Archive for the 'Both Hikers & Trampers' Category

Feb 27 2019

Coutts Gully – Sawmill Roads – options

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 76 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Coutts Gully Return Sawmill Rd Farm”
Livingstonia Park distance from car-park: 31.5 km.

27/2/2019. Hikers. Sawmill-Coutts Gully Roads. Leaders: Clive and Francis.

22 Hikers and ramblers arrived at Livingstonia Park in time for the rain to set in.   The hikers set off along the beach in a bracing breeze and made their way in a loop up to Alan Gartons’ farm at the top of Sawmill Road.   Alan offered us shelter in an a barn to have our morning tea out of the elements.

C.1) Morning tea in Alans shedc

Morning tea in Alans shed. (Clive pic and caption.)

All refreshed we set off Westerly in what was remembered as a more level walk. (it got quite steep in places).  After passing several points remembered from the earlier visit we struck off towards Coutts Gully Road and the paper road extension.   Several spots were greasy under the steady rain and a few ended sitting on the track!.   Just as the rain eased we turned East along Coutts Gully Road and reached the old sawmill about 12.30pm, in time for lunch in warm sunshine.

C.2) Lunch at the old sawmillc

Lunch at the old sawmill. (Clive pic and caption.)

C.3) Lunch at the old sawmillc

Lunch at the old sawmill. (Clive pic and caption.)

From there it was a straightforward walk along the formed road back to the cars and onward to Brighton for afternoon tea. – Clive.

Ramblers. Leaders: Mutually agreed.

The four of us first fortified ourselves with a leisurely morning tea at Livingstonia Park. We then motored off in search of a faintly-remembered-by-Ian Livingstone-Green family bush walk. First try:  Sawmill Road. Surprise! Ahead, the Hikers. Nothing to do but to gaily sail past to find our bush walk but it was not on that road. Returning back down to the Hikers with what dignity we could muster,  we enquired of Leader Clive who confirmed it was on the other road, – Coutts Gully, – so we retreated thence. Only to realise when we arrived, the extreme narrowness of both board and track, a bit unnerving for some of us to tackle. Anyway, it was too hilly as well.

But back down the road a bit was a lovely flat walk diagonalising across from the C-G Road to Moturata Road bordering  the shallow private wetlands estuary there, with which Ornithological-Society-of-New- Zealand-member-Lesley was familiar. Out with the binoculars, identifying Stilts (flighty), Fern Birds (invisible but with distinctive clicks), a white duck, a Spoonbill, a Shoveller and half a dozen others. Most enjoyable to watch them feeding, floating and flying, accompanied with Lesley’s learned commentary. Rain? Hardly any. Sun? Occasional. Shelter from wind? Great. (Just a pity I forgot to get the camera out.)

We walked back up the road to the aforementioned Livingstone-Green walk entrance to lunch under a rain-proof tree which sheltered us from a brief shower.

Well… What now? What else, but to precede the Hikers with coffee at Brighton, and then home. – Ian.

19. 5/4/2017. Both. Sawmill-Coutts Gully Roads. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Route map, courtesy Bruce.

Eighteen hikers and trampers set off from the grass berm in Burma Road after most of the cars parked on the berm. Five hikers, including Les, Margaret, Leslie and Bev made a separate excursion in the area. The main group walked beside the trees on the beach side of the park and then followed a track through the sand hills to Moturata Road  near the bridge,  following the 2 signposts with first a turn to the right and secondly a turn to the left.  We crossed Moturata Road where the track emerged and then walked 50 m to Sawmill Road on the left. We proceeded up this road and stopped for morning tea just past the house of the farm owner, Alan Gorton, through a gate and just before the dog kennels.

Morning tea. (Ian pic and caption.)

After morning tea we proceeded up the road about 200 m and turned to the left, passing an old coal range and some implement/vehicle sheds,  opposite the Mongolian style dwelling, a Yurt (Mongolian: Ger). We followed a farm road which wound down to the right through some bush and then went up hill through the farm. After some distance we followed sheep tracks straight up a steep part of the hill …

Not the farmer’s bath night. (Clive pic and caption.)

… rather than following a bulldozed track to the left. At the top of paddock was an open gate with a steel bar attached to it.  We went through the gate and continued to the next gate which was closed and had a plastic water tank with sides about 1.3 m in length. We went through this gate and then turned to the left and proceeded in a straight line  through a further 3 open gates, noticing a bulldozed track down the hill to the left but not going towards it. At the top of a brow of the hill, at the end of the straight line of travel, there was bush ahead and soon a grassy track was visible to the left which we went along for 100 m. We then noticed the start of the bulldozed track on the right which led down the hill through bush. The start of the track was not easy to see until we almost reached it because of the slope of the hill. The bulldozed bush track crossed a stream and then went up hill to reach a grassy paddock. We turned sharp left here and proceeded along Coutts Gully Road. The road in its upper parts is just a narrow path between some gorse bushes. We closed the Cyclone gate some distance along and erected 2 netting fences, with plastic bags on them, which were there to keep stock in. We had lunch at the sawmill further down the road.

Lunch at deserted sawmill. (Ian pic and caption.)

Near the bottom of the hill the group split in two with some doing the 40 minute Livingstone-Green family bush walk …

A 40 minute side trip. (Clive pic and caption.)

… with a loop at the end. We went to the right side of the loop.

At the top of Livingstone-Green. (Clive pic and caption.)

The rest of the group proceeded back to the cars. The last of the bushwalkers reached the cars at approximately 2.15 pm. The distance was approximately 11.5 km without the bush walk and 12.5 with the bush walk. The weather was cool but the rain that had threatened in the forecast some days previously did not eventuate. – Bruce and Marjorie.

18. 4/3/2015. Both. Sawmill-Coutts Gully Roads. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Route 2

Garmin 62S GPS of route, courtesy Bruce. Distance travelled: 12.68 km, moving time 3 hrs 43 mins, stopped time 1 hr 35 mins, moving av speed 3.4 km/hr., overall av speed 2.4 km/hr.

GPS of route

A grosser GPS of route, showing rough kilometers.

Twenty-seven trampers and hikers, including two guests from Wales who had been on the Turf to Surf cavalcade walking group, Jeremy and Mary, departed from Livingstonia Park, Burma Road, Taieri Mouth, at 9.45 a.m. on a calm sunny morning via the marked beach access track closest to the Burma Road entrance.

Entering beach from Livingstonia Park.

Entering beach from Livingstonia Park. (Bruce pic)

We proceeded north along the beach and turned to the left to the white marker pole on the beach edge which led to Moturata Road, just before we came to an assembly of some hundreds of seagulls, or, in the view of George, terns arranged in a square like a cohort from a legion of Roman soldiers.

We crossed Moturata Road and proceeded up Sawmill Road, stopping to admire two Clydesdale horses…

Horses. Clydedales, as someone said?

Horses. Clydesdales?

…that were patted and fed some grass by Chris.

Further up the road, we were greeted by a frisky pup, and then at 10.30 am we stopped for morning tea near a caravan, some houses and a yurt, a Mongolian style tent. After morning tea,

Morning Tea

Morning Tea

we entered the gate on the left, with the permission of Mr Allan Gorton, son of the late Bill, and continued down a steepish winding farm road through native bush into a gully and then up the other side into open farmland…

Emerging from deep gully.

Emerging from deep gully.

…which gradually led further up the hill.

At a gate some distance up the hill near a bush gully we veered to the left to go through another gate. After cresting the hill brow and passing a further gate we climbed another undulation and on the far side of this came eventually to a greenish track that led into the bush on the right. We noticed a further gate away to the left but did not go to it.

The bush road was also somewhat rocky and steepish. At 12.05 pm we stopped for lunch near a corner of the road at which a bank with a rocky backrest provided some seating. Proceeding again at 12.45 pm, we descended further and then gradually climbed up the other side and out of the bush into farmland.

The exit was adjacent to the upper part of Coutts Gully Road which continued towards the top of the hill via a gully on the right. We took the part of the road to the left and descended down towards an old truck parked in the bush on the left side of the road and the sawmill. The initial part of the road was a relatively narrow gap in the gorse. We then came to a Cyclone gate and subsequently a netting gate. Several birds chirped in the QE2 covenanted bush, including melodious korimako (bell birds), on the left of the road. Piwakawaka (fan tails) flitted around in the trees. After passing the sawmill, which had a pile of fresh sawdust indicating it had been recently used, we continued down the road until it emerged from the bush.

Then on the left, we had the option of doing the Livinstone-Green 30–40 minute Green Family bush walk.

Sign indicating walk through QEII reserve on Coutts Gully Road.

Sign indicating walk through QEII reserve on Coutts Gully Road.

A little over half the group did this travelling over a narrow well maintained bush track with steps, bridges and hand rails. We stopped for a rest near a seat that gave a view of Moturata Island,

The seat at the to of the QEII bush walk

The seat at the to of the QEII bush walk. Moturata Island in the background.

set in a turquoise sea, from near the top of the loop track near the end of the bush track. The grass track up to this along the fence line had been recently mown. We then proceeded back to the start/finish of the bush track.

The final portion of the walk was along Coutts Gully Road and Burma Road to Livingstonia Park, where we arrived back at approximately 3.30 pm. – Bruce.

17. 22/1/2014. Trampers. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road.
After explaining to everybody about the possibility of coming across some bulls, and bees, we set off up Coutts Gully Rd.
Had morning tea in the usual spot at the pine trees where a side road branches off, then went on to tackle the climb to the top road.
After climbing through the top fence, we were surprised to see some bulls in that paddock, as I was under the impression that they were in the paddock we wanted to go back down through. However, we gave them a wide berth, & pressed on regardless, with only one or two showing any interest in us, with most of them moving quickly out of our way. I must say I breathed a sigh of relief when we finally reached the top road, & the safety of the gate. There was certainly a “lot of bull in that paddock”, with probably 50 or so animals. As we had safely negotiated the bull paddock, we then stuck to the original route down Sawmill Rd. At this stage it was starting to get a little cooler, with a breeze, so we decided to get down into the shelter of the pines for a lunch stop. After lunch we walked down Sawmill Rd. [which is just a 4WD track at it’s top end], and spooked a couple of deer on the way down. From the bottom of Sawmill Rd. it was a short walk back to the cars.
We did 13.5 km; 4.3km/h ave.; 3hr 7mins moving time; climbed 320mtrs. max height 347mtrs. – Ken
16. 21/3/2012. Trampers. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

Six of us trampers took to the hills behind Taieri Mouth, via Coutts Gully Rd.  We had morning tea at the normal spot under the pine forest, then tackled the rather steep climb up to the tops. Two of us decided to go the longer, more difficult way up, while the rest took the easier route.
However when Neil and I reached what we believed to have been the agreed lunch-spot, the others were not to be seen. After a half hour spent looking for them, we had lunch on the top where we could get a good view all around, but saw no sign of them at all.
As we were finishing lunch, we got a phone call from the others asking if they could go on!!!
After inquiring as to their whereabouts, we discovered that they were not too far from us, but had lunched in a place where they could not be readily seen. Ah well…
After joining up again, we made our way back down to Taieri Mouth via a track down a ridge, onto Sawmill Rd, & back to the cars. – Ken.
15. 20/4/2011. Trampers. Coutts Gully, Kennedys, John Bull. Car shuttle. M.

Route GPS. (Courtesy Ken). 14.56 km in 4h 23m. (4.4k/h in 3hrs 20m actual tramping.) Max elev. 305m.

There were 9 of us on the day. A good number. Upper Coutts Gully Road quite muddy after recent rain. Occasional light skiffs of rain, and some sun on the day.

Tea break, well up Coutts Gully track.

Lunch at top. Sheltering from the skiffs of rain and shifting wind.

After this was the walk out to Finlayson Road, along to Kennedys Farm and down to the seat on the John Bully Gully track. Down in the bush the track very muddy and deteriorating in places, especially THE muddy broken-stepped patch. – Ian.

14. 24/11/2010. Hikers. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road. M. Leaders: George, Dorothy

13. 9/6/2010. Trampers. Coutts Gully Road, Finlayson Road, Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth.Leaders: George, Bob.

Scanned Google Earth pic of the area of Wed’s walk with a red line tracing the route we took. (Bob pic and caption)

Coutts Gully road was wet a muddy on the first sunny day after a series of wet ones. We discovered as we went further up that the track was now a National Trust protected open space.

Coutts Gully track now a protected open space.

Yet further up and a reminder of the sawmill in Coutts Gully.

Sheds in the sun

Sic transit gloria, mutatis mutandis, or plus ca change plus c’est la meme chose, or something not at all like that. Anyway, a track off to the side, which we used to take, was discovered to be no longer viable. Quite overgrown.

We found that the entrance to a track we had formerly used was now overgrown.

You can see just how muddy the track was, as we edged past stacked wood, well-shrouded against wet winter weather.

On past the sawmill’s stacked wood

Our trekking hitherto had been in gully shade. Now out into the sun, it was time to remove extra clothing which the cold morning’s start had necessitated.

Up into the sunshine and time to remove a layer of clothing

Out into higher open paddocks, but the climbing became much steeper than the more gentle gully incline.

One of the steep paddock climbs

Then it was grudgingly down into a dip, to cross over to a yet more arduous extended paddock climb. Rain had soaked the sheep-nibbled grass to make steeper slopes very slippery also.

The beginning of an long steep climb

We kept to the left of and beyond the route marked out on the map (at the top), to make a fuller day of it. Towards the top, we lunched on the way by a gorsed fence, rewarded by great views of the coast. Until we eventually emerged onto Finlayson Road. Only a short way down and the leaders took us through a gate on the right to make our way back down. A paddock or two and we came onto a most useful connecting ridge, nicely cleared, to get us on the way down to Sawmill Road

On the way back down, on a convenient ridge

As we continued to make our way down, looking back into the sun, we could detect through the bush a track we had taken on one or two former times to take us through a gully from another ridge to this one.

Looking back to a track we have used on earlier occasions – through a bushed gully

Now it was only to continue on back down and out. A good day. Thanks to George and Bob for guiding us through some tricky turns at times to make for a tramp, parts of which we had not tackled before. – Ian
12. 3/3/2010. Both. Coutts Gully Road, Finlayson Road, Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth. Leaders: George and Bob M.
It was a good ‘walk-in-the-hills’ at 17km as pedometers read it, and it was a good round-trip route from sea level to skyline

From sea to skyline. (Bob pic and caption)

and back on a pleasant summer’s day with distant views to Cape Saunders for the baker’s dozen who did it (perhaps the previous week’s walk had worn some out?).

Setting out. (Bob pic and caption)

There was little ‘road’, in spite of the title of the walk, just some gravel at start and finish, but most of the trip was good pasture land often on cattle tracks or farm roads across Gorton and Wilkinson properties. Morning tea was near a still-operating, one-man sawmill, processing logs from nearby plantations. Pleasant bush lined Coutts Gully with ample birdsong especially from Bellbirds. We slowly climbed out of the gully and then plunged back through it on a 4WD track and out onto spur tops. Lunch was past the landmark lone pine

Lone pine and lunch stop. (Bob pic and caption)

and in a warm enclave among hawthorn and macrocarpa.

Artists Bob E and Elaine at work. (Bob pic and caption)

Here George held a remembrance observance for Ngaire Moir who passed away this week. People remembered her as having been on this walk many years ago when she was active in the club. Our sincere sympathies were expressed for Doug and the family. From this point, we rose by degrees to the Skyline Road which gave us vistas both east and west. A group of friendly cattle walked with us at one point.

We are joined by other ‘walkers’. (Bob pic and caption)

After only 15 minutes or so along the top we turned through yet another gate and took a downhill route along a different spur. There were more friendly/curious cattle, a little club of sheep with one solitary goat who’d joined them as a fully paid-up member, and at one stage George rounded a fenced bend and unexpectedly drafted a flock of sheep back towards us down the path. Then came perhaps the nicest stretch of the walk along a ridge top sheltered by manuka on both sides but through lovely summer grass along a quad bike path.

Grassy ridge. (Bob pic and caption)

From the open pastures that followed, we had good views of Moturata, Green, and White Islands, Sandymount, Saddle Hill, and the whole Dunedin coastline north.

Moturata view and beyond. (Bob pic and caption)

To the southeast, there was the Akatore catchment and forested hills aplenty. And so along Sawmill Road beside the lagoon which sadly did not present us with the flock of Royal Spoonbills seen on the recce, back to the cars (parked outside Denise’s crib, where there were good exchanges with the residents). Bob M
11. 1/6/2005. Trampers. Coutts Gully Road, John Bull. Leaders: George, Bob H
10. 13/8/2003 Trampers. Coutts Gully, Kennedys Farm, Taieri River. Medium. Leaders: George, Joyce.
Sabina

Sabina. Up beyond Coutts Gully Road

Down

Bob, George. Down spur to River

Above

Bob, Tash, Doug, Lex. At seat above the Taieri

Track

Doug, Bob H. Track back down along River

9. 3/6/1998. Coutts Gully, Sawmill Road. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H.
8. 26/3/1997. Coutts Gully Sawmill Road. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Frank.
7. 1/5/1996. Sawmill Road – Coutts Gully. Average. Leaders: George, Eric and Dorothy
6. 21/6/1995. Sawmill Track and Coutts Gully. Medium. Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H, Chris.
5. 13/9/1992 Coutts Gully, Taieri Beach Road. Long. Leaders: Ray W, Dave & Jean, Shirley
4. 20/2/1991 Sawmill Road – Coutts Gully. Good tramping and views. Average. Leaders: Eric and Dorothy, Jean, Joan.
3. 9/5/1990. Coutts Gully tramp, Taieri Mouth. Average. Leaders: Denise, Jean, Dorothy and Eric, Ria.
2. 12/4/1989 Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth. Leaders: Denise, Jean, Ria, Margaret
1. 16/11/1988 Sawmill Road, Taieri Mouth. Leaders: Jean, Ria, Judith

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Feb 13 2019

Pump House, Tunnels, McRaes Weir, Racemans, return

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

8. 13/2/2019. Hlkers. Whare Flat Area. Leaders: Jan and Peter.
Another hot Wednesday, but fortunately this tramp was mainly under bush cover which made things a bit easier.  There were 30 of us, including 5 ramblers and a few trampers.  Jan led the ramblers and anyone else who wanted an easier start via the ford, while Peter led the rest up the more interesting undulating bush track to the right of  the Silverstream.  We met up just past the swing bridge for morning tea.
C2.2) Morning tea near the suspension bridgec

Morning tea near the suspension bridge. (Clive pic and caption.)

  Then a short climb up to the Tunnels Track where we took a left and went part way round the McRaes Weir track before retracing our steps to the junction.  From there it was a gentle ramble along the Tunnels Track and a slight climb up through the previously forested open area.  People lunched in various spots along this part of the track where it was shadier, but some of us were in the open  area.  Great views, and fortunately there was a very welcome slight breeze here.  Interesting to see that this whole area has been replanted in pine trees.  Carried on up a bit further after lunch.  Track has grown over a bit in this area, but easy to follow the markers.  Then descended down through more bush and came out on a shorter track to the road which avoids a somewhat tricky creek crossing at the end of the track.

C.3) Bruce checks out the tunnel on tunnel trackc

Bruce checks out the tunnel on tunnel track. (Clive pic and caption.)

C.4) The Kereru checked us out2c

The Kereru checked us out.(Clive pic and caption.)

C.5) There was more than one tunnelc

There was more than one tunnel. (Clive pic and caption.)

  Returned to the cars via the hot dusty road which was a bit of a drag.  Perhaps we could suggest to the DCC that a return track be formed along the bush line parallel to the road.   A very welcome coffee at Wals.  Jan and Peter

7. 7/9/2016. Both. McRaes Weir – Racemans Circuit. E. Leaders: Ian, Doug and Arthur H.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Nike App switched on at swing bridge. Sorry! Tramped 10.5 km.

Well! It was a most successful tramp for the first Wednesday of the month for both groups together – four trampers and four hikers, to be precise. So sorry the REST of you didn’t come along.

We enjoyed a sunny sheltered tramp around the McRaes Weir

McRae's Weir. (Helen pic and caption.)

McRae’s Weir. (Helen pic and caption.)

Circuit. (This reporter sticks to the implication of Hamel’s terminology, despite thought-provoking signage at its Racemans’ end.) From there we went further up the Racemans, past the Steve Amies Track turn-off, to reach the point where the Powder Creek Circuit comes across-stream to join the Racemans. Then we turned back, in view of the promised impending storm, till we reached a clear sunny spot to lunch at 12 noon.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch View. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch View. (Helen pic and caption.)

From there we returned, via the shorter Racemans track this time, eschewing the lengthier  McRaes Weir Circuit, crossing the swing bridge …

Silver stream looking lovely. (Helen pic and caption.)

Silver stream looking lovely. (Helen pic and caption.)

… to the Silverstream’s true right (we had initially entered by way of it’s true left to that point),  but of course in consequence suffering the foot-soaking (for some) ford to arrive back at the cars just as the predicted storm’s rain began to fall at 1.00 p.m.

Oh, did we mention? We had prudently cancelled the scheduled Traquair tramp the night before, lest the storm caught us in the afternoon while still exposed up on the hills. And we DID promise there could be morning’s sun for a sheltered Racemans’ tramp in the morning. Happily 8 of us took full advantage of the opportunity. Again, we’re sorry the rest of you missed out on our rewarding time together.

P.S. The trampers’ carload enjoyed a post-tramp birthday toast  to one of their own back at The Wooden Table.

Coffee Wooden Table. (Helen pic and caption.)

Coffee Wooden Table. (Helen pic and caption.)

The hikers’ carload returned home out of the rain. – Ian.

6. 25/5/2016 Waiora Camp, Whare Flat Road, Pump House, Mcraes Track, return. Leaders: George and Peter H.
Nike GPS map of Hikers' route.

Nike GPS map of Hikers’ route.

It was a dark and stormy night … nay, ’twas a cold and frosty morn, giving way to a perfect calm and sunny winter’s day. However, an early winter rain-fest on the Monday had put a damper on the Leaders’ plans for Wednesday. Flooded fords at each end of the day’s hike sprang disappointments at both points; the first resulting in a refusal to follow the leaders’ urging, the second, – planned for but only because the lesser of two evils – a boots’ soaking.

But to begin. With on a little confusion, all drivers negotiated the Waiora Scout Camp roads to reach its central parking area. (George had arranged this alternative to the usual spot because on an earlier occasion he had returned to find his car had been broken into.)

While in the camp, we visited a nearby lookout point, remembered by some, only to find the its outlook reduced by healthy bush growth. After that, it was back out the camp gates and up the Whare Flat Road, only to find a strong flow of water streaming over the first of the road’s two fords, blocking our progress. Despite the leaders setting up a rope railing and encouraging group members to take the plunge, no one wished to get cold wet feet so early on a frosty morning. However, before turning back, George recounted the history of the Whare Flat School , whose school house was further up the road, attending to the education of the children of the water race families and settlers in the area. Also, Chris told us of her mother being a former pupil at the school, and also of a relative who had worked on the race. All most enlightening.

So, plan two. Retrace steps back down the road and enter the pump-house area. Back at the pump house, the ford here was equally flooded as shown here in Sharyn’s photo.

Flooded ford. (Charyn pic.)

Flooded ford. (Sharyn pic.)

So it was along the track that followed the fence-line on the stream’s true left and up and over its hilly ridge. The climb is steep, and several turned back, but the majority persisted on. At the track’s outlet by the swing bridge, we circled round …

s-Frost melt vapour. (Sharyn pic.)

Frost melt vapour. (Sharyn pic.)

… to ascend the nearby track that took us to the end of the Tunnels Track – the other end of the one the leaders had originally planned to take.  But  we turned left and took the water race track leading along to McRaes Weir.

About half-way along, we reached the site of the short (dry) water pipe taking the race through a small ridge. Challenged upon learning that it had been scrambled through on previous occasions by many of the older hikers, three new heroes ‘took the plunge’, so to speak, notably Bruce, (who broke the cobwebs for the others, Adrienne, …

Adrienne by pipe exit. (Unknown photographer)

Adrienne by pipe exit. Success. (Unknown photographer)

… Peter …

Peter emerging from water race pipe. (Adrienne pic)

Peter emerging from water race pipe. (Adrienne pic)

… and Janice, …

Accomplished! Bravo Jan. (Adrienne pic)

Accomplished! Bravo Jan. (Adrienne pic)

… emerging from the other side of the hill to the applause of the lesser souls who had preferred the climb over the ridge.

We lunched in the sun …

Lunch. (Sharyn pic.)

Lunch. (Sharyn pic.)

… just a bit short of McRaes Weir, and afterwards continued along the track, past the 1913 storm-damaged wreck of the raceman’s hut, to reach and view the weir and also the challenging steep climb out on the other side of the stream. Either respectively too wet and too steep for the day.

All that was left now, was to return out the way we had come in, but avoiding this time the steep ridge we had negotiated on the way in in favour now of the swing bridge …

Swing Bridge. (Sharyn pic.)

The Swing Bridge. (Sharyn pic.)

… and the soppy ford …

Sloshing across the ford by the pump-house.

Sloshing across the ford by the pump-house.

… by the pump-house. So it was back to the cars in squelchy boots, a change of foot-ware, and then sociable coffee at a cafe for some. – Ian.

5. 7/11/2007. Pump House, Tunnels, McRaes Weir, Racemans, return

Peter, Sabina, Doug M, Joyce, Neil, Wendy, Pat, Bill

Tea break. Identifiable: Peter, Sabina, Doug M, Joyce, Neil, Wendy, Pat, Bill

As this was another first Wednesday of the month, 25 Hikers and Trampers combined for a delightful walk in the Silverstream Water Race area. Joyce and Lesley led us on a round tour of part of the Racemans track area. Because the pedestrian bridge by the Pump House is now a casualty of the large 2006 flood, we kept to the stream’s true left the entire day, appreciating the new track that took us to beyond the swing bridge further up where we stopped for morning tea on a sunny grassy area. We had enjoyed bush rich with bellbird song on the way. Then a gentle climb took us up to the

Rest stop. Peter, Pat, Bill, Bob H, Neil

Rest stop. Peter, Pat, Bill, Bob H, Neil

Racemans Tunnel Track and level all the way along to the old McRaes Weir, which we were shocked to find badly flood-ravaged. Along the way however, Lex pulled a leg muscle. With pain-killers, he was able to return with two supporters to wait for us back at the cars. We crossed the little McReas side- stream and made our way along the McRaes track , admiring some quite large Pungas on the track-side until we reached its junction with the main Racemans Track. At this point we enjoyed

Ken, Wendy, Joyce, Neil, Margaret, Chris, Who?

Lunch. Identifiable: Ken, Wendy, Joyce, Neil, Margaret, Chris, Who?

a leisurely lunch-break in beautiful sunny bush. Then it was down the main access track, past the old Silverstream weir, past the Pump House water intake, along the newer first part of the track, past the Pump House itself and back to the cars to find Lex and his companions waiting for us in the sun. His leg was still sore but not excessively and he looked forward to returning home and getting cold compresses on it. The day proved a good social outing with both groups enjoying each others company. Ian

4. 7/11/2007 Leaders:
3. 13/9/2006. Trampers. Tunnels, McRaes Weir, Steve Amies, Little Coal Creek, Racemans. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Athur H.
2. 19/10/2005. Hikers. Racemans, Tunnel Track. Leaders: Nancy, Eleanor B
1. 10/11/2004. Both. Tunnels, Raceman Tracks. Leaders: Bob H, Victor, Nancy.
Weir

Old Weir. Lance, Lois, Anne, Who? Who? Dot, Pat? Bill, Sabina.

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Feb 06 2019

Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth

No. 47 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Toko Beach. M Young”; also No. 65 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Chrystalls Beach Farm”

Location: 59 km from the car park.

Directions: On SH1, before Milton, at Helensbrook intersection, left onto Forsyth Road, right onto Back Road, left onto Glenledi Road.
Best in Summer. The stock winter over.
19. 5/2/2019. Both. Cooks Head. Farm walk. Took Mouth. Return beach. M. Leaders: Arthur H. and Lester.
It was a 50 minute drive for the 7 cars transporting our group of 31 Trampers and Hikers (combined), to reach Chrystalls Beach which is out at the coast from Milton.
A rather chilly wind coming up the coast greeted us, so it was jackets or windbreakers on. A semi-sheltered pine plantation was our morning tea stop – in the sunshine.

Morning tea in sun out of the wind. (Gordon pic and caption.)

A little later, as we passed the cowshed on the dairy farm, a light shower arrived necessitating sheltering in the lee of some trees for 5 minutes.

A shelter-belt of trees on our left gave good shelter as we walked down the farm lane in a southwest direction.

Eventually we crossed the last paddock and negotiated the two-wire electric fence (turned off, thankfully) to arrive on the bank of the Tokomairiro River, and followed it to the sea.

Part of Toko township. (Gordon pic and caption.)

IMG_1735c

Jim and Keith comparing sticks or contemplating the distance to China. (Kevin pic and caption.)

The wind had eased somewhat by now, and it wasn’t quite as cold. After a rest stop we began the Beachwalk on the return part of our circuit, but now with the wind coming from behind it was much more pleasant.

Heading off along the beach. (Gordon pic and caption.)

After about half a kilometre we stopped to eat our lunch at the top the beach. It was low tide, and the surf was endlessly roaring.

Lunch on the beach. (Gordon pic and caption.)

No lingering over lunch, and then onward again. Chrystalls Beach is not a particularly pleasant beach to walk on because the coarse sand does not pack down hard. Nevertheless the group made good time up the beach, with the only thing of note being, sadly, the dead body of a very young Little Blue Penguin.

Heading off to Captain Cooks Head Rock. (Gordon pic and caption.)

All were very glad to reach Cooks Head, to have a breather in its shelter …

The Rock. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… while admiring its volcanic origin.

The rock makeup. (Gordon pic and caption.)

IMG_1743

(Kevin pic.)

Strangely no one wished to climb to the top today.

Will we climb it or not? (Gordon pic and caption.)

A short walk through the sand dunes, and on the road soon had us back at the cars, having covered just over 9 km for the day.

We had had only the one shower during our tramp, but there had been rain inland, and it was raining at Milton as we travelled homeward.

A refreshment stop was made at Waihola, before arriving back in Mosgiel at 3 p.m. – Art.

18. 21/9/2016. Trampers. Cooks Head. Farm walk. Took Mouth. Return beach. M. Leader: Arthur H.
We had a day at the beach.
Seven trampers left Mosgiel at 9.00 a.m. and travelled for 50 minutes to reach Chrystalls Beach, which is out at the coast from Milton.
After parking behind the beach, we walked back up the road we had just descended, – “Irishmans Road”. The overcast sky was beginning to show some blue patches now, the day becoming quite sunny.
An easterly breeze was coming in from the sea, and was noticeably cool. We had dropped Helen off at the top of the hill to find us a sheltered morning tea spot. The rest of us were nicely warmed up by now, and morning tea in the sunshine was most welcome.

Onward we walked, and were soon on one of the lanes of the daily farm. Downhill towards the cowshed …

Towards Toko Mouth. (Helen pic and caption.)

Towards Toko Mouth. (Helen pic and caption.)

… and then followed the main farm lane heading south.

The lanes were dry, and perhaps not too interesting themselves, but it was a pleasure to walk through the farm and enjoy the colour of the fresh spring grass. We had passed the large mob of dairy cows soon after leaving the cars, grazing in their paddock beside the road.
Eventually we came to the end of the lane, and crossing one paddock, arrived at the bank of the Tokomairiro River. Under the electric fence and along the specially cleared track through the gorse and we were at the water’s edge.
We could look across at the Toko Mouth houses as we followed the river for half a kilometre or more to the mouth.

It was getting close to low tide, but just a little early for lunch, so we began  the beach walk, coming to our dining seat before too long. A nice smooth log was perfect, plenty of room for all of us to sit side by side while munching away happily – like a row of birds on a wire.

H-114941Lunch on beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

H-114941Lunch on beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

We could watch the endless waves breaking on the beach and listen to the surf. Sea birds were noticeably absent, however.

Lunch over, we resumed our northward beach walk. The sand conditions were rather trying (and tiring), being a bit soft to walk on. It is about 3.5 km along the beach, and all were glad to eventually reach “Cooks Head” rock.

Rock and then close up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Rock and then close up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Time was taken to inspect the volcanic formations, similar to the “organ pipes” near Mt Cargill, which form the rock. Two were keen enough to climb to the summit …

Arthur and Eleanor on top of Cooks Rock. (Janine pic and caption.)

Arthur and Eleanor on top of Cooks Rock. (Janine pic and caption.)

… and admire the view.

The view. (Arthur pic.)

The view. (Arthur pic.)

The others were content just to watch.

Ten minutes more and we were back to the cars soon after 1.00 p.m. Not a long tramp, at around 10.5 km overall.
An historical note – In 1907 a French sailing ship, the Marguerite Mirabaud ran aground in fog on Chrystalls Beach. No lives were lost and the cargo was auctioned off behind the beach after being recovered. The sea broke up the ship though.

On the way back to Milton we stopped to inspect the sign erected by the Milton Rotary Club on the roadside, to mark where Richard Pearse had lived for 10 years from 1911.

Sign. (Arthur pic.)

Richard Pearse Sign. (Arthur pic.)

He is credited by some as flying a powered aircraft in 1902 or 1903,  before the Wright Brothers.

The cars then made an essential stop at Waihola on the homeward journey. All seemed to have enjoyed their day at the beach. – Arthur.
17. 19/3/2014. Trampers. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy.
 Chrystalls Beach to Toko Mouth & farm walk was the destination for our outing this week. Quite a few of the six who turned up had not done this before, so it was especially enjoyed by them. This time, to make it a bit different, I decided that we would do the trip in reverse, so walked back up the road to the farm house, where we were met by a overfriendly young dog that wanted to follow us, so we tried tying it up, but it went absolutly berserk, so we had to untie it, & really growl at it to make it stay at the house.
There has been quite a change to the look of the farm, with new roads, & the top paddocks bare of vegetation, but the lower paddocks are still the same. We had a lunch break …
Lunch

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

… along the beach a bit from Toko Mouth, then walked along to Cooks Head & inspected …
Cooks Head rock formation. (Heb pic and caption)

Cooks Head rock formation. (Heb pic and caption [Ed note: on the seaward side of the ‘Head’])

… the rock formations, before walking back to the cars.
The weather was very nice all day, with bright sunshine, & mostly calm conditions, which was enjoyed by all. – Ken.
16. 25/9/2013. Trampers. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy.
Chrystalls Beach Circuit. GPS of route courtesy Ken.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm, circuit.

On a day that looked threatening weather wise, 5 of us travelled to Chrystalls Beach, & after parking the cars away from some loose wandering cattle, we made out way across to Cooks Head where we had morning tea.
Morning Tea stop in the shelter of Cooks Head. (Ken pic)

Morning tea stop in the shelter of Cooks Head.

Then we rugged up for the very windy walk along the beach to Toko Mouth. The sand was just as soft & hard to walk on as I remembered it from last time I was there.
We had a regroup around the corner of the Toko estuary out of the wind, then made our way along there to the point where it is possible to climb through the gorse, & up onto the farm paddocks. It was then a case of deciding which way to go to find the big hay shed where we had lunch the last time. After locating this we walked along the muddy track to where our route turned off into the paddocks, to head back up to the top road again. We had lunch out of the wind, hunkered down behind a large stack of trees that the farmer had torn out of the ground, & stacked up in piles along the new fence line. After lunch, it was just a matter of walking back up the slope that leads past the house on the property, & then along the roads back to the cars.
We all agreed that it was a good walk, despite the wind, & the very occasional light spot of moisture.

15. 14/7/2010. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy. Leaders: Ian, Ken.
Because of low tide at 11.00 a.m., we walked the beach first for the first tiime instead of doing the tramp the more usual other way round. So it happened that we came upon Cooks Head from the north instead of the south and discovered a cave we had never noticed before.

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Jan 09 2019

Deep Creek Weir from Old Dunstan Road past Rocklands

No. 2 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Deep Stream [Stream crossed out and replaced by Creek] (Rocklands). R Lippers. Cattle.”
No. 56 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Deep Creek from Old Dunstan Road. (Rocklands. Year Round”
Est, 50 km from car park.
See Deep Creek Water Scheme Pipeline history.
See further background information behind Deep Stream project

16. 9/1/2019. Deep Creek Gorge Pipeline. Leaders: Theresa and Clive.

Route map, Deep Creek railed walkway and weir, courtesy Ian.

31 Trampers, Hikers and Ramblers set out across the tussock of Te Papanui Conservation Park. It was an ideal day for a walk on the tops as there was high cloud keeping what can be a scorching sun off our backs. The 16 degree temperature was just right to get things started after the Christmas/New Year break. 13 of the participants had not been on the walk before and were looking forward to the gorge.
Morning tea

(Clive pic.)

found us being observed by a large herd of cows who seemed very interested in what we were all doing there.
After a twenty minute break we headed on up hill

(Clive pic.)

to the hut at the mouth of the gorge. Having made sure everyone was accounted for it was across the 40 ? or 41 ? bridges and board walks to the weir at the top of Deep Creek.

(Kevin pic.)

(Clive pic.)

(Kevin pic.)

This gorge is a feature that makes this walk so interesting. As an aside, the DoC blurb advises that there are over 500 species of native insects; plus a wide variety of plants and animals (including pigs and red deer), in the Te Papanui park.
Lunch was taken back at the mouth of the gorge, sheltering from the cool breeze that had sprung up. After lunch the Trampers headed off in a more Easterly directing to add a bit more distance to the completed walk. The hikers and ramblers headed back the way we had come in the morning. The hikers covered about 9.5 kms by the end of the day and were happy to sit down for afternoon tea at the Wobbly Goat about half an hour ahead of the more exercised Trampers group. The consensus was a ‘gorge’-ous days outing! – Clive

15. 26/4/2017. Deep Creek Gorge Pipeline . Leaders: Theresa and Arthur.

Nike app route map, courtesy Ian.

Leave the car park and go up SHWY 87 until Clarks Junction. Turn left onto Rocklands Road. Travel on excellent tar seal until you pass the Rocklands Station complex. Now you will be on gravel and at the beginning of the Old Dunstan Trail. Turn left off the Old Dunstan Trail and proceed on farm track for 2 kms. Park cars at the trees. Cross over farm land for a period of time — only down and up one gully,

Morning tea in gully, sheltered from a breeze. (Clive pic.)

going in a west / north direction towards the gorge. A gate in the middle of a paddock with a faint track going in the right direction. Two  small newish huts with a solar powered panel on roof mark the beginning of the Gorge  track. This is part of the Te Papanui Reserve. Traverse  pipe line for approx 1/12- 2 kms.

New section at start,  replacing broken single wooden planking. (Keith pic.)

The pipe line is suspended  off the cliff high above the Gorge .The track is narrow  on the pipe line …

(Clive pic.)

… but is easy and in the main flat. There are many foot bridges to cross. (An in-house challenge to count the number, caused differing results/) One  dedicated tramper even ticked them off on a piece of paper .WHO  are we to disagree!! A small dam was at the head of a very picturesque Deep Creek Gorge.

(Keith pic.)

(Keith pic.)

Repeat the trip back to the road just beyond the huts. From then it is an easy road tramp back to the cars. 12 very happy trampers enjoyed a WOW 😳 kind of a day out. Approx 10 kms  in length. Debrief and coffee at Outram. -Theresa.

14. 9/4/2014. Trampers. Deep Creek. (A replacekment for ‘The Gap’, programmed for the day, which would have turned out extremely muddle.)
 The first thing we struck was hundreds of sheep by the trees where the cars normally park.
so we parked just before that spot and skirted the trees on the other side so as not to disturb the sheep.  We left morning tea till we got to the old hut …
Morning tea in the sun (Heb pic and caption)

Morning tea in the sun (Heb pic and caption)

… sitting on some concrete pipes there. From there we followed the track taking us onto the pipeline …
Looking upstream toward the weir (Heb pic and caption)

Looking upstream toward the weir (Heb pic and caption)

… right up to the weir.
Ria and Eric at the Deep Stream Weir (Heb pic and caption)

Ria and Eric at the Deep Stream Weir (Heb pic and caption)

About halfway back we enjoyed lunch in the sun sheltered in a gully with no wind. It was great. From the hut on the way out, we followed  white pegs indicating the pipeline which helped us avoid getting our feet wet in a muddy creek. Then it was back to the cars. A great day for tramping. – Heb.
13. 31/8/2011. Trampers. Deep Creek.

GPS

Five of us battled a strong wind on the tops, really icy and straight from the antarctic, to a late cuppa at the cave part way up the road from where we park the car. However the cave faced straight into the wind so we nestled behind it in the shelter of its lee.

The cave, with light chinks in the ‘bricked up’ rear.

Wrapped up in wind-breakers, gloves and woollen hats we struggled onward and upward to at last the crest of the slope and escape down into the shelter of Deep Creek’s gully and onto the walkway.

Looking downstream at start. (Ken pic and caption)

Ian, Linzi, Ria and Doug at start of creek track. (Ken pic and caption)

There was quite a lot of water in the creek. (Ken pic and caption)

Part of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

Doug, Ria, Linzi and Ian at the weir. (Ken pic and caption)

A large flow of water over the weir. (Ken in the background disappearing up the ladder.)

Creek above the weir. (Ken pic and caption)

Looking down on the weir from the control hut. (Ken pic and caption)

Looking back along the track from the control hut. (Ken pic and caption)

View of further downstream from the control hut. (Ken pic and caption)

On the way back out, we remained to lunch in the shelter of the gully before getting back out to expose ourselves to the wind again. We examined the old hut, little changed from last time, before making the return back to the car, this time thankfully with the wind behind us. – Ian.

12. 10/11/2010. Hikers. Deep Creek. Medium. Leaders: Evelyn C, Graham.

11. 12/3/2008 Hikers. Deep Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce S, Lesley G

The adventure for the 14 Hikers this week was a drive via Rocklands Station and the Dunstan Old Road, turning off to the Te Papanui Reserve. There was a cold S.W. wind that kept us in woolly hats for the day, even although we had sunshine as well. A walk up the hillside to a cave amongst the rocks was earmarked for coffee by Joyce S, our leader.
Then on to the gorge of Deep Creek, a tributary of Deep Stream, and the path following the pipe line to the weir.
A Deep Creek Gorge

Gorge in Deep Creek. Looking upstream at beginning of walkway.

Bob H told us about the water race used in the gold mining days and the pipeline to supplement the Dunedin City’s water supply, built in the 1930s. The farmland had been former tussock country but the gorge was not modified and still supported many alpine plants, including gentians in flower. We had several sightings of NZ Falcons, which are now considered to be diminishing in numbers. It was an exciting area to be hiking in,

as the river was a long way below us and the sides of the gorge very steep. Ian F was making mental notes for the retrieval of anyone who miscalculated their step, but fortunately the plan wasn’t needed. We were back at the cars by 2pm and home to Mosgiel 3pm. An exhilarating day. – Lesley G

10. 13/6/2007 Leaders: George, Abe

Snow at top

Snow at top

Lwr Crk

Deep Creek in lower reaches.

Grp

On pipeline. George, Leonie, Tash, Ria, Pat, Ian, Glenice, Arthur.

UprXCrk

Upper Deep Creek showing railed walkways.

9. 23/8/2006. Hikers. Deep Creek, Old Dunstan Road. Medium. Leaders: Val, Arthur & Barbara

8. 24/11/2004. Both. Deep Creek, Lammermoors. Leaders: Evelyn C, Ian, Peter and Wendy

Deep Creek Pipeline Track

Deep Creek Pipeline Track. Evelyn, Wendy, Peter.

Deep Creek Weir

Deep Creek Weir. Evelyn, Wendy, Peter

7. 17/4/2002. Alt. Rockland and Deep Creek. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Bev McI.

6. 21/10/1998. Deep Creek from Old Dunstan Trail. Leaders: George, Les S.

5. 24/3/1998. Deep Creek, Rocklands. Leaders: Shirley McN, Ria L, Bev H.

4. 15/10/1997.

3. 8/2/1995. Deep Creek from Old Dunstan Road. Easy. Leaders: Jack R, Bob H, Ted, Dot T.

2. 20/3/1991. Deep Creek Dam and Pipeline. Great viewing and interesting country. Easy+. Leaders: Dave and Jean, Margaret D, Janice.

1. 1/2/89. Deep Creek.

1/2/1989. “Pumping Station.” Deep Creek. (Ian pic, scanned from Peg Chisholm photo collection.)

Background.
The Deep Creek Water Scheme was built during the depression of the 30s.
The Pipeline is 58 years old and 64 km long.
The intake is 675m above sea level.
The catchment is 5420 hectares; mainly tussock with some grassland.
The steel pipeline, lined with bitumen, was in a bad state of repair by the 80s and the leaks were constantly plugged with tapered wooden plugs until it resembled a porcupine.
The authorities were eventually persuaded to renew the worst section, this being done with the aid of a helicopter in 1992. It is a useful supplement to Dunedin’s water supply.
The Pipeline is made of bitumen-lined steel excepting the first 1.4 km which was replaced in 1992 with concrete pipes.
Water quality is variable and often discoloured.
Over the 58 years the yield has dropped from 11,000 cubic metres to 6,800 cubic metres a day.
The water goes to Booth Road Treatment Station and Sullivans Dam.
Replacing the rest of the pipeline is estimated at $20,000,000 and would increase the flow to 17,000 cubic metres a day.
– From a hand-written record in the President’s file and supplemented with other data.

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Dec 12 2018

Berwick Forest Tracks and Beyond

No. 35 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Berwick Forest. G Such. Wenita. Nov-April. Year round”

Location: Old Wool Shed: 30 km.
Location: Lodge: 33  km.
click to enlarge

39. 12/12/2018. All. End of year. Pot luck meal at Berwick Lodge. Leaders: Peter, Wendy and Dave.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Trampers and most Hikers were led from the Lodge by Dave and Keith along Hook Road, up, up, up Farm Road, left along Old Boundary Road and down, up and back down again along a track through broom, gorse and trees to the Old Wool Shed site on Hook road, and back along it to the Lodge again. Peter led the Ramblers on a shorter walk.

Young at Heart – Judy!!! (Dave pic and caption.)

A number of former club members turned up to a well-provisioned finger food meal at mid-day, and bowser a well covered trestle table of books, sale proceeds to go to the new Mosgiel swimming pool. Over 40 of us leisurely ate and talked till President Jill took over. She introduced Bruce who had composed a 4-stanza song to the tune of “The Old Grey Mare, and after lyric sheets were handed out, led hearty singing of it.

Thanks to excellent preparation, Jill had a briefed a number of us to give 2-minute accounts of private trips, local and overseas. These were many and varied. A good ending to the year, at a venue many of us hadn’t visited before. – Ian.

38. 20/9/2017. Trampers. Berwick Forest – Meggat Burn, Shaw Road. M. Leader: Arthur.
There were 14 keen Trampers out today for a walk in the forest – one member of the group used the word “intrepid” in describing us.
It must be a few years since our Club has tramped this track? Anyway, the cars parked at the usual spot by the old woolshed on the road into the “Berwick Forest Lodge”.
It was noticed that the toilet facilities by the carpark were absent, as about a month ago some “empty head” had burned it down!
There was a brief paddock walk in the sunshine (sunny all day) before crossing the footbridge over Boundary Creek, to the beginning of the track up into the pine trees. After about 150 yards we came to 6 large trees down over the track, which were successful negotiated by going under, over, or around.
Smoko was taken in a sunny trackside spot, at the appropriate time.

Gathering on way up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continuing uphill we soon came to and crossed a Forestry Road (Prentice Road). Now descending slowly we eventually came to the Meggat Burn, which was crossed without mishap using a variety of techniques. Electing to just plough through, not worrying about wet feet, and some crossed on the shallowest part of the rock ledge where it was maybe only 3 inches deep. The burn was only slightly up after all of the rain a few days ago.

(Margreet pic.)

While the track was muddy in many places, it was surprisingly good after the quantity of rain that had fallen. Further up there was vegetation, especially gorse, beginning to encroach but not impeding our progress.

The track came out onto a forestry road, Tobermory Road; and in 10 minutes more we reached Shaw Road before 12 noon. Down Shaw Road for a few minutes took us to our lunch spot in a sunny area under the Pole Line that parallels Shaw Road. There was a limited view down on to the Taieri from here, with Hope Hill in the background. We could even see the sea.

Lunch spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

The sunshine was most enjoyable, ideal for lying back forma little nap after eating – one tramper having to be roused to begin the return journey!

Our return followed the same route, some care being necessary descending a slippery clay section before arriving back at the Meggat Burn. All crossed in safety again although a piece of equipment may have been lost?

It was uphill for a little while, and then it was down all the way. It was very noticeable that the leaders were in a hurry to get home (I was at the back of the group here), and not wasting any time – probably they could detect the aroma coming from the coffee shop? But it was just their imagination!

We were back in the lovely sunshine at the cars by 2.30 pm, having tramped 13.5 km for the day’s effort.

The Leader was most gratified to hear that all of the party had thoroughly enjoyed the day’s walk (and talk). Considerable birtdsong was heard in the forest.

As per the usual custom, a stop was made in Outram for refreshments and  discussion. And then back to Mosgiel, and then home for boot cleaning duty. – Art.

37. 15/12/2010. All. End of year. Lodge, Farm Rd, East Boundary, Old Wool Shed, Lodge. Pot luck meal at Berwick Lodge. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
For some of us, accustomed to entering Berwick Forest along Terrace Range Rd by the Old Woolshed at the old HQ site, it was a new experience to travel further along the Berwick Road to enter the forest by the sign-posted Webbs Rd and then down Farm Rd, turning left onto Boundary Creek Road to arrive at the Lodge.
The walk took us back up Farm Road.We stopped for tea break at its crest where it crossed East Boundary Rd and continues to Webbs Road.

GPS of route courtesy Ken

From here we had a good view across to Waipori Lake.

View of Lake Waipori

Almost immediately off Webbs Rd, Peter and Wendy led us along a forestry track paralleling the E Boundary Rd (which you can see on the left of our GPSed route) through Douglas Firs…

Through Douglas Firs

…and blackberry brambles in the more open areas.

Brambles

Interesting foot bridge

The track ended where at a log-loading site we joined up with the East Boundary Road. Turning right, were almost immediately at the two-storey lookout, with its lovely view of the Sinclair Wetlands.

The Lookout on E. Boundary Road.

Boundary Road eventually wound its way around to Terrace Range Rd near the old HQ site by the Old Woolshed.
Further on it was left off Terrace Range Rd onto Boundary Creek Rd, (passing Farm Rd on our left, thereby completing the loop,) and so back to the Lodge for lunch. Good planned timing, Peter and Wendy!

Lunch inside

Peter reported that the tramp was 6kms long and 19 happy trampers took part, with one or two others joining us for lunch and a singsong with Bruce and his guitar.

Bruce leading the singing.

Peter, as Past President, gave a speech on behalf of President Bill who unfortunately could not attend due to ill health, and wished us well for the Christmas season. – Ian
36. 8/9/2010. Hikers. Berwick Forest from Old Woolshed. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn.
35. 13/5/2009 Both. Berwick Forest from old Woolshed. Pink Route. Terrace Range, Shetland Saddle Ridge, Market, East Boundary Medium. Leaders: Ian, Ken.

Well, an unusual start to the day. For a wet morning, but promising to clear up later in the day, 10, mostly Hikers, turned up at the carpark and after much discussion forewent the programmed Cleghorn Street-Signal Hill walk, and settled on a Berwick Forest road-walk, because ground everywhere was SO WET. And again, despite a longer walk than usual, it proved that Hikers can do anything, given time-out on the hills.

click to enlarge
Lunch.

Lunch. Ken & Neil stading. Peter & Bev sitting.

We endured one or two showers initially, giving way to cloud and latterly even to sunshine.

Down track

Down Shetland-Saddle Ridge. Peter & Neil at back. Bev at front.

It was instructive to witness extensive flooding everywhere and how waterways cope; also the transformations brought about by forest harvesting and re-growth that had taken place over the 10 years since the club last visited the area. Views of the Sinclair Wetlands rewarded the last stages of the day and we got back to the cars just after 3.00 p.m., tired, a bit sore, but triumphant. – Ian.

34. 31/10/2007 Shaw Road?

Although once again, weather report not so good and some cloud hanging around, we left the car park at 9am as usual for our hike in Waipori – Berwick Forest area with high hopes of a good day out. We parked by the side of the road and set off walking along the road then across farm land and up a fairly steep hill.

Morning Tea

Morning Tea

Took our time and stopped frequently to admire the view which got more interesting and expansive the higher we got.

Down Hill

Certainly well worth the effort. Had views over Taieri, down to Waihola and over the Wetlands, as well as the hills and valleys round that area. We really enjoyed our morning tea break after our hard slog up the hill. From then on it was fairly easy, pleasant going along forestry roads and through the trees. Found a nice sheltered spot in the sun for our lunch and sat and made the most of the break and rest before returning to the cars the same way we had come. Day turned out to be a good one for hiking. Not too hot at first but warmed up considerably by the time we were on our way back. Another happy day for hikers. Bev.
33. 24/10/2007. Hikers: Berwick Forest. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Tom.
32. 12/9/2007. Trampers. Berwick Forest from Old Woolshed. Medium. Leaders: Doug J, Tom
31. 7/6/2006. Old Woolshed to Shaw Road, return. Leaders: Bob H and Arthur H.
30. 7/6/2006. Both. Berwick Forest Lodge. Leaders (Medium): Bob H, Arthur H, (Easy): Margaret D, Val.
29. 14/12/2005. End of Year. All. Berwick Hall. Bring a plate. Leaders: Lance and Lois, Lesley S.
28. 26/5/2004. Old woolshed at Berwick to Waipori Return. H.Started from the old woolshed, through the forest, Meggat Burn to Shaw Road, and down the track to the picnic ground near the Waipori River Bridge to have lunch there. Returned the same way. It must have been a long, tough tramp to do that. (Recalled by Art.)
27. 18/12/2002. End of Year. All. Berwick Forest Pre-Christmas Tramp. Finger food lunch and flasks, wet or fine. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Wendy J.
26. 19/12/2001. End of Year. Combined. Berwick Forest. Pre Xmas Tramp. Finger food lunch and flasks. Leaders: Graham, Bill H, Wendy J.
25. 13/12/2000. Berwick Forest – Pre-Xmas Tramp. Finger food lunch and flasks. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Bev H.
24. 30/8/2000. Berwick Forest Area. Leaders:  Claude, Graham, Ian.
23. 16/2/2000. Berwick Forest Circuit. Leaders: Barbara McC, Mary L, Sabina.
22. 15/12/1999. Pre-Christmas tramp and lunch. Berwick Forest. Wet or Fine. Finger Food and Flasks. Leaers: Margaret and Les, Colleen.
21. 12/5/1999 Old Wool Shed. Green Route. Half track, half road. East Boundary, Hook, Halfway, Prentice, Oban, Ret. Leaders: Claude, Lex, Molly.
20. 3/2/1999. The Circle at Berwick Forest. Leaders: Jack R, Pat, Hazel.
19. 19/8/1998. Berwick Forest Tramp. Leaders: Les W, Eleanor.
18. 13/5/1998. Berwick, Shaws Hill, Hayes Woolshed. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S.
17. 17/6/1998. Old Wool Shed. Pink Route. East Boundary, Market, Shetland Saddle Ridge, Terrace Range, Ret. Leaders: Graham, Claude.
16. 30/7/1997. Old Wool Shed. Pink Route. East Boundary, Market, Shetland Saddle Ridge, Terrace Range (Part), Halfway (part), Bishop, Longspur, Terrace Range (part), ret. Leaders: Graham, Claude, Les W.
15. 19/3/1997 Waipori Gorge to the Megget Burn stream, Berwick. Leaders: Molly, Diana and Ray
14. 12/2/1997. Woolshed Shaws Hill and return. Leaders: Colleen, Ted, Sabina.
13. 13/7/1994 Berwick Forest Woolshed to Waipori and return.Leaders: Molly, Dot T, Graham, Frank
12. 31/3/1993. Berwick Forest. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Barbara McC, Mervyn, Doreen.
11. 17/6/1992. Berwick Forest walk. Average. Leaders: Mary Y, Nola, Doreen, Mary McG
10. 25/9/1991 Berwick Forest and Native Reserve. Average. Leaders: Dot B, Jean Y, Denise
9. 10/7/1991 Berwick Forest Woolshed to Waipori. A good winter tramp. Average. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Ray, Joyce I, Catherine T
8. 11/10/1989. Berwick – Shaw’s Hill Road. Easy. Leaders: Joyce I, Joan A, Norman.
7. 6/9/1989 Berwick Forest. Average. Youth Camp to Native Reserve. Leaders: Ria L, Peg C, Peggy A
6. 7/6/1989. Berwick Forest from Forest Headquarters.  Sheltered pine walk. Leaders: June W, Ria, Peggy, Peg
5. 14/5/1989 Waipori Gorge to Meggetburn stream, Berwick. Bush and Pine walk. Leaders: Daphne, Helen W, Mavis
4. 3/2/1989. Berwick Forest – The Upper Circle. Incorporates the Otago Youth Adventure Trust training track. Leaders: Jack, Pat, Hazel.
3. 21/9/1988 Berwick Forest from Old Woolshed to Boundary Creek and O.Y.A.T.I. camp. Leaders; Kees and Ria, Doreen.
2. 22/6/1988 Berwick Forest from the Woolshed. Back early for barbecue. Leaders: Dave and Jean
1. 13/4/1988. Berwick Forest from Shaw Hill Road. Leaders: Hugh, Jean Y.

 

 

2 responses so far

Nov 07 2018

Ross Creek and environs

No. 94 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Ross Creek – McGlashan College Year Round”

27. 7/11/208. Both. Hikers: Craigieburn and McGoun. Trampers: Craigieburn, Davies and Pineapple. Leaders: Pam, Dawn and Art.

Hikers’ route map, courtesy Ian.

The 44 setting out from Rockside Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

Trampers’ Report: The Hike leaders for the combined club day suggested that the Trampers could extend their walk, which we did.

Morning tea at the Byre. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Leaving the Hikers after the morning tea stop at Craigieburn, 12 Trampers look the shortest route to McGouns Road and on to find the bottom of Davies Track.

It was rather warm and humid as we climbed up through the second-growth bush, on the lower part of the track. The juice flowed very freely!

However, on reaching the older native bush the temperature dropped considerably, allowing all to enjoy this part of the track.

Trampers heading up Davies track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Above the bush line we emerged into the flax and tussock – the pigs had been busy up here. Davies Track is well maintained, other than the topmost part in the tussock where small gorse bushes will need to be dealt with at some time.

Trampers’ view from Pineapple track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

It had been an enjoyable (?) climb, but all were very glad to reach the top and emerge onto the Pineapple Track. Five minutes took us down to the junction with the track to Swampy Ridge, where we had our lunch.

Trampers’ lunch break on Pineapple track. (Gordon pic and caption.)

By the time the lunch half hour was over the wind was picking up, and the sky darkening. But it was downhill all the way now on the Pineapple Track and we made good time.

Hikers’ lunch in the shade at head of Booth Road after short-cutting from McGouns through the lower part of the original Pineapple to the water tank. (Ian pic and caption.)

After a while it came on to rain lightly, …

Trampers on way home in forest in the rain. (Gordon pic and caption.)

… but had stopped by the time we reached the bottom of the track.

A group of hikers was seen just in front, but they didn’t wait, disappearing down Tanner Road somewhere.

The Trampers returned to their cars via Craigieburn and the bush tracks to record a useful day’s work of about 10 km. – Art.

26. 24/10/2018. Hikers.Ross Creek Trails. E. Leaders: Clive and Doug.

26 Hikers set off from Malvern Street bridge along the Upper Leith walk. Many had done this walk before and were not sure what to expect.

Down the staircase in the bush. (Clive pic and caption.)

Firstly we had to cross School Creek as the track to the dam face was closed. Jumping across the stepping stones was tricky but no one took a spill. That was exhausting so we settled down for morning tea on the other side. We then continued up the stream to Burma Road. Lots of vehicles parked here for repairs to the dam.   Arriving at the side of the dam we could see the water level was very low. (It had been hoped to refill the dam by the end of October.)

The reservoir was very low. (Clive pic and caption.)

We continued up Burma Road to Wakari Road and then right to the junction of Tanner Road where we entered the track system again. It was a hot day reportedly 25 degrees, but under the canopy of trees and bush it was very pleasant. We looked at old stone remnants of building past and scaled the heights to the old byre.

A rest at the old byre. (Clive pic and caption.)

Bit of a rest here after that climb saw some breaking out the sandwiches, but a bit early for lunch. Downhill to the other side of the dam in time to sit down for lunch, if you could find a comfortable spot!

Lunch beside the dam. (Clive pic and caption.)

After lunch we made a loop of the dam, as the face was closed, arriving at a point on Burma Road we had been at earlier. Some opted for the down hill section back to the stream crossing. Those with a bit left in the tank headed uphill to Cannington Road before dropping down a steep slope to the creek. Total distance 9.1k.

All arrived back at the cars safely and then it was off to Croc-o-dile cafe in the Botanical Garden for afternoon tea. – Clive & Doug

25. 25/10/2017. Hikers. Ross Creek, Craigieburn, Cycle tracks, McGouns, Ross Creek. M. Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Route map courtesy Ian. It stopped recording 1.5 km before finish! (Ian pic and caption.)

(Clive pic.)

Morning tea. (Clive pic.)

Steep descent. (Clive pic.)

Did they really order that much?. (Clive pic.)

24. 24/4/2016. Hikers. Ross Creek, McGouns, Tanner Lookout, Craigieburn. M. Leaders: Dawn and Pam.
GPS of route. Failed to complete it at time; hence straight line indicating car travel to Plaza Cafe. We did just on 7 km, despite the '6' not showing. (Hidden by the "1"?) Distracted by Spittles' wonderful disbursement of blackboy peaches.

GPS of route. Failed to complete it at time; hence straight line indicating car travel to Plaza Cafe. We did just on 7 km, despite the ‘6’ not showing. (Hidden by the “1”?) Distracted by Spittles’ wonderful disbursement of blackboy peaches.

Panorama of some of the 26 hikers lunching.

Panorama of some of the 26 hikers lunching.

23. 20/1/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh Gardens, Ross Creek reservoir, Craigieburn, Tanner Lookout. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
GPS route map of Ross Creek tramp courtesy Bruce.

GPS route map of Ross Creek tramp courtesy Bruce. Distance covered 10.6 km, moving time 2 hours 55 minutes, moving average 3.6 km/hour, stopped time 1 hour 44 minutes, overall average 2.3 km/hour, and total ascent 221 m.

Twenty-two hikers departed at 9.30 am from the Gardens’ Carpark opposite Mecure/Leisure Lodge on a sunny calm day, in contrast to the previous drizzly afternoon. We turned to the left in the Gardens and followed the north perimeter with the themed borders to the main gate, crossed at the traffic lights to the north side of Bank Street and walked around to the Woodhaugh Gardens, past the mural of the Otago University Clocktower building with a portrait of the architect Maxwell Bury (1825–1912), painted under the Pine Hill Road bridge.

Clock tower mural under bridge. (Bruce pic and caption)

Clock tower mural under bridge. (Bruce pic and caption)

We kept to the left in the Woodhaugh Gardens circumnavigating the duck pond by proceeding along a bush track and stopped at 10. 00 am for morning tea near the paddling pool.

Morning tea at Woodhaugh (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh. (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh. (Bruce pic and caption)

We then followed the path near the right bank of the Leith to Malvern Street, crossing at the bridge and turning left opposite the building that was originally the Woodhaugh Hotel into Woodhaugh Street. We followed the track on the left on the left bank of the Leith Stream and passed an excavator at work clearing the boulder trap built in 1963. We ambled along the track up the valley past the New Zealand Motor Caravan Association’s property before crossing the foot bridge and continuing to the site of the disused Woodhaugh Quarry and the explosives store. Our path continued up the valley and along the true right side of the Ross Creek reservoir (facing down the valley) after which we crossed the bridge over Ross Creek and after proceeding about 300 m down the true left side of the reservoir took the track uphill on the left. Where this branched after another 100 m or so we turned to a relatively new and level track to the left which later passed close to some rimu trees before swinging right and coming out on the grassed area below the Craigieburn cow byre. After passing the byre and the left hand end of the stone wall further ahead we stopped at Tanner View at 11.40 am for lunch. After lunch we turned to the right on the track and then, at a sign, to the left passed the cobbled road to the little ruin.

Little ruin at Craigieburn. (Bruce pic and caption)

Little ruin at Craigieburn. (Bruce pic and caption)

From the ruin we took the track to the rimu forest eventually emerging at the bridge at the top of the Ross Creek reservoir that we had crossed earlier. We made our way down the left hand side of the reservoir and then followed our earlier route back to the gardens,

Group photo Woodhaugh Gardens. (Bruce pic and caption)

Group photo Woodhaugh Gardens. (Bruce pic and caption)

reaching Crocodile at 2.10 pm where many stopped for refreshments.

– Bruce and Marjorie

22. 25/3/2015. Hikers. Ross Creek and McGouns Track. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.
GPS of Hikers' route

GPS of Hikers’ route

The hike was planned well. First, we parked our cars at the beginning of Malvern Street. Pam and Dawn  then led us into the Upper Leith Walkway
Upper Leith Walkway (John pic)

Upper Leith Walkway recent sign. (John pic)

that runs alongside Woodhaugh Street till we came to and crossed the large footbridge onto the other side of the Leith and through the old quarry that lies under the cliffs that bound the north end of Maori Hill, where Braeview Crescent runs along their top. The path then twisted us up into Ross Creek, with cliffs now on our right marking the boundary of Rockside Road houses above. On and up until very steeply up to crest the big earth dam (that is scheduled to be reinforced some time) of Ross Creek Reservoir.
Plaque. Ross Creek Water Works. (Jphn pic)

Plaque. Ross Creek Water Works. (John pic)

Meantime the water level is kept remarkably low to relieve stress on the dam wall. Morning tea was up at the second part of the reservoir, which we found to be surprisingly set up for water polo, but absent any players.
Morning tea. (John pic.)

Taken by the morning tea stop. Unusual dewatered view of reservoir. (John pic.)

Then on up through the bush tracks. We passed through the Craigieburn area…
The Little Ruin. (John pic)

The Little Ruin. (John pic)

…to emerge at the intersection below Booth Road. This was an important regrouping point before Pam led us on through a gate…
A new McGouns Track sign. (John pic)

A new McGouns Track sign at entrance to McGouns Road. (John pic)

into McGouns Road leading to the start of the McGouns track. This took us across to the Pineapple Track and back down to Booth Road.
Back into the top of Ross Creek bush, but this time up to…
Tanners View sign. (John pic)

Tanners View sign. (John pic)

… the old cow byre …
Tanners View (John pic)

Old Cow Byre (John pic)

Lunch (John pic)

Lunch on old cow byre site. (John pic)

…for lunch.

After lunch it was simply back out and down through the Ross Creek environs to the cars.

Thanks to Pam and Dawn for a well planned hike. – Ian.
21. 12/6/2013. Hikers. Ross Creek and surrounds. Leaders: Lex and Fred.
Route

Route. 9.65km

We parked our cars at the north end of Burma Road. Lex led us through the bush to exit up on Tannock Road. Along a bit and down Leighton Road to  morning tea in the grassy reserve at the road’s end.
Then back along Tannock Road, (just past 1km on map) down through the bush and along the reservoir to the dam at its end. It was a shock to see how much the water had been lowered.
Low water

Low water in Ross Creek Reservoir.

Of course, because of the cracks that have been detected in the earth dam.

Looking down

Looking down the dam face to cleared bush below.

We crossed the dam, turned left and down to walk past the cleared bush site …

Looking up

Looking back up the face of the dam.

and on down to reach the junction of Rockside Road at its bottom and Malvern street. (2km mark on map)

Then it was to walk leisurely up Malvern Street, stopping for Lex to point out various interests on the way. What surprised ss was a string of tall posts diagonally across the Leith above the first set of houses we passed. We thought it might be to trap flood debris.

Just further up Lex pointed out a weir, immediately below which he used to swim in when a small boy. Ian and Lex talked about the Clark family house that used to be across the locked pedestrian bridge overlooking the weir.

Then it was yet further up to the old Jacksons’ beautiful stone house when Ian recalled, (as a boy in company with others) stealing  cream out of a jar left to cool in the clear cooling water of a ditch, replacing what was removed with water. Just a bit further up, at the foot of Fulton Rd was the house of the late artist Eana B Jeans with only the gate of Ian’s old home showing a sort distance up Fulton Road. On up, to turn from Malvern Street up to the left onto Islay Street, (Beyond 4km mark on map) upon which, in a sunny spot, we stopped for lunch, just above the road connecting across to Fulton Road. Ian and Lex recalled calling the three roads the steepy (Fulton), the toppy (Islay) and the greeny (the connecting less-used road, now (surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly) closed.

Lunch

Lunch on a bank in the sun on Islay Street.

At the top, opposite Lex’s childhood house we went over to the former plantation road (nr 5km mark on map) that led to the start of the McGoun Track and stopped to view the stone cairn 1996 Tannock memorial. Further on and up until we reached the top of the (comparatively) recent set of mountain bike tracks (2/3 of way to the 6km mark). These we took, zig-zagging down to reach the large car-park at the end of Wakari Road. (7m mark) It was here that one or two of our party of 17 elected to take a short cut down to the cars while Lex took the rest of us along Wakari Road, past the end of Polewarth Road to turn down Joshua Place (a bit before the 8km mark) and from the along to a track that led us back to Polewarth Road. This we turned down heading for Burma Road at its other end, until called back by some at the rear who had noticed a dog worrying a flock of sheep in a paddock. We cell-phoned the DCC to inform them of such, along with the dog’s registered number. – Good deed for the day. Then on down Polewarth Rd to join the Burma Rd (abt 9km mark) and along it back to the cars. Thanks to Lex and Fred for yet a further novel changed route – and the chocs! – Ian.

20. 24/10/2012. Hikers, Ross Creek. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

19. 30/5/2012. Hikers. Wakari Road. Cycle Tracks etc. Ross Creek. Leaders: Lex, Jill.

18. 25/5/2011. Hikers. Ross Creek area. E. Leaders: Lex, Molly
17. 21/7/2010. Hikers. Ross Creek area. New track. E. Leaders: Lex, Graham
16. 26/3/2008. Hikers. Ross Creek. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Jean.
In Ross Creek

In Ross Creek

As we’ve come to expect, Wed. was fine and 15 happy hikers parked by the Meter House, near the corner of Wakari & Burma Rds, ready to set off on the Ross Creek area and tracks.

Lex was our leader, and as he lived in that region from childhood he is very knowledgeable about the territory, which makes a popular walk even more interesting. We did various tracks through the lovely bush, stopping every now and then for Lex to tell us about some trees that had been planted and trialled, or other things of interest about that part. It was lovely to hear so many birds whistling and singing cheerily all round us. So often these days one is very disappointed at the lack of birdsong in a region where once you would have heard them. We arrived at Prospect Park

Lunch at Prospect Park

Lunch at Prospect Park

View from the Bullock Track

View from the Bullock Track

via bush and road and relaxed and soaked up the sun while enjoying our lunch. Then it was off down the Bullock Track to the lovely little trail along the Leith Stream through the old Woodhaugh Quarry area. From there it was back up one of the bush tracks to the cars. A lovely pleasant day out, as usual. – Bev Harvey

15. 26/3/2008 Leaders: Lex, Jean A

14. 14/11/2007 Trampers. Woodhaugh, Ross Creek, Davies, Flagstaff Track, Pineapple, Ross Creek return.

13. 21/2/2007. Hikers. Ross Creek, McGouns Track. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Dot B.
12. 14/7/2006. Ross Creek Reserve – Woodhaugh. Leaders: Doreen, Rosemary and Jack.
11. 28/9/2005. Hikers. Ross Creek. Leaders: Betty B, Nelson T
10. 13/10/2004 Ross Creek, Burma Road. Leaders: Lex, Doug M, Margaret D

Tree canopy

9. 2/10/2002. Combined. Ross Creek, Burma Road. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Doug M, Evelyn C.

8. 1/10/2001. Alt. Ross Creek – Cannington Road. Leaders: Joan H, Jean, Peggy M.
7. 18/4/2001. Ross Creek. Leaders: Bev and Ivan, Peggy M.
6. 24/11/1999. Ross Creek area. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Jean.
5. 8/9/1999. Rose Creek Reserve. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Jean.
4. 29/7/1998. Ross Creek, John McGlashan. Leaders: Ivan and Rosemary.
3. 19/11/1997. Ross Creek, School Creek from McGlashan College. Leaders: Bev and Ivan.
2. 7/8/1991. Ross Creek area from John McGlashan College. Easy. Leaders: Nel, Margaret B, Ivan, Margaret D.
1. 13/6/1990. Ross Creek and School Creek from John McGlashan College. Easy. Leaders: Margaret S, Joan, Jean and Jack.

No responses yet

Sep 26 2018

Taioma, Parera, Viaduct

No. 96 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Parera Taioma (Transrail & Wenita Year Round”

Wenita permit. Require 6 weeks notice, but less from us.

Taieri Gorge Railway. Phone 477 4449 for details.

14. 26/9/2018. Trampers. Taioma, Parera, Viaduct. Leader: Keith.

Eight trampers left the car park and drove to the carpark near the Wingatui viaduct.
A strong tail wind helped push us up the hill on the forestry road before we found a sheltered spot  for morning tea, behind a bank with sun and no wind.
We continued on up a long ridge before tracking off road through some newly planted pine trees until we reached the Taieri River.
Following the railway around to the Parera tunnel,

The Parera railway crossing. (Dave pic and caption.)

Old railway house well maintained. (Dave pic and caption.)

where we climbed up Bacon track and did some bush bashing to get past a washout,

Makin Bacon track. (Dave pic and caption.)

The team at the tunnel!. (Dave pic and caption.)

Jill sees the light at the end of the tunnel!. (Dave pic and caption.)

we followed the railway again, then onto  “Garraways” track where we had lunch then under the viaduct

(Janine pic.)

Railway viaduct – magnificent engineering! – pic.. (Dave pic and caption.)

and back to the vehicles.
Coffee for 6 at Blend. Distance 9.3 km. – Keith

13. 20/6/2018. Hikers. Wingatui Viaduct, Taioma. Leaders: Jenny, Shona.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Top of tunnel climb. A track washout stopped us getting very far down the other side. (Ian pic and caption.)

The tunnel we climbed over. (Ian pic and caption.)

lunching on a new breakout of portable seats. (Ian pic and caption.)

12. 12/4/2006. Hikers. Taioma, Viaduct, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Lesley G.
11. 5/10/2005. Both. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Doug J, Jacqui, Lesley G, Anne R
10. 1/9/2004. Both. Taioma, Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Molly

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

Parera siding. Evelyn, Pat, Wendy

x

Lunch at Parera. Judy, Pat, Dorothy, Ria, George, Peter

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

Taieri Gorge Train on Wingatui Viaduct. Ria, Pat, Peter, Evelyn, Judy, Helen, George

9. 4/9/2002. Combined. Taioma, Wingatui Viaduct. Medium. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Wendy J.
8. 16/1/2002. Combined. Taioma – Parera. Medium. Leaders; Molly, Pat and Bill.
7. 8/11/2000. Taioma – Parera – Wingatui Viaduct. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Shirley McN.
6. 5/5/1999. Taioma – Parera – Viaduct. Leaders: George, Hazel, Ian.
5. 26/11/1997. Taioma, Parera. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor, Ted.
4. 9/8/1995. Taioma. Parera. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Bill and Lesley, Jack R.
3. 25/8/1993. Taioma, Viaduct to Parera, up the hill to Mount Allan Road and return. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Penny & Peter, Jack M
2. 14/10/1998. Hindon Railway Viaduct. Leaders: Hugh and Judith.
1. 20/4/1988 Taioma to Parera. Leaders: Bob H, Denise

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Sep 19 2018

Tramps associated with Saddle Hill

[No. 7 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Creamery Rd. Ocean View. C Hughes. Farm. Lambing.”
Not during lambing September to October.
USE STILE AT END OF CREAMERY ROAD.
No. 84 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Taieri View (Blairs) (East Taieri) Farm”
No. 104 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Old Brighton Rd – Clevelands – Saddle Hill (See George Haggie) Farm”]

19/9/2018. Trampers. Saddle Hill circuit. Leader: Eleanor.

On a very warm spring morning 14 trampers set off from Quarry road and walked up Coal Stage and Saddle Hill roads then down McMaster road.  Enjoying a great display of Kowhai in full bloom, also a mix of blossom and animals along the way.  One member recalls riding horses as a girl on a property we passed.

Just the best Kowhai forest around. (Phil pic and caption.)

We enjoyed smoko break overlooking the ocean.  At this point with the sun shining brightly upon us, we decided to do an add on.

Welcome morning tea break after earlier start. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Turning onto Old Brighton road we headed to Fairfield, then crossed over to Flower street walked up the couple of hills crossing a stile into the water tank paddock.  Once again (on both sides of the rather steep stile) with more great views, lunch and chatting was enjoyed.

View of Kaikorai Valley from lunch. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Donkeys on Chain Hill road. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We then walked along Chain Hill road and back down Quarry road to our cars.

View of Mosgiel from overbridge. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Blend was the chosen coffee shop, we enjoyed catching up with 2 members unable to tramp on the day.
We reckon we walked 15 km, give or take a little.
Great to be back out with such an enthusiastic group of friends.
– Cheers Eleanore

12/2/2017.

Route map

38. 6/4/2016. Both. A Circumnavigation of Saddle Hill, majoring on the seaward slopes. Leaders: Bob, Doug and Arthur.
The Hikers' easier route. The trampers took the beach.

The Hikers took the bus,  the Trampers, the beach.

Apr 6 Tramp Saddle Hill 2016. ... Distance not counting the bus travel 10.2 km. (Bruce pic and caption)

Apr 6 Tramp Saddle Hill 2016. … Distance not counting the bus travel 10.2 km. (Bruce pic and caption)

Trampers’ Report. Saddle Hill to the Sea. – Arthur.

Being the first Wednesday of the month, this was a combined operation. Together with the Hikers, our group parked beside the wool-shed on Saddle Hill Road, before walking through the “Saddle” and down through farmland on the other side. Special thanks to the landowners for giving us permission to do so. A suitable spot was found at 10 o’clock for morning tea.

The 27 of us at morning tea

All twenty-seven of us at morning tea, part-way down the slope.

The view from our morning tea spot

The view from our morning tea spot.

The two groups then split, with the Trampers forging ahead, as they had further to walk. We had 8 trampers now, and it was noticed that the 2 men were outnumbered by the ladies.

Continuing down through the sheep farm we climbed a style out on to Creamery Road. Going down the road now, we could view several lifestyle blocks with new houses on them. At the bottom of the hill a large contractor’s yard had obviously had much money spent on it.

Contractor's Yard

Contractor’s Yard

We arrived down at the main road to Brighton at Ocean View. After a short walk along the road we were able to gain access to the beach at the car-park (Freedom Campers spot). Good use of the facilities here was made for a comfort stop.

The tide was well out, just beginning to come back in, allowing us to walk on good firm sand for several kilometres. Other people were making use of the beach too – walking, exercising dogs and especially horses.

The Kaikorai Stream was closed to the sea, allowing us to return to the road on the Waldronville side, past the Pistol Shooting Club. The walk along the beach took a neat hour. We found a suitable lunch stop beside the car park at the road.

The Trampers' lunch spot. (Helen pic)

The Trampers’ lunch spot. (Helen pic)

From there we had to walk across the bridge and along the road a short distance. It was a little difficult climbing through a fence back onto farmland – several comments were made at this time about some not being as young as they used to be!

Trampers. A fence scramble. (Helen pic)

Trampers. A fence scramble. (Helen pic)

With the Green Park Cemetery on our left we had a very pleasant uphill walk through the large field, but with one especially steep pinch, before squeezing around the end of a gate and out onto the Old Brighton Road – closed long ago by a large slip.

Along the Old Road and then up McMaster Road a short distance, before taking a short-cut through private property. A donkey brayed a welcome as we passed, and then the lady was gardening at the house.

Coming back onto McMaster Road, we found three of the Hikers talking to the man of the house at his mailbox. The road levelled off, and soon we were back to Saddle Hill Road where we caught up with the Hikers with about a kilometre to go.

There were good views from here of Mosgiel, …

Mosgiel from lookout.

Mosgiel from lookout.

… the Taieri and beyond. In fact we had great views all day on this tramp, and good weather to go with them.

Our combined tramp could not have been more successful, as both groups began and finished the day together.

A big thank-you to Bob for this. Everyone was back to the cars by 2.15 p.m. The Trampers covered a distance of about 14 km (estimated).

***** SAFE TRAMPING IS NO ACCIDENT *****

– Arthur.

Hikers’ Report.

As Arthur has covered most of the day’s main points, this need be only a supplementary one.

Where Creamery Road joins Brighton Road, various options emerged.  Some drifted off: one had a car waiting for her, another walked to her home nearby, others shortened their walk by walking on the seaward side of the road to earlier catch the bus to Brighton and back. The remainder walked towards Brighton and waited at a convenient bus stop to catch the returning bus. The driver put on a mock-stern display, questioning our age entitlement and closely examining our Gold Cards. We had made his day, as we disported ourselves around his empty bus. From the Green Park Cemetery gates we made our way uphill behind the cemetery and were surprised (well, this reporter was) to see the beginnings of an eco-burial site of about twelve plots, aligned alongside a clump of bush, each plot planted with a native plant.

We lunched in a sheltered spot a little further on up the hill.

Hikers at lunch part way up hill.

Hikers at lunch part way up hill.

…. Much further on, as we turned from McMaster Road into Saddle Hill Road,  we were surprised and delighted to find ourselves caught up by the Trampers . The timing couldn’t have been better. Excellent planning, Bob. This has to have turned out the most rewarding “together-Tramp” yet!  – Ian.

37. 23/7/2014 Hikers. Greenpark Cemetery, McMaster Road, Creamery Road, Brighton Road, Beach. return. M. Leaders: Bob, Janice.

Cars parked at the southern entrance to the Green Park Cemetery. The leaders took us directly up through paddock from behind the cemetery, to swing right …
GPS

GPS of round route from Greenpark Cemetery south gate.

… and continue on
Blackhead

View en route. Blackhead (Liz pic)

Green Island

Green Island

Another view en route. Green Island (Liz pic, using zoom lens, no doubt.)
to eventually reach the style at the top of Creamery Road. Down the road to the Brighton Road, north along here to drop of Bruce and Marjorie at the home and on to the Ocean View domain for lunch.

Out onto the beach and a long walk to arrive near the Kaikorai Estaury. Through sand hills, skirt estaury, through horse yards, out onto the Brighton Road, and back along to the cars.
29/9/2010. Trampers. Saddle Hill from Old Brighton Road. Leaders: Keith and Glenis.

GPS Route Map, courtesy Ken.

Eight of us set off over a paddock much hollowed with slumps betraying old coal mine workings, caused probably by wooden props long since rotted, up towards Saddle Hill. (See last pic below.) As we approached the bush ahead of us, we were glad to be able to follow a cleared track that wound up to our left, foregoing the former track we used to take to the right, now heavily infested with gorse. The track further up was well grassed, but just SO boggy and wet, although drier in places. One such place was ideal for an early morning tea.

Morning Tea on log. (Ken pic)

On up through a second property and we crossed McMasters Road into a third property taking us up to the bush around Saddle Hill.

Bush track entrance.

The track through the bush took us round to the seaward side grassy slope and then it was up to another bush entrance for the last push to the top (473m, according to Ken), where there were views galore for our cameras. 11.00 a.m. and far too early for lunch.

Emma (Ken pic)

Saddle Hill trig. (Emma pic)

Mosgiel from Saddle Hill (Ken pic)

View south from Saddle Hill

We made our way down over a very bouldery grass paddock to Saddle Hill road, round into McMasters Road again to reach the place we had ascended, and then it was back down again. We found a most pleasant lunch spot softened by thick pine needles and sheltered in by pines. Then it was down and through the much-slumped paddock back to the cars.

Coal Mine slumps.

36. 27/2/2008. Hikers. Saddle Hill, Taieri Lookout. Medium. Leaders: Dot Bennett, Chris.

35. 25/1/2006. Trampers. Saddle Hill from Stevensons Farm. Medium. Leaders: George, Hazel.

34. 27/4/2005. Both. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill, Watts BushLeaders: Joyce, Hazel, Eleanor W, Eleanor B

33. 14/4/2004. Trampers. Saddle Hill via Creamery Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug J, Molly

Saddle Hill Hotel

32. 19/5/2004. Both. Saddle Hill, Pearsons Farm. Medium. Leaders: Pat, Bill, Betty, Ann
Doug, Bev H, Irene on slope background Kaikorai Estuary

Doug, Bev H, Irene on slope background

Kaikorai Estuary

Similar shot.

Similar shot.

Bob M and others descending seaward side.

Bob M and others descending seaward side.

31. 9/5/2004. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Betty B, Anne R
Saddle Hill stop. (Bob pic).

Saddle Hill stop. (Bob pic).

30. 5/11/2003 Creamery Road. Leaders: Ocean View Dot B, Chris
29. 5/11/2003. Hikers. Creamery Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot B, Chris.
28. 11/6/2003. Both. Saddle Hill through Pearsons.
Year round. Park overhead bridge. Contacts: Seek permissions. The Grange. Phone for appointment for permission to tramp on this property. “We like to see you face to face.” (Paddock with coal mine entrance and tram line track)
Park cars at motorway overhead bridge. Leaders: George, Hazel, Jack & Rosemary.
hotel

Doug, Catherine. Old hotel

Old Mine entrance. Arthur.

Arthur by hidden mine entrance.

Hi, Shirley. Bob on east side climb.

Hi, Shirley. Bob on east side climb.

old

foundations; tram track gap

tram

Coal Mine old Tram Track

27. 20/11/2002. Hikers. Creamery Road, Ocean View. Easy. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Muriel.
26.30/1/2002. Alt. Creamery Road – Watts Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Lesley W.
25. 7/2/2001. Creamery Road, Watts Bush. Leaders: Nelso and Dot, Winifred.
24. 7/2/2001. Creamery Road, Watts Bush. Leaders: Nelso and Dot, Winifred.
23. 9/8/2000. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: George, Hazel, Molly
22. 9/8/2000. Saddle Hill – Walnut Grove. Park Overhead Bridge.Leaders: George, Hazel, Molly.

21. 31/5/2000 Saddle Hill, Law Road, from carpark. Long Tramp. Leaders: Lance & Lois, Betty B

20. 7/2/2000 Creamery Road Finnies, McIntosh (frmly Watts) Bush, return Scroggs Hill, Brighton Road, Beach. Nelson & Dot, Winnifred

19. 8/12/1999. Creamery Road, Watts Bush, Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Bob H.

18. 25/8/1999. Car Park, Saddle Hill, Law Road. Long tramp. Leaders: Frank and Lesley, Arthur and Barbara.
Return Silverstream to car park. Long tramp. Leaders: Wendy, Evelyn M, Eleanor B, Hartmann
17. 24/3/1999. Creamery Road – Ocean View. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, W W.
16. 20/5/1998. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret D.
15. 1997 Saddle Hill, Jaffrays Farm, East Taieri Scouts Hall. Leaders: George, Betty B, Wendy
14. 26/11/1997. Saddle Hill, Fulton Hogans, Hills Clevelands etc. 5 hour tramp. Leaders: George, Betty B, Wendy.
13. 13/8/1997. Saddle Hill, Scroggs Hill, Walnut Grove. Leaders: Les W, Frank, Jack M.
12. 2/10/1996. McLeods – Saddle Hill. Average. Meet Ocean View carpark. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Pat
11. 6/9/1995. Creamery Road, Watts Bush, Scroggs Hill. Medium.Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H, Chris
10. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hill, Fairfield. Medium. Meet at Fulton Hogan Yard, Old Brighton Road. Leaders: Rob Q, Nelson & Dot, Molly
9. 24/7/1996. Jaffrays and Saddle Hill from East Taieri Scout Hall. Average.  Leaders: Dot T, Les and Mavis.
8. 15/6/1994. Creamery Road, Saddle Hill, Watts Walk (now Finnies, McIntosh), Scroggs Hill. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Chris, Joan H.
7. 28/7/1993. Start from car park, Saddle Hill to Law Road. Long Tramp. Leaders: Wendy, Evelyn M, Eleanor B, Hartmann
6. 23/6/1993 Creamery Road Finnies, Watts Bush (now McIntosh), return Scroggs Hill. Medium but long. Cars at Ocean View Picnic Ground. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Jack M, Joyce S
5. 20/11/1989. Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill from the overhead bridge. Average. Leaders: Mavis, Peg A, Margaret S, Daphne
4. 30/3/1988 Saddle Hill and Jaffray Hill. A little bit of history. Meet at Saddle Hill Lookout. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A
3. 18/9/1991 Green Park – Saddle Hill, returning via Hare Street and beach. Splendid coastal views. Cars meet at Green Park Cemetery. Average. George, Eric & Dot,  Les W
2. 20/9/1989 Creamery Road, Ocean View. Average. Meet Ocean View carpark. Leaders: Mary Y, Daphne, Betty B, Margaret D
1. 24/3/1989 Creamery Road, Ocean View. Leaders: Doug M, Eleanor W

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Sep 05 2018

Brighton Walks

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers

15 km from car-park.
6. 5/9/2018. Both. Brighton Area & George’s 90th Birthday. Leaders; Alex, Liz and Arthur.

George’s 90th Birthday. (Clive pic and caption.)

Back to the 9am summer starting time today. All club members traveled to Brighton this morning and parked at the Bowling Club.

Although a combined day, the leaders Liz and Alex asked me to take the Trampers on a separate tramp, to give them some exercise. The Hikers did a walk around the Brighton town area, …

[The hikers had a good walk. This leader was carried away with the atmosphere of the day wanting to treat it as a special occasion with special people which I feel hopefully was achieved. – Alex. and Liz]

Along the front at Brighton. (Clive pic and caption.)

Ocean Beach towards Black Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

Down the Zig Zag. (Clive pic and caption.)

… while the Trampers crossed back over the bridge and then followed Mcintosh Road out into the country.

Passing the “Hire Boats” by the river bridge brought back many memories from childhood for some, of boating on the river long ago.

After passing the last houses, the road followed the river flat for a time before turning away to ascend the green farmland hills.

At the right time morning tea was taken at a nice sunny spot.

The brilliant sunshine was very enjoyable as we followed the road uphill, with much to see. Green paddocks with some new lambs therein, and the bushy deep gullies. It was a beautiful day.

About 1.5 km short of reaching Scroggs Hill Road, it was time to turn back, and retrace our steps, downhill now.

Arrived back right on time (11.45 am) at the Brighton bowling Club’s pavilion for the birthday celebrations.

It was both George’s and his wife’s (Elizabeth) birthdays today, and both sat in a place of honour for the “finger lunch” provided by club members.

Ian Fleming said grace before the meal, …

Plenty to talk about and plenty to eat. (Clive pic and caption.)

…  and afterwards presented an interesting speech on George’s long association with this club, with reminiscences and memories of a Life Member. …

Amusing stories of George and the tramping club over 30 years. (Clive pic and caption.)

… George spoke in reply, before blowing out the candles and cutting his 90th Birthday Cake. …

The man and the cake. (Clive pic and caption.)

… A great time was had by all, being a very happy occasion for our club members. The venue was perfect, with around 60 in attendance.

Special thanks to Liz and Alex Griffin for organising the day, [not to mention Jan Y for arranging the cake – Ed] and to George for providing the excuse for our day’s celebrations.
– Trampers’ Leader, Art.

5. 28/6/2017. Trampers. Kaikorai Estuary to Brighton. E. Leader: Jill.
On a frosty morning 10 trampers ventured south into the sand dunes at Ocean View Domain. Initially we crunched on frozen sand which was a contrast to last weeks creek crossings, rope climbs and the mud. It really was a pristine day the sea gently rolling in with a spray along the tops , sun out in its full glory and a clear horizon and no mid winter dippers !!

We followed the Ocean View coastal walkway

Clive pic.

towards  Brighton. This is a purpose built track, fenced with access points to the beach to help protect the fore dunes. The back dune area has also has been replanted and is an ongoing project along with weed gorse and broom eradication.  The track meanders round a little creek back to the main road just below Big Rock. We climbed Big rock and had wonderful clear views both north up the coast

Clive pic.

and south over Brighton and beyond. That was our hill climb for the day.

Our return was along the beach to the Kaikorai stream estuary where we had lunch along with the seagulls.

Clive pic

Our trip back was over the mud flats into the dunes again along a tussock covered track. We were accompanied by a local farm dog who wasnt really willing to go with his owner who was out training his horses on the beach. We eventually came out on the beach again and back to the cars  the time only being 1 pm. Back on the road towards Westward I had spotted a sign to a B n B and Gallery so all were keen to venture up the gravel road to a hidden gem where we meet the artist Karen Baddock who proudly showed us into her studio  and explained the history of some of her pieces . As I had read the birds look as tho they are ready to fly off the canvas. Her address karen.baddock@fine-art.co.nz. It’s well worth a visit .We walked 10.2 kms and had our art fix as well . An enjoyable day . – Jill

4. 14/6/2017. Hikers. Brighton walk. Leader: Alex and Liz.

Nike app route map courtesy Ian. Was a bit slow remembering to turn it on.

Eight hardy hikers enjoyed a walk along sand dunes at Ocean View with morning tea stop at playground.

Off to Brighton on a street walk with many points of interest given.

Climbing back down from top of Brighton’s Big Rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

Back to Ocean View…

Liz pic.

…for a one and half hour lunch stop with many topics discussed at the invitation of Marjorie and Bruce Spittle.  The weather was up and down but an enjoyable day had by all and off to Agnes’ coffee shop for refreshments and more wisdom. Great company.  – Liz and Alex.

Route map, courtesy Ian. (Begun a few minutes late.)

3. 8/8/2012. Hikers. Brighton Walk. Leaders: George and Chris.
Just thought I would say what a great day we had with our hikers’ day. The leaders Chris and George where the upmost of leaders.
The day started from the rugby club’s rooms at the Brighton Domain. Up and on through muddy fields.  And, I will say, a field with a very huge bull with his lot of cows. One of our group,  whom I will not name due to privacy laws, was very stressed about the bull. So we formed a group around her and we moved through. So far, so good.
Then we were approached by a group of horses  (sorry, are they called a group?). They demanded  food. Lucky for us George had a container of carrots!
Whew – we got through all that!
Then George found a wool stand to have lunch under cover. Well done, George.
What a day!  I think we must have done about  10 km.  Lots of laughs.
P.S.We girls did agree the uniforms of all the guys at the games are wonderful. – Elaine.
2. 14/12/2011. All. Brighton Recreational Reserve. End of Year Tramp. Easy.
George first took 22 of us along a short beach walk and up to his property for morning tea. A light drizzle had set in, but not too discouraging. Thank you George for providing so many chairs.

Part of group on George’s front lawn having morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

Chris then took over and led us around a number of Brighton’s back streets overlooking the Otokia Creek. (I like ‘Stream’ better, but Creek it is.) Non-Brightonians were surprised by the extent of the township’s suburb.

Blooming wild flowers

Overlooking the Otokia Creek from Brighton back streets

 However the light rain wasn’t letting up, so at 11.00 a.m. we adjourned prematurely to the Brighton Rugby Football Club Hall (sic) on the Brighton Recreational Reserve (sic) (you can see I have googled all the correct local nomenclature).
With an hour’s wait till lunch time, Bruce, however, had happily brought along his guitar and songbooks, led us in some merry singing. In seemingly no time at all, we arrived at meal-time. President Bev presented an excellent official welcome and we enjoyed a pleasant sociable hour or so over a generous and varied selection of food. Thus came to its close another successful year. – Ian.
1. 13/12/2006. All. Brighton Domain. End of Year Tramp – Xmas finger food lunch. Easy. Leaders: George, Chris.

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Jul 18 2018

Allans Beach

27 km from car-park.

5. 18 July 2018. Hikers. Allans Beach. E. Bruce and Marjorie

28 hikers set off from the car park at the end of the Allans Beach road by crossing the style at approximately 11 am and had morning tea

Morning tea in the sand dunes. (Clive pic and caption.)

near the end of the track to the beach, reached by crossing a second style. Our transit time from 9.30 am at the Bush Road car park was longer than usual because of the work associated with the widening of the road from Broad Bay to Portobello with fill from the Clearwater quarry near the south side of Papanui Inlet. The fill is transported in large truck trailer units and for safety the Allans Beach road is one way during the week at present (apart from for residents) from Allans Beach to Portobello. We were not aware of this when we did the recce on Saturday 7 July. The route that remained open to Allans Beach, which most of us followed, was proceeding through Portobello on the Harrington Point road and turning right, after 1.3 km, into Weir Road, right onto the Papanui Inlet road and then taking the second road on the road that passes between Papanui Inlet and Hooper’s Inlet, and between Gearys Hill and Mount Charles, to join the Allans Beach Road. Most of us also explored Sheppard Road between Papanui Inlet and Hoopers Inlet to find that it was one way and did not allow a left turn into Allans Beach road.  The entrance to the Clearwater quarry is on the Papanui Inlet road about 0.8 km past Sheppard road between Varleys Hill and Gearys Hill. 

We proceeded to explore the northeast end of the beach until we reached the rocks and then turned to travel southwest along the beach

A sunny walk along the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

and around the corner to the right to have lunch at 12.15 near the north end of the first bay on the right.

Some of the group made their leisurely way back after lunch while the main group proceeded around the shoreline until 1.10 pm to the fence which comes to within 1 m of the water just around the point where the inlet shoreline turns from north to north east. 

A 1-year-old sea lion appeared to observe our arrival at the fence area and flapped its way across a boggy area from about 150 m away to the east, wriggled through a fence and swam down the channel to stop adjacent to our party to observe us.

a sea lion poses for everyone. (Clive pic and caption.)

We had endeavoured to remain a safe distance from the wildlife, which a regular observer of the wild life informed us later was 20 m, but this young sea lion proceeded to emerge from the water opposite us a distance of less than 20 m and display some sea lion dentition. We retreated appropriately in the face of this gesture and proceeded to retrace our steps to the end of the beach near the outlet, pausing to watch a mother-child pair

Mother and calf in the sand dunes. (Clive pic and caption.)

approximately 3 m into the sand dunes from the inlet, about 300 m from the fence. Some other sea lions were observed on the shore on the opposite side of the inlet

We proceeded north east up the beach for about 100 m to approximately 25 m past a pine tree in the dunes to a track whose entrance was marked by an upright post and a surf board shaped portion of boat. 

We followed the track through the sand hills, past a grassy clearing, with tree segment seats arranged around the inverted remnants of a copper, and through an open gate into a paddock with approximately 100 cows on the grass whom we passed on the left between the grassy and boggy areas.

When we reached a fence we turned right for about 100 m past a circular water trough to open a gate on the left. We proceeded to follow the track past the farm house of Christine and Sam Neill who had kindly given permission for us to traverse their property.  We opened two gates to cross the drive way to the farm house, passed the cattle yards on the left, went through another gate and were reunited with our cars by opening the gate leading to the cars, about 80 from our first style, at 2.15 pm.  

The group that returned earlier arrived shortly before the main group via the beach or past the cattle. The distance travelled was approximately 8 km and the route was similar to that shown in the map for March 2016. The weather was relatively calm, cloudy and reasonably comfortable for walking. Low tide was at approximately 2 pm, about 30 minutes before low tide in Dunedin. (The tide at Taiaroa Head is approximately 13 minutes before Port Chalmers which is approximately 14 minutes before Dunedin). 

Afternoon coffee was at Nichols. The Allans Beach has the possible disadvantage of being at some distance from Mosgiel but offers a soft terrain to walk on, some variety between beach and farm walking, flattish terrain and, potentially, glimpses of wild life.

Bruce and Marjorie

4. 23/3/2016. Hikers. Allans Beach. E. Leaders: Bruce, Marjorie.

Mar 23 Allans Beach route. (Bruce pic and caption)

Mar 23 Allans Beach route. (Bruce pic and caption)

Allans Beach tramp report 23 March 2016

Twenty-two hikers set off from the car park at the end of Allans Beach road at 9.40 am. Low tide at Dunedin was 11 am and at Allans Beach (between Taiaroa Head and St Clair) approximately 10.30 am. We went over the stile and down the track to the beach before turning left and proceeding to the end of the beach …

At eastern end of Allans Beach (Bruce pic and caption)

At eastern end of Allans Beach (Bruce pic and caption)

… where we observed a couple of sea lions

Sea lion eastern end of beach (Bruce pic and caption)

Sea lion eastern end of beach (Bruce pic and caption)

before returning a little to have morning tea at the base of the rocky cliff, where a sign indicated that no dogs were allowed.

Morning tea break. (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Bruce pic and caption)

After morning tea we went to the other end of the beach and looked at the channel with the outgoing tide running quite swiftly.

We then went up the left bank of Hoopers Inlet walking on quite firm sand and seeing a few more sea lions.

Sea lion left bank of inlet (Bruce pic and caption)

Sea lion left bank of inlet (Bruce pic and caption)

We stopped at the fence which stretched to within a metre of the water’s edge and then returned to have lunch in the shelter of the lupins.

Lunch break (Bruce pic and caption)

Lunch break (Bruce pic and caption)

After lunch we returned to the beach and took a track into the sand dunes about 150 m from the end of the beach. The track came out on the farm of Sam and Christine Neill and we went across the farm, past the house, through two gates on the road leading to the house, and back along the paddock to the stile by the carpark, reaching this at 1.30 pm. Distance covered approximately 8.5 km. Morning tea was designated for the Portobello Café but we ended up at the Penguin Café, Portobello.

It would have been difficult to walk along the edge of the inlet on the sand unless the tide was reasonably low.

–  Bruce and Marjorie

3. 11/1/2012. All. Allans Beach. Leader: Fred.

GPS of Allans Beach Walk, courtesy Ken.

View of the fog that was around all day. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch 2. (Ken pic and caption) (Lex at left, sitting)

Diamond Wedding.

Rocks at nth end of beach. (Ken pic and caption)

Displeased boss of the beach. (Ken pic and caption)

Busy as main street. (Ken pic and caption)

2. 20/4/2011. Hikers. Allans Beach. Leaders: Molly, Graham.
1. 29/9/1999. Allans Beach. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Peggy M.

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Jun 27 2018

Skyline from Bull Ring

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

Location: 15 km from car park.
Flagstaff name
4. 27/6/2018. Trampers. Skyline from Bull Ring. Leader: Helen.A group of 10 keen trampers left the carpark driving to the Bull Ring.

Moving out. (Gordon pic and caption.)

Walking up to the Flagstaff lookout on what was an early bullock and stock route.As was the case prior year 1850, mist covered the lookout making it easy to get lost. Donations then, were called for and allowing flagstaffs to be erected hence the current name.

Such was the case in chilly conditions today. The normally spectacular views were poor. Morning tea was under the north side of the lookout.

Out of the wind for smoko. (Gordon pic and caption.)

We continued past  the Pineapple Flagstaff  intersection and in muddy conditions towards Swampy Summit, passing 4 runners and a mountain biker. Lunch was just after noon and behind the Aircraft Navigation Building.

Lunch at Swampy Summit. (Gordon pic and caption.)

As conditions were cool we had a shortish lunch and returned the same way. We spoke with a man and 2 dogs on the lookout for a wallaby seen in the area yesterday.

The cloud had lifted enough to get most of the 360 degree views passing the lookout.

Barr Stadium. (Gordon pic and caption.)

It was a cool but enjoyable tramp covering 13 to 14 kms overall.

Afternoon tea was taken at Blackstone Cafe. Phil M

3. 29/3/2017. Trampers. M. Leaders: Jill and Jan R.

We had brilliant sunshine and little breeze all day. From the Bull Ring, we went up the “Pineapple Track” to have our morning tea on “Flagstaff” summit. Superb views from here …

Morning Tea with view. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… but  by far the most interesting was the massive bank of sea fog which extended as far as the eye could see – north and south along the coast, and out to sea. The fog was moving up the Otago Harbour, almost to the city and entirely covering the Peninsula. The bank of fog was of interest all day to us, as it ebbed and flowed.

Fog on Peninsula. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Continuing along the “Pineapple Track” for a while it was rather concerning to see gorse and broom encroaching somewhat  over the track for some distance.

Turning off to the left we reached the “Swampy Ridge Track”, to follow it out and back for the rest of the day.

We met a lady with 2 dogs who had just come up “McQuilkans Track”, and it was gratifying to hear of our club members’ track clearing efforts being appreciated. We don’t know how many people use the tracks we clear, though.

After a time, and a couple of good uphill pulls we cam to the top end of “Porkies Track”. It was here that our newest member elected to stop, to be collected on our return journey.

The rest of the group continued on to Swampy Summit, to have our lunch on the roadside …

Lunch. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… beside the Aviation VOR beacon (a.k.a. “The Flying Saucer”.)

Judy’s dance troup. (Arthur pic and caption.)

We had superb views inland in the clear air into the Silver Peaks, Rock and Pillar, Lammermoors and Wind Farm, Maungatua and the Taieri Plain. A piece of wedding cake to have with our lunch was a special treat.

Lunch over, the homeward trip began – retracing our steps, and collecting new member at “Porkies” (he must have had a good nap in the sun).

The breeze died away, and the heat rose as the sun beat down on us. Some rest stops were needed, but eventually we were back at the “Bull Ring” with empty (or near empty) water bottles.

On returning to Mosgiel we visited the Blackstone for a little while. 9 Trampers were out today to enjoy or 15 km walk. – Art.

2. 2/3/2016. Both. Bull Ring to Leith Saddle via Transmitter Tower. Leaders: Jill, Janice.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Ignore straight line. Forgot to turn off in time. Distance measured by others up to 9.5km.

21 of us set off from the bullring across the Pineapple Track, up to Swampy Summit, then down the Leith Saddle track. The day was perfect, sunny but not too hot, with no wind to speak of. The views were superb, …

Mosgiel

Pearl of the Plain.

… firstly overlooking Dunedin, …

Dunedin

Dunedin’s beautiful setting.

Morning Tea. Guess where?

Morning Tea. Guess where!

… then from Swampy down the Leith Saddle Track great views to the north west of the Silverpeaks and Blueskin Bay areas.

Blueskin Bay from Swampy (Helen Pic.)

Blueskin Bay from Swampy (Helen Pic.)

The track up to Swampy was a bit steep in places, and some of us found it a bit of a struggle, but there was a sense of accomplishment when we reached the top. Had lunch at the summit by the transmitter tower, then made our way down to the Northern Motorway where we were picked up by a couple of shuttle buses and taken back to the cars. Part of the descent track from Swampy is quite scoured out and care was needed getting down the wooden steps, but generally the tracks are in very good condition We allowed 5 hours for this traverse, and everyone comfortably completed it well within this time. – Janice.

1. 14/9/2005. Skyline from Bull Ring. Leaders: Molly, Lesley S

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May 16 2018

Daphne/Margaret Road, Kathleen Road

Wenita permit.
Distance from car park: 21 km.

13. 16/5/2018. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Jim and Betty.

pine needle carpeted walk into the forest. (Clive pic and caption.)

On the way to the top. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch on Big Stone Rd. (Phil pic and caption.)

Homeward bound along Big Stone Road. (Clive pic and caption.)

Conditions were a pleasant cool day for the hike in the Allanton Block of Wenita Forrest south of Brighton. The majority of 22 hikers stopped off at the Brighton Cafe for refreshments on the return trip to Mosgiel.

It was a successful late change to the planned hike.

Betty & Jim

12. 17/6/2015. Hikers. Daphne, Big Stone and Kathleen Roads. M. Leaders: Alex, Liz and Dot.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce. 12.2 km. [N.B. Bruce has commented on the interesting difference between the 2012 (q.v. below) and 2015 Google maps. – Ed.]

The Google map for yesterday was taken in 2015 and was a little different from that from Ken’s report in 2012 with imagery taken on 17 Sept 2011.

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

June 17 Map with named roads. (Bruce pic and caption)

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers

iPhone GPS of route showing kilometers, courtesy Ian.

About twenty Hikers did the now more customary route of climbing the Daphne Road’s gentler but longer route and descending by Kathleen Roads shorter but steeper. We morning-teaed in the sunny spot at the foot of Daphne Road where the Club has always stopped, and lunched …

Lunch on a sunny level.

Lunch on a sunny level. (Looking back along the road).(Ian pic and caption.)

… on a level stretch of the road, but still some distance from the top. Older members, presumably familiar with the route found they had failed to recollect the many gully dips on the road. They also appreciatively noticed the rubbish collection by the top gate had been cleared. …W-e-l-l perhaps not all!

Made for each other.

Made for each other. (Ian pic and caption.)

Reaching the top of Kathleen  Road, a substantial number struggled around and under the closed and apparently locked gate before Les noticed that it was not locked at all. … Sigh.

It was yet another good-weather Wednesday, tempting some to to wonder whether a Higher Power must look after the Club. (Well, it was colder on Tuesday and Thursday promised snow.) Admittedly a cold breeze had driven us into woollen hat and gloves when we emerged from our cars, but this eased in the shelter of the forest and in the patches of sun the trees permitted us from time to time. It was a great Winter’s day tramp and a great location – a metalled road rather than a sloshy paddock or slippery track. (Pity the poor trampers! – see their report.)

Mention must be made of the occasional great views of the coast and down gullies that we stopped to enjoy from time to time.

A misty vista in the 'dista'

A misty vista in the ‘dista’, looking up the coast from Kathleen Road. (Ian pic and caption.)

It was further remarked that tramps like this get us to see the other sides of properties that mere car travellers never get to appreciate.

So, thank you leaders, for a well-reconnoitered and led tramp. We were well looked after, with thoughtful stops for regrouping. – Ian.

11. 13/2/2013. Hikers. McLeods Farm. Leaders: Wendy and Peter.
10. 22/8/2012. Trampers. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We did 11.7 km at 4.7 km/h.

9. 4/7/2012. Both. Daphne Road, Big Stone Road, Kathleen Road. Medium. 12 km. Leaders: George, Lex.

Morning Tea at bottom of Daphne climb. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at the top of Daphne where joins Big Stone

8. 6/8/2008. Both. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. Medium. Leaders: Dot M, Chris.
7. 15/3/2006. Hikers. Margaret Road, McLeods Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Bill & Pat, Dot T
6. 29/6/2005. Hikers. Margaret Road, Katherine Road. (Brighton). Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
5. 25/7/2001. Alt. Margaret Road, Katherine Road, Kuri Bush. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Chris H
4. 18/2/1998.
3. 14/5/1997. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road via McLeods to Coast Road. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, George. Big Stone Road from Margaret Road to McLeods. Leaders: Ray and Diana.
2. 10/7/1996. Margaret Road, Big Stone Road, McLeods. Average. Leaders: Graham, Eric and Dot.
1. 30/11/1994 Margaret Road, Wenita Forestry, Big Stone Road. Medium. Leaders: Eric & Dot, Joan H, George
 
 
 

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Apr 18 2018

Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream

No. 89 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Outram Glen – Lee Stream Year Round”

11. 18/4/2018. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. H. Leaders: Clive and Jim.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to switch app on only at morning tea stop, so total distance more like 9 km.

26 Hikers and Ramblers set out from Outram Glen scenic reserve alongside the Taieri River to Lee Stream.   This was our first visit since the storm last year caused a lot of damage to the track and trail.   Repairs are on going, apparent from the pile of gravel on the track and washouts still to be repaired on the trail.   Several trees still block the trail.

We arrived at the end of the track about 10.15am and had morning tea on the rock strewn beach beside the river.

Morning tea at the end of the track. (Clive pic and caption.)

Several ramblers and a couple of the hikers then turned back to the start.   An intrepid 19 hikers continued over the trail, followed by fantails and tom tits to Lee Stream.   There seemed to be more hills to climb and they seemed steeper.   Maybe that’s an age thing!

Arriving at Lee Stream around lunch time we picked spots out of the wind to have lunch.

Lunch at Lee Stream – not quite there. (Clive pic and caption.)

It was pointed out by a senior hiker that we hadn’t actually reached Lee Stream and should continue to the stream.   Walking a further 100 meters got us there. (see photo)

Lee Stream. (Clive pic and caption.

Lunch of others at Lee Stream. (Ian panorama pic and caption.)

The return journey took longer than normal and unfortunately one member suffered a wound to her calf muscle on a broken bush stump whilst trying to cross a washout.

A tired crew arrived back at the carpark after 3.30pm.   It was intended to visit a local coffee shop, but when we got there it was closing,.so 2 cups of coffee next time!  Happy Tramping.  – Clive

10. 9/11/2006. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jennifer and Dorothy S.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Total elevation of 433m the product of  ALL the UPS on the track, – the by-product of all the downs!

Morning tea by the Taieri. (Ian pic and caption.)

Morning tea by the Taieri. Threatening rain cautioned some to don parkas but there were hot sunny periods in the day as well.  (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream “beach” at the confluence of the stream with the Taieri River. (Ian pic and caption.)

9. 10/8/2016. Hikers. Outram, Historical Park and Museum, Outram Glen. E. Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Nike GPS Route Map

Nike GPS Route Map

A good frost today but lovely and sunny for our hike around Outram

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

which was varied with a visit to the Museum,

Museum

Waiting in the sun outside the Museum to regroup.

Vintage Park and then onto the Glen track.

Wheelbarrow

Standing aside to allow a motorised tracked wheelbarrow returning empty from delivering gravel to resurface the track. A sunny spot. (Liz pic.)

Frost (Liz pic.)

And a shaded spot. Frost. (Liz pic.)

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point.

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point of the Outram Glen – Lee Stream Track.

We numbered 25 and finished off with the Local Coffee Shop.
It was a wee bit different owing to the unknown conditions from the nasty weather three days earlier but as usual the company was good and we achieved our goals thanks to everybody. – Liz and Alex.

8. 26/3/2014. Hikers. Taieri Musem, Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of track to Lee Stream

GPS of track to Lee Stream

We were met with a surprise variation to simply walking the Outram Glen track. The leaders took us first up to the Taieri Historical Museum via an interesting side track shortly up the George King Memorial Drive by the bridge over Traquair/Whare Creek. We were seduced by the machinery museum building at the top of the property with its wonderful variety of early Taieri farming implements. They found it hard to drag us away.
We made our way down the driveway this time, and past a surprising number of cars to the track beginning. Time had passed so the leaders made our cuppa stop at the crest of the track’s large rise just past the entrance and in a nice sunny spot.
Then on we went till we reached the great set of steps that took us up from the river side to the high undulating bush track, or more officially, ‘route’. From the top of the steps on to the end of the route was a long series of regrouping pauses, where the more able waited for the less able to catch up. But get to the end we did.
A note to the side: On our way to the start of the track, we noticed Bob’s ute had joined our parked cars while we were up at the Museum. Some knew that he did have a prior commitment and must have presumed he would have caught up with us somewhere on the track but knew nothing of the leaders’ plan to visit the museum first. Eventually we did meet him, towards the end of the track, returning. It was all just too sad a misunderstanding.
We discovered the reason for the group of cars at the start when we reached the end. By the Lee Stream mouth was a large group of young St Mary’s School pupils being instructed on safety measures pertaining to launching inflatable rafts drawn up nearby.

Launching

Launching the rafts

There were eight rafts in all, four setting out at a time to practise the art of paddling in the stiller waters upstream before heading off down over the first set of rapids below.
Afloat

The paddling rehearsal before negotiating the first rapids

By this time we had finished our lunch and just prior to entering the bush track again, were surprised again to see the rafts anchored against a cliff on the opposite side of the river, and each pupil being required to leap off a ledge in the cliff into the water, resurface, and to drift with their life jackets down to and be helped back into their rafts immediately downstream. They did this wonderfully, some choosing a yet higher ledge to leap from. Bravo.
We seemed to make much faster return time down the track than when earlier coming up, and were regaled from time to time by excited shouts and screams below us as the rafters made their way downriver.
As we neared the end, it was just a case of now of negotiating the rise at whose summit we had earlier in the day had our cuppa, (it’s steeper and more laborious on the up-track side of the rise and this reporter, at the tired end of the tramp, hates it) and we were back at the cars and en route to home.
Thanks to Betty and Jim for their imaginative planning of the day and careful looking after us. – Ian.
7. 5/10/2011. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Leader: George.
Lambing got in the way of the programmed Lee Stream ramble. The Outram Glen walk was a most successful replacement. 20 of us went. The first bit’s nice and flat in general. We stopped early for morning tea by the river. A cold wind drove us back up to shelter in the approach track.

Down-track view.

Up-track view.

Beyond the sign indicating the more difficult part of the track was the (never less) challenging (never-ending as well) set of steps. They are now well-worn but still very serviceable. We all made the ascent at our individual rates of speed. Beyond that, the various ups and downs are still well serviced by the sets of stone steps. They have stood the test of time and are firmly embedded. Well made. We all made our way to the Lee Stream confluence with the Taieri, some arriving earlier, others later. Again an early lunch enjoyed with the warmth of sun and calm, and cooler bits of  breeze. But still comfortable enough.

Some of us at lunch.

The confluence of the two streams at lunchtime.

Again, we wandered back each at our own pace. A pleasant day, sheltered by bush from the coolish wind. – Ian
6. 3/9/2008. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Easy. Leaders: Evelyn and Bob.

Nineteen of us walked the riverwalk from Outram Glen to Lee Stream. The weather was threatening but we had just a little rain, and with no wind and a mild temperature it was an enjoyable 12 kilometre expedition. Many of us had not seen the Taieri River so brown and surging for a long time.
The track in the upper reaches was quite slippery so we needed to watch our feet. Some birdsong from bellbird and fantail was appreciated as was the presence of wood pigeons. We had lunch at Lee Stream where a number could remember past picnics beneath willow trees.
Congratulations to Evelyn and Bob for leading the group. Evelyn did a stalwart job in trying to keep the group together, trying to both race ahead to hold back the fast movers and take care to see the rear guard were still with us. She even managed to end up with one more tramper at the finish than she had at the start. Well done Evelyn!
Bob provided us with some drama by taking a tumble. However he bounced back and even did it again to keep the medics on their toes. He finished the tramp in fine fettle and good humour, leading the bulk of the group on the homeward stretch. We hope the scratches and bruises do not cause too much discomfort.
George celebrated his 80th birthday and first great grandchild by handing out beautiful chocolates to all.
Altogether it was a satisfying day with a return to home base before the southerly caught up with us. – Marjorie

5. 6/6/2007 Ian, Doug M, Eleanor B, Joyce S

4. 3/5/2006. Both. Outram Glen. Leaders: Ian, Doug, Les & Margaret S, Bev H
3. 9/2/2005. Both. Outram Glen. Leader: Nancy
2. 19/8/1998. Outram Bridge, Taieri Gorge. Leaders: Nelson and Dot.
1. 25/3/1992. Outram Bridge – Taieri Gorge. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Doreen, Molly

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Apr 04 2018

Quoin Point Bull Creek

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 79 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Quoin Pt – Bull Creek – Farmland (see George) Farm”
45 km from car park.
“quoin” definition: 1. An exterior angle of a wall or other piece of masonry.
2. Any of the stones used in forming such an angle, often being of large size and dressed or arranged so as to form a decorative contrast with the adjoining walls. Seek permissions.
Coast and farm walk. Bull Creek nature walk to waterfall (tiny!) recommended.
14. 4/4/2018. Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. M. Leaders: Ian,  Arthur and Bob.

Hikers’ Route map, courtesy Ian.

The day was fine when twenty-seven of us started down from a  busy shearing shed at the end of Quoin Point Road to morning-tea down by the Quoin Point rocks. Both we and a multitude of inquisitive young seals were amazed at the sight of each other.

Quoin Point at the sealions gathering. (Clive pic and caption.)

Morning tea at Quoin Point.(Clive pic and caption.)

Ten trampers set off first, closely followed by eleven Hikers…

(Kevin pic.)

… leaving seven Ramblers behind to enjoy a more leisurely walk, which they took as far as the first house, returning along the beaches before having to regain the paddocks. They got back to the cars at 1.15 p.m.

For the others, the route varied between the flats of rocks and beach where practicable, and paddocks and gates where necessary. Towards lunch-time the query of “how much further” was beginning to be raised by some of the newer hikers. The hut-on-the-paddock’s site had complicated matters with new electric fencing forcing skirting around it before reaching the familiar route again. (We did better on the return trip.)

The trampers arrived at Bull Creek …

Bull Creek. (Clive pic and caption.)

.. in time to get round to including the picnic area and the  Bull Creek Bush Walk.

Along the waterfall walk. Clive pic and caption.)

Along the waterfall walk. (Clive pic and caption.)

The Hikers, with their much later arrival, (their walk enriched however with much mushroom-picking) had time only to get through their lunch

Brief lunch. (Kevin pic.)

before the low-tide’s turn prompted getting back across the creek.

On the return trip, our two groups were mixed and strung out as people moved off from Bull Creek in their own time. Admirably, Bob, our back marker, kept his disciplined place, to ensure we all got back in one piece.
This time, at the second stile, fortunately Arthur remembered to remain on the flat until we had got past below the little paddock hut before resuming the paddocks.
So we straggled back to the cars, strung out in various groups, some faster, others slower as the weariness of a 12 km tramp set in. Bob’s sterling work as back marker, at this point really paid off.  Several paddocks short of our destination one of us found the going too much and needed rescuing. Gordon, a new member of the club who had accompanied Bob stayed back to keep watch, while Bob strode on to fetch his large four-wheel-drive ute back to the rescue.
So all’s well that ends well. with the day ending with a congenial “coffee” stop off at Brighton. – Ian.
13. 30/7/2014. Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good group of eight set out from the farm road at Quoin Point to walk along to Bull Creek. there was a bit of a wind blowing which kept the temperature down, & it was VERY muddy going across the paddocks. We didn’t get onto the beach very much as the tide was quite high, even although on the tramp program it was stated to be low at 11:30 approx. [Yes, a 0.3 m low tide i.e. on the higher side – Ed]
It was surprising to see that the gates along the coastal paddocks had “Walking Access” signs attached to them, so good on the land owners for allowing this.
We had morning tea in the shelter of some rocks, & lunch at Bull Creek. Lunch was a reasonably hurried affair, as the sandflies were eating more than we were!!! The exit of Bull Creek onto the beach was probably passable, but we didn’t fancy getting wet feet so we stayed on the Nth. side.
After lunch, it was just a return walk mostly back along the paddocks to the cars. The wind had started to dry out the very muddy parts, so it was only just a little less muddy going back. But, unfortunatly, one member slipped over at one point, & has some dirty washing to attend to !! We walked 12.3km in approx 4hrs. – Ken.
12. 5/3/2014 Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: Lex and Peter.
Failed to reach Bull Creek. Ed note.
11. 13/2/2013 Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. (9)
Nine of us enjoyed the tramp, three of us oldies, six newies, to show it off to. And they did appreciate it.
We saw lots of seals/sealions (?) on the way.
It was surprising to see such a high sandbar at Bull Creek.
Sandbar

A high extensive sandbar now. (Ian pic and caption.)

Backed up

Bull Creek water backed up by the sandbar. (Ian pic and caption.)

Although a souwester was very strong at times it was good tramping weather.
A feature of the tramp at its end was the discovery of a very flat battery in Ian F’s car, whose parking lights had been accidentally knocked on and left for 5 hours! With an AA call-out rescue, we got all got home by teatime. – Ian.

10. 2/6/2010. Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: George and Dot.

It was a most unusual start. Various reports had it that after the recent rainy period the paddocks would be too wet or the coast road would have been damaged. As it turned out, not – in either case. The upshot was though, that one of the leaders led a number on a round trip road walk up the Scroggs Hill from Brighton. 12 went on to Quoin Point. Of the 12, only 4 went to Bull Creek.

It was a nice low tide, but the Bull Creek flood waters were too deep to comfortably cross.

Packing up after lunch. Ken, Doug.

The remainder stopped for lunch a few gullies back.

Bull Creek minus 30 mins. (Bill caption and pic) Lex and who?

The day was brilliant with little wind.

How did this get here? Noticed on the way back.

It was a good day out. All the more enjoyable for contrasting with the previous week’s extended rain. – Ian
9. 23/12/2009. Trampers. Ken and George. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good walk on Wednesday, lots of rock hopping. It was a perfect day for it as well, with virtually no wind, and not too much sun either.
Returning from Bull Creek. George. (Ken pic)

Returning from Bull Creek. George. (Ken pic)

8. 4/4/2007. All. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Easy+. Leaders: George, Hazel, Eleanor B, Joyce S
7. 1/3/2006 All. Quoint Point, Bull Creek. Easy. Leaders: Dot B, Glenis, Frank & Lesley
6. 6/4/2005. Both. Quoin Point. Leaders: Hazel, Dot B, Anne R, Colleen.
Ian and Bob

Tea Break. Ian,  Bob H.

Seascape

Seascape (Ian pic and caption.)

High tide at Bull Creek. No crossing today!

High tide at Bull Creek. No crossing today! (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 22/1/2003. Both. Quoin Point, Bull Creek. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Bill and Pat, Denise.
4. 24/4/2002. Quoin Point Bull Creek. Medium. Leaders: Graham, Bill & Pat
3. 28/11/2000. Quoin Point. Leaders: George, Pam, Audrey K.
2. 29/3/2000. Quoin Point Bull Creek Leaders: George, Hazel, Bev J.
1. 15/5/1996. Quoin Point – Bull Creek. Return. Russell Road. Medium. Leaders: Jack M, George, Ted, Jack R.
Alternative: Woodhaugh – Leith Valley. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

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Feb 28 2018

McNally Walkway

No. 83 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “McNally Track, Milton. Year Round”

44 km from car-park.
Access: Milton M 91km ret. Opposite Presbyterian Church, turn left at Ossian Street and follow on down Moore and Tokoiti Streets to Cemetery near which is the entrance to the McNally Walkway. Park cars by the side of the road.

Combined potential.

16. 28/2/2018. Hikers. McNally Walkway. M. Leaders: Bob and Lesley.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

This was the walk up the hill we were all expecting it was the other three that were unexpected! (Clive pic and caption.)

The high point conquered by Ian. (Clive pic and caption.)

Paradise revisited. – Milton. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch at the the trig point with views to the Blue Mountains

 

15. 4/5/2016. Both. McNally Walkway. Leaders: Jennifer, Dawn.

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Lunch. (Margreet pic)

Lunch. (Margreet pic)

Margreet pic.

Sign. (Margreet pic)

Cold drinks at Waihola. (Helen pic and caption)

Cold drinks at Waihola. (Helen pic and caption)

14. 14/5/2014. Trampers. McNally Walkway.

GPS of McNally Walkway, courtesy Ken. We walked about 8 1/2 km. Climbed 476 mtrs. – Ken.

Wednesday morning, we burst out of the Taieri Valley mist into sunshine about 4 kms north of Milton and headed to the hills that lie between the coast and Milton cemetery.

McNally Track (which opened in 1980) took us up along the fence-line past the sheep, and further up past orange guide poles and over stiles to a well-placed seat, offering a panoramic view across Milton (and morning tea).  Continuing upwards we had the choice of a native bush track or ‘open’ track and opted for the former which presented some mud slipping and sliding.  None of this mattered, as through this part the birds’ songs rang through the trees; just beautiful.

Further on and up to the trig and sun-dial where at the top there was an awesome 360 degrees view which encouraged us to a further amble around the area and lunch under cover of the haybarn.

Lunch at the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

En route, a couple of us slipped and brought mud back to the car in places other than our boots….. but while parts of this track tested our lung capacity, the varied nature of the well-kept track made it a very pleasant tramp of Medium level, taking about two to 2 1/2 hours’ walking time. – Neil & Carol

12. 8/2/2012. Trampers. McNally Walkway.

Morning Tea on McNally Track. (Ken pic and caption)

Milton from morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop and view from the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

The plane table at the lookout at the top of the hill.

11.3/12/2008. McNally Walkway. Leaders: George, Dot B, Glenis

There had been no recce as of course it was a track well-remembered by many of us – not. Memories fade as we age. We started off well, climbing steeply through a couple of paddocks to morning tea on a steep slope with good views.

Our President's big strides

Our President’s big strides

A little further up, we were faced with a choice of direction around the top loop. We chose “main track” rather than “loop”, which resulted in us travelling anti-clockwise. Later on, on crossing a styled fence into bush, we found a track sign arrowed only backwards! What to do? Thinking the bush track must wrong for us, we came back out and pushed further up on open grass. But when we eventually reached the crest of the slope,

A breather stop

A breather stop

we were able to pick out some yellow track-poles a long way down on our left that indicating where that bush track emerged from the bush again. Ah well… So it was all the way down to rejoin the track in order to then climb back up on the other side of the gully to eventually reach the lookout and our lunch stop.
There was a great view. Signposts there helped clarify matters a bit, so with more enlightenment, and renewed confidence, we continued on our anti-clockwise loop, bravely ignoring now, any reverse-indicating arrows, and so arrived back at the loop’s stem.
There were 19 of us, and there was plenty of time so were able to unhurriedly manage the many steep bits. The weather was fine and it was good being all together. – Ian.

10. 8/9/2004. Both. McNally Track. Medium. Jim & Thelma, Evelyn C, Lance, Ria L

Lower McNally Walkway.

Lower McNally Walkway. Overlooking Milton. Recognizable in foreground: Helen, Evelyn, Lex.

9. 1/5/2002 Combined. McNallys Track. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Colleen, Ria L
8. 27/2/2002. Alt. McNallys Track, Milton. Medium. Leaders: Les W, Ray and Diana.
7. 12/7/2000 McNallys – Track. Milton. Leaders: Peggy M, Denise, Evelyn M
6. 21/7/1999. McNally Track, Milton. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Doug J.
5. 10/9/1997. McNally’s Track, Milton. Leaders: Ray and Diana, Peggy M.
4. 26/2/1997. McNeilly Track. Leaders: Betty B, Mary Y
3. 13/3/1996. McNally Track. Leaders: Ivan and Bev, Doreen.
2. 22/3/1995 McNally Track. Easy. Leaders: Daphne, Peg C, Peggy M, Joan H
1. 15/7/1992 McNally Track. Milton. Easy. Leaders: Nancy, Peg C, Jack & Rosemary

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