for children than a bridge. (Ian pic and caption.)

a dry-seated lunch at the Green Island Rugby Football Club pavilion in Miller Park. (Ian pic and caption.)

18 of us at Coffee at Agnes’, where we got to enjoy a separate room all to ourselve, complete with en suite. (Ian pic and caption.)

Many were the remarks appreciative of the cleverness of the route. A big thank you to Elaine and Chris for a great day out. – Ian, (for Elaine [without her knowledge – yet!] whose recent rapidly failing eyesight prevented her from tackling a report.)

3. 25/2/2009 Hikers. Green Island. Farm Walk. Leaders: George, Dot B
2. 10/5/2006. Hikers. Green Island street and farm walk. Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
1. 8/2/2006. Hikers. Street Walk: Green Island Street and Farm Walk. Leaders: Dot B, Chris.

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Apr 05 2017

Coutts Gully – Sawmill Roads – options

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 76 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Coutts Gully Return Sawmill Rd Farm”
Livingstonia Park distance from car-park: 31.5 km.

19. 5/4/2017. Both. Sawmill-Coutts Gully Roads. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Route map, courtesy Bruce.

Eighteen hikers and trampers set off from the grass berm in Burma Road after most of the cars parked on the berm. Five hikers, including Les, Margaret, Leslie and Bev made a separate excursion in the area. The main group walked beside the trees on the beach side of the park and then followed a track through the sand hills to Moturata Road  near the bridge,  following the 2 signposts with first a turn to the right and secondly a turn to the left.  We crossed Moturata Road where the track emerged and then walked 50 m to Sawmill Road on the left. We proceeded up this road and stopped for morning tea just past the house of the farm owner, Alan Gorton, through a gate and just before the dog kennels.

Morning tea. (Ian pic and caption.)

After morning tea we proceeded up the road about 200 m and turned to the left, passing an old coal range and some implement/vehicle sheds,  opposite the Mongolian style dwelling, a Yurt (Mongolian: Ger). We followed a farm road which wound down to the right through some bush and then went up hill through the farm. After some distance we followed sheep tracks straight up a steep part of the hill …

Not the farmer’s bath night. (Clive pic and caption.)

… rather than following a bulldozed track to the left. At the top of paddock was an open gate with a steel bar attached to it.  We went through the gate and continued to the next gate which was closed and had a plastic water tank with sides about 1.3 m in length. We went through this gate and then turned to the left and proceeded in a straight line  through a further 3 open gates, noticing a bulldozed track down the hill to the left but not going towards it. At the top of a brow of the hill, at the end of the straight line of travel, there was bush ahead and soon a grassy track was visible to the left which we went along for 100 m. We then noticed the start of the bulldozed track on the right which led down the hill through bush. The start of the track was not easy to see until we almost reached it because of the slope of the hill. The bulldozed bush track crossed a stream and then went up hill to reach a grassy paddock. We turned sharp left here and proceeded along Coutts Gully Road. The road in its upper parts is just a narrow path between some gorse bushes. We closed the Cyclone gate some distance along and erected 2 netting fences, with plastic bags on them, which were there to keep stock in. We had lunch at the sawmill further down the road.

Lunch at deserted sawmill. (Ian pic and caption.)

Near the bottom of the hill the group split in two with some doing the 40 minute Livingstone-Green family bush walk …

A 40 minute side trip. (Clive pic and caption.)

… with a loop at the end. We went to the right side of the loop.

At the top of Livingstone-Green. (Clive pic and caption.)

The rest of the group proceeded back to the cars. The last of the bushwalkers reached the cars at approximately 2.15 pm. The distance was approximately 11.5 km without the bush walk and 12.5 with the bush walk. The weather was cool but the rain that had threatened in the forecast some days previously did not eventuate. – Bruce and Marjorie.

18. 4/3/2015. Both. Sawmill-Coutts Gully Roads. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Route 2

Garmin 62S GPS of route, courtesy Bruce. Distance travelled: 12.68 km, moving time 3 hrs 43 mins, stopped time 1 hr 35 mins, moving av speed 3.4 km/hr., overall av speed 2.4 km/hr.

GPS of route

A grosser GPS of route, showing rough kilometers.

Twenty-seven trampers and hikers, including two guests from Wales who had been on the Turf to Surf cavalcade walking group, Jeremy and Mary, departed from Livingstonia Park, Burma Road, Taieri Mouth, at 9.45 a.m. on a calm sunny morning via the marked beach access track closest to the Burma Road entrance.

Entering beach from Livingstonia Park.

Entering beach from Livingstonia Park. (Bruce pic)

We proceeded north along the beach and turned to the left to the white marker pole on the beach edge which led to Moturata Road, just before we came to an assembly of some hundreds of seagulls, or, in the view of George, terns arranged in a square like a cohort from a legion of Roman soldiers.

We crossed Moturata Road and proceeded up Sawmill Road, stopping to admire two Clydesdale horses…

Horses. Clydedales, as someone said?

Horses. Clydesdales?

…that were patted and fed some grass by Chris.

Further up the road, we were greeted by a frisky pup, and then at 10.30 am we stopped for morning tea near a caravan, some houses and a yurt, a Mongolian style tent. After morning tea,

Morning Tea

Morning Tea

we entered the gate on the left, with the permission of Mr Allan Gorton, son of the late Bill, and continued down a steepish winding farm road through native bush into a gully and then up the other side into open farmland…

Emerging from deep gully.

Emerging from deep gully.

…which gradually led further up the hill.

At a gate some distance up the hill near a bush gully we veered to the left to go through another gate. After cresting the hill brow and passing a further gate we climbed another undulation and on the far side of this came eventually to a greenish track that led into the bush on the right. We noticed a further gate away to the left but did not go to it.

The bush road was also somewhat rocky and steepish. At 12.05 pm we stopped for lunch near a corner of the road at which a bank with a rocky backrest provided some seating. Proceeding again at 12.45 pm, we descended further and then gradually climbed up the other side and out of the bush into farmland.

The exit was adjacent to the upper part of Coutts Gully Road which continued towards the top of the hill via a gully on the right. We took the part of the road to the left and descended down towards an old truck parked in the bush on the left side of the road and the sawmill. The initial part of the road was a relatively narrow gap in the gorse. We then came to a Cyclone gate and subsequently a netting gate. Several birds chirped in the QE2 covenanted bush, including melodious korimako (bell birds), on the left of the road. Piwakawaka (fan tails) flitted around in the trees. After passing the sawmill, which had a pile of fresh sawdust indicating it had been recently used, we continued down the road until it emerged from the bush.

Then on the left, we had the option of doing the Livinstone-Green 30–40 minute Green Family bush walk.

Sign indicating walk through QEII reserve on Coutts Gully Road.

Sign indicating walk through QEII reserve on Coutts Gully Road.

A little over half the group did this travelling over a narrow well maintained bush track with steps, bridges and hand rails. We stopped for a rest near a seat that gave a view of Moturata Island,

The seat at the to of the QEII bush walk

The seat at the to of the QEII bush walk. Moturata Island in the background.

set in a turquoise sea, from near the top of the loop track near the end of the bush track. The grass track up to this along the fence line had been recently mown. We then proceeded back to the start/finish of the bush track.

The final portion of the walk was along Coutts Gully Road and Burma Road to Livingstonia Park, where we arrived back at approximately 3.30 pm. – Bruce.

17. 22/1/2014. Trampers. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road.
After explaining to everybody about the possibility of coming across some bulls, and bees, we set off up Coutts Gully Rd.
Had morning tea in the usual spot at the pine trees where a side road branches off, then went on to tackle the climb to the top road.
After climbing through the top fence, we were surprised to see some bulls in that paddock, as I was under the impression that they were in the paddock we wanted to go back down through. However, we gave them a wide berth, & pressed on regardless, with only one or two showing any interest in us, with most of them moving quickly out of our way. I must say I breathed a sigh of relief when we finally reached the top road, & the safety of the gate. There was certainly a “lot of bull in that paddock”, with probably 50 or so animals. As we had safely negotiated the bull paddock, we then stuck to the original route down Sawmill Rd. At this stage it was starting to get a little cooler, with a breeze, so we decided to get down into the shelter of the pines for a lunch stop. After lunch we walked down Sawmill Rd. [which is just a 4WD track at it’s top end], and spooked a couple of deer on the way down. From the bottom of Sawmill Rd. it was a short walk back to the cars.
We did 13.5 km; 4.3km/h ave.; 3hr 7mins moving time; climbed 320mtrs. max height 347mtrs. – Ken
16. 21/3/2012. Trampers. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Six of us trampers took to the hills behind Taieri Mouth, via Coutts Gully Rd.  We had morning tea at the normal spot under the pine forest, then tackled the rather steep climb up to the tops. Two of us decided to go the longer, more difficult way up, while the rest took the easier route.
However when Neil and I reached what we believed to have been the agreed lunch-spot, the others were not to be seen. After a half hour spent looking for them, we had lunch on the top where we could get a good view all around, but saw no sign of them at all.
As we were finishing lunch, we got a phone call from the others asking if they could go on!!!
After inquiring as to their whereabouts, we discovered that they were not too far from us, but had lunched in a place where they could not be readily seen. Ah well…
After joining up again, we made our way back down to Taieri Mouth via a track down a ridge, onto Sawmill Rd, & back to the cars. – Ken.
15. 20/4/2011. Trampers. Coutts Gully, Kennedys, John Bull. Car shuttle. M.

Route GPS. (Courtesy Ken). 14.56 km in 4h 23m. (4.4k/h in 3hrs 20m actual tramping.) Max elev. 305m.

There were 9 of us on the day. A good number. Upper Coutts Gully Road quite muddy after recent rain. Occasional light skiffs of rain, and some sun on the day.

Tea break, well up Coutts Gully track.

Lunch at top. Sheltering from the skiffs of rain and shifting wind.

After this was the walk out to Finlayson Road, along to Kennedys Farm and down to the seat on the John Bully Gully track. Down in the bush the track very muddy and deteriorating in places, especially THE muddy broken-stepped patch. – Ian.

14. 24/11/2010. Hikers. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road. M. Leaders: George, Dorothy

13. 9/6/2010. Trampers. Coutts Gully Road, Finlayson Road, Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth.Leaders: George, Bob.

Scanned Google Earth pic of the area of Wed’s walk with a red line tracing the route we took. (Bob pic and caption)

Coutts Gully road was wet a muddy on the first sunny day after a series of wet ones. We discovered as we went further up that the track was now a National Trust protected open space.

Coutts Gully track now a protected open space.

Yet further up and a reminder of the sawmill in Coutts Gully.

Sheds in the sun

Sic transit gloria, mutatis mutandis, or plus ca change plus c’est la meme chose, or something not at all like that. Anyway, a track off to the side, which we used to take, was discovered to be no longer viable. Quite overgrown.

We found that the entrance to a track we had formerly used was now overgrown.

You can see just how muddy the track was, as we edged past stacked wood, well-shrouded against wet winter weather.

On past the sawmill’s stacked wood

Our trekking hitherto had been in gully shade. Now out into the sun, it was time to remove extra clothing which the cold morning’s start had necessitated.

Up into the sunshine and time to remove a layer of clothing

Out into higher open paddocks, but the climbing became much steeper than the more gentle gully incline.

One of the steep paddock climbs

Then it was grudgingly down into a dip, to cross over to a yet more arduous extended paddock climb. Rain had soaked the sheep-nibbled grass to make steeper slopes very slippery also.

The beginning of an long steep climb

We kept to the left of and beyond the route marked out on the map (at the top), to make a fuller day of it. Towards the top, we lunched on the way by a gorsed fence, rewarded by great views of the coast. Until we eventually emerged onto Finlayson Road. Only a short way down and the leaders took us through a gate on the right to make our way back down. A paddock or two and we came onto a most useful connecting ridge, nicely cleared, to get us on the way down to Sawmill Road

On the way back down, on a convenient ridge

As we continued to make our way down, looking back into the sun, we could detect through the bush a track we had taken on one or two former times to take us through a gully from another ridge to this one.

Looking back to a track we have used on earlier occasions – through a bushed gully

Now it was only to continue on back down and out. A good day. Thanks to George and Bob for guiding us through some tricky turns at times to make for a tramp, parts of which we had not tackled before. – Ian
12. 3/3/2010. Both. Coutts Gully Road, Finlayson Road, Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth. Leaders: George and Bob M.
It was a good ‘walk-in-the-hills’ at 17km as pedometers read it, and it was a good round-trip route from sea level to skyline

From sea to skyline. (Bob pic and caption)

and back on a pleasant summer’s day with distant views to Cape Saunders for the baker’s dozen who did it (perhaps the previous week’s walk had worn some out?).

Setting out. (Bob pic and caption)

There was little ‘road’, in spite of the title of the walk, just some gravel at start and finish, but most of the trip was good pasture land often on cattle tracks or farm roads across Gorton and Wilkinson properties. Morning tea was near a still-operating, one-man sawmill, processing logs from nearby plantations. Pleasant bush lined Coutts Gully with ample birdsong especially from Bellbirds. We slowly climbed out of the gully and then plunged back through it on a 4WD track and out onto spur tops. Lunch was past the landmark lone pine

Lone pine and lunch stop. (Bob pic and caption)

and in a warm enclave among hawthorn and macrocarpa.

Artists Bob E and Elaine at work. (Bob pic and caption)

Here George held a remembrance observance for Ngaire Moir who passed away this week. People remembered her as having been on this walk many years ago when she was active in the club. Our sincere sympathies were expressed for Doug and the family. From this point, we rose by degrees to the Skyline Road which gave us vistas both east and west. A group of friendly cattle walked with us at one point.

We are joined by other ‘walkers’. (Bob pic and caption)

After only 15 minutes or so along the top we turned through yet another gate and took a downhill route along a different spur. There were more friendly/curious cattle, a little club of sheep with one solitary goat who’d joined them as a fully paid-up member, and at one stage George rounded a fenced bend and unexpectedly drafted a flock of sheep back towards us down the path. Then came perhaps the nicest stretch of the walk along a ridge top sheltered by manuka on both sides but through lovely summer grass along a quad bike path.

Grassy ridge. (Bob pic and caption)

From the open pastures that followed, we had good views of Moturata, Green, and White Islands, Sandymount, Saddle Hill, and the whole Dunedin coastline north.

Moturata view and beyond. (Bob pic and caption)

To the southeast, there was the Akatore catchment and forested hills aplenty. And so along Sawmill Road beside the lagoon which sadly did not present us with the flock of Royal Spoonbills seen on the recce, back to the cars (parked outside Denise’s crib, where there were good exchanges with the residents). Bob M
11. 1/6/2005. Trampers. Coutts Gully Road, John Bull. Leaders: George, Bob H
10. 13/8/2003 Trampers. Coutts Gully, Kennedys Farm, Taieri River. Medium. Leaders: George, Joyce.
Sabina

Sabina. Up beyond Coutts Gully Road

Down

Bob, George. Down spur to River

Above

Bob, Tash, Doug, Lex. At seat above the Taieri

Track

Doug, Bob H. Track back down along River

9. 3/6/1998. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H.
8. 26/3/1997. Coutts Gully Sawmill Road. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Frank.
7. 1/5/1996. Sawmill Road – Coutts Gully. Average. Leaders: George, Eric and Dorothy
6. 21/6/1995. Sawmill Track and Coutts Gully. Medium. Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H, Chris.
5. 13/9/1992 Coutts Gully, Taieri Beach Road. Long. Leaders: Ray W, Dave & Jean, Shirley
4. 20/2/1991 Sawmill Road – Coutts Gully. Good tramping and views. Average. Leaders: Eric and Dorothy, Jean, Joan.
3. 9/5/1990. Coutts Gully tramp, Taieri Mouth. Average. Leaders: Denise, Jean, Dorothy and Eric, Ria.
2. 12/4/1989 Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth. Leaders: Denise, Jean, Ria, Margaret
1. 16/11/1988 Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth. Leaders: Jean, Ria, Judith

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Mar 29 2017

Murrays Farm, Hoopers Inlet

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm,Hikers

No. 93 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Murrays Farm – Sandymount (Chris Hughes) Farm”

Distance for carpark: 31.5 km.

Map supplied by the owner. (Keith pic.)

11. 29/3/2017. Hikers. Murrays Farm. M. Leaders: Keith and Shona.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

It was a foggy, misty morning when 19 Hikers met at the gateway bel0w Murrays Farm before ambling up the road to having morning tea in the implement shed.

We then followed the fenceline up and across the paddocks before descending to explore around a container being used as a crib.

George investigates shower workings on new crib. (Ian pic and caption.)

We exited onto the coast …

We discover a new route from paddock to beach. (Eleanor W. pic.)

… where we had lunch …

Papanui Inlet mouth beach for lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

… out of the northerly wind.

We followed the water’s edge around past the old boat shed, climbing up the hill and visiting an old dwelling also being used as a crib and back along the farm tracks to the hole in the hedge and down the hill to the cars.

Coffee was at Macandrew Bay cafe. – Shona and Keith.

10. 20/2/2013. Hikers. Murrays Farm. Medium. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
Cuppa

Morning Tea at old homestead

ducks

Paradise Ducks in formation

tree

Waiting for others in shelter from the hot sun

9. 7/12/2011. Both. Murrays Farm. Medium.

GPS courtesy Ken. Track from distant spot anti-clockwise.

Comfort plus for morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

Five trampers scaled the almost vertical ascent to the Sandymount road before descending further by the bush.

Hoopers Inlet video

We sampled the beach at the mouth but a keen wind persuaded us up around the point to a boathouse in a more sheltered position.

Lunch stop. (Ken caption and pic)

Just along a little bit from the boathouse, we came upon this nest.

Black gull’s abandoned nest. Our bird expert explained they lay 2-3 eggs-in-nests before inclubating a further pair.

Then it was just a case of following our noses back across paddocks to the cars. – Ian
8. 10/2/2010. Hikers. Murrays Farm. Medium. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Fred.
7. 14/5/2008. Hikers. Murrays Farm. Easy. Leaders:Chris, Gwen.
Fine upstanding Hikers

Fine upstanding Hikers

An eye- and nose-watering wind greeted us when we stepped out of our cars at Hoopers Inlet. It was not a time for hanging around so our group of 13 set off at a brisk trot and soon reached the shelter of a shed which provided a good spot for morning tea.
Fuelled by hot drinks we ventured on and found that the hills and gullies gave good protection and we could enjoy this stroll through beautiful, peaceful countryside with the only other signs of life nearby the large number of paradise ducks. Perhaps they had discovered this place to be a refuge from duck shooters. In the distance sheep grazed and black cattle eyed us with interest.

Sheltered lunch spot

Sheltered lunch spot

We found our way down to the beach and a sheltered corner at the far end provided a comfortable lunch spot.

Seal among the lupins

Seal among the lupins

Margaret’s sortie into the sand dunes also brought to our notice a young seal hidden away under the lupins. We retraced our steps admiring the expansive views of the inlet and the winter colours on the hills.

It had been a short walk but a very pleasant country ramble.

Chris, who knows the area well, ably led us and, before returning home, some of us were lucky enough to stop off with her at a relative’s house on the hill and walk around the interesting garden, admiring both the plants and the panoramic views. – Marjorie.

6. 27/6/2007 Leaders:
Group

Group. Ian, Leonie, George, Tash, Pat, Hazel, Ria.

5. 1/2/2006. All. Murrays Farm, Hoopers Inlet. Leader: Chris.
4. 5/3/2003. All. Murray Farm. Leaders: Chris, Les and Margaret, Bev McI.
3. 3/7/2002. Combined. Murrays Farm. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Chris, Claude.
2. 6/2/2002. Combined. Murray Farm, Hoopers Inlet. Medium. Leaders: Chris, Jean, Colleen.
1. 2/5/2001. Murray Farm – Hoopers Inlet Road. Easy. Leaders; Chris, Jean, Colleen.

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Feb 01 2017

Traquair Station Tramps

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

Not during lambing or calving. Permissions from Traquair and Horsehoof.
Location: 22 km.
 13. 1/2/2027. Both. Traquair Station and Old Dunstan Road circuit. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug for the Hikers with Arthur for the Trampers.
Our inclement summer weather allowed a window of moderate breeze and sunshine for a most successful tramp in Maungatua Range’s foothills. Twenty-eight turned up at the carpark, including (was it?) 5 guests, all of ability suitable for the day.

– What more to say? We all made it leisurely and easily up a moderate gradient slope through paddocks, (with a stop for a cuppa, – not to mention mushrooms – on the way)

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

to the Microwave.

Getting near the microwave. (Helen pic and caption.)

We sauntered down the grassy Dunstan Trail, stopping for lunch in the sun.

Click for … Video of lunch stop on the Maungatua foothills’ part of the Old Dunstan Road … lunch video.

We returned through paddocks and the two fords, (sorry, two, not one, as announced), the fords just a little engorged with extra water from an overnight rain. Over a steep ridge …

[View] Back up hill on way to end of tramp. (Helen pic and caption.)

… and back to cattle yards on Mahinerangi Road.
Our five able guests, (the number possibly a day’s tramp record for the club?), contributed towards interesting ensuing conversations on the day. Furthering the opportunities for social (yes, social) intercourse was provision along most of the tramp for four-and-more-abreast walking.
It wasn’t a long day. Distance just 12.5 km. Recourse to the Wobbly Goat  Cafe for coffee and chatter ended a very happy outing. – Ian.

12. 26/2/2014. Hikers. Traquair Station, Cattle yards, implement shed, Microwave, Old Coach Rd, Crawfish Creek ford, implement shed circuit.  Leaders: Ian, Janice.

GPS of Traquair circuit

GPS of Traquair circuit. Distance: 12.6 km, Total time spent: 5 hrs, 8 mins.

Leader Ian started the day by his car engine overheating and having to be abandoned about 2 km short of the tramp start. Fortunately a most helpful couple in a double cab ute delivered him and his passengers to the tramp start at a set of cattle yards. The leaders had calculated on a six hour tramp, so we pushed on up-hill at a steady rate, much faster than need be, as we later learned. We stopped on a convenient ledge …

Morning Tea IF

Morning Tea. (Red dot near 2 km on GPS route.)

for morning tea, continuing on through various gates. In one of the paddocks six horses showed lively interest by galloping up to and away from us again. The last stretch was through tussock with the Microwave looming ahead of us.

Just about at the Microwave.

Just about at the Microwave. (Near 4 km on GPS route.)

When we reached it, instead of taking the two hours predicted by the leaders, we had made it in one and a half. (Apologies to those at the back who felt a bit pushed.) Bravo. Well done.

From there, give or take the odd little rise, it was soon just a lovely stroll down the Maungatua Range foothills section of the old Dunstan coach road. (Mentioned in first sentence of Early History), a ridge skirting the head-gullies of Crawfish creek which we were to ford later on. We stopped for a leisurely lunch …

Lunch. (Red dot on GPS route.

Lunch. (Red dot beyond 7 km on GPS route.)

… on a hillock alongside the track. After that it was just a short distance down the attractive gently-sloping close-cropped grass path amongst the tussocks to reach an all-important gate (at right-angle between 7 & 8 kms on left of map) that was to take us on the return journey towards the cars again. So perhaps it was understandable that two members of the party (who will remain nameless), strolling on ahead failed to stop and only by dint of much whistling and shouting were eventually persuaded to return. (Just as happened on the last Trampers’ trek, whose failure to stay with the leader is indicated by the extra tail at the same spot on Ken’s GPS of the route below.)

The journey back to the cars was just as recounted in the report below.
Back at the cars, Ian’s passengers were fitted into other cars. Ian was ferried back to his car, which had now cooled and made it back to Outram. With careful nursing it got back to Ian’s car hospital where it awaits diagnosis and possibly replacement parts.
The day was perfect. All made it with no trouble. A good day out. – Ian.

11. 18/5/2011. Trampers. Traquair Station, Cattle yards, implement shed, Microwave, Old Coach Rd, Crawfish Creek ford, implement shed circuit. Leader: Ian

GPS of route, beginning from far back right corner. (courtesy Ken) Distance 13.9km. Moving ave. 4.5 km/h. Total ascent: 821 mtrs.

A blustery cold gale buffeted us right from the start, and all the way up the steep climb to the Microwave. There was talk of whether it would be wiser to turn back and cancel the tramp.

Sheltering in the lee of the Microwave

The old coach road was a welcome change from the climb and the buffeting wind was showing signs of easing.

A distinctive small loop around a hillock.

The unbroken fence on the right at last yielded to the critical barb-wired top gate. The place through which to take to the paddocks.

Paddock route lower left to upper right

In navigating the above cross-paddocks route the trick was to keep to the right of the fence as the  track, surprisingly partially coach-road in appearance, swung left and right and left again as it took us to the L-shaped pair of gates decision point.

The twin gates ahead.

The gate on the right leads down the RHS of a gully before tracking down into it to lead to the two fords, the sole crossing-point over the Crawfish.

After the fords, the track led steeply up and up again. Three of us took to the level contoured stock tracks winding in and out around ridges and gullies while the others tackled the tracks steep climb up and over.

Looking back at the high ridge we had negotiated by one means or another.

Past that hurdle, we were clearly on our way past the implement shed and on back to the cars.
It had been a testing tramp, but worth pushing through on. A triumph for the seven trampers on the day. – Ian
10. 10/12/2008 Traquair Station, Microwave, Old Coach Rd, Crawfish Creek ret. Leaders:Ian, Bill M Farm and tussock country.
click to enlarge
Curious horses.

Curious horses.

Seven of us parked our two cars on Mahinerangi Rd  a little away from the Traquair cattle-yards as there was to be considerable cattle activity there that day. We walked across a large paddock, passing to the left of a large shed and and proceeded up a ridge directly in line with the microwave. We made it easy for ourselves by beginning slowly – and then easing up!

We morning-teaed  on the way

Morning tea

Morning tea

and arrived at the microwave some time after 11. We then made our way down the old coach road to the right and lunched among large tussocks which made good Little Miss Muffet seats. Then it was yet further down the lovely smooth grassy Coach Rd until we turned off to the right through a rare gate in the fence line. We then  crossed two or three paddocks following a fence line  before reaching the gate that marked for the leaders a gully that would take us down into  Crawfish Creek.

An ideal ford of Crawfish Creek.

An ideal ford of Crawfish Creek.

Near the crossing, we paused to admire the beauty of stream and gully slope before climbing up the other side.

Crawfish Stream scene. (Bill pic).

Crawfish Stream scene. (Bill pic).

Halfway up the steep hill, we elected to take a stock track which followed a beautifully level contour line around the hills ridge making for a longer but far easier way to the hill’s farther side. Then it was over to the shed we had passed earlier in the day, completing the loop of the round  trip, and back to the cattle yards and cars.

Several commented that it was easier than the hilly McNally track of last week, well within the ability of the hikers and a beautiful new tramp present members don’t recall ever having done before. It does appear though that Traquair Station is listed on tramping programmes of 1993 and earlier. The walk was basically a tramp up a ridge on Crawfish Creek true right, a skirting across the top of its head-water gullies, and then a return back down its true left to cross the creek lower down. Despite the small water flow of the creek, steep gorges in places lower down from our crossing indicated the powerful eroding work it has carried out in the past. – Ian
9. 29/7/1998. Traquair Microwave round trip. Leaders: Barbara McC, Mary L.
8. 31/1/1996 Traquair. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine T, Nel, Irene
7. 23/3/1994 Robert Reid Farm, Mahinerangi Road. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine T
6. 17/11/1993 Robert Reid’s Farm. (Mahinerangi Road). Medium. Marie F, Ria L, Ria H, Nel K
5. 17/3/1993 Manugatua – to Microwave from Traquair. Medium. Round Trip. (Walking week.) /strong> Leaders:Molly, Peggy M, Catherine, Ria L
4. 18/11/1992 Foothills of the Maungatuas. Round Trip. Average. Leaders:Ria L, Catherine, Jean, Ria H
3. 9/10/1991 Foothills of the Maungatuas. Traquair to Micro-Wave Station. A nice hill tramp – tussock country. Average+.Leaders:Catherine, Molly, Ria L, Peggy M
2. 12/6/1991 Traquair  – Microwave station – Maungatuas. Round trip, nice tussock tramp. Average+ Leaders: Dave & Jean, Molly, Peggy M
29/7/1989 Traquair Station Leaders: Barbara M
1. 5/4/1989 Microwave Trig from Traquair. Open tussock country. Another good tramp for everyone. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A, Hugh D

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Nov 30 2016

Ship at Anchor, Lammermoors, Deep Stream, Gold tailings, Mahinerangi

Published by under Farm,Lambing Sep-Nov,Year round

Lake Mahinerangi. From Eldorado Track, Cox’s Reef, Cosmopolitan battery, Timber Gully Waterfalls, old gold workings. (data lacking)
No. 8 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Ship & Anchor. Lake Mahinerangi. George. Year round.”
No. 3 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Eldorado Track. (Waipori.) Year Round.”
50 km from car-park. ( 54 km with Eldorado Track. Locked gates. Key from DCC Water Dept.)
Long tramp. Tussock now heavy. Summer too hot? Autumn may be preferable.

12. 30/11/2016. Trampers. Ship at Anchor. H. Leader: Arthur.

At the 3rd attempt, we finally did it! Today 7 trampers climbed up to the “Ship”, and then completed the circuit we had planned.

Southwest winds were forecast, so were expected, but it was a COLD WIND – there was obviously quite a wind chill factor in force!

Over an hour’s journey took us up past the Mahingerangi  wind farm and into the “Black Rock Scientific Reserve”. We followed the “Eldorado Track” until we were on the hilltop just above the weir on Deep Stream. This was our day’s starting point, one car being taken back downhill for the end of day car shuttle.

It was a 10 minute walk down to the weir and tunnel inlet, but there was no shelter there from the cold wind, making morning tea a very brief affair.

But we had the privilege of watching two N.Z. falcons chasing away a pair of Harrier Hawks. They must have had a nest to protect. Their flight manoeuvres were superb.

The next stage of our tramp was the most difficult – up, along, down to cross a rather difficult side stream, then up and up. After three quarters of an hour we were up on the open slope, much easier apart from the trackless tussock. We travelled in single file.

Further up, the leader came on our track made last February, following it for quite a distance. We passed the locality of our helicopter visitation of last time; and continuing on up slope a further 1 km we came to the “Ship at Anchor”.

Water around Ship at Anchor. (Helen pic and caption.)

Water around Ship at Anchor. (Helen pic and caption.)

All of us climbed up on top, well 6 did anyway, for a photo opportunity.

Group getting blown around on the top of Ship at Anchor Arthur Bruce Neil M Neil S Theresa and Jennifer. (Helen pic and caption.)

Group getting blown around on the top of Ship at Anchor Arthur Bruce Neil M Neil S Theresa and Jennifer. (Helen pic and caption.)

The wind was strong and cold on top. We didn’t linger.

Down in the shelter of the “Ship” we had our lunch.

Hunkering down for lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

Hunkering down for lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

We noticed a large, dirty rain shower over towards Mauntagua, missing us. But the weather had changed, with a light shower of tiny hail (about 1 mm in diameter) for us. Even a few snowflakes were seen! What a contrast to the terrific heat we had to contend with there last summer.

Weighing anchor(?), we turned downhill for the next 3 km. The going was far easier now, the tussock quite small here, and out of the worst of the wind. Only the last few hundred metres down to the Chinese Gold Diggings were difficult, becoming steep and rough going. We took our time but a few knees were complaining.

We crossed Deep Stream safely, although it took time, with most keeping dry feet.

Crossing last lot of water. (Helen pic and caption.)

Crossing last lot of water. (Helen pic and caption.)

After a brief spell at the Gold Diggings, we were onto the last leg of the tramp – uphill on the 4WD track. Light skiffy rain showers had appeared by now, remaining till we had finished.
The two car drivers forged ahead now, and once back, collected the far away car to meet the group at the road.

One or two thoughts to finish with:-

  • The car shuttle worked very well.
  • In the cold conditions experienced, the tramp didn’t need to be any longer.
  • Coats (and more) had to be worn all day in the cold, but we were warm while moving.
  • Distance for the can can only be estimated at 12 km (no modern wonder to tell us).

Back to Outram for the day’s finale, as Judy D (not out today) had invited us in for a warm up at her log fire, and a hot drink. And choccy bikkies as a real treat, too.

Thanks, Judy – you are a real GEM. It had been a satisfying day’s tramp. – Art.

11. 3/2/2016. Both. Ship at Anchor attempt and Gold Tailings. Leaders: Arthur, Ian and Bob.

Trampers’ Report. Leader: Arthur.

Ship at Anchor Tramp – 3/2/16.
8 trampers (including 2 guests) travelled in convoy with the hiking group who were going to the Chinese diggings.
The cars’ access was up Eldorado road/track, and passing the Maninerangi Wind Farm, in to the Black Rock Scientific Reserve.
We walked for 10 minutes before stopping for morning tea by the water tunnel outlet.

Trampers Morning Tea. (Heb pic)

10.30 a.m. Trampers Morning Tea. (Heb pic)

As part o the Mahinerangi Hydro Complex, a tunnel was built through the hill to divert some water from Deep Stream to end up in Lake Mahinerangi. This was completed in 1984.
We then followed the road (Eldorado Track?) up over the hill and down to where it ends at the weir and tunnel inlet end, on Deep Stream.
After a brief stop we then crossed the bridge and tackled the difficult hillside leading up onto the open tussock slope which leads up to the Ship at Anchor.
We stopped for lunch at 12.45 before continuing up the trackless tussock slope. One of our lady guests was feeling the heat (it was hot out in the sun by then) and at 2pm was in severe distress.
An immediate 111 call was made, and once the police had pinpointed our exact position, the rescue helicoper soon arrived …

Helicopter rescue. (Heb pic)

About 2.50 p.m.Trampers’ helicopter rescue. (Heb pic)

…and transported her to hospital. Happily she soon recovered and went home that night.
The 7 remaining trampers then returned down hill back to the weir – too far behind time to continue.
After a 15 minute rest at the weir, the car drivers took a pleasant little stroll over the hill to bring the cars over to collect the rest of the group who had remained at the weir. All then returned safely to Mosgiel.
Thank you to our 2 nurses, Jill and Margreet, who rendered first aid, and thanks also to the whole group for the care and understanding shown by all.
And finally a very big thank you to the N.Z. Police. Also to the Otago Regional Rescue Helicopter and its Crew.

A final reflection. A motto for our club to adopt?:

****** SAFE TRAMPING IS NO ACCIDENT  *****

– Arthur.

Tramper's stop

Map of the 2 treks, including the Trampers’  ‘happening’. Circled X marks helicopter pickup. The ‘x’ below it marks the lunch-stop, showing how slow progress had been.

Hikers’ Report. Leaders: Ian and Bob.

We hikers were 13 in three vehicles and were parked beside the trampers’ other two. The trampers set off immediately but our much shorter prospective journey allowed us a leisurely morning tea on a bank overlooking the cars.

Hikers Morning Tea

Hikers Morning Tea. (Helen pic)

Then it was down the “Track” only a short way, then a sharp right turn up a steep rise to an T-junction where we regrouped. From there we set off in a strung-out line along the 4-5 km 4WD track through the tussock down to the diggings down the Deep Stream. We arrived there early, but what the heck. It’s hot. Sit down and enjoy a rest and an early lunch.

Hikers, Lunch, Diggings, Panorama

11.30 a.m. Hikers, Lunch, Diggings, Panorama.

This reporter was surprised few took the opportunity to do much exploration of the diggings.

Drainage channels at north end of diggings

Drainage channels at north end of diggings

We had arrived. It was hot. Trek accomplished. Eventually some started going back. Groups of 2 and 3 left to return up along the track we had earlier come down. No trouble about this. The 4WD track was clear. The route would be uphill this time. The heat was increasing. There need be no rush. So we strung out and Bob made his way to the front with Ian grateful to be at the back with the the last two slow ones. In fact so slow were we, that after Bob and the others had got back to the cars Bob still had time to return in his big 4WD before we had even reached the T-junction, and made light work of transporting us the rest of the way. Although all the others had of course accomplished the full distance, it must be said that there were not a few cases of light-headedness. Frequent drinks of water and good sun protection were certainly essential. There was no shade.

We were back at the cars – when? – about 2 p.m. Now for the area’s other highlights. But by car this time! We took the route the trampers had taken earlier, steeply up over the hill, visiting in turn the Water Tunnel Outlet …

Water tunnel exit

Hikers at the far end of the Water tunnel exit. (Photo taken from beside the T.K.S. Sidey bronze plaque affixed above the tunnel’s exit.)

… and its inlet over the hill at the Weir. (We didn’t know it at the time, but had we looked back as were were driving back up the hill from the weir we might have caught sight of the trampers coming back from their aborted expedition. They saw our cars! And we hadn’t even noticed that big black helicopter! So close were our two groups! So distant! And of course the area is not cellphone territory.)

For us,  it was simply back over the hill, blissfully unaware (and unable to know) of the critical state the trampers were in. Out through the Black Rock Scientific Reserve, through the two locked gates, and translocating from the 4WD Eldorado Track to the upgraded Trust-Power Mahinerangi Wind Farm’s Eldorado Road. (How ‘tracks’ can change over the Club’s history!) A wind turbine blade repair job alongside the ‘road’ dwarfed the technicians in their tiny cage. (Click a second time to enlarge the photo.)

Wind turbine blade getting attention

Wind turbine blade getting attention.

We returned this time via the Lee Flat Road for a change. We were now on tar seal, and arriving at Outram made us feel we had returned to civilisation.

Hikers. Coffee at Outram

Hikers. Coffee at Outram. (Helen pic)

What a day to mark in the Club’s history! Well, all’s well that ends well. Sooner for us, and – well – eventually for the trampers. (There’s too many ‘wells’ in there somewhere) – Ian.

10. 25/2/2015. Trampers. Gold Tailings attempt.
The 4 of us set off to do the Ship at Anchor. When we got to the outlet tunnel at Barbours Creek with the rain and cold wind we decided to go back to the sign to the mining village. We set off up the track to the second sign, the same as down at the road. No clear indication on which way to go. We went down a FWD track, thinking this was the way but after a while I stopped and said this was not heading the right way, so we returned to the car with the wind and rain in our faces. The four of us decided to have lunch at Waipori Falls picnic area. Within five minutes it started to rain again so we headed into the car heading for home. We ended up eating our lunch when we got home. – Heb.
9. 12/12/2012. Trampers. Ship at Anchor. Deep Creek. Gold Tailings.

Tea break before climbing road to top of rise.

View from top of rise down to foot bridge across stream.

 

George, Eric and Heb on top of Ship at anchor.

Enforced slide down steep slope. George has made it, Judy at foot of slide, Ian making a cautious start. NB: tussock  thick now.

Down at diggings.

Stone ruins. (Ken pic)

8. 2/3/2005. Trampers. Ship at Anchor. Lammermoors, Deep Creek, Gold Tailings. Leaders: George, Arthur H
Ship at Anchor. Sth Face.

Ship at Anchor. Sth Face.

 

DCC Works. Bridge. Pat, Hazel, Arthur, George

DCC Works. Bridge. Pat, Hazel, Arthur, George

Ship at Anchor. Bob H. Who?

Ship at Anchor. Bob H. Who?

Lunch. Arthur

Lunch. Arthur

Stream crossing by old diggings. Dorothy? George, Doug J? Bill, Arthur, Pat

Stream crossing by old diggings. Dorothy? George, Doug J? Bill, Arthur, Pat

7. 12/11/2003. Trampers. Ship at Anchor, Lammermoors, Deep Creek. Medium+. Leaders: George, Arthur H
6. 31/3/1999 Ship at Anchor – Mahinerangi. Leaders: George, Lex, Graham
5. 2/1995 Leaders: Eric, George, Doug M
4. 23/2/94. Ship at Anchor. Medium+. Leaders: Ria L, Eric B, George, Doug M. Easier alternative: Leaders: Ria H, Jean A.
3. 13/11/91. Ship and Anchor on the Lammermoors. Harder. There will be an alternative route if you run out of ‘puff’. Leaders: George, Bob & Audrey, Dave & Jean

2. 27/9/89 Ship at Anchor, Lake Mahinerangi. Harder grade tramp. Leaders: Hugh & Judith, Dave & Jean, Ria L

1. 1/3/1989 Eldorado Track. Interesting country – old Waipori cemetery. Leaders: Ria L, Bob H, Molly

 

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Jun 15 2016

Sandymount – Sandfly Bay Tramps

Published by under Farm,Hikers,Trampers,Year round

No. 24 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lovers Leap – The Chasm – Sandfly Bay. N Strang. Farm. Year Round.”
No. 73 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sandymount – Lovers Leap. Year Round”
29 km from car-park.
See Sandymount for area background information.
Sandymount closed for lambing Aug-Oct. Track unformed in places, grassy, slippery when wet. (See also article on pingao planting.)
20. 15/6/2016. Trampers. Ridge Road. Farmland, Bay, Sand-hills, Sandymount and road return. M. Leader: Jill.
On a pristine winter’s morning 11 eager trampers left from the cars on Ridge Rd and traversed through farmlands to Sandfly Bay. Here we had a later morning tea on the beach listening to a very noisy sea.
We progressed along the beach giving wide berth to 5 sea lions 2 of them were a sandy colour and we wondered if they were the youngsters.

White seal. (Helen pic and caption.)

White seal. (Helen pic and caption.)

Went to a locked up viewing hide before plodding our way through sand-hills, sand-hills and more sand-hills till we finally climbed through coastal scrub emerging at the Sandymount car park. From the car park we had a very panoramic view of the Otago Harbour, Hoopers, and Papanui Inlets that were surrounded with Harbour Cone and Mt Charles with Allans Beach at its base. Lunch

Helen & Judy. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Helen & Judy. (Margreet pic and caption.)

was sheltered at the entrance to the macrocarpa  avenue of trees

Beautiful canopy of trees. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beautiful canopy of trees. (Helen pic and caption.)

which we walked through after lunch to view both Lovers Leap

Lovers Leap platform. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lovers Leap platform. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lovers leap. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lovers leap. (Helen pic and caption.)

and the Chasm. Venturing around Sandymount we finally spotted the trig just above us on the track where some wandered  up but the scrub was rather high blocking the view which was better at a lower level. The final stage of our trip was on the Sandymount road back to the cars. We covered 11kms and felt we deserved liquid refreshments at the St Clair salt pool cafe enjoying the last of the winter sun. – Jill.

19. 28/1/2015. Hikers. Lovers Leap, The Chasm. Leaders: George, Alex.
Hikers Sandymount Route

Hikers Sandymount Route – anticlockwise from car-park. But application stopped working at the Chasm. W-h-y??? Bother, bother!!

Thirty-nine of us, yes THIRTY-NINE (did include a number of school children due back at school the following Monday) turned up at the Sandymount car park for what was promised to be a shorter walk with not too much climbing. George and Alex had recceed a round trip clockwise, deciding to lead us in an anti-clockwise direction on the day. So we set off.

New (well, to the writer at least) signs at the first junction indicated that Lovers Leap was via Sandymount Hill,

Signs like this have proliferated around Sandymount now.

Signs like this have proliferated around Sandymount now. (John pic)

the other sign indicated Sandfly Bay. BUT! The writer has never climbed the hill before, as on previous occasions we have always gone on round and past the entrance to the fence-lined Sandfly Bay track, a MUCH less hilly route. Had George forgotten that? I DID query George’s choice of the hill option, but didn’t press the matter.

So it was up, up a track that got quite steep in places. However all made it, even the hiker who had requested assurance of not too much climbing. (He’s not coming out next week, when we do the Leith Saddle track, which except for one wee saddle, is all climb.)

The hill summit rewarded us with the foggy view  we had expected, but it was good to stop here for the morning cuppa.

Cuppa time

Cuppa time (John pic)

Steeply down the other side, sidle further round the hill, soon to arrive at Lovers Leap. (I wonder if they really do, or is it their personal possession. It’s fun omitting the apostrophe [before or after the ‘s’?] to allow for the ambiguity.)

Lovers Leap

Lovers Leap. Some of the 39 plus fog.

We pushed on. Bit of a climb till we reached the open gate giving entrance down through paddock, new style and paddock to the Chasm. Too much of a drop for some to even go near the viewing platform.

Back up onto the track, further around, past the sheep shed and a stop for an early lunch

Lunch. (John pic))

Lunch panorama.. (John pic))

at the beginning of the impressive double macrocarpa-lined avenue.

Then through the avenue, and, for some never here before, the shock of the cars’ sudden appearance at the avenue’s end.

There were some sheltered areas and some areas exposed to the cold wind that never stopped blowing.

Elaine had designated Nichols Cafe again for the last cuppa, and 25 of us adjourned there for coffee and company.

Coffee at Nichols. 25 of us.

Panorama of coffee at Nichols. Some of the 25. Remainder still to arrive.

Thanks to George and Alex for leading a record number of us, (39!!) with nary a one missing or going over the edge. – Ian.

18. 31/7/2013. Trampers. Ridge Road, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay.
We were all expecting it to be a bit windy on the coast, but when we got there it was very mild, & dead calm, so off with some clothing was in order. We had all forgotten how far the road walk from Ridge Rd to Sandy Mt. Rd was, but undeterred we pressed on to a morning break at the normal place in the paddock on the LH side of the road.
pack

Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

From there it was a leisurely walk around the Chasm & Lovers Leap viewing platforms, to marvel at the very flat sea conditions. The inlets were like a mirror, it was so calm.
Then off up the climb to the top of the track, where we had lunch at the top of the sandhills, before the easy conditions of the downhill slide onto Sandfly Bay, where we did the obligatory side trip to the viewing hide, only to discover that there are now two hides there, one of which is locked, & is for the tourist operators use only. We did see a sample of the wildlife that inhabits this coastline, one of them didn’t bother with us at all,
Grandad snoozing

Grandad snoozing. (Ken pic and caption)

but the other one was a bit wary of the strange quartet walking past.
Why are you annoying me?

Why are you annoying me? (Ken pic and  caption)

We all enjoyed the walk, although it wasn’t a very long day, as we arrived back at the car around 2:30pm. Distance – 10km, @ 4km/h. – Ken

17. 18/4/2012. Trampers. Ridge Road, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Cars parked half-way along left of route. Long sand-hill descent clearly depicted.

There were 12 of us. A record in recent memory.

Morning Tea, sheltered from the wind. (Ken pic.)

Lunch spot at the top of the lovely long sand-hill descent. (Ken pic)

16. 7/7/2010. Both. Sandymount, Sandfly Bay return, Lovers Leap, The Chasm. Medium. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Look at those five animals lined up at a trough. (Joyce caption, Bill pic) 7/7/2010

New signs at Sandfly Bay track turn-off 7/7/2010

Picturesque grove (from south side) 7/7/2010

The Chasm 7/7/2010

15. 13/8/2008 Trampers. Sandymount summit, Lovers Leap, Chasm, Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Tash, Pat.

Large sandhill. Pat Leonie Ken Tash. 13/8/2008

A wonderful tramp on the peninsula… A small but enthusiastic group of 5 parked our cars at the end of Ridge Road, and then walked back up to the junction, where we turned up towards Sandymount. Near the top we had morning tea in a sheltered spot whose first discovery was attributed to George. At the carpark at the top, the gate to the left said “track closed”, so we took the track to the right instead and made our way back round to Lovers Leap. The views were amazing and as 4 of them stood on the platform, there was much discussion as to who would do the “Leap”. There were no volunteers so we retraced our steps and ended up above Sandfly Bay. Here we had our lunch with beautiful views in all directions. We discussed the fact that lunch stops are a very important part of the tramp and that that spot is often what we remember. And then down, down ,down the wonderful sand hills that looked like scenes from Lawrence of Arabia. Running down like kids… A quick visit to the Penguin hide and then onto the beach where some very large sea lions were lolling about on the sand. Two large ones emerged glistening black from the sea, reminiscent of when the first creatures left the sea to live on the land all those millennia ago. Near the end of the beach we came to a stream where Leonie suggested we sit and take in the great surroundings we were in, with powerful waves in the background crashing onto the beach amidst a surge of foam.

Leonie, Pat, Tash on Log

Leonie, Pat, Tash on Log 13/8/2008

And then after some cunning navigating by Ian we were onto a poled track through a farm, up a small hill and back at the gate, beyond which magically were our cars. I wouldn’t have missed it for the world. – Tash

14. 14/3/2007. Trampers. Sandymount, Lovers Leap, Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Bruce & Marjorie, Doug M
13. 6/7/2005. Trampers. Sandfly Bay, Lovers Leap, Chasm. Leaders: Bob H, Ian, Frank
12. 6/7/2005. Hikers. Sandymount, Sandfly Bay. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Grove of trees and ongaonga

Grove of trees and ongaonga

Belted Galloway cattle beast. Who?, George, Hazel

Belted Galloway cattle beast. Who?, George, Hazel

11. 17/3/2004 Trampers: Ridge Road, Sandymount, Sandfly Bay Leader: Ria L
LL

Lovers Leap

VP

L-Leap Platform. Bill, Pat, Ria, George

V

L/Leap Platform. Ria, George, Glenice, Doug M

S

Sandhills at top. Ria, Glenice

10. 17/3/2004 Hikers: Sandfly Bay, Sandymount, Ridge Road. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
9. 20/8/2003. Hikers. Ridge Road to Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Anne R.
8. 27/2/2002. Sandfly Bay – Lovers Leap – Chasm. Leaders: Bob H, Shirley McN, Ria L
7. 29/8/2001. Lovers Leap – Chasm – Sandfly Bay. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Ian, Elaine.
6. 29/3/2000. Sandy Mount, Lovers Leap, Lime Kilns. Leaders: Chris, Jean, Ngaire.
5. 25/8/1999. Sandfly Bay. Leaders: Doug and Myrie, Irene.
4. 10/3/1993. New Track – Sandfly Bay. Medium. Leaders: Bev H, Les and Margaret, Ivan and Bev.
3. 16/10/1991. Sandfly Bay. Seals Sand and sun. Average. Leaders: Betty, Wendy, Shirley, Mary McG.
2. 17/7/1991 Lovers’ Leap – The Chasm – Sandfly Bay. Easy. Merle H, Diana B, Nancy, Pam M
1. 27/11/1996. Sandy Mount Road – Lime Kilns – Lovers Leap.Leaders: Chris, Jean, Ria H.
 


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Jun 04 2014

Fort Hill, Barnes and Circle Hill Roads, Milburn.

Published by under Farm,Hikers,Trampers

No. 90 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Round Hill – Milburn (George) Farm”

42 km from car park.

2/6/2014 Both. Fort Hill, Barnes and Circle Hill Roads, Milburn. Moderate. Leaders: Ian, Ken
GPS

iPhone GPS of route. Shows shorter than actual because I forgot to turn it on until after the first half km! See also Ken’s GPS for his 2010 route map.

Twenty-six turned out for a sunny first tramp for the winter, on back country roads amongst lovely rolling hill farms to the west of Milburn.
Morning Tea

Morning Tea at the Finch Road turnoff from Circle Hill Road. (Heb pic)

We lunched where Fort Hill Road ended at a T-junction with Barnes Road, which stretched left to meet Circle Hill Road, and right to form to form a larger route to also turn down Circle Hill Road at its end where both these roads joined to form Douglas Road.
Lunch. Panorama pic.

Panorama pic. (The black bit at pic bottom results from my inexpert handing of my panoramic app.) Lunch. Here, Barnes Road goes ahead (in the pic) for the shortcut route and to the right for the longer route.

Ken supplied this report regarding this spot. Thanks Ken. : “The people that did the longer walk, covered 15.2km; Moving time  3hrs 9min; We climbed 374mtrs. I guess the ones that took the shortcut walked about 11km.
I base this on the time taken for us to walk around the longer loop, & the ave speed was 4.8km/hr, & it took us nearly an hour to walk around the loop.”

As said before, the day was sunny and calm, and each ample time to make the climbing bits at bits own pace.

Just a personal thought for road walks. With the growing practice of wearing, and of availability of high-viz vests, a good idea would be for more than just the leaders to be wearing them.

And lastly. What is becoming the customary coffee stop was enjoyed this time at Waihola’s Black Swan. – Ian.

1/9/2010 Both. Fort Hill, Barnes and Circle Hill Roads, Milburn. Moderate. Leaders: Ian, Ken

GPS of route. The short-cut can be readily picked out. (Courtesy, Ken).

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Nov 18 2009

Michelles Farm, North Side Taieri River, Outram

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 87 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Michelle’s Farm Outram Farm”

Park under Outram Bridge. Contacts: Seek 3 permissions
Proceed east side of Taieri River along gravel road to gravel pit.  Bear right uphill to power lines. Follow generally along grass farm tracks to top of hill.
Landmarks: Trig marker on right; also obvious paper road between two fence lines; Long barn on right (good for lunch stop); large wool shed on top of hill straight ahead (this is still on Hyslop’s property.
Straight on access is to Taioma Road but we don’t usually go that far!
Plenty of mushrooms in April – take a bag!
18/11/2009. Trampers. Outram Bridge. Michelles Farm. Leaders: George, Hazel.
Traversing gut between gravel and bank. Marie from Toronto, Lex, Bill, Ria, Hazel

Traversing gut between gravel and bank. Marie from Toronto, Lex, Bill, Ria, Hazel

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Aug 27 2009

Big Stone Road, Smooth Hill, Kathleen Road, return to beach.

Published by under Farm,Hikers,Year round

No. 75 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Kathleen Rd – Big Stone Return Forestry Farm”
27/8/2009. Trampers. Queen Street, Highland Street, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road, Isobel Road, beach return. Medium Leaders: George, Hazel.

Starting at the home of George and Elizabeth, George and Hazel led us along to the corner of Queen Street and up across several paddocks to reach Highland Street where we sheltered from the wind for morning tea. Once we reached Big Stone Road, we paralleled it on a forest track just across the fence, which was much more interesting, if slower, than walking the road. We were amazed to see the extent of forest harvesting on the other side of the road, cleared, replanted and now for sale as lifestyle blocks.

Recently Maori forestry cleared. Now for sale as lifestyle blocks.

Maori forestry recently harvested.

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Oct 08 2008

Swampy, Pole Track

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 34 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Leith Saddle – Swampy – Pole Track. Farm”

No. 81 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Skyline Leith Valley Return (Thomson) Farm”
Location: 25 km.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.

 

8/10/2008. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Pole Track. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Ken.
15/11/2006 Leaders: George, Doug J
7/9/1994. Leith Saddle, Pole Track. Medium.
10/6/1992. Swampy Pole Track via Leith Saddle. Hard. Leaders: Ria and Kaas, Barbara McC, Jack R.

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