Mar 21 2018

Tunnels Track, Yellow Hut, The Gap, Gap Ridge

Published by under Trampers

Click Silver Peaks Forest for background information on the area.

Accessed from Mountain Road from old forest HQ 6 hr ret, Route, DOC and private land.

(Green Hut access: 41 km from car park.)

6. 21/3/2018. Trampers. Tunnels Track. (Yellow Ridge.) Leader: Arthur.

The rain started as we left Mosgiel, but despite this, it wasn’t cold and the eight trampers were VERY DETERMINED to go tramping.

The cars regrouped at Waitati, and ONWARD was the only option – no one wanted to cancel. So it was up Double Hill Road and Semple Road to Mountain Road. A key allowed us through the locked gate and we drove up to, and parked at, the beginning of the Tunnels Track. The rain continued.

Our plan was now just to do a short tramp. It was very dark in among the trees as we descended the track, some wag asking for the street lights to be switched on!

After twenty minutes we came to the old gold mining tunnels …

At tunnels…no one home. (Phil pic and caption.)

… where we had a stand-up morning tea. No one was electing to sit on the wet ground. A N.Z. robin kept us friendly company here, which was nice.

From the Tunnels we followed the old water race to the main track, and then descended to the South Branch of the Waikouaiti River which was up a bit and a little discoloured.

At South Waikouaiti Branch. (Phil pic and caption.)

No use going further in the rain, so it was uphill back to the cars to finish at 11.15 a.m.

We had travelled slightly less than 4 km, and all had greatly enjoyed our little excursion, which had taken one and a half hours.

Surprisingly, the tracks were not slippery, even on the steepest bits.

Into the cars and to Blueskin Nurseries for hot drinks, before returning to Mosgiel.

Eight trampers had decided that a little but of rain was not going to spoil their day, even if it was a shortened tramp. Thanks to all participants. – Art.

5. 11/2/2015. Trampers. The Gap, via Yellow Ridge.

GPS Yellow Ridge to The Gap, courtesy Ken.  We walked just on 12km We climbed 1000mtrs.
ave speed 3km/hr moving time just over 4hrs. Stopped time 3hrs max elevation 700mtrs.

A good number of 6 trampers, & one visitor + dog turned out for the 8:30 start for the tramp to the Gap via Yellow Ridge. 4 members of the group had not been there before, so it was a bit of an experience for them. We started by walking down to the tunnels, for the ones that had not seen them before, then it was along the old water race back onto the main track, where we had morning tea…

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

…at the grassed area before crossing the Waikouaiti River, & then climbing the steep track up to the new Philip J Cox hut for a breather.
We then carried on towards the Gap, but two of the new members were starting to struggle a bit by now, & as we approached the last couple of climbs up to the Gap, they decided that they would find a nice spot for lunch, & then go back down to the hut & wait for us there. The rest of us carried on to the Gap, where we had lunch,

Lunch at the Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

& admired the views.

View looking north from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking north from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South west from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South west from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South-West from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South-West from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

A quick trip was taken up to the trig on the northern side of the Gap to say we had been there, & then it was on with the packs, & back the way we had come. We caught up with the others at the hut, just a few minutes after they had got there, so an extended break was in order for refreshments,…

At Philip J Cox hut on the way back out. (Ken pic and caption)

At Philip J Cox hut on the way back out. (Ken pic and caption)

…& another breather before the steep decent into the Waikouaiti River again.
At this time, one of the group decided that he would start off down the track, thinking that he had told somebody that he was leaving, & it was not until we all got about 15mins down the track that I noticed he was not in our group, & asked where he was. We stood around waiting, thinking that he was still behind us, but in the end I asked our fittest member if he would go back & check. While he was doing this, we decided that the others would go down to the bottom, & see if he was down there, while I stayed to wait on the member we had sent back up the track. All this took approx 1/2 hr to accomplish, so we knew we would be a bit late getting back to the cars. As it turned out, the missing member was at the bottom waiting for the rest of us to arrive, & was very apologetic for his mistake.
We took another break at the grassed area…

Resting at Philip J Cox hut on the way out. (Ken pic and caption)

Resting at Philip J Cox hut on the way out. (Ken pic and caption)

…before we tackled the last climb up the steep track back to the cars. We had decided beforehand to go out the north end of Mountain Rd. as the road is in much better condition at that end. However, when we got to the last locked gate, we couldn’t unlock the padlock with the key that was given to us by City Forests, so it was about turn & drive all the way back to the south end & down to Waitati.
The weather was good, with no wind, & not too hot, & the low cloud that we observed when driving in was non existent when we got to the Gap. This is probably one of the harder tramps that we do, & is one that I might forgo in the future, although I managed it quite well, a result I put down to drinking Gatorade, & more fluids than I normally do on a tramp. – Ken.

4. 14/11/2012 Tunnels Track, Yellow Ridge, The Gap, Gap Ridge

GPS Yellow Ridge to The Gap, courtesy Ken. We climbed just over 1000mtrs.
ave speed 3km/hr
moving time just over 4hrs.
max elevation 668mtrs.

Four intrepid trampers gathered at the Bush Rd. car park before setting off at 8:30am on an adventure that 3 of us had never done before. The fact that Dermot had managed to get a key from City Forests for the gates on Mountain Rd. saved us about 9km of walking time, as we were able to drive right to the start of the Tunnels track. We set off down this track at about 9:30, & went to explore the tunnels themselves, a new experience for 2 of the group. Arriving at the grassy area at the bottom by the river, we had morning tea, & then set off across the river, without getting wet feet, & started the relentless climb up Yellow Ridge. On reaching the new Philip J. Cox hut, we had a short break to regain our breath, admire the hut, it’s fixtures & facilities. {We even swept the floor when we left]

Ready for the next part of the trip. (Ken pic and caption)

The next task was to get to the Gap for lunch, however remote this possibility seemed as, the track actually goes past it, instead of towards it for a while, & you start to wonder when you will be getting closer.

Nearing the top with The Gap showing. (Ken pic and caption)

At this point, one member of the group decided that he would go back to the hut & wait for us there. We eventually did get to the Gap,

Sign at the top. Thank God for something to lean on. (Ken pic [taken by Heb] and caption)

where we had lunch, then a short walk up to the trig on the top of the Northern part of the Gap,

Trig above Gap north rock. (Ken pic and caption)

where the views are magnificent, despite the lowering cloud/fog that had been hanging around all day. We then retraced our steps, carefully, due to the slippery nature of parts of the track that were very steep. Someone commented ” why didn’t they just provide a ladder” !! We stopped again at the Phipip J. Cox hut to have another drink, & to pick up our other group member, who we discovered had left a note for us, saying that he had left the hut 1/2 hr ago, & was making his way slowly back to the car. As we travelled back to the river, & up the Tunnels track, he had left numerous arrow signs, & the time that he had drawn them in the soft ground. So we knew how far in front of us he was, & when I arrived at the car, he had only been there about 3 minutes or so.

Everybody agreed that it was a worthwhile trip, & even although it’s a bit of a ‘gut buster’ it’s worth doing, but the early start, & the gate key is a must if you want to get home at a reasonable time. We made it back to the Bush Rd. car park just after 5pm, & I was home by 5:30pm. – Ken.

3. 20/2/2002 Tunnels Track, Yellow Ridge, The Gap, Gap Ridge Leaders: George, Ian, Hazel
Mountain Road, Tunnels track, Yellow Ridge, the Gap.
On Monday 4 Feb 2002, George Haggie, Hazel Leslie and Ian Fleming receed the route for the Taieri Recreational Tramping Club. We left Green Island meeting point at 8.30. On George’s prompting we drove further north and entered Mountain Road at Merton and drove 17 kms back to the Tunnels Track DoC sign on a good well metalled road arriving there a 9.30.  The south branch of the Waikouaiti River was shallow enough but the track up to the manuka scrub was in poor condition with a large slip crossing it.
Once in the trees conditions improved greatly and it was most pleasant all the way to Yellow Hut which we found to be in poor condition inside.  A DoC sign recommended going any further for experienced trampers only due to Silver Peaks notoriously changing weather conditions.
Beyond the hut we were into large tussock which being largely dry was not too much trouble to wade through although we walked more by faith than sight through the sea of tops, confirming we were still on the track with our feet. in many cases.
The route does a left-hand semicircle on a broad ridge. We lunched at the Gap at 12.15 in a very slight smirry rain but under dry rock overhang.
Returning, the tussock, now wet was much more difficult to push through, with the wet leaves lying lower onto the track, tangling our feet and tripping us up. The notorious steep never-ending climb back up from the Waikouaiti to Mountain Road keeps getting longer with more rest stops as one ages.
We got back to the car at 3 pm and continued round Mountain Road, now striking many potholes with several spots so severe as to be almost impassable.  This part was 13 km from Tunnels Track to Waitati. The sandy road metal contrasts with the rock metal on the northern part and although a few kms shorter and with many main highway kms eliminated  is not to be recommended at the moment. Returned home just on 5 pm, having driven 103 kms.
2. 23/2/2000. The Gap via Yellow Hut. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ian.
1. 12/11/1997. Tunnels Track to Yellow Hut and Gap. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Claude.

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Jun 21 2017

Leishmans, Chalkies and/or Boulder Hill.

Published by under Trampers and tagged: ,

No. 68 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Leishmans Falls – (J Roy) Summer”
12. Trampers. Chalkies Circuit. Leader: Arthur.
A good frost began the day, which was also the shortest day of the year.
13 Trampers turned up at the car park, from where we travelled in 4 cars up “Silver-Stream Valley” road to park near the beginning of what used to be called “Leishmans Track”. DoC have renamed it as “Chalkies Circuit Track”, with no mention of “Leishmans” any more.
The track was very wet and muddy to begin with, drops of water were falling from the tree canopy – presumably from the thawing frost.

We soon came to the old pump house…

The old pump house. (Keith pic and caption.)

…and weir of the long dis-used water supply going to Mosgiel from Leishmans Creek.

We had to cross the creek several times, and also negotiate some steep slippery steps, eventually coming to “The Rope“. The rope was essential as the track going steeply up here was very wet, muddy and slippery.
All of the group made it up safely, and I was assured that it had been fun, (no, I’m not joking). We continued on for another 10 minutes or so, until above the steepest part, before stopping for morning tea.
The track was drier, mostly, now as we proceeded uphill, ever uphill.
Speaking of the track, the whole circuit had been attended to very recently by The Green Hut Track Clearing Group, who had made an excellent job. Thanks, chaps, well done.

We made it out onto the summit of Powder Hill (altitude 525 metres) in time to have our lunch at the “trig”.

Margreet pic.

Good views in many directions; to Saddle Hill; some snow on the Rock and Pillar. Pulpit Rock was quite prominent too. A smoke haze covered the whole of the Taieri Plain indicating an “inversion”, it being very thick over Mosgiel.

We continued our tramp, downhill now, stopping to inspect the limestone outcrops of “The Chalkies”, for a few minutes.

Chalky rock. (Keith pic and caption.)

Further down we were lucky enough to see a pair of South Island Robins. They were aware of our group (quietly) watching them feeding on the forest floor only 2 or 3 metres away, but weren’t bothered by us.

Out of the bush, and down the private road, after a time we came to the ford by the pumphouse. From there it was down the still frozen road to the cars, having covered 8 km doing the circuit.
Back to Mosgiel, the smoke haze was extremely bad as we drove down Factory Road and Bush Road on our way to “Wals“.
It had been a very happy group out today, and all had obviously enjoyed the day’s exercise. It was also pleasing to see the numbers of our group growing.
Thanks to all. – Art.
11. 26/8/2015. Trampers. Leishmans, Chalkies.
Leishmans Long Ridge Chalkies

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leishmans Long Ridge Chalkies. (Ken caption) Walked 11km; ave 3.4km/h; 3h 15m moving; climbed 730m; max 532m.

Todays tramp was different to what was in the program due to a problem getting permission for the farm walk we were supposed to do.
So we set off for Leishmans track in the Silverstream valley, which not many of the 7 trampers on the day had done before. This turned out to be quite a grunty climb to get up on the top of the ridge, & it was slow going with very slippery conditions underfoot. One member only got about 2 hundred meters into the track when he sat down in the first creek crossing, not a good start to the day !!! It was just past here that the track got steep as it wound it’s way up the hillside. After a few rest stops we eventually made it up into the flax & tussock area at the ridge top, & we made a short detour to see where the trig at the top of Chalkies track was, just to get our bearings. Then it was off along the 4WD track to try & find how to get onto Long Ridge.
We failed in this, so turned around & walked back down the road past the turn off to Leishmans, & away down heading in what seemed the direction of the Taieri. We eventually came across a track junction that I recognised from a few years back when a friend & I were in that area looking for deer.
After a short stop here we again turned around, & went back to the entrance of the Leishmans track, along here till the turn off to the trig at the top of Chalkies, & down here to the lookout area where we had quite a long break.
Lunch stop

Lunch stop (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch

Lunch (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was down Chalkies, being careful to not slip on the slippery surface, & back out to the cars via the Scout camp grounds. – Ken
10. 28/5/2014. Trampers. Leishmans, Chalkies.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leishmans Chalkies exploration. ((Ken caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leishmans Chalkies exploration. ((Ken caption)

We started off to go up Leishmans, & down Chalkies tracks, however, when we got to the Silverstream Rd, there was a ROAD CLOSED sign up, not a good start !!
We drove up to the start of Leishmans where there was a track closed sign up saying ‘Closed for Maintenance’ — so what to do?? We walked up the track to see what was happening, & soon came across the problem, it was a real mess with trees down across it & virtually impassable, so we retraced our steps back to the road.
Here we decided to go & have a look at Chalkies track, so we drove up the road to the car park at the pump house, where we could hear logging operations going on in the Chalkies area. We decided to go & have a look anyway, so as the stream was running a bit high we went the long way around, & came back down the road to get to the bottom of the Chalkies road, which was a quagmire for it’s full length due to the forestry operations. All of the forest on the LH side going up is gone, & the track up to where you turn off onto the bush track has been dozed, & is very muddy & rough.
It was a pleasure to get onto the bush track, but it doesn’t get any less steep as time goes on !!
As we had taken loppers with us, we did some track clearing on the way up, which helped to fill in the day. At the junction to the Chalkies ledge, we dumped our packs, & worked our way to the top where the spear grass started to appear, & we could see the trig on Powder Hill about 3 – 4 hundred meters away.
It was now well after 12pm, so we went back to the ledge & had a leisurely lunch break, …
Lunch at Chalkies Ledge (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at Chalkies Ledge (Ken pic and caption)

… after which we walked & slid our way out to the cars, this time crossing the stream to wash some of the mud off our boots, with some getting wet feet for their trouble. – Ken.
9. 16/11/2011. Trampers. Leishmans, Chalkies.
Seven of us did the shorter 7 km tramp up Leishmans, down Chalkies. We entered in past the weir and old Mosgiel water supply holding tank and negotiated our way to the small bluff at the foot of the ridge. We were surprised to find a sturdy new rope. So, ‘plus ca change plus c’est la meme chose’.  First the old rope. Then the ropeless period after its removal. Now a new one. Well, bravo, anyway. Safe and reassuring.

Morning tea on the only plateau on Leishman track.

Continue Reading »

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Dec 11 1980

Silverpeaks Route

For many years the Silverpeaks has been a major recreation area for Dunedin people. Since the 1920s excursions have been regularly organised into the hills and some very old huts used by musterers and trampers of earlier days can still be visited.

The walkway follows 15 km of one of the mot popular tramping routes through the Silverpeaks. Continue Reading »

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Jun 13 2018

Doctors Point area tramps

Published by under Beach,Hikers and tagged: , , ,

Distance from car-park to Waitati: 34 km.
Distance from car-park to Doctors Point: 38 km.
20. 13/6/2018. Hikers. Opeke Track and Orokonui Estuary Track. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.

This area is a popular one for the hikers. Especially at this time of the year when weather can be somewhat inclement. This Wednesday was one of those days. Dull and overcast, threatening rain. However, 27 turned out and once again enjoyed a pleasant relatively easy walk. The rain did start after lunch but was really only a misty-like drizzle, so not too unpleasant. We parked at Blacks Bridge as usual and had our morning tea before we started as it was well after 10am! Walked down Doctors Point Rd to the far end of the Opeke Track then back along the track, enjoying the views and scenery as we went. Were a bit early at the favourite lunch stop but decided just to have an early, leisurely lunch break anyway.

Then it was back along the road, in the the rain, to Chelivode St. and the start of the Estuary Track. We didn’t waste much time walking this track back to the cars as we were getting rather wet. We still enjoyed the bush, birds and views along the way though and everyone said they’d had a good day out in spite of the weather.

Adjourned to Blue Skin Café for after-hike refreshments and chat. – Bev, & Lesley

19. 2017 Jul 26. Hikers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Urupa. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
23 hikers reported for duty at the Doctor’s Point carpark on a calm winter’s morning.

The tide was still going out as we made our way along Canoe Beach, through the caves

Clive pic.

 to our morning tea stop at the bottom of Mapoutahi Pa.

Our pathway to Purakaunui Beach was almost blocked by a large tree which had fallen due to the recent floods.
Then, as we headed along the track towards Osborne Road we encountered deep water which made us retrace our steps and walk along the beach.

After a pleasant beach walk,we made our way through the trees to the Maori cemetery.

Clive pic.

We then retraced our steps back to Mapoutahi,where we planned to have lunch. This plan was quickly abandoned,as the incoming tide was threatening our route back to the cars.

Clive pic.

We eventually had lunch on the beach near Doctor’s Point.
 Time and tide wait for no Hikers!!! – Peter B.
18. 2017 Jun 21. Hikers. Orokonui Estuary & Opeke Tracks. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
On a cold, frosty but rather dank morning 27 keen hikers parked their cars at the parking/picnic area on Orokonui Rd., where the Estuary track starts. From there we walked the short distance back. to the Waitati Cemetery where we had morning tea.

Clive pic.

Quite a few people hadn’t been there before so were interested to have a look around the graves. As it was rather cold though we didn’t linger too long. On down Orokonui Rd. till we reached the little bridge crossing the Waitati river which brought us out onto Killarney St. at the end of which was a new bit of track with some board walk coming out onto Doctors Point Rd. From there it was along the road till we reached the far end of Opeke track. By this time we were all feeling somewhat warmer after a reasonably brisk walk. Then it was down onto the Opeke track. This is a very attractive and interesting walk which gives pleasure to the many people who use it. Locals and visitors alike. Near the end of this track is a short detour into an area that has some seats and great views across Blueskin Bay to Warrington and the other side of STH 1. Ideal for our lunch stop.

Wednesday’s walk was the nicest walk I have done. The plantings of native bush out there is so beautiful and the track was great as well. (Eleanor W pic and comment.)

We had a fairly leisurely lunch and then it was off again

At The cove was the royal blueskin Bay yacht club HQ just below the nesting tree of the Royal spoonbills. (Clive pic and caption.)

Clive pic.

to the end of the Opeke track and back onto Doctors Point Rd. The walk along the road helped to warm us up again as it had got a bit chilly sitting at lunch time!. We turned up Chelivode St. and along to the other end of the Estuary track. This took us back to the car park and the end of what everyone agreed was a most enjoyable and ideal walk for a winter”s day. The Estuary track is a lovely track with bush and birds plus lovely views. We all felt it a suitable one to repeat yearly. The day finished off as usual with coffee break at Blueskin Café. Lesley & Bev

17. 2016 Aug 31. E. Hikers. Orokonui Inlet Track via Orokonui Ecosanctuary exclosure fence lower gate. E. Leaders: Leslie and Bev.
Hikers' route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The "55.55' is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Hikers’ route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The “55.55′ is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Cars at tramp start.

Cars at tramp start.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

View from further up along fence.

View from further up along fence.

16. 2015 Jul 22. Hikers. Opeke and Orokonui Inlet track and back blocks of Waitati. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

What to start off with? Well, two things, actually. We are suffering a barrage of birthdays presently. Adrienne had a big one last Wednesday, Dorothy anticipates a bigger one next week and Ian a small one a few days ago. And the other? Maybe a record? A full twenty of the twenty-four hikers of the day socialised for coffee later. A beautiful Birthday Card, crafted by Pam and signed by all present, was presented to Dorothy, who responded with a most pretty speech.
Tramp matters. The day was calm and got really warm.
Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all.

Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all. (John pic)

Many who hadn’t been on the last visit to Opeke were struck with the embellishments added to the trackside. The CAR, and small limestone carvings to mention only two. We had parked at the bridge and road-walked between Opeke and the Orokonui Inlet Track.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch. (John pic)

Two birthdays

Two birthdays (John pic)

The track crowns the inlet’s head and finishes off along the Orokonui Road. We took the foot bridge across the Waitati Stream to skirt a back-blocks or two …

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye (john pic)

… before emerging onto the Doctors Point road and returning to the cars. Lesley and Bev had picked on doing this trek again, foregoing the earlier swap plan of exploring the Old Waitati Road area due to his colder shadiness under the hill. So thanks to Bev and Lesley for opening this newer area to even more Hikers. – Ian.

15. 2015 Apr 15. Hikers. Orokonui, Estuary and Opeke Track. E. Leaders: Bev and Lesley.

*** THE POEM ***

OROKONUI ESTUARY WITH THANKS TO LESLIE AND BOB

‘Twas a cold and windy morning – the sane ones stayed in bed.

But fourteen hardy hikers, bravely out were led.

They travelled to Waitati, the river was quite high –

They didn’t fancy wet feet, I can’t imagine why.

Instead, the estuary beckoned, with better shelter there.

With coats and hats and gloves on, they didn’t have a care.

 

The track was easy walking, through bush and flax and trees.

They lingered over morning tea, sheltered from the breeze.

A grassy bank was found for lunch, it wasn’t even wet.

John took lots of photos, you’ll see them on the net.

Leslie found a bird’s nest, she took it home to keep.

(I hope the birdies last night, did find somewhere to sleep).

 

On to Blueskin they did go, for coffee and a talk,

Joined by Jim and Betty, who didn’t do the walk.

Plans were laid for Luxmore, a short two weeks away,

With satisfaction they went home – It was a lovely day.

– Judy

***  THE REPORT ***

(Sorry, no route map. It seems a bug got into my application. Ian.)
On a day when only heroes and the mad go out, we found the Waitati Stream at the foot of the Waitati Valley Road too full to attempt the intended crossing. So leader Leslie, who with Bev had already recceed  the above  Orokonui Estuary walk set for later in the programme took fourteen of us on a route more suited to the day. We parked at the Estuary bridge and set off, well-clad in storm gear, to the Opeke track’s northern entrance for morning tea at the lovely setting of table and seating near its entrance. Fortunately although windy, (and here we were well sheltered) the day was dry.
Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa at the table and seats by the Opeke track.  (John pic)

We completed the Opeke circuit – for the first time in this reporter’s experience – in an anticlockwise direction. It’s so revealing viewing stuff when going in the opposite direction. As well, quite a number of improvements were there to be discovered, not least an old wreck of a car…

What's this alongside the track? (John pic)

What’s this alongside the track? (John pic)

…tied down and waiting to be wreathed in nature’s verdure – apparently!

Trekking back from Opeke, we turned off just short of the bridge up Chelivode street, passed a hay-baled house, and turned down a newly-made track to skirt the side of the Orokonui Estuary.

Track (John pic)

Track (John pic)

The track wound up, down and around through bush and paddock to emerge at the head of the estuary to cross swampy ground…

Solid (John pic)

A walkway across swamp, solidly built to last a lifetime.  (John pic)

…to reach the back yard of a number of farm sheds accessed from Orokonui Road. The track diverted down around a paddock or two to soon parallel the Orokonui Road on one side, and a heavily swollen Waitati Stream on the other.

Waitati Stream

Waitati Stream (John pic)

We lunched on a now sunny bank, still clad however in our parka-covered woolly underlays.

Lunch

Lunch. (John pic)

Further along,…

The nest referred toby Judy in her poem. (John pic)

The nest referred to by Judy in her poem. (John pic)

..and we crossed the stream via the Erne Street footbridge to walk along Killarney Street and turn into Foyle Street. Here we came across a garaged honesty stall featuring jams and sauces…

Garage (John pic)

Garage (John pic)

…and lingered a while. Then it was out onto Doctors Point Road, back to the cars and to resort to the Blueskin Nursery cafe,…

Coffee (John pic)

Coffee at Blueskin. (John pic)

…- all 14 of us, augmented by Jim and Betty who turned up.

Thank you to Lesley and Bev, ably supported by back-marker Bob keeping us safely together, for devising such an appropriate alternative for such a challenging day. – Ian.

14. 2015 Jan 21. Hikers. Doctors Point. Mapoutahi Pa, Forestry and Urupu, return. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Jim and Betty, who had been allocated leadership the last three visits to Doctor’s Point, gave the trip an original twist, – by dint of three recces to get matters precisely aligned to the tide. They led 29 of us to the Mapoutahi Pa site for the tea break.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site. (John pic)

Via the beach beyond the peninsula we turned off into the FWD through the sandhills, past the cliffs and on to the beginnings of the road proper, at the corner of the forestry. Here Jim opened the gate and led us past the following sign.

Urupu notice

Purakaunui Urupu notice at forestry’s entrance.

Another FWD track led us a considerable distance through the forest to terminate at a historic Maori graveyard.

A Urupu site

The Urupu site (John pic)

Betty and Jim then led us on through the forest by a route that they had previously explored and marked (well done!) to take us out to the inlet’s entrance, where there was quite a cold wind persuading several to don more protective garments.

Panorama

Panorama  of Potato Point and Purakauni. (John pic)

Only a little way down towards the beach Jim let us into a well-sheltered spot amongst Marram Grass for lunch, where a warm sun persuaded garment-offing again.

Lunch

Lunch (John pic)

The return walk along the beach took us over the neck of Mapoutahi Pa peninsula to happily reveal that there was still a stretch of navigable beach at the bottle-neck by the rockfall not yet swallowed up by the incoming tide.

Returning through cave

Returning through the cave. Thought this photo worth displaying. (John pic)

A walk back to the cars ended a most satisfying day, with all of us congratulating and thanking Jim and Betty for the quality time they invested into their recce. Thanks to them here, too. – Ian.

13. 2014 Mar 19. Hikers/ Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, return. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

GPS of Route

GPS of Route

This must be our most popular tramp, as we schedule it about twice a year. This time Arthur and Barbara gave us the full Waitati to Mapoutahi Pa road and beach walk, with Opeke for morning tea in between. The very low tide gave us the largest beach expanse this reporter has ever seen. The sea mist spoilt views but cleared just enough for us to glimpse the rail tunnel from the peninsula. The near record of 30 of us included three new members and one visitor. Thank you Barbara and Arthur for your good careful leadership. – Ian.
12. 2013 Oct 9. Hikers. Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Purakaunui inlet, Mapoutahi Peninsula. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of routes. First Opeke Walk. Second Drs Point to Purakaunui Inlet mouth, return, 8.53 km total.

We parked the cars first at Michies Crossing, and walked across the line Continue Reading »

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Nov 08 2017

Rollinsons, Swampy, Swine Spur

Published by under Trampers

Location: 15 km.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.

6. 8/11/2017. Trampers. Swine Spur. M. Leader: Dave.

Last Wednesday’s tramp could have been called a number of names and probably was!!

(a) Swine spur – was it the pig rooting or the steepness of the trail in a gale?

(b) A walk on snow in wintery gale conditions in November    or

(c) How many differently named tracks can you do in a day?

Ten keen trampers’ left the car park having some idea what the weather might be like for the day ahead. We parked in Rollinson’s road just below the bridge adjacent to the entrance into the bush with the sign ‘swine spur’.  The bushes and trees were wet from the rain the night before. It was pleasant walking through the Kanuka with lots of clematis flowering.  However it wasn’t long before the colour of the track resembled the colour of the clematis! SNOW WHITE!!

Started off in snow.!! (Helen pic and caption.)

As we wandered up the track the snow got thicker and the wind got stronger. We decided to have morning tea in the last bit of shelter before the track upwards became exposed. The wind was very strong – we could just stand up! Keeping together we supported each other, through flax and dracophylum, up to the top to the green building on Swampy. The wind was so strong that there was little shelter even behind the building.

A very short break and then we followed down ‘swampy ridge road’ until we reached ‘Porkys track’ – this faced into the gale. We slipped and slid where the snow lay on the grass. Gradually we headed down to where the shrubs became trees. After a while we came to a track junction and then followed ‘possum busters track’. There were a number of creeks, full of water, from the rain the night before. To cross – you had to get wet again!

 

Tricky creek crossings. (Helen pic and caption.)

A welcome lunch was had amongst the trees in the shelter.

It was then on to the junction with ‘smithies track’ which we followed for a while through attractive natives.  ‘Whare Loop track’ was then followed to Whare lake.

The group at Lake Whare. (Helen pic and caption.)

At this spot the Maoris of the past used to soak the flax in the lake – later making both twine and linen. See Flax in New Zealand – Wikipedia. The remains of a stone house were inspected before completing the loop and out onto the road where the cars awaited.  A distance of approximately 10.2 km was covered.

The group decided to go for a well, deserved coffee at a usual coffee shop but alas the power was off, probably because of the winds. We soon found another where we recounted our adventure which was enjoyed by all.

Many thanks to Neil M and Arthur for the track clearing they have done, this was very evident. Others have volunteered to help them.

– Dave M

5. 12/3/2014. Trampers. Rollinsons Rd, Swine Spur, Swampy Ridge, Rollinsons Rd, Picnic Tables, return to cars.
Swine Spur route.

Swine Spur route done. Red indicates the heavy Swine Spur work, yellow the faster road work!

At the car park, the trampers lacked a leader knowledgeable of the Swine Spur track programmed for the day, so this hiker was dragooned into going with them, with his traitorous act objected to strongly by one of the hikers (who shall considerately remain nameless) with his friendly invitation for the writer to never go with the hikers again.

A careful inspection of the access road roadside eventually elicited the heavily grassed over entrance to the Possum Busters track. We made it through Manuka-Kanuka wood and the two steep guts of Mckenzie Creek and the other unnamed one, to stop for the cuppa at the traditional stop at the intersection of Possum Busters and Swine Spur tracks.

Then we turned left up the Swine Spur through the easily graduated track that was to inevitably bring us to the foot of the near vertical strenuous climb to Swampy Ridge roadway.

A word of appreciation here of the sterling track clearing from the route of all the impedimenta the once-in-a-life-time wet snow storm of last August brought down across it. Bravo, you track clearers! It was obviously a massive job.

Anyway, we reached the small concrete-block aerial navigation building sitting there at the top and turned left along the road to pass the Airways Corporation combined VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Radio) and DME (Distance Measuring Equipment – where’s an easier name?) setup to head down the access road. We forewent going on through Swampy to Hightop, as had been programmed, indulging in an easier day instead. (A concession to the hiker, the writer suspects.)

Well, that was to be just a boring road walk back to the cars, but most pleasantly interrupted with a lunch stop at the 0ld-trampers’ picnic area at the head of the Steve Amies track. With all the time in the world, we just lazed there around the tables before eventually deciding to head back out and down to the cars. We arrived back at the car park BEFORE the hikers! One for the record book? – Ian.

4. 20/10/2010. Trampers. Rollinsons Road, Possum Busters, Swine Spur, Swampy Ridge, Rollinsons Track, Rollinsons Road. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

Navmap of tramp, courtesy Ken. Rollinsons Track at top, part of it hidden on slope behind Swampy Ridge

Ria and Hazel led us into the start of Possum Busters from off Rollinsons Road. The two deep gullies were still there, but with the steep banks provided with wonderful sets of steps. Bravo, track-clearers. We stopped for a tea-break at the Swine Spur junction, wishing we had the tools to re-attach Les Murcott’s track signs to the remaining-standing manuka trunk. Then it was up the gentle incline of the Swine Spur track before it steeply climbed onto the actual Swine Spur.

Snow on track near top of slope of Swine Spur.

We were delighted to find the last bit onto the Spur was now a well-defined route, replacing the half-dozen or so attempts through the over-grown area. Reaching the top, we stopped for a brief shelter from some cold wind.

Sheltering from wind at building at top of Swine Spur.

Then it was along the road to Swampy Summit.

Snow on Swampy Summit

The Swampy Summit Track beyond the summit led us down through slippery frozen snow and on to our next turn-off. The Rollinsons Track was well-indicated and its route well-defined with copious track markers. Another good change from a time when it was really hard to detect parts of the track. Again, thanks to some excellent recent work by some good people, added to by our leaders on their recce.

Lunch scene. Foreground: track marker on bush, background: left to right, Pulpit rock, Silver Peaks No. 2, Rocky Ridge, The Gap.

The track kept high on the slope, avoiding the wetter parts of Swampy.

Tarn at heart of Swampy

The track wound its way back up and out of Swampy to join with the Rain Gauge track. Again, the track sign had been clearly renamed “Rollinsons” instead of the “Swampy Tarns” sign that had been put over the old faded sign. Then it was just out to Rollinsons Road at the hairpin bend and on down to the cars.
Thanks to Ria and Hazel for this lovely tramp over the whole Rollinsons again – a replacement for the trip into Jubilee Hut that  had been thoughtlessly scheduled for during lambing. – Ian.
3. 15/3/2006. Trampers. Rollinson, Burns, Swine Spur. Medium+. Leaders: Doug J, Ian, Shirley.
2. 30/4/2003. Both. Access Road, Rollinson Track, Swampy Saddle, Swine Spur Track. Medium+. Leaders: Ria, Bill and Pat, Denise, Anne R.
1. 19/9/2001. From Access Road, Rollinsons Track, Swampy Saddle, Swine Spur Track. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Doug and Myrie, Joyce.

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Nov 01 2017

Pyramids, Victory Beach

No. 48 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Pyramids & Beach Area. (Victory Beach) Beach Walk only. Year Round”
Location: 38 km from car park.

Topo of Area

25. 1/11/2070. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders:  Bruce and Liz.

Route map of Hikers medium sub-group only, less the small pyramid, climbed by others, courtesy Ian. Trampers also climbed the larger pyramid.

Report 1 November 2017. Pyramids and Victory Beach.
Thirty-five hikers and trampers set off from the Pyramids car park in Dick Road at approximately 9. 45 am towards Papanui Inlet passing 7 Sheldrake ducklings and their parents in a pond on the way.

We entered into the saltmarsh at the sign and followed a path to the inlet, turned to the left, walked approximately 400 m around the edge of the inlet, and then climbed a small bank on the left to get on to the 4-wheel drive track. We went along this about 100 m to a relatively sunny spot for morning tea.

 

A great place for morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

After morning tea, we continued along the 4-wheel drive track towards the sea crossing a plank bridge and then the style into the DCC Okia reserve. We continued on the track to where it veered to the left into the scrub and went instead to the right down a small bank on to the sand bordering the inlet. The bank was about 10 m before where the concrete square on the bank used to be. The square has now fallen down the level of the inlet. We proceeded around the edge of the inlet on relatively firm sand. The tide was coming in, with at 2.0 m high tide due at 3.16 pm. We soon met our first sea lion sleeping in the sun and later sitting up in the water facing us and periodically giving us a view of its oral cavity.
Another sea lion was on the point and lumbered towards us before settling down to rest. After turning to the left around the point of the beach we proceeded up the beach. A group of four sea lions consisting of a mother and 3 younger members of the species where resting…

Sea lions and fur seals were on the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

…near the site of the 1861 Victory wreck, the upper crescent of the fly wheel of which was visible periodically when the waves subsided. We were strung out along the beach as we travelled north passing another sea lion and a dead sea lion or seal pup in a state of partial decomposition.

We congregated for lunch at the foot of the sand hills, about 70 m before the track leading to the pyramids, between approximately 12. 15 pm and 12.30 pm.

The birthday boy Clive in his 70th with chocolates. (Helen pic and caption.)

After lunch a group of 16, led by Arthur, departed slightly before rest with the intention of returning to the car park via the end of the beach, the large pyramid and then the small pyramid.

The remaining 19 went 70 m north to enter the track to the pyramids which is marked by a yellow and black pole, approximately 50 cm high, in a steel square framework. After passing a board referring to the wildlife we split into two further groups with 7 continuing on the grassy track straight ahead to the pyramids, and then the car park, while the other 12 turned to the right and followed a more circuitous route via some initially longish grass, the rosette, and the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff to the cave in the small pyramid which, uncharacteristically, had water covering the floor.

Cave flooded. First time ever for us. Extensive flooding of marshes and tracks never seen before. Wet winter! (Ian pic and caption.)

Approximately 6 members then climbed the small pyramid.

We were then met by the returning trampers and, after some more pyramidal ascents were mad,e we returned to the carpark and then, for most of us, had refreshments at the Bay Café, Macandrew Bay.

A pond was present just before the rosette and a temporary bridge and detour was present on the track just after the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff because the track was flooded. The track was partially built up for a few metres near the small pyramid, evidence of a wetter than usual winter. Some pot holes were present in Weir Road. The Pyramids/Victory beach area remains as a place where a level round walk with varied scenery in the country is possible.

The weather was good with some early mist, relatively high temperatures and a cooling breeze on the beach. The distance travelled, depending on the route chosen was approximately 10.5 to 13 km. Including the rosette and the small pyramid ascent the distance was 11.7 km.
My thanks are due to Liz Griffin for stepping in and performing admirably as co-leader/back marker at short notice.
– Bruce

Trampers’ addendum report.

16 trampers left the main group after the lunch stop, and continued along the beach to the north end. It was rather a scramble to get up the steep sand dune, to find that the track along the top was quite overgrown. However the leader unerringly led the group 100 metres or so until the mown track was reached, and easy going.

As we took a last look at the sea,

Bruce on his first tramp back after surgery . (Helen pic and caption.)

2 or 3 porpoises were spotted frolicking in the surf. The wildlife was wonderful today.

12 trampers climbed to the top of the big pyramid,

Both Pyramids. (Helen pic and caption.)

to gain the superb views on offer. Down again, we continued and caught up with the Hikers, the last of whom were just descending the small pyramid.

4 trampers also ascended it, to claim having climbed both pyramids today.

And so we returned to the cars together, after a most enjoyable day’s tramp. – Art.

24. 2/11/2016. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Thirty-one hikers and trampers met at the Pyramids car park on Dick Road at 9.50 am on a calm sunny morning. Low tide at Dunedin was 0.3 m at 1258 and the Papanui Inlet tide is about 1 hour later. Three of the group (Leslie, Bev and Molly) accepted the shorter route option of taking the direct yellow-marker route to Victory Beach via the Pyramids while the other 28 proceeded via Dick Road past some bovine mothers and children who found us to be of interest.

 

Bruce

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We entered the salt marsh by crossing the ditch opposite the sign

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

and walked straight ahead to the estuary before turning left for approximately 400 m …

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

… to have morning tea on the 4-wheel drive track approximately 200-300 m from the gate at the north end of the road. Overgrowth of the lupins and bank erosion made it easier to walk on the estuary for a distance to where the bank up to the 4-wheel drive track was less steep. A suitable morning tea site, with access to the pine forest and some logs for sitting on, was present after the barbed wire fence on the left stopped.

After morning tea we proceeded along the track, over the railway sleeper bridge and then the style into the Okia Reserve and followed the track with white markers to the estuary edge where a large concrete block was present. The bank was eroded here and most of us went down a slightly easier place a few metres before the block.

We then walked on the firmer sand near the water’s edge going to the end of the estuary, passing some Paradise (Sheldrake) ducks and then around the sandy point with dunes to Victory Beach. We paused to inspect two sea lions.

Sealions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Sea lions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

The fly wheel of the Victory was partly submerged.

[Scroll down to (20. 16/7/2014 tramp report) to view a new photo insertion (I’ve just learnt how to make out of a video frame), of Bruce standing on top of the Victory flywheel back at that date. (There’s also a video to click on just below it.) – Ian.]

At 12.05 pm the groups of 3 and 28 merged and we lunched on the sand at the base of the track marked by an orange pole and two green crayfish pot floats.

 

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After lunch Molly and Clive followed the shorter option path back to the Pyramids and cars while the other 29 took the 4-wheel drive track to the right and then when almost at the cliffs at the end of the beach turned to the left to follow the track around to the rock rosette.

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We continued on the loop track to the Margaret Hazel Slope track.

Margaret Hazel slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Margaret Hazel Slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Five of the trampers made a detour from here back to the cars via the top of the large Pyramid.

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.) [of smaller pyramid - Ed.]

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

The rest continued back to the junction near the small Pyramid where most waited while approximately 6 visited the cave in the small Pyramid to inspect the pentagonal and hexagonal basalt column crystal structures.

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Approximately 8 persons took the 10 minute track up to the top of the small Pyramid for the expansive viewbefore following the others back to the cars via Dick Road. Everyone was back at the car park by approximately 3 pm and refreshments were consumed at the Portobello Café.No major calamities occurred on the day. A potential problem may occur if the track up the small pyramid is strayed from because of the steepness of the terrain. The persistent sun may have caused some sunburn. The route followed requires the low tide to be at an appropriate time.

The distance travelled by the main group was approximately 12.3 km with the small and large pyramid ascents adding approximately another 0.15 and 1.2 km respectively. – Bruce.

23. 20/4/2016. Trampers. Pyramids, Victory Beach and Papanui Inlet. Leaders: Neil and Margreet.Ten trampers set out at 0945 on a warm autumn day to explore this scenic reserve and beach.  We stopped for morning tea at a well concealed cave

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.) [Note: Ed. recalls climbed by only an adolescent before.]

and then followed the undulating track to the beach. Even though it was still near low tide, we could only see a small part of the fly wheel of the wreck of the “Victory” at the South end of the beach. Much more impressive were all the seals …

One of many seals on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

One of many sea-lions on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

… lazing on the sand and gambolling in the waves. There was also a lone, grounded Mollymawk …

Mollyhawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

Mollymawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

… on the beach, seemingly injured.

Once we reached the end of the beach we turned into the Papanui Inlet and had lunch in a scenic spot where we were entertained by young seals frolicking in the water nearby.

We meandered around the inlet and then followed the gravel road back to the car-park.

As we had made good time, it was decided to drop our packs at this stage, and do some more exploring. Four trampers climbed Little Pyramid

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

and the other six went up the larger pyramid

Girls on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

Girls on top of big pyramid … (Margreet pic and caption)

Then nen on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

… then men on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

via Margaret Hazel Slope. It was worth the clamber to get great views of the beach and surrounding hills from the summits.

A coffee stop at Portobello completed an enjoyable day’s outing.

In total we walked 11.85 km. – Margreet and Neil Simpson

22. 13/5/2015. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leaders: Chris and Adrienne. Later: also Bruce.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

Today’s tramp was an alternative to Murray’s Farm which was deemed too wet following the previous day’s rain. After regrouping at the gate into the reserve, we resorted to the club’s habitual setting in the nearby cave for morning tea, happily in sunshine.
Then followed the trek out to the beach along along the usual, but surprisingly cleaned-up track, extravagantly cleared to a width greater than we had ever encountered before, complete with side bays as well. Obviously a scrub-cutter operator had enjoyed their job.
But at the beach entrance, whoa! Full tide! Even Keith and Ian’s trek along the narrow wave-touched strip of remaining sand ‘pour encourager les autres’ (to encourage the others) to reach less wave-washed sand further on, failed to inspire the leaders, indeed earned only their rebuke for ‘not staying behind the leader’. Sigh.
An alterative suggestion from Bruce to visit the viewing spot of the 30 metre wide circular geologically-formed rock “rosette” on the cliff-face of the larger pyramid found favour, so thence we trouped.
 This proved an occasion for some interesting discussions. “Where is it?” “There it is. Can’t you see it?” “No, I can’t”. “Look, it’s right THERE.” Well, I suppose we can’t all be brilliant.
Presently, returning the way we had come, we stopped on a slope of the track for an early lunch,
Lazy lunch. (John pic)

Lazy lunch. (John pic)

lazing enjoyably in the sun with not too much wind to disturb us. Following lunch, back on the main scrub-cleared track, came an early afternoon decision time. A goodly half of our number (of 28), elected to return to the cars, but not all …. Now, over to Bruce. – Ian
Loop group. After lunch a group of 13 headed out to the beach some distance north of our earlier entry point to the beach before lunch. A sand cliff was present where the track reached the beach due to sea erosion and we had to make a short detour on a less defined track, 20 m further north, and a short slide to the beach.  Going to the earlier entry point further south would, in retrospect, have been better. We proceeded down the beach…
Along the beach. (John pic)

Along the beach. (John pic)

…past 6 sea lions who were mainly at the southern end of the beach. The fly wheel of the Victory was partly visible between waves.
Flywheel. (John pic)

Flywheel. (John pic)

After rounding the point at the end of the beach we proceeded up a rather boggy narrow stretch of sand on the edge of the inlet until we reach the pine tree stump, approximately 500 m along the inlet, where we climbed a short slope of bank , beside a concrete slab on the top of the bank, to get on to the grass road…
Smile, please. (John pic)

Smile, please. (John pic)

…leading the style at the edge of the reserve. After crossing the style we passed the holiday homes on our right, in the Clearwater property, and then crossed the bridge providing vehicular access to the cribs. It had been repaired with macrocarpa sleepers since our last visit. We continued along this grass track until we reached the gate at the end marked private property (inverted). We then went down a diagonal track to the left of the gate, past Ian’s sheltered morning tea spot, and along the edge of the Inlet. Because of the high water level, approximately 25 cm  deep, it was necessary to cut across the corner of the paddock. We did not cross the water filled inlet/ditch leading to the Salt Marsh sign on Dick road until we were nearly at the road. We then crossed the next ditch parallel to the road beside the sign and walked 2 km along the road back to the car park arriving there at or slightly before 2.45 pm. Another idea for another time would be to consider walking from north to south along the beach to see the fly wheel and any sea lions that might be about and then returning along the beach to cut out the 2 km of walking on the gravel of Dick road. The weather today for this part of the hike remained calm and warm. – Bruce.
Hang on, P.S., BTW or whatever. The Loop Group coffeed at Portobello…
Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

…and the ‘others’ were going to go to Nichols. – Ian.
21. 12/11/2014. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leader: Bruce, with Bev as back-up.
Route

Route

Twenty-two intrepid hikers were undeterred by the forecast of an afternoon southwesterly change and after proceeding through Portobello to Weir Road turned left into Dick road and parked at the Pyramids and Victory Beach car park. They crossed the style and proceeded along the Riddle Road causeway, through the gate at the end and passing to the left of the little pyramid turned to the right on the beach track (not to the left on the loop) and, a short way along, took a short track to the right to have morning tea in the cave at the little pyramid.

 

Cuppa. (John pic.)

Morning tea. (John pic.)

We confirmed the basalt blocks were five rather than six sided.

After morning tea, we retraced our steps and turned to the left onto the loop track. We passed the Margaret Hazel slope (marker 4) noting that one can reach the top of the large pyramid by going up it and turning left. (Earlier we noted a 10 minute track to the top of the small pyramid started just after the gate at the end of the Riddle Road causeway). We continued to the right on the loop track and stopped at marker 6 to view the circular rock rosette feature …

Rosette (Bruce pic.)

Circular rock rosette (Bruce pic.)

… on the cliff face. Antony Hamel describes this as a 30 m wide pod of lava which is inaccessible to grazing animals and that it contains less common native plants such as the Easter orchid.

We should then have turned sharp right to the yellow marker pole and then a sharp left to the beach at markers 8 and 9 but ended up on a more circuitous route ending up with a short slide to the beach.

Slide (John pic.)

Short slide to the beach.  (John pic.)

We proceeded down Victory Beach noting one sea lion and a partially submerged Victory flywheel (1861) just before the end of the beach where we found sheltered spots for lunch at 12.10 pm.

Lunch (John pic)

Sheltered spots (more or less) for lunch (John pic)

Another sea lion was resting at the water’s edge between our lunch spot and the inlet. After lunch we travelled along the water’s edge to where a grass track leading to the cribs starts. It was marked on the bank by a concrete rectangle but one needed to climb up the bank to see it. It was just past the end of the pine trees between the cribs and Victory beach. Some of our party overshot the turnoff and rejoined the track further on while others backtracked a little to get onto the grassy track. We all met up again …

Met up (John pic)

Met up again. All ‘parkaed-up’ after the short storm blast. (John pic)

…  just before the locked gate and stile at the boundary of the Okia reserve.

After crossing the style we continued along the grassy vehicle track on the inlet side of the fence separating the inlet from the property of Jason Clearwater. We crossed over a somewhat rickety bridge containing a round fencepost alongside the rectangular hardwood decking. At the end of the grass track we came to a locked gate with an inverted Private Property sign. We went down a track then to the left of the gate and along the inlet beach until level with the sign, about 300 m on, marking the salt flat conservation area. We headed at right angles to the sign along a narrow path alongside a snail-containing water course to a corresponding sign next to Dick Road. We crossed the relatively firm ground in the ditch beside the sign on to Dick Road and then walked, mainly in the sun, back to the carpark where we arrived at 1.55 pm.

Distance travelled 11.73 km by Garvin GPS, 10.6 km by Iphone, 12.33 -12.48 km by pedometer. Overall the weather could have been worse. A cold wind blew for a short time near the end of Victory beach and some spots of rain fell shortly after lunch leading us to put on our coats but it soon stopped and it was not enough to get wet with. Several of the group stopped for coffee or fruit juice at MacAndrew Bay …

Coffee

Coffee

… on the return journey to Mosgiel. Thanks were expressed to Bruce for leading and Bev for backmarking. – Bruce.

20. 16/7/2014. Hikers. Victory Beach. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
GPS

GPS

A Herd

A Herd

Marsh start

A Marsh

Harbour Cone

A Harbour Cone pic

A log

A Log

Silhouette

A Flywheel. (of wrecked Victory)

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

And A rare extremely-low-tide video of the Victory Flywheel, with Bruce standing on the top

19. 24/11/2010. Trampers. Ryans Beach. M.
Since learnt: “Ryans Beach is entered legally only by the landowner (Penguin Place) and scientists.”

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

The climb out of Victory Beach up to the headland.

The descent to Ryans Beach.

Pam supporting the mast.

Close-up of the wreck.

Close-up of the wreck.

Smile please. Enjoying the view from the headland.

View from headland of Okia. Older beach lines showing.

18. 11/8/2010 Hikers Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Dorothy, Chris.

The Logarithmics ? – Lunch on an accommodating log. (Bill pic and caption)

17. 19/8/2009 Hikers Victory Beach, return road. Easy. Leaders: Mollie.
16. 29/7/2009 Trampers. Larger of two pyramids, Victory Beach, return lupins. Leaders: Arthur H, Ian.

click to enlarge

"Elephant" Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption)

“Elephant” Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption) Pat, Ian

"Large" Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

“Large” Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope. George, Pat, Sabina, Doug, Glenice, Bill, Arthur

Ascending Larger Pyramid

Ascending Larger Pyramid. Club members barely detectable on skyline.

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

Starting the descent

Starting the descent. George, Glenice, Pat, Sabina.

Striations on nearby cliff

Striations on nearby cliff

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

Through dunes to beach

Through dunes to beach. Pat, Sabina, Arthur

Paddle Wheel of Victory Ship

Fly Wheel of Victory Ship at low tide. (Arthur pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Returning to Pyramid

Returning to Pyramid

15. 1/10/2008. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Medium. Leaders: Bill H. Lesley, Molly.
14. 20/2/2008 Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Bob, Neil.

Another lovely Wednesday, as we have come to expect over the years. Large muster of 21 hikers today, due possibly because it was another beach walk and a very popular one at this time of the year. It was the Pyramids and Victory beach. After parking cars and getting everyone organised and over the stile, it was along to the Pyramids for morning tea. Refreshed and ready to go, it was on down the track to the beach. How very pleasant and enjoyable it was. The sun made the sea really sparkle, and the seals and sea lions were out frolicing or lying in the sun relaxing on the rocks or the sand as the fancy took them. We went to the left first as far as we could to the rocks. Then we turned round and walked to the other end of the beach, watching the seals and sea lions playing or resting as we went along. Cameras got plenty of use and I’m sure we’ve got some good photos to keep in our collections. Lunch was at the Papanui Inlet end of the beach and a very pleasant place to sit and relax it was. On round the end of the beach and back across the grass by the cribs and then the swampy bit to the road. Some of us didn’t have to walk all the way back to cars as Bob H. and Peter went and picked up drivers to save some of that road walking. Very good hike, enjoyed by all. – Bev

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

13. 15/2/2007. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Margaret D.
12. 15/2/2006. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Mary M.
11. 27/10/2004. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Graham, Ian, Ann R, Chris, Betty
Cave in Pyramid.

Cave in Pyramid.

Ships Wheel? of "Victory"

Paddle Wheel of “Victory” Ship

Drift wood. Dog?

Drift wood on Victory Beach. Dog?

10. 3/9/2003. All. Pyramids. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Catherine.
Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

9. 4/12/2002. All. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Evelyn C, Pam McD
8. 4/7/2001. Combined. Pyramids – Ryans Beach. Easy+. Leaders: George, Ray and Diana.
7. 21/7/1999. Victory Beach, Pyramids. Leaders: Chris, Sylvia, Diana.
6. 10/3/1999. Pyramids – Victory Beach. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
5. 18/2/1998. Victory Beach, Pyramids, Ryans Beach. Leaders: Chris, Bev H, Ria H.
4. 30/10/1996. Victory Beach – Pyramids. Average. Leaders: Joan H, Ria H, Jean
3. 31/5/1995. Pyramids, Victory Beach, Ryans Beach. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Mary Y, Betty B, Margaret D
2. 16/2/1994. Pyramids, Taiaroa Hill. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Denise, Alison, Mary Y. Easier alternative: Leaders: Bev McI, Frances M.
1. 23/3/1988. Victory Beach and Pyramids. Seals, penguins, rock formations. Leaders: Kath R, Dave M.

2 responses so far

Oct 18 2017

Tomahawk Lagoon and nearby tracks/areas

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Ocean Grove, also known as Tomahawk, is a suburb in the southeast of the New Zealand city of Dunedin. … The suburb was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name not being a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”.
No. 23 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karetai Rd via Monument from Lagoon. Year round.”
Distance from car-park: Tomahawk: 19 km; Smaills Beach: 22 km;  Paradise Road: 26 km.’
DCC List: 41 Peg Track. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Oregon St. 3.5 hrs ret. Tramping track – unbenched. Managed: DCC CAM, private land.
Description – This track provides a link between Ocean Grove and Highcliff Road. Access to the track in Ocean Grove is off Oregon Street. An attractive walk around Tomahawk Lagoon then climbs through gorse and native bush. Turn right towards Soldiers Memorial through paddocks with gorse sometimes obscuring the rock walls.
  • Classification – Hard
  • Time – Approximately 45 minutes.
  • Parking – Limited at Highcliff Road. No dogs.
  • Dogs – No
*****

Distance from car-park: 19 km.

24. 18/10/2017. Hikers. Tomahawk. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce

Bruce

23. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

22. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
4.1km/h
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water
Ducks (Eleanor pic)

Ducks on ice (Eleanor pic)

or swans trying to get out of frozen water?

Swans

Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.

Memorial

Soldiers’ Memorial (Eleanor pic)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…

Track

Tarseal Road (Eleanor pic)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil
21. 29/1/2014. Hikers. John Wilson Drive, Golf Course, Beach, Cave, Tomahawk Lagoon, return Lawyers Head Paper Road. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
A few of the over Christchurch over 40s Tramping Club contingent lodging for the week at Waiora Scout Camp went off with our Trampers but the majority at the car park threw in their lot with the Hikers. The task for the Christchurchian cars to navigate through the city to the St Kilda playground adjacent to the John Wilson Drive was made easier by someone’s suggestion that locals spread themselves out amongst their cars as pilots and that worked well.
When we were eventually all gathered at the beginning of John Wilson Drive, Marjorie counted 51 of us. An all-time record? The views along the drive, with the Chisholm Park Golf Links and city on one side, the beach and sea on the other, was remarked upon by all. Further there were no cars to bother us this early in the day. It was time for morning tea when we reached Lawyers Head, one of a series of basaltic headlands which punctuate much of this section of the Otago coast, (others nearby being Maori Head and Blackhead). This one is named for the likeness of the cliff face to the profile of a lawyer in traditional legal wig, …
Lawyers Head

Lawyers Head

… so we supped our cuppas  around the Leonard Wright memorial at the Head.

Lawyers Head Lookout

Lawyers Head Lookout

Hidden hard nearby was a narrow steep track connecting down to the golf links, around whose Lawyers Head coastal edge the leaders had gained permission for us to single-file our way. We found ourselves right on the crest of the Lawyers Head cliff, the Tomahawk beach stretching out below us. We made quite a strung-out sight.
Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless applauded tee shot.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless ironically applauded tee shot at the end of our links perimeter stroll.

Now down and away from the links along another narrow, but lengthier track out and across to the Tomahawk Road.

A long line

Looking back upon another strung-out sight.

We emerged upon a playground on Tomahawk Road.

The suburb beyond us, now called Ocean Grove, was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name being, not a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”. (Wiki).
We descended the road a little way to the lower of the twin-lobed Tomahawk Lagoon, this lobe being its outer one,  whose outlet we skirted on its true left to emerge onto the Tomahawk Beach.
The day’s trip had been selected for one of Dunedin’s low-tides, so the beach was ours, as was the small tidal cave at its end, an addition to the area’s features.
Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Up a small but energetic sand-hill and we were on another track out to the road again, down it a bit, and into a side road leading to yet another side route and out onto a recreation area alongside Tomahawk Lagoon’s inner lobe, this one a wildlife reserve, although both lobes are noted for their bird life.

Here was to be the lunch stop, but prior to that there was a short walk up alongside the lakelet to where our local club members knew of a Trampers’ track leading up to a soldiers’ memorial on by the Peninsula high road. But this was to just to wander the level part of track and enjoy (??) at one spot a strong pong from the the slightly stagnant waters and mud verge. (Roll on a storm flush!)

So we lunched leisurely, variously at tables and on ledges until our leaders judged it time for the return journey.

Out on the road, a motor cyclist stopped to talk and admire our impressive size. He was glad to hear we were returning by the Lawyers Head paper road and invited us to notice the “use it or lose it” graffiti posted in a couple of places before its entrance. (Apparently the City Council proposed closing it.) We were going to be a wonderful “use it” example.

The ‘road’ led us through a corner of the Andersons Bay Cemetery, close by the towering Crematorium and out through the Chisholm Park Golf links. Then across the Pirates Football Club pitch and we were at our cars again and adjacent to a useful new toilet block by the playground.

Now came farewells and dispersal time. There were many appreciative remarks from the Christchurch Club members about the unique difference of such a walk, with its wonderful unexpected variations. ‘The best of their week so far’ was one comment.

I know our club felt quite proud to hear such unstinted praise, and of course are so indebted to Marjorie and Bruce for their careful planning, taking into account the meal stops, the permissions sought, and the trip duration. Bravo. Of course the day’s excellent weather didn’t hurt either. – Ian.

20. 1/6/2011. Both. Bowls Stadium, Cemetery, beach, Fishing Club, Karetai Rd, Smaills Beach, return. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Select only coastal part of GPS for this route. GPS Courtesy Ken. Distance travelled = 11.7km Moving time = 2hr 46min. Moving ave. = 4.2k/hr Stopped time = 1hr 50min

Twenty-three hikers and trampers set off from the Westpac Bowls Stadium in Tahuna Road at 1000 in cool cloudy conditions and went up the grass verge between the road and the Chisholm Park golf links before entering the first gate on the right to the Andersons Bay cemetery. We walked through part of the cemetery before continuing down the hill, watching some horses train behind a motor vehicle, and crossing the bridge over the outlet from the Tomahawk Lagoon. Immediately over the bridge we followed a gravel road alongside the outlet stream and then, after 80 metres,  a track alongside the stream down to the beach where trucks were removing sand, probably for attempting to remedy the erosion at Middle Beach.

Truck and loader for removing sand from Tomahawk beach. (Bruce pic and caption)

We proceeded along the length of the beach to the two caves at the far end and had morning tea on the rocks there. Some inspected the cave, risking getting wet feet in the process with high tide approaching at 1430.

Morning tea near the caves at Tomahawk Beach. (Bruce pic and caption)

After morning tea we ascended the sand hill to the Tomahawk Road and continued down the private road to the Tautuku Fishing Club, Dunedin and Haast Inc. We arrived there at approximately 1130 and were kindly shown around and given a history of the Club and the fine bluestone building by the club president Brett Bensemann.

Tautuku Fishing Club premises. (Pic: Ken. Caption: Bruce.)

Bob pic.

Bob pic.

The building was originally the homestead of Alexander Smaill and was bought by the club, together with some surrounding land, by the Club in 1972 for $5000.
At 1205 we continued up Karetai Road for 15-20 minutes

Bruce on Karatai Rd. track with others in the background. (Ken pic and caption)

to the corner near the style leading to a black and white Geodesic Trig on the right.

About nine of the group, following a route pioneered by Ken, went down to the trig …

Ken at the Geodesic Trig looking towards Sandymount (Bruce pic and caption)

… and then contoured around on a track

Bob pic.

back to the lower reaches of Karetai Road while the others retraced their steps down the non-rutted road in good  condition for walking. We lunched in a sheltered area close to the start of the first track on the left leading from the road to Smaill’s Beach.
After lunch we proceed to the beach via three routes, necessitated by a slip which had damaged the track (a) up the sand hills to avoid the slip, (b) via a narrow edge beside the river, or (c) retreating back to the gate and taking an alternative direct to the beach instead of going alongside the river bank. After briefly looking at the windswept beach and the offshore Bird Island (which has claimed many lives on account of a strong under-current including William and Thomas Henderson of Tomahawk  in about 1900)

Doug and others leaving Smaill’s Beach with Bird Island in the background. (Bruce pic and caption)

we climbed back up to the gun emplacements at the Jack Fox lookout. Two six inch Vickers coastal defence guns were part of a network of coastal batteries during WW2. The guns were removed  in 1945. A cluster of three similar batteries were present at Taiaroa Head  and the mother of one of the group nursed there.
We returned to the cars via Tomahawk Road, Luke Street, the disused Tomahawk School, the soccer playing fields and the cemetery grounds which we entered via the pedestrian entrance on the left a short distance above the bridge. We arrived back at 1445 somewhat wind buffeted but knowing more about Porbeagle Sharks which are only caught in the local area. (For more information about the Tautuku Fishing Club see: Tautuku Fishing Club) – Bruce.
19. 23/9/2009. Hikers. Tomahawk, Centre Road. Medium. Leaders Arthur and Barbara.
18. 4/6/2008 Both. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial, Centre Road. Leaders: Joyce, Ian, Lesley G
Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Three shaggy dogs

Three Irish Wolfhounds

17. 26/9/2007 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Memorial. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Although the day dawned very cold, overcast and threatening to rain, 8 intrepid Hikers turned up at Glascow St. carpark for the day’s tramp from Tomahawk Lagoon. In spite of weather we had a very happy and enjoyable day. We left cars in car park by the Lagoon and set off up the track to WW 1 Soldiers Memorial on Highcliff. Although track was very wet and muddy it is now much improved to what it used to be when we tramped in the area many years ago. Morning tea was a very welcome and refreshing break in the slippery slog up the hill. Up to the Monument and lovely views of our beautiful harbour.

Peninsula Soldiers’ Memorial

Highcliff Rd to Centre Rd. was pretty cold but we soon warmed up. Then we had the great views over the other side of the Peninsula. Found a nice sheltered spot for our lunch and were vastly entertained by a very interested audience of 3 Irish Wolfhound dogs. Hard to say whether dogs or people were most fascinated.
Down the road and round the corner, back to cars after an enjoyable, sociable and refreshing day out. – Bev.
16. 25/7/2007. Trampers. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial. Moderate. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
15. 31/1/2007. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Mary M.
14. 13/4/2005. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Rosemary and Jack.
13. 3/12/2003. Hikers: Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Dot T
12. 29/10/2003. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Joan H, Chris.
11. 11/4/2002 Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Ray, Les W
10. 15/8/2001. Alt. Tomahawk, Karetai. Leaders: Nancy, Val, Peg C.
9. 11/4/2001. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Les W.
8. 23/2/2000. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Ria H.
7. 30/6/1999 Tomahawk Lagoon. Centre Road. Leaders: Jean Y, Denise, Eleanor W
6. 12/8/1998. Highcliff Centre Road from Lagoon. Leaders: Molly, Frank.
5. 18/3/1998. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road round trip. Leaders: Jean, Ria H.
4. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean
3. 18/9/1996. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Chris, Joan H, Ngaire.
2. 8/7/1992.  Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Centre Road. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, Bev H, Merle
1. 12/7/1989 Centre Road, Highcliff. Average +. Leaders: Kees & Ria, Diana
B, Ria H
10. 15/7/2015. Trampers. Buskin Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track.After a bit of a mix up over pickup points, we parked up beside Penzance Kennels, where we had a discussion on which way we would tackle the days walk. We settled on going down Buskin Track & worrying about the return journey later.
The track was mostly dry apart from a few areas where it has been damaged by water scouring it out quite badly. As two of the party of three, had never been there before we took some time to check out the cribs [baches] at the bottom of the track.We also came across an employee of Otago Pest Destruction [I think that’s what they are called] who was happily banging a possum on the head, after it got caught in one of his traps. He said he got 27 the day before, so much for a possum free peninsula !!!
We then made our way out to the beach for some boulder hopping practice, before gaining the sand at the northern end. As we passed by the log shelter I noticed an intruder lying inside, looking very cosy indeed.

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

It lifted its head to survey me for about two seconds, then just went back to sleep ! What a life !!
We wandered along the beach wondering where all the sand had gone, the bank holding the tussock is badly eroded, & about 1 meter high. So now, there is no way for the Yellow Eyed Penguins to climb up & get to their nests further up the hill.
We walked back past the intruder in it’s cosy shelter,

3 Anothe shot of the intruder.

3 Another shot of the intruder.

& had lunch sitting on a large bit of driftwood,

Boulder Beach, Otago Peninsula New Zealand

1 Lunch spot at Boulder Beach

before walking up Braidwood Rd. to the gate into the paddocks leading along to the Double Bay area, where I had an unsuccessful look for the viewing hide I had seen at an earlier date, but the vegetation had me beat, so we retraced our steps around to the bottom of Paradise Track, made our way up there, & back along Highcliff Rd. to the car.

We walked 10km
ave 3.3km/h
climbed 475m – Ken

9. 28/11/2012. Trampers. Tomahawk, Soldiers Monument, Buskin Track, Highcliff,  Karatai Rd

GPS Tomahawk Soldiers Monument Buskin Track Karatai Rd, courtesy Ken.

Lunch at junction of Boulder Beach tracks. (Ken caption and pic)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic)

8. 26/9/2012. Trampers. Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road.

Karetai

Six of us parked at Smaills Beach car-park. We had dropped the idea of Silver Peaks because of the forecast rain with its fog. As we went up Karetai ‘Road’, we reached the rain level at our tea break and had to ‘parka-up’. We turned off further up onto the Highcliff Track …

Boulder Beach from Highcliff Track

and round to Beatties Cottage where we lunched. We didn’t bother going down to the beach but lazed in the sunshine (temporary but happily well-timed) in the shelter of the cottage’s large hedge from the wind.
The climb up Paradise Track gets no shorter but by and large, with its couple of zig-zags, provides a good gradient.
Along Highcliff Road, we forewent turning down the Buskin Track, with its promised steep climb back up the Highcliff Track, and carried on to the Karetai Road turnoff, returning down it to the cars.
Surprisingly Ken’s GPS recorded we had done 14.5 kms! A useful day’s walk. – Ian

7. 14/2/2007. Trampers. Boulder Beach, Karetai, Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders; Bruce and Marjorie.

6. 14/5/2003 Hikers. Karetai Road, Boulder Beach. Medium.Leaders: Colleen, Betty

5. 20/3/2002. Alt. Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Smaills Beach. Medium. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

4. 19/7/2000. Boulder Beach, Karetai Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris, Joan H.

3. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean

2. 13/4/1994 Tomahawk Lagoon, Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Buskin Road, Soldiers Track and return. Medium. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, June G, Betty H
1. 7/3/1991. Cars park Karetai Road Car Park. Karetai Road from car park. A good peninsula walk. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret S, Les W, Jack M.

 

 

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Sep 06 2017

Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, transmitter tower. Also Rustlers/Burns Tracks

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
See also: Leith Saddle and Morrison Tracks
Leith Saddle, Waitati Valley Road, Sawmill Track, Swampy Ridge, Burns Track
Click boardwalk history for account about the original Leith Saddle Track  and the establishment of the boardwalk in 1993.
For our Club’s part in the boardwalk venture see boardwalk for an ODT account of its construction.
See also TRTC Jack Merrilees (who died January 2015)

Cars park off motorway at Leith Saddle yard (alternatively down side road at bridge (restricted space). 25 km from car park.
Walk across side road to track.
Gravelled track 1.5 km. (morning tea on lookout seats a little further on)
Transmitter tower 2 hours.
Going further: along road past doppler radar to DoC sign.
Right along Rustlers Ridge track to junction with Burns Track.
Through junction and up and round hill on Rustlers Ridge Track. (Lunch on hill)
Down ridge to pipeline. (Alternatively turn right at junction for Burns and down to pipeline)
Turn right along pipeline.
5.5 hours in all.
Burns/Rustlers circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group. DCC land.

32. 6/9/2017. Both. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Burns, Pipeline Tracks circuit. M. Leaders: Betty and Jim.

A total of 33 persons started.
The total party walked to the Lookout Point for morning tea and at this point George Haggie served chocolates to celebrate his birthday.

George plus chocolates. 89 yesterday. (Helen pic and caption.)

Some of the party turned back because of the increased steepness and slipperiness of the track caused by recent rain.

From this point 15 trampers split off and forged ahead for an extended tramp that brought them down to the gravel road and back to the cars at the saddle.

7 hikers had lunch at the micro wave tower at the summit before returning to the cars at the Saddle where they met up with the members that had returned earlier.

We then adjourned to the Plaza Cafe and the tramping party arrived a short time later.

Weather conditions were pleasant.
Cell phone coverage to stay in contact with the split up groups was of assistance. – Betty and Jim.
…..
The combined group split after morning tea on the Leith Saddle Track, 15 trampers forging ahead to go further.

We reached the Microwave up on Swampy soon after 11 am…

At the Microwave. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and decided to carry on to Swampy Summit and do a circuit instead of returning down the same track.
The breeze up top was decidedly chilly but the views were superb – 360 degrees. Whichever way you looked there was something to see.

 Taken after the trampers had left the hikers en route to the Burns Track from Swampy. (Phil pic and caption.)

We rested briefly beside “The Space Ship” (Aviation V.O.R. Beacon) at the highest point of Swampy while Neil2 explained its use.

Further on we turned off onto the “Access Track to Burns and Rustlers Tracks” – so the sign stated. Wouldn’t it be simpler to call it “Rustlers” Track – or would that not be logical?
It was lovely walking through the tussock on the upper part of this track. After a time we stopped to ear our lunch in the sunshine, sitting in the shelter,

(Margreet pic.)

and still with nice views to the north-east.

Lunch looking down to Blueskin Bay. (Helen pic and caption.)

Further down, the track was a bit slippery in the bush but we soon came to the Junction.

It is some years since I was last on the lower half of Burns Track, and had forgotten how much pleasure could be had while slip-sliding down the first steep and muddy part. There were also some muddy patches further down, and several members of the group made the most of the opportunity provided to add some mud to their clothing, etc.
However, most of the Burns Track was very pleasant. At the bottom it was along the Pipeline Track and then the road for a kilometre to gain the cars where they had been parked.

Today’s tramp had provided a good variety – bush tracks, tussock, and views – what a great day it had been. Distance – 10.8 km.
The hikers had already returned, so most of the trampers followed to rejoin them at the Stadium’s coffee shop to complete the day. – Art.
31. 23/11/2016. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Rustlers, Pipeline Tracks circuit. M. Leader: Arthur.

It was a bit of a shock to the system when we climbed out of the cars at the Leith Saddle carpark beside the Northern Motorway. A cold wind was funnelling up from the south, bringing low cloud with it.

But the Leith Saddle Track was nice and sheltered and we soon warmed up as the first ten minutes had a distinct uphill flavour to it. A good gravel track, with nice native forest to enjoy. Lot of ferns too, but not much birdlife today.

We reached the observation point at about 10.00 a.m., but the only view we got was of lots of cloud. We had our morning tea in the shelter of the vegetation close by.

As we climbed higher the low cloud cleared a little and we could get the occasional glimpse of the city, and back towards Blueskin Bay.

The wind was cold and most unpleasant

Theresa getting blown around up top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Theresa getting blown around up top. (Helen pic and caption.)

when we reached ‘Swampy Spur Trig S’, which is quite exposed. Otherwise the track was more sheltered till we reached the microwave, where we found a group of six trampers having their morning tea. A five minute stop with them was taken. They had proceeded us up the track, but were returning by a different route to us.

From the microwave we had a half hour road walk on top of Swampy.

Space shuttle for the planes. (Helen pic and caption.)

The doppler radar navigation complex. (Helen pic.)

We kept moving as the wind was rather coolish, but we could get quite a good view down over Mosgiel and the Taieri, if a little hazy.

We turned off onto the good track through the tussock, heading down “Rustlers Ridge”. The sign at the top states “Access track to Rustlers and Burns Tracks.”

The weather seemed to be clearing a little and we could get a good look at the Silver Peaks. We stopped a little early for our lunch, while there was still a good view of Blueskin Bay. Unfortunately a light shower arrived while we were eating but we were well hunkered down in shelter.

Lunch out of the wind. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch out of the wind. (Helen pic and caption.)

A chocolate treat from birthday girl, Judy K, keep our spirits up. – Thanks, Judy.

Only a few minutes’ travel got us to the junction with Burns Track. We continued down Rustlers, eventually reaching the Pipeline Track which would take us back in the direction of the cars.

The Pipeline Track had a few muddy patches on it, but also some very pleasant parts. The rocks were a bit slippery when we crossed Burns Creek, and we were soon out onto the road for the last kilometre or so.

The eight trampers out for the day’s fun had walked 12.1 km – a good training day for the tougher tramps coming in the next two weeks. And it had been an enjoyable day’s tramp. Moving time was 2 hrs 40 mins.

It came on to rain lightly as we got back to Dunedin, where we stopped at the Hot Chocolate Shop (some did have coffee though). And then back to Mosgiel, all fired up for next week. – Art.

30. 25/11/2015. Trampers. Burns-Rustlers.

Garmin GPS of Route, courtesy Ken: Burns Swampy Summit Swampy Ridge Burns Rustlers Pipeline tracks

Garmin GPS of Route, courtesy Ken: Burns Swampy Summit Swampy Ridge Burns Rustlers Pipeline tracks

Today, we did a tramp that maybe only one member of the group had done before.

We started off at the beginning of Burns Track from the Leith Valley Rd. car park, made our way up the short climb to the Pipeline track, where we turned right, & walked along to the short track leading to the Intake for the pipeline. We thought this was the entrance to Burns track, as Hamel’s book states that the entrance is hard to find. However, we soon ran out of track, so retraced our steps, & walked further along the Pipeline track until we found the large sign proclaiming Burns Track, & this was where we had morning tea.

1 Morning tea spot at start of Burns track. (Ken pic and caption)

1 Morning tea spot at start of Burns track. (Ken pic and caption)

As we were making our way up to Burns saddle, we came across two Green Hut track workers, who were doing a great job of track maintenance. The climb up to Burns saddle is quite steep, but with a few rest stops we all made it ok.
After some discussion, we decided to take the track to Swampy Summit, & have lunch at the Airways building at the start of the Swampy Ridge track.

2 Lunch at Airways building. (Ken pic and caption

2 Lunch at Airways building. (Ken pic and caption

After lunch we walked along the Swampy Ridge track till we found the sign at the top of Burns track. We followed this sometimes muddy/swampy track back to the Burns Saddle, & then took Rustlers track back down to the Pipeline track. This was also a bit muddy in places, so I don’t think anybody got home with clean boots. From here it was just a walk back along the Pipeline track [also a bit muddy] back to the cars.

There were some tired bodies at the end, but all enjoyed the walk on a very nice [25° C] day to be out tramping.

Walked 12km
3.4km/h
3h 30min moving
climbed 562m
max height 740m – Ken

29. 4/2/2015. Both. Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, Transmitter Tower. Leaders: Ian, Jill.

Twenty-three of us turned up for the scheduled Leith Saddle Track route. To accomodate our differing individual climbing speeds, the leaders advised us to climb at our most comfortable rates, to all meet at the view point seats for the morning cuppa. After a sociable meeting, Jill led us on again, ever onwards and upwards. However rain set in, getting only heavier and colder with even some hail appearing. And it did get HEAVY. At the trig on the exposed Swampy Spur, the wind was so fierce that leader Jill made a prudent decision, given the uncertain outlook at the time, for the Hikers to turn back,  allowing seven Trampers among us to carry on. Unbeknownst to us at the time,  the worst was over and the storm was passing. For the Trampers, of course, there was the immediate shelter in the dip in the track beyond the Trig, where it drops down from the Swampy Spur.  For the Hikers, it was back down into the shelter of the bush.
The Trampers reached the Telecom Tower on Swampy Ridge. The possibility of going on along Swampy Ridge to the point where the Rustlers Ridge track turns off, and returning along the Burns track was complicated with one or two of the party being found to be part of car loads with Hikers who were already returning back.
Meantime the Hikers had spent some time down at the Lookout, allowing all to regroup and make sure everyone was all right. As it turned out, Elaine had taken a fall on one of the wet wooden step side edges but was still mobile. During that time, the Trampers caught up on the Hikers just as the latter were setting off down again.
At track’s bottom, we separated. A few stopped off nearby to lunch in the sun.
Several Trampers, (whose car-loads were not complicated with some Hiker passengers), set off down the Waitati Road and along the pipeline track to take a look at the end of the Burns Track for those among them who hadn’t seen it before.
Here is Ken’s account of that part:
“These pics…

1 lunch stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop 1. (Ken pic and caption)

 

2 lunch stop (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop 2. (Ken pic and caption)

 

…were taken on the pipeline track at the bottom of Burns track. We just went for a little bit of a recce to see what the area was like, with a view to doing something in that area later. -Ken.”
The majority of the Hikers lunched at Sullivan’s Dam in calm sunny air on a nicely warmed-up concrete slope.
Somewhat approaching a dozen caught up on each other at Topiary’s later for a convivial coffee.
An interesting day. A different day. All ended well (except for Elaine). – Ian (for the leaders).
28. 5/12/2012. Both. Leith Saddle. Leaders: Bev and Leslie.

27. 13/11/2013 Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Rustlers, Pipeline tracks.
From the Leith Saddle we went up a very well constructed and maintained track to the picnic area (where the seats are) where we had our morning tea. In the quiet, the roar of trucks on the motorway was very noticeable.
We encountered fog from that point on, very light of course, but when we got to the top it was clear only at the place we were and a short distance ahead.
We passed the place where it seemed the aliens had landed (the airplanes navigation complex) and headed down the track that that led to the junction of the Burns and Rustlers tracks.
We lunched about halfway down Rustlers in a good sheltered spot. We eventually got down to the bottom and headed along the almost flat pipeline track. The end part of it was mown grass! Instead of heading down the farm track we continued right ahead, across the bridge and out onto the road and back up to the car.
I must say all track signs were very clear. – Heb.

26. 14/9/2011. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Rustlers, Pipeline tracks.

Bush sheltered us for the first bit along the now step-less, if still steep in places, beautifully gravelled DoC track. It looks like what one of us said that those in the UK would disparagingly call a Yellow Brick Road or pedestrian motorway. Perhaps however, the only practical way to overcome the bush underfloor condition. Even beyond the bushline, the track was still wonderful underfoot, accompanying and crossing only muddy traces of the original. Here we took our ‘cuppa’ on the lookout seat there, after wiping the remaining snow off it.
Now we were exposed to the gale coming straight up from the Antarctic as we tackled the steep hill-side beyond.
 At the Swampy Ridge Trig, we were exposed to the wind blustering from our left so much so that we were blown off our feet. It was a relief after negotiating past the trig’s stay-wires to slip down through the rocks into the comparative shelter of the dip beyond.
Across the dip, the last bit of a climb and we scurried into the shelter of the Post Office building.

We had planned the clockwise direction so that the wind would be behind us on Swamp Ridge. Well, not quite behind us, more on our left shoulders. But it was still preferable to battling it head-on.

Once we turned off onto the track linking down to the Burns/Rustlers junction, the wind was now more comfortably behind us. Relief. And then when the track started its plunge down from the tops, – no wind. Ahh. Had it stopped or were we just sheltered?
We should pause here to acknowledge the benefit of the most magnificent track-clearing work we have ever experienced on this track. Bravo. Where tussock, celmisia and flax often used to overhang and impede, the track was open all the way! In fact, when we got to the steepest and slipperiest part just before the junction, it was hard to find anything left to hang onto!
At the junction, all was sheltered and most pleasant with bits of sun shining through. We lingered for a while after lunch.

 

Rustlers had been cleared too, but it was the same old Rustlers Ridge, tree-rooted and bits of bog in places.
Then we were down on the contoured Pipeline track, level – did I say level? – all the way except for its now many ups and downs.
And its boggy bits get not better. Except, that  someone has where possible put sodded tracks alongside some of the worst of them. Except for the following one.

Remember the detour that led around to the Burns Creek weir crossing? Well, it’s still there, but now relegated to redundancy. The former disused track that lead down to the old non-existent bridge, has been reopened and steps dug down into the creek and back up the farther side.

Whom to thank for all the track work we benefited from today? The Green Hut group? Task Force Green? Well, thanks all, anyway. You made it all so much easier and pleasanter.

Then it was just onto the really level part of the Pipeline track, past the foot of the Burns Track, out the old Waitati Road and up the cars. As you can see from the pics, we were well wrapped up, we survived and enjoyed a good workout. – Ian.

25. 24/3/2010. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy Ridge Track, return Burns Track, Pipeline Track. Moderate.

Today was the first time we tried out the track since it had replaced the steep stepped boardwalk two years ago.

 

It turned out to be an excellent tightly-packed gravel path bordered all the way to the lookout with staked sides. In contrast to the former stepped boardwalk, (a few of whose boards had also suffered breakages), we encountered no steps until well up the hillside. (This didn’t exclude some quite steep slopes also at times.) But what a path!

Doug and Sabina stop for a chat on the track.

On the steeper slope past the lookout excellent steps had replaced the former scramble. It was gravel with occasional heavy metal all the way, past Swampy Spur right up the telecommunications tower at the top.

As we walked along swampy ridge, the glint of sunshine on cones of the doppler radar navigation complex caught our attention

Further on, as we turned off swampy to go across and down to the Burns Saddle for lunch, we found the track to be beautifully cleared for most of the way. Thanks to the clearers.

We found parts of the Burns Track well cleared also, but prior to entering the bush it was so heavily covered by what appeared to be rank hook grass (but fortunately seedless at this stage) that we could detect the track only by pushing through by feel. Down at the bottom, the pipeline track had been recently mown making for easy walking. Then it was up the road and back to the cars. Seven of us ventured out. It was a good day. – Ian.

24. 24/11/2008 Trampers. Leith Saddle, Rustlers Ridge, Swampy, Leith Saddle Tracks. Leaders: Peter & Wendy

Once again the weather forecast was chancy but nine of us had the best of the day, striking rain just as we got back to the cars at the end. From just a little way down the Waitati road from the Leith Saddle, by a bridge where we parked our cars, we made our way up to and then along the nicely level Waitati-Leith pipe-line track (that takes water to Sullivans Dam), passing the foot of the Burns track and going further along to the Rustlers as we had decided to do the circuit anti-clockwise this time. Rustlers proved well cleared and we made our way easily up to the crossing junction of the 4 tracks, viz. Rustlers Ridge (and the extension of Rustlers up to Swampy Summit) and Burns (and the Burns extension to the Swampy Ridge track further north) and early-lunched at 11.30 a.m.

 

Lunch at Rustlers-Burns. Wendy, Peter, Glenice

Lunch at Rustlers-Burns intersection. Wendy, Peter, Glenice

 

Lunch at track junction. George, Hazel, Pat, Bill

Lunch at track junction. George, Hazel, Pat, Bill

Returning on the Burns, we soon crossed the Burns Creek…

Burns Creek crossing. Sabina, Hazel, Glenice, Bill Pat, Wendy

Burns Creek crossing. Sabina, Hazel, Glenice, Bill, Pat, Wendy

…and enjoyed the walk through the flax and later the bush, back down to the pipe line and out to the cars. We heard a bell-bird and two or three grey warblers but that was all. We enjoyed the bush and were rewarded by the magnificent views. – Ian

 23. 29/10/2008. Trampers. Burns-Rustler. Medium-. Leaders: Leonie, George, Ria L

22. 24/10/2007. Trampers. Rustlers, Burns. Medium. Leaders: Wendy and Peter.
21. 20/9/2006 Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, return Rustlers Ridge. Leaders: Ian, Sabina
20. 1/9/2005. Both. Burns, Rustlers. Shirley, Bruce, Doug M, Bob and Nadia, Kerri
19. 20/10/2004. Both. Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, return Burns Track. Leaders: Barbara M, Val, Arthur and Barbara.
Dunedin from Swampy. Pat

Dunedin from Swampy. Pat

View

View?

18. 2/7/2003. Trampers. Burns – Rustler Track. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Ian.

On Swampy Summit

Crssg3

Sign on Tracks' Crossing

Snow on Burns Track

Rustlers Track Sign

Near end of tramp. On pipeline.
17. 25/9/2002. Leith Saddle – Rustler Track. Medium. Leaders: Hazel, Bill and Pat.
16. 8/5/2002. Alt. Burns – Rustler. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Joyce, Val.
15. 26/9/2001. Leith Saddle, Rustlers. Medium. Leaders: Claude, Les and Margaret.
14. 31/1/2001. Rustler – Burns Track. Leaders: Nancy, Frank and Lesley.
13. 7/9/2000 Leaders: Bob & Nadia, Shirley
12. 12/7/2000. Leith Saddle – Rustler Track. Leaders: Bob H, Shirley McN, Val.
 11. 9/2/2000. Burns – Rustler Track. Leaders: Eleanor, Bev McI, Daphne.
10. 31/1/2000 Burns-Rustler. Leaders: Nancy, Frank & Lesley
9. 10/2/1999. Burns – Rustler Tracks. Eleanor, Nancy, Lesley S.
8. 30/9/1998. Pigeon Flat, Swampy, Burns Track. Leaders: Ted, Les W.
7. 15/9/1998 Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, return Rustlers Ridge. Leaders: Les W
6. 1/7/1997 Leith Saddle, Gold Trail return Swampy Spur Leaders: Jack & Rosemary, Daphne
5. 11/11/1996 Leith Saddle, Gold Trail return Swampy Spur Leaders: Bev H, Ria L
4. 30/8/1995. Pigeon Flat, Swampy Spur, Burns Track. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Doug and Ngaire, Ted.
3. 13/5/1992. Burns Rustler Track. Combined bush and open country. Great views. Average. Leaders: George, Margaret S, Ivan & Bev
2. 18/10/1989 Burns Rustler Track. Average+ Native Bush. Leaders: Bob H, George H, Mary Y, Margaret S
1. 10/2/1989 Burns Rustler Track. Leaders: Eleanor B, Nancy, Lesley S

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Jul 19 2017

West Harbour Recreation Trail

Published by under Hikers

6. 19/7/2017. Hikers. Boat Harbour to St Leonards ret. Leaders: Bev and Judy.
21 hikers parked at the Otago yacht Club and walked the cycle/walkway to St Leonards and back, a total of 11 ks.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

21 hikers parked at the Otago yacht Club and walked the cycle/walkway to St Leonards and back, a total of 11 ks – not bad for a mid-winter day with planned hikes cancelled due to illness of leaders.  Morning tea was had on the yacht club verandah as it was still a bit chilly.  With a cold breeze in our faces we stepped it out briskly …

Walkway name. (Ian pic and caption.)

A ship. (Ian pic and caption.)

… to St Leonards where lunch was eaten with a bit of sunshine to help.  The return trip saw us well spread out with unfit ones like myself dragging the chain a bit at the back of the pack.  We were reunited at the University coffee shop where a pleasant social hour was spent. – Judy.

5. 13/1/2016 Hikers. Ravensbourne – Burks – St Leonards. Leaders: Judy and Adrienne, Helen.
Route map

Route map

We parked cars down below the Ravensbourne Hotel and took the walkway to Burkes where we morning-tead.

Cuppa in bus shelter

Cuppa in bus shelter

Cuppa on lawn

Cuppa on lawn

We took the old road to St Leonards reflecting on its probably origin as just a track through the bush following the easiest gradient. We turned up Kiwi Street, along Kaka Street, admiring well-kept properties there, down Pukeko  and along past St Leonards Hall and the school. Up Ruru to view the mock Tudor House.

Tudor house by the harbour

Tudor house by the harbour

Down again  to front past the University Lodge  Gates, and next it, St Leonards Lodge. Then along to St Leonards Park for lunch.

Ready for sun or shower

Sun/shower security.

Ladies on the lawn

Ladies on the lawn.

Returning back to the cars we were relieved the cold southerly had abated somewhat. Thanks to Judy, Adrienne and Helen for excellent leadership. – Ian.

4. 29/10/2014 Hikers. Ravensbourne Walkway. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

On the 29th October a very good group of hikers started off from the boat club on from the stadium. The day was cool to start with then got warm and sunny.
Pub

Harbour View Hotel (John Pic)

What a pleasure it is to walk on this wonderful walkway. There was so much going on in the harbour and train tracks. A very large goods train sped past us
Train

Train (John pic)

and a not very tidy rail car …
Shabby railcar (John pic)

Shabby railcar (John pic)

… I thought was up and down the track a few times.
The $12million Otago tug
Tug

Tug (John pic)

chuffed along the channel following [Tug illustration chosen shows the tug going the other way earlier. Sorry. Ed.] a cargo ship …
Ship. (John caption)

Ship. (John pic)

… going to the Dunedin wharf.
Lunch stop was very sheltered, with plenty to watch on the walkway – runners … cyclists … mums with prams …
Two of our group caught the eye of another group and had their photo taken which was published in the Star local paper on Thursday 30th.
I was very taken with a stone sofa on the side of the walkway.
Looking very nonchalant (John pic, Fred caption)

Looking very nonchalant! (John pic, Fred caption)

Who made it and how long has it been there?
All up we walked over 10km Lets hope this walkway does find its way to Port Chalmers in the future.
We spoke to a young girl on the track from Uni. She was part of a group of students from the Mining dept. She was amazed when Mollie told her how old she was. Then Doug came striding along and I said he was the same age. She was very impressed with us.
We had a coffee at the Plaza which is the cafe at the stadium in the uni part.
Have a good week everyone. – Elaine.
3. 27/3/2013 Hikers. Pedestrian-Cycle Track Rowing Club to St Leonards. E. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
GPS

“GPS” of route.

ship

LPG tanker viewed from walkway

2. 9/3/2011. Hikers Pedestrian/Cycle track North End Rowing Club to Maia E. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

1. 17/6/2009 Hikers Pedestrian/Cycle track North End Rowing Club to Maia E $4.00 Leaders: Lois & Lance

7 members (Molly, Neil, Lois, Lance, Bev, Margaret and Angela) set off at 10am from the University Aquatic Centre (just north of the Boat Harbour, via Leander St- opposite Butts Road on the way to Port Chalmers beside Palmers Quarry – now known as Shiel Concrete) for a brisk stroll to the Ravensbourne Yacht Club, stopping a while for morning tea.

From there we proceeded to Maia crossing the railway line at Hume Pipeworks, opposite the Ravensbourne Hotel, which looked closed for the winter.

There are extensive notices in yellow & red advising one NOT to cross the railway line but in this case we had no alternative as the walkway from the Ravensbourne yacht club proceeded on the left-hand side of the yacht club on the site of the second railway line which has since been removed.

Upon leaving Maia we proceeded up Ascog Road & along Totara St and down Adderley Terrace to the Ravensbourne Hotel, across the road to the overbridge at the Ravensbourne Yacht club and back to the cars.

The walk took approx 1 1/2 hours and because of the cool temperatures and accompanying wind chill factor it was decided to go home for lunch.

An enjoyable walk taking 3 hours (includes an hour travelling time) – Angela.

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May 24 2017

Botanic Garden, Logan Park, Northern Cemetery, Chingford

Published by under Hikers

Distance from carpark: 20 km.

21. 24/5/2017. Hikers. Botanic Garden and Logan Park. E. Leader: Marjorie.

28 hikers set off from the Gardens car park for a leisurely wander up to the azalea garden for morning tea. The fact that two groups became separated from the leading group, due to the multiple track system, reminded the leader of the need to regroup frequently. All reached the morning tea area…

Clive pic.

…and from there we proceeded out to Lovelock Avenue and entered the bush area, then proceeding up the track…

Clive pic.

…to the top of the cemetery. We walked through the cemetery on the main track,

Clive pic.

stopping to view the Thomas Bracken tombstone, and then followed the track through the bush to Logan Park car park. An easy stroll followed along Butts Road, through the area of the Sports Academy (old art gallery), along the sports field and back along the track on Butts Road. The 250 steps of Abbs Way were a good work out bringing us back to superb views over the city.

Clive pic.

Continuing up through the cemetery with a short detour to the Larnach tomb had us back into Lovelock Bush and then to the azalea garden for lunch. We ended the hike with a walk through the geographic gardens area and the bird aviaries, then down to the lower gardens where most of us had coffee at the Crocodile café. Some of the planned route had to be abandoned due to the closure of tracks for tree cutting but suitable alternatives were available. Although the overall distance was fairly short the steeper areas provided sufficient exercise. The Gardens were in their autumnal colourful splendour and there were many points of interest in the Gardens and the cemetery which made for a diverse and interesting day. – Marjorie.

20. 19/10/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh, Botanic Garden. E. Leaders: Dot and Bev.

Route Map (Courtesy Ian.)

Route Map. (Courtesy Ian.) A delightful Ramblers-style walk in the blaze of the Spring-blossomed Botanic Garden. – Ian.

Wednesday saw 25 happy hikers assemble in Duke St at the back of Woodhaugh Gardens to enjoy what proved to be a very relaxed and pleasant day out. We walked through bush tracks to emerge in the children’s play area, where some ‘older children’ couldn’t resist the challenge of a small flying fox,

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

and then on to the paddling pool section where we sat and enjoyed an unhurried morning tea break.

From there it was out to George St. and a walk along to the Gardens corner to enable us to cross to the Botanic Gardens with the safety of the traffic lights.

We walked right through the Gardens to the exit at Gore St. which we didn’t use but turned up the track to take us to Upper Gardens. From there we wandered round quite a few tracks that a lot of people hadn’t been on before. These took us through areas of bush, the rhododendron dell, and other not so well known areas of the Gardens.

We arrived at our designated lunch spot by 11.45 a.m. but nobody seemed to mind an early and extended lunch hour. Everyone took their time over lunch and from there were free to wander the Gardens at their own pace, meeting again at main gate at 1.30pm to walk back to, and through, Woodhaugh Gardens to the cars.

The Dunedin Botanic Gardens are looking beautiful and are well tended and maintained. Certainly well worth visiting at any time of the year.

Coffee stop was Plaza Café. – Bev.

19. 30/9/2015. Hikers. Logan Park. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Hikers' GPS

GPSs of route, courtesy Bruce.

Report on hikers’ trip to Logan Park 30 September 2015

Twenty-four hikers, including three students on holiday, set off, on a sunny spring morning, from the Gardens Car Park, opposite Mecure Dunedin Leisure Lodge, at 9.30 am and walked near the Gardens perimeter in a clockwise direction. We appreciated the new bark covered walkway near the themes of sculpturing hedge plants (topiary), coloured plants and plants with fragrancies. We went through the Clive Lister garden and after crossing the bridge viewed the brown trout sculpture near the duck pond commemorating the early breeding of trout in the Opoho Creek ponds in the 1860s. After looking at the two Peter and Wendy themed sculptures we crossed the stream and made our way up hill through the middle of the gardens for morning tea at 10.05 am at the Azalea/Rhododendron dell lawn area.

Refreshed, we passed through the Lovelock Bush on the other side of the road, went up the path and crossed Opoho Park to the right of the rugby club rooms to turn right into Opoho Road and then left into Warden Street. We proceeded to Opoho School at the end of Warden Street and then turned to the right down the driveway at the end of Blacks Road. We passed to the left of a tree at the end of the driveway to proceed downhill on a public walkway, that was initially covered with bark. The advance description of the hike noted that, “Some of the paths are very good, others are steep and less well formed.” The descent from Blacks Road to the Opoho Creek matched the latter description more than the former. Some bird song was heard in this area and a pair of tuis observed. The native bush, including large pungas was quite dense …

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

… and Jennifer noted that it was possible, at one time, to hear other trampers but not see them. The track followed alongside the Opoho Creek to a curved bridge where it met a mountain bike track. We continued downhill on this better track (right turn) and came to the remnants of the 1868 Opoho Creek trout breeding ponds about 75 m further along.

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We then continued downhill on the mountain bike trail until we came to a pile of gravel on the right when the playing fields of Logan Park school were visible and turned left up the Marshall mountain bike trail for approximately 50 metres where a large rock was present and then turned right contouring through bush towards a white cloth marker on a tree (Just above the rock in a sign, seen from the uphill side, on a tree with red and green arrows). We went slightly downhill, for about 20 m, to a ledge (part of a trail) and then up and to the right towards another white marker (20 m) and then straight ahead for 20 m to come to the Pelichet Bay rifle butt remains, a stone structure about 20 m long and 2 m high.

 Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We noted the hidden geocache container in the region.

The white cloth marker track led out the other end of the butts and turned to the right to cross a stream (a few metres above a steep descent in the stream where some brave souls saw the need to provide themselves with additional challenges by crossing here). We went downhill on an angle for 30 m and then uphill and to the right for another 30 m to a yellow marker and then followed the track out to the main Signal Hill mountain bike track and then down this to the top mown field at Logan Park to stop for lunch on the sheltered sunny north facing bank at 12.05 pm.

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Some required sun burn lotion to be applied.

After lunch we crossed the broad track above the mown field, on the left edge of the unmown rough area, to reach the gravelled track on the north side of the gully. About 100 m down this, on the top of a slight rise, the groups split into two. Les kindly led a group back to the car park via the gravel track to Dundas Street and then Leith Street. The others arrived about 30 minutes later after ascending the track through the bush on the right, up and to the right, to the corner of Opoho Park by the playground.

From there they crossed to the left hand end of the pine trees on the west side of the park, past the happy ribbon tree,

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

across to the top of the cemetery by the path, through a small part of the cemetery, back through the Lovelock Bush, over the road, downhill through the rhododendron dells, down a native bush path turning to the right down some steps just before the bridge and down a long board walk to Lovelock Avenue which featured a view of a large broadleaf tree that was just a seedling in the early days of Dunedin in 1844. We emerged on Lovelock Avenue just above the memorial stone and re-entered the gardens about 30 m further on to follow the excellent track above the left bank of the Leith Stream back to the car park.

Many had afternoon tea at the Croc-o-Dile.

The bush above the fish breeding ponds in Opoho Creeks was noticeably denser with more moisture than that near the conifers and manuka/kanuka near the rifle butts, and on the hillside between the school fields and Opoho Park. The track descending from Blacks Road to Opoho Creek may be better suited to trampers than hikers and future alternatives would include going from the car park to Lovelock Avenue along the left bank of the Leith track, walking on the streets to Logan Park school, and visiting the fish pond with a dog leg walk up the good quality mountain bike track.

Distance travelled: 8.2 km.

Bruce and Marjorie.

18. 8/10/2014.Hikers. Logan Park, Gardens, University. E. Leaders: Janice and Theresa.

Route

Route. Parked Logan Park HS. 1km: top of Northern Cemetery; 2km: Entering Upper Gardens; 3km: At the Worm; 4km: Near duck pond; 5km: Into Nth Leith St; 6km: Point where Leith turns towards the Harbour; 7km: coffee at University Plaza Cafe.

26 of us parked at the Logan Park High School, closed at the time for the school holidays. Walked further around Butts Road and climbed St Abbs Place steps to Brackens Lookout. Went into the Northern Cemetery to William Larnach’s tomb. Wandered around cemetery to find Brackens grave. Had morning tea amongst the graves, sheltered from the wind by a hedge of bushes. Came back out and climbed up the track behind the new planting out buildings of the Botanic Garden. Entered the Upper Garden at the top corner and went through them into the Rhododendron Dell. Came back up and across to the Mediterranean Garden Terrace.

Mediterranean

Mediterranean Garden Terrace

Next, went down to the flat and admired the Ouroboros stainless steel worm sculpture, designed to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Botanic Garden.

worm

Ouroboros worm sculpture

Walked through to the Gardens Corner exit and made our way along to the Woodhaugh Gardens for lunch on a set of some conveniently sheltered seats.

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch finished, we made our way across the gardens via the Duck Pond to Duke Street. We stopped and wondered at the white spanish type building at the foot of the Bullock Track, but no one could shed any light on it’s design origins. We continued down Duke Street into Nth Leith St, into Montgomery Avenue to cross the St David Street pedestrian bridge and to wander along the grass frontage to the original University Buildings, admiring the stepped Leith Stream flood works still underway. We emerged onto the Dundas Street pedestrian bridge, making our way through various newer buildings, past a fruit and vegetable co-op to return alongside the Leith Stream again. We crossed and recrossed this, emerging at last onto Anzac Avenue.

Tramp’s end now in sight, we had to sit down outside Plaza Cafe on the University Plaza adjacent to the Forsyth Barr Stadium to ponder whether to get our (now) customary coffee shot before or after getting back to the cars. Most decided before, several after. This, with much thought, determined and accomplished, wound up the tramp for the day.

Thanks to Jan and Theresa for a successfully conducted tramp, losing none of our straggling party through the many twists and turns of the day. The threatened rain held off and cool  temperatures made for good tramping conditions. A good day out, through many varied locations. Again, thanks Jan and Theresa. – Ian.

17. 11/9/2013. Hikers. Botanic Garden – Bracken View – Rhododendron Dell – Northern Cemetery. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
Last Wednesday 29 hikers turned up at the car park, led by the Woodfields. A nice sunny day.
We started at lower car park at the Botanic Garden and walked our way up the paths in the garden. We stopped at the Mediterranean Garden Terrace for the tea break and enjoyed the lovely cake made by Hazel for George’s Birthday.
The magnolia trees were just starting to show their blooms and the early rhododendrons were out. Roll on October when the main ones bloom.
Blossom
Lunch was at a grassy area at the upper garden. George, who was 85 – did you know GEORGE WAS 85? – shouted a lot of lovely brut,  bubbly and nibbles. This was a wonderful time …. How many of us will be still hiking around when we are 85? As usual we had lots of laughs.
We visited the northern cemetery and looked at the  William Larnach tomb and then we worked our way down through the Garden.
I think everyone had a good day as there certainly was a lot of talking going on.
Some of the group finished of the day at the Topiary Cafe at Wals Plantland  in Mosgiel for coffee with warm pikelets and cream and carrot cake.
Being retired is so good. – Elaine
 16. 23/5/2012. Hikers. Botanic Garden. Leaders: A & B Landrebe.

15. 26/10/2011. Hikers. Botanic Garden.

14. 17/11/2010 Dunedin Botanic Garden. Leader: Bev.
13. 11/11/2009 Hikers. Upper Gardens, Rhodendron Vale, Northern Cemetery, Aviary. Leaders: Lance and Lois
(Bill pic)

Just representational of the Rodo gardens and borders. Many of our group enjoyed guessing names of rhodos but there are so many, especially hybrids, that to get one right is near impossible. (Bill pic and caption)

 

(Bill pic)

Morning tea interest group. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Best to just listen. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Knarled convolutions. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Northern Cemetery. Another place worth a further (temp. only) visit. It was noticeable so soon after 31st October how many large cracks in the plastering there were. Do they repair these each year? (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Palmers Quarry. (Is that apostrophe s or s apostrophe? Probably apostrophe s.) This stop-to-view coincided with 11.11.11. and I wasn’t sure which bangs were quarrying blasts and which were cannon shots. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds. Thanks DCC. They got this one right. What a great use for a stadium. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds(2). (Bill pic and caption)

12. 25/6/2008. Woodhaugh, Botanic Gardens and Northern Cemetery. Leaders:
After some concerns about the weather the day before, we were pleased to wake up to relatively clear skies and no wind. The decision was made to proceed with our mid winter ramble in Woodhaugh and the Botanic Gardens and all fourteen participants set off enthusiastically. There was certainly a nip in the air and snow on the surrounding hills encouraged us to walk briskly along the banks of the Leith and around some of the well maintained bush paths. Sheds 3 and 4 provided shelter for our morning tea break and then we headed across the busy highways via Willowbank and Leisure Lodge to enter the Botanic Gardens. A stiff hill climb levelled out in the rhododendron area, the bushes bare of flowers but still sporting lush green leaves. Crossing Lovelock Avenue, we entered Lovelock Bush, to shortly emerge at the reservoir.
There followed a circuit of the northern cemetery. A warming sun came through the grey sky to enable us to proceed more leisurely and take in some of the interesting sights and historic old tombstones as well as admiring the sculptured trunks of the even older trees.
Lunch with the ducks

A rest at the cemetery

We made a fairly brisk descent to the lower Gardens via the aviary where the birds were in fine, if raucous, voice.

The Shakespeare Gardens

The Shakespeare Gardens

It was warm enough to eat lunch on the seats overlooking the duck pond and lower gardens where we were soon joined by hopeful seagulls, one drake and a blackbird. Some took the opportunity for a quick look at the information centre and glasshouses
Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

before we returned to the cars, well satisfied with our outing and happy to get off home before the weather deteriorated. – Marjorie
11. 19/11/2008 Botanic Gardens, NEV street walk, Chingford Park ret. Leaders: Graham.
Botanic Gardens - Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

Botanic Gardens – Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

The programme said “Chingford” but Graeme, our leader realised that it alone would not extend us, so we began at the Botanical Gardens carpark, completed numerous walks along Gardens paths, had morning tea among the rhododendrons, Continue Reading »

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May 17 2017

Mount Hyde Station

Published by under Lambing Sep-Nov,Trampers,Year round

No. 5 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mt Hyde to Taieri River. Aqueduct. D Moir. Farm. Lambing.”
Location: 23.5 km. Lambing September-November.
14. 17/5/2017. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leader: Neil.
A good turn out of 12 keen individuals to spend a few hours exploring the route to Taieri river and pipeline from Mt Hyde.The day was fine and overcast and very pleasant for a walk in the hills. Left the cars about 9:30 am and proceeded round the side of Mt Hyde and then started a steady descent down to the pipeline bridge.Had a stop at about 10:10 to keep everyone happy and the views around the river valley were quite spectacular. Wandered across the bridge

(Margreet pic.)

between the two pipes

(Keith pic.)

and comments were made about OSH rules in building something like this today. A 20 minute return trip up the hill over the fence and turned right to follow a farm track through several gullies and a couple of ridges before leading down to the gravel by the river. Proceeded upstream and found the old flying fox…

(Keith pic.)

…giving access across the river. No one seemed very keen to give it a go. Retraced our steps down river and started the return climb up the hill. At about 12 o’clock lunch was suggested but the majority wanted to go a bit further on an empty stomach as this would be easier. So we climbed about halfway up before stopping , where the view was again pretty good. There was only once that the talking had almost ceased on this uphill climb; an interesting observation!!!!  After lunch the track leveled out a little and the section to the top was a little easier. Arrived back at the cars at about 2:00 pm (I think).

Keith’s calculations:: Walked 10 km,  380 metres climb fromthe river to cars. .
Trundled back to the Wobbly Goat for a coffee and debrief, where a few wobbly goats were seen getting out of cars. Ha Ha!!!
A great tramping day that everyone appeared to enjoy. – Neil.
13. 27/2/2013. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. 9.25 km; 2h 33m; moving ave. 3.6km/h; climbed 561m.
Morning Tea

Morning tea break.

Taieri gorge train looking like a model train set

Taieri gorge train looking like a model train set

Ian on the Flying Fox

Ian on the Flying Fox

12. 17/11/2010. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Ken, Doug.

9 of us squeezed into 2 cars for the trip. Although we were on 4WD tracks all the way, over-night rain had left the grass soaking wet. We had received permission as the lambs were now well developed.

GPS of tramp, courtesy Ken. Follow anticlockwise. 11 km.

The road down to the bridge was as steep as ever, with fresh crushed metal on the lower portion rolling under our boots.

Arch structure of aquaduct.

We enjoyed morning tea on the bridge and admired the spring growth on river-side and banks. Evident on the bridge are the larger Deep Stream pipe and the smaller Deep Creek Pipe. It is they that carry the yellowy brown peat water to Mt Grand to be miraculously transformed into our pure drinking water.

Morning Tea on Viaduct at Mt Hyde (Ken pic and caption)

Distant view of Aquaduct.

When we arrived at our furthest point up-river, we were struck by the beauty of the smooth water.

Unruffled

A scramble up a bank and we were at the flying fox that George and Ria had promised to show us.

Keith in flying fox. (Ken pic and caption)

We then lunched by the stream.

Lunch on Mt Hyde by river. (Ken pic and caption)

We continued our circuit, climbing up the 4WD track under the power-lines, across paddocks and back to the cars. Another great day. The rain held off. Perfect. – Ian.
11. 16/4/2008. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Ken, Sabina.

Only 5 who braved the misty start to the day were rewarded with a great tramp on Mt Hyde station. The highlight of course was the
graceful arched aqueduct of Dunedin’s Deep Stream Pipeline traverse of the Taieri River.

Willow trees aligning waterways were at their autumnal golden glory and a plentiful harvest of mushrooms promised an appetizing garnish to the evening meal. Finding ourselves above the mist at the start, we steeply descended through some damp cloud to clear air nearer the river, enjoying a dry morning tea amongst a manuka stand on the way. We lingered long on the aqueduct, drinking in all the beauty of the river to the song of a nearby bellbird.

Then we had to re-ascend steeply for a short distance back up the way we had come until we could join a side track that paralleled the river upstream and descended to flats near where the Mullocky Stream debouches its meagre flow. Lunching on the gravel by the water we were pleasantly entertained by flights of paradise ducks and Canada geese up and down the river.
We elected to reconnect with the track by way of a very steep grassed gully, our footing thankfully assisted by cattle beast hoof marks. As we climbed ever higher, we got great views of the Taieri Gorge railway on the other side of the river and of the Wingatui Viaduct in the distance across the Mullocky.
Finally reaching the track again, it happily proved an easier gradient than the gully we had emerged from. A steady ascent, easing off later and we reached our car by about 2.00 p.m. Some steep work, but plenty of time to do it in. In all, a vindication for those willing to give the day a try, despite an unpromising beginning. – Ian
10. 11/4/2007. Trampers. Mount Hyde, Viaduct. Medium+. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
9. 19/7/2006. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Shirley.
8. 11/12/2002. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Hazel, Graham, Molly.
7. 8/8/2001. Mount Hyde. Medium+. Leaders: Lex, Hazel, Molly.
6. 27/1/1999. Mount Hyde to Taieri River. Leaders: George, Lex, Colleen.
5. 17/5/1995. Mount Hyde. Medium. Shorter trip available. Leaders: Nancy, Judy C, Colleen, Judith D.
4. 26/1/1994. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Les and Margaret, Doug M.
3. 5/2/1992. Mount Hyde. An interesting tramp. Average+. Leaders: Nancy, Margaret D, Peggy M, Barbara McC
2. 3/5/1989. Mount Hyde to Taieri River via aqueduct. Leaders: Ria.
1. 12/10/1988 Mount Hyde on George King Memorial Drive. Very interesting tramp to Taieri River, crossing via pipeline bridge. Leaders: Daphne, Hugh and Jean, Ria, Kaas.

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Mar 15 2017

Akatore Farm Walk or Beach Walk

Published by under Hikers

No. 78 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Knarston Park Sth Coast (Ask Jean Young) Farm”
Akatore Farm permission required. (Ask Bob.)
Distance Livingstonia Park from car park: 31.5 km.
Distance Akatore Farm from carpark: abt 36?
13. 15/3/2017. Hikers. Akatore Farm, Stream and Beach. H. Leaders: Bob and Lesley.

Route Map, courtesy Clive. Cars parked up from lunch spot. Distance walked: about 8.5 km.
                     

Bob lead 24 Hikers down the road to the bridge over the Akatore River,where we sat in the sun for morning tea.

Morning tea across the Akatore Bridge in the sun. (Ian pic and caption.)

The tide was low enabling us to walk along the estuary,to the coast.This included a few moments of rock hugging,with many helping hands to get around a bluff.

Rock hopping and climbing. (Clive pic and caption.)

A few people declined and returned to the road,to be picked up by Braden,Bob son,on his farm “mule”and some rejoined the group.

Akatore Creek mouth. (Clive pic and caption.)

It was a clear,sunny day,with little wind and the journey along farm tracks,above the rocks,was good hiking.We lunched and explored at a private beach, …

Kevin emerging from a cave on the beach at the lunch stop. (Ian pic and caption.)

… then climbed the hill back to the cars,completing about 9km.

It’s all uphill after lunch. (Clive pic and caption.)

It was a different route on a favourite area,enjoyed by all, with coffee at Wals. – Lesley.

12. 5/10/2016. Trampers. Akatore Farm and Beach. E. Leader: Arthur H.
The windscreen wipers worked away as the bus took us for our tramps, the Hikers being dropped off first to walk the Millennium Track from the Henley end.
The Trampers were taken to Taieri Mouth, and then down the Akatore Road to the Taieri Beach Road, where we dismounted.
It was right on 10 o’clock, so morning tea was attended to as the first priority. A convenient ledge sheltered us from the cool breeze and light rain.
We walked down a long paddock to reach the sea. The paddock being recently cultivated was quite sticky from the rain. Our boots grew in size somewhat.

It was quite a relief to reach a lovely sandy beach, with the tide well out.

Down on beach copy. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down on beach copy. (Helen pic and caption.)

Turning right, we headed south, aiming for the mouth of Akatore Creek. The light rain was easing off slowly and after a while desisted altogether.
Along the beach, then it was up in the paddocks briefly to avoid a difficult patch of rocks.
It was most pleasant following the coastline. Interesting rocks, some small sandy beaches and sandy patches interrupted the mostly rock.
Lovely beach. Helen pic and caption.)

Lovely beach. Helen pic and caption.)

Quite a lot of bird life was evident – lots of seagulls of course, oyster-catchers, pied stilts, a pair of terns overhead, and paradise ducks out in the paddock.
After inspecting an interesting cave, we had to climb up to the paddocks for a little. Descending again, we had a nice grassy strip of grass to follow, above the rocks.
We came to the Akatore Creek mouth at 12 noon. It was almost low tide, and with a considerable flow of water exiting the creek.

Lunch was partaken of in the shelter of a steep bank, with some lovely yellow flowers about The breeze was quite light, but cool.

Lunch spot at Akatore Creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch spot at Akatore Creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

The next leg of our journey wass uphill through the farm paddocks. A large mob of very friendly dairy heifers followed us along the fenceline as far as they could.

At the top of the hill we devoured a little to the left to get a good view looking down onto the Akatore estuary and environs.

Road and tidal area. (Helen pic and caption.)

Road and tidal area. (Helen pic and caption.)

Out onto the road, we followed it for two kilometres to arrive back at our starting point at 1.35 p.m.

A little early for the bus, we walked the road to Taieri Mouth. Downhill was easy. A very friendly pet lamb wanted to join our group after escaping from his paddock. But we had to be firm! Near the Taieri Beach School is an animal park (closed) where we glimpsed various species, including alpacas, geese, deer and ostriches(?).
We kept walking along the road, not so enjoyable but many interesting houses and backyards could be viewed in Taieri Mouth. Eventually we came in sight of the bridge over the Taieri River and the bus parked at the southern end of it.
The Trampers came to the bus at 2.45, soon after the Hikers had finished. There had been seven in our group today, our distance travelled: 14.5 km maybe(?) (using a small-scale road map to estimate from) – please come back soon, Margreet!
The bus delivered us all back to Mosgiel, after which may invaded “Wals”, creating mayhem with the tables, but it was a good finish to the day. – Arthur.
11. 23/9/2015. Hikers. Akatore Farm and Beach. E. Leaders: Bob and Leslie.
Twenty-nine of us parked at the farm’s stock yards and walked back north along the road to enter a neighbouring property, go through past the homestead, out into paddocks and down to the coast for morning tea.
<Click here to see a video John took of our morning tea spot beach side area>
A rocky knoll tempted two or three of us to climb it and view the surroundings from there.
On top of knoll. (John pic)

On top of knoll. (John pic)

View from knoll. (Bob pic)

View from top of knoll. (Bob pic)

We climbed back out, this time heading south parallel to the coastline through paddocks, some grassed and one being freshly being turned over with a large six-furrow plough. We walked for a while down along beach and rocks …
Down to beach

Down to beach

A seaside conversation

A seaside conversation

… before being obliged by the high tide to return up the the paddocks. Eventually we reached the Akatore mouth. And what a sight. What had formerly been a gentle rock-hugging stream was now a wide mouth of breaking surf from the near side right across to the farther one.
New Akatore mouth 1. (John pic)

New Akatore mouth 1. (John pic)

New Akatore mouth 2 (John pic)

New Akatore mouth 2 (John pic)

No beach, or none at this tide level. Bob led us along the outside of a fence upstream just a little to descend a steep back to a new beach where once the stream had flowed. He had provided us with a huge hawser rope tied to the fence and lengthened at its end with a strapping belt stretching right down to the new beach.
New beach. (John pic)

New beach. (John pic)

With its aid, we all made our way safely down the cliff-face, …

2nd descent

2nd descent

… each doing so in our own fashion.

We lunched there, finding seating on lumpy dry marram grass, on the new beach of sand that must have been metres deep. What a powerful transformation the high seas had made of the old mouth we had become accustomed to.
New stream mouth

New Akatore mouth (See below in 2011 report, click on video of old creek mouth)

After lunch, Bob led us up the true left edge of the stream along an edge made very narrow with an ebbing tide that still had a long way to retreat. At the first point there was no option but to make one’s way around rock still surrounded by shallow water. Never mind. The rest of the way was dry, if pebbled with rocks larger and smaller in places, sandy in others. We made our way then up to the bridge where Bob introduced us to that steep road climb that takes one right up from sea level to the top where the road first turns down. It made for a good workout, giving hikers with their varying energy levels the chance to brave the climb at their own pace. However, beside the rope provision back at the lunch stop, behold there had also been Bob’s ute sitting down at the bridge for any who didn’t relish the prospect of the climb. But bravo, no one took it. And Bob was noble enough to leave it standing there, true to his leadership role, and climb with the rest, with the intention of  walking back down later to retrieve it. Noble? Would might even say silly not to enjoy ride back up in triumphant style. Painful certainly, this reporter imagines. It’s a long hill climb to the top. Good on yer, Bob.
(It was too bad the ‘Nike + Running’ app fell over in a big way and has had to be re-down-loaded, – so no GPS record this time). This was a most interesting tramp, a replacement for the original one that had to be abandoned due to lambing. We all enjoyed the experience of a route the club had not done before, now made possible by the mighty changes the ocean had wrought on the Akatore’s mouth, and exploited by Bob. So thank you Bob (and sister Leslie!) for the planning and the advance provision of rope and ute. Great leadership! – Ian.
10. 26/11/2014. Hikers. Akatore Farm and Beach. E. Leaders: Leslie and Bev.
GPS of route

GPS of route

 

Cuppa - John

Cuppa. (John pic)

Lunch panorama

Lunch panorama. (John pic)

Got comfortable yet?

Comfortable? (John pic)

Chicks

Paradise Duck Chicks in pond.

26/6/2013. Trampers. Livingstonia Park to Akatore. Beach Walk.

On a day that could’ve turned to rain, [according to the forecast] 8 trampers turned up for the walk from Taieri Mouth to Akatore. This is a challenging walk over the beach rocky outcrops, with some easier sandy sections for good measure. In some places it is safer to take to the farm paddocks to bypass some deep splits in the rocks. We had morning tea at the carpark before leaving, as it was already 10am, then headed off down the beach. We reached the river mouth at about 12:30, & went in search of a sheltered spot to have lunch, as a bit of a wind had come up, making it a little unpleasant.
Lunch at Akatore River mouth. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at Akatore River mouth. Pic has Pat obscured behind Eric. (Ken pic and caption)

We then retraced our steps, with two of the group deciding that the farm paddocks offered a better route back again. The rest of us did some beach, & some farm walk back to the cars, which took a bit longer than the outward trip due to tiredness creeping in. We arrived back at the carpark at about 4pm. (13.9km, 3hrs 44min, moving ave 3.7km/h.) – Ken

9. 8/2/2012. Hikers. Akatore farm walk. Akatore Rd about 5 kms from Taieri Mouth. Leaders: Bev, Chris.
8. 30/11/2011. Trampers. Taieri Mouth Livingstonia Park to Akatore. Beach walk. 

Welcome smooth sand ahead after extensive rock hopping …

… but more rocks ahead.

<Click to see this video of the Akatore stream mouth in 2011>

<Video of kelp in swell firmly anchored on the rock.>

Five Paradise duck-lings in a farm pond. Couldn’t detect the sixth.

7. 15/4/2009 Trampers. Taieri Mouth Livingstonia Park to Akatore. Beach walk. Leader: Ria.
12 of us made the trip. A bit of a struggle for one or two but we all got there. Here George poses as an Indian shaman(?) in front of a cave.
click to enlarge
A Shaman? George

George

There were places where we had to clamber up to the paddocks before descending to the rocks again.

Bank climb Ian, Shaleen, George

Bank climb Ian, Shaleen, George

This was a very narrow squeeze.

The narrowest squeeze. Wendy at back

The narrowest squeeze. Wendy at back

The trip was well-timed, with low tide after 1.00 p.m. so there was room for plenty of rock work clambering …

A clamber

Difficult descent. Pat, Ken, Joyce, Bill, Shaleen (in mid-flight), George, Doug

and beach sand. This is where we stopped for a pleasant cuppa.

Tea break

Tea break. Lex, Ria, Bill, Pat, Wendy, George, Bob.

Five lunched down at the Akatore mouth, the rest content to dine in the paddock above.

Pat, George, Bill, Doug

Pat, George, Bill, Doug

The five “down at the mouth” are just visible from the paddock.

Akatore mouth from paddock

Akatore mouth from paddock. Ken, Shaleen, Doug, George and Ian at rear.

Here is just one of the ponds as we made our return, this time largely over paddocks.

Part of paddock walk

Paddock walk return. Doug, Ian, Bill

Careful rock clambering challenged some, and for others the distance was a bit of a stretch. But it was another successful day with the weather remaining kind. – Ian

6. 6/2/2008 Taieri Mouth Livingstonia Park to Akatore Beach walk. Trampers. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

Lunch stop at Akatore Stream mouth. Leonie, Keith H, Tash, Lex

Lunch stop at Akatore Stream mouth. Leonie, Keith H, Tash, Lex

Tramp Report for Wednesday February 6th 2008

A beautiful day greeted 16 trampers as we met at Livingstonia Park for the start of our walk from Taieri Beach to Akatore. Our leaders were Ria Lippers and Hazel Leslie who had done 2 recces to make sure they had it all under control as it was the first time the Taieri tramping club had done this walk.
Tea Break. Doug M, George, Keith, Glenice, Joyce, Pat, Bill, Ria

Tea Break. Doug M, George, Keith, Glenice, Joyce, Pat, Bill, Ria

Tea Break. Who?, Tash, Keith H, Lex

Tea Break. Carol, Tash, Keith H, Lex

It turned out to be quite an adventure as we scrambled up and down rocks between the lovely bays that stretched all the way along this stunning Otago coastline. The tide was at a tantalising level as the more adventurous felt it was possible to get round, while our leaders took the more secure upper route along the cliff top. It was great to have the choice. We had lunch where the Akatore River reaches the sea, an enchanting spot with crystal clear water and white sand. George had a paddle in the water and we all relaxed in the sun. The tide was coming in, so most of the way back was along the top grassy pathway, but we did manage to go along some of the wider beach areas. As we descended the rope walkway back down to Taieri Beach we were so surprised to see so many people sunbathing and swimming, all taking advantage of the amazing Waitangi Day weather. Carol and I couldn’t resist a quick paddle before returning to the cars where everyone was waiting for us !! – Tash

5. 6/2/2008 Taieri Mouth to Akatore Beach walk. Hikers. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

Beautiful day for a beach walk when 12 hikers parked their cars at Knarston Park. The tide was out so we were able to walk south along the beach for quite some way before having to go up a rope walk to the grass area above beach to get past an outcrop of rocks. Then back down onto beach and time to sit and relax with our morning tea. Such a lovely day and so clear, the views were great and sea bird life interesting. On down the beach until we came to another outcrop on rocks that for us, was impassable and we couldn’t find a place suitable for us to climb up to top. So we decided that although it was a bit early we would have our lunch and sit a bit longer than usual, just soaking up the scenery and views. Watched the tide gradually coming higher up a little inlet, examined some interesting seaweed and heard about some of the bird life from our expert, Lesley G. 12 happy hikers wandered back to cars along the beach mostly and all agreed we’d had a very relaxed and pleasant day.- Bev.

4. 26/2/1997 Akatore South Side. Leaders: Jack M, Hugh, Mary L.
3. 7/8/1996 Akatore Farm Walk. Average. Leaders: Jack M, Jean A, Ria H
2. 9/2/1994. Akatore. Medium. Leaders: Jack M, Eleanor, Judy & Rob
1. 30/1/1991 Akatore Forest Walks. Leaders:

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Feb 15 2017

Tomahawk and surrounding area combinations.

Published by under Uncategorized

34. 15/2/2017. Trampers. Highciff Road, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Paradise ‘Road’, Highcliff Road.

Our tramp started on Highcliff road. 11 of us today. Lovely
to see Judy out again, also Bruce after his holiday. Also
back again was Neil number 3 after an outing with us last
week.
Along Karatei Road to McMeeking Road and past farmhouse. Got
onto Highcliff track after our morning tea.

Morning tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Some stunning views of Boulder beach,

Boulder Beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

farmland and the coastline. Along the side of the hill

Along the side of the hill. (Helen pic and caption.)

and down to not quite the beach.  It was closed for the penguins.
Passed the old houses and onto Paradise  track up to the
road having lunch on the way.
Up the road then and back to our cars. Decided to go to the
pool cafe at St Clair for our coffee debrief. A lovely tramp
all up. – Helen.

33. 8/6/2016. Hikers: Tomahawk/Smaills Beach. E. Leaders: Judy and Jay.

Nike Route Map.

Hikers’ Nike app Route Map.

A fine frosty morning found 30 hikers heading for the crematorium carpark.  We wandered down the track from the carpark corner out onto Tomahawk Road, and along to the Tomahawk School (now closed) for morning tea.
Unfortunately the planned walk up between the two lagoons could not be followed due to a last minute refusal from the land-owner.  So instead of a round trip, we turned into Oregon St and followed the track around the north lagoon, a pleasant walk in the bush.  The swans on the lagoon made a great sight (and noise) as they lumbered across the still waters and took flight from our invasion.
Across the style, and then a short climb up though the bush to a second style.  18 keen types carried on up the fence line for another 10 minutes, enjoying the views on such a marvellous morning.  (This track continues on up to the Soldiers’ Monument on Highcliff Rd.)

Calm lagoon, from Peg 14 track. (Sharyn pic.)

Calm lagoon, from 41 Peg track. (Sharyn pic.)

The rest wandered back down the track to wait at the picnic tables for the others to return.
Then it was back out to Tomahawk Rd, and a long pull up the hill past the gun emplacements, …

White Island, from gun emplacements.

Islet off Smaills Beach, taken  from WWII gun emplacements area.

… across the Centre Rd junction and down to the Tautuku Fisherman’s Lodge …

The notable Glen Cairn stone house. Originally owned by the Smaill family, early 1880 settlers in the area. (Sharyn pic.)

The notable Glen Cairn stone house. Built by the Smaill family, early 1880s settlers in the area. (Sharyn pic.)

… for lunch.  With no-one in residence there we had to crawl under the barrier arm and across the cattle stop, a good exercise in balance!
After a leisurely lunch,

Leisurely lunch. (Judy pic.)

Leisurely lunch at the Lodge. Where’s Fred off to with his chocs? (Judy pic.)

Ah, here's Fred. Good one!. Gotcha!. (Judy pic.)

Ah, here he is. Gotcha! Good one! Thanks, Fred, for the weekly treats. (Judy pic.)

it was back up the hill to the bus terminus, then through the track to the sand-hills and down to the beach.  A good low tide allowed some to explore the cave …

Exploring small cave at northern end of Tomahawk Beach. (Adrienne pic.)

Exploring small cave at northern end of Tomahawk Beach. (Adrienne pic.)

… at the end of the beach before proceeding to the far end, then out to the road and back up to the cars.
Coffee at Nicholls was enjoyed before it got too cold to hang around!
– Judy and Jay.

32. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

31. 15/7/2015. Trampers. Buskin Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track.

After a bit of a mix up over pickup points, we parked up beside Penzance Kennels, where we had a discussion on which way we would tackle the days walk. We settled on going down Buskin Track & worrying about the return journey later.
The track was mostly dry apart from a few areas where it has been damaged by water scouring it out quite badly. As two of the party of three, had never been there before we took some time to check out the cribs [baches] at the bottom of the track.

We also came across an employee of Otago Pest Destruction [I think that’s what they are called] who was happily banging a possum on the head, after it got caught in one of his traps. He said he got 27 the day before, so much for a possum free peninsula !!!
We then made our way out to the beach for some boulder hopping practice, before gaining the sand at the northern end. As we passed by the log shelter I noticed an intruder lying inside, looking very cosy indeed.

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach. (Ken pic and caption.)

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

It lifted its head to survey me for about two seconds, then just went back to sleep ! What a life !!
We wandered along the beach wondering where all the sand had gone, the bank holding the tussock is badly eroded, & about 1 meter high. So now, there is no way for the Yellow Eyed Penguins to climb up & get to their nests further up the hill.
We walked back past the intruder in it’s cosy shelter,

3 Another shot of the intruder. (Ken pic and caption.)

3 Another shot of the intruder.

& had lunch sitting on a large bit of driftwood,

Boulder Beach, Otago Peninsula New Zealand

1 Lunch spot at Boulder Beach. (Ken pic and caption.)

before walking up Braidwood Rd. to the gate into the paddocks leading along to the Double Bay area, where I had an unsuccessful look for the viewing hide I had seen at an earlier date, but the vegetation had me beat, so we retraced our steps around to the bottom of Paradise Track, made our way up there, & back along Highcliff Rd. to the car.

We walked 10km
ave 3.3km/h
climbed 475m – Ken

30. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
4.1km/h
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water …

Ducks on ice. (Eleanor pic.)

… or swans trying to get out of frozen water?

Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic.)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.

Soldiers’ Memorial. (Eleanor pic.)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…

Tarseal Road. (Eleanor pic.)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk. (Eleanor pic.)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil.
29. 29/1/2014. Hikers. John Wilson Drive, Golf Course, Beach, Cave, Tomahawk Lagoon, return Lawyers Head Paper Road. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
A few of the over Christchurch over 40s Tramping Club contingent lodging for the week at Waiora Scout Camp went off with our Trampers but the majority at the car park threw in their lot with the Hikers. The task for the Christchurchian cars to navigate through the city to the St Kilda playground adjacent to the John Wilson Drive was made easier by someone’s suggestion that locals spread themselves out amongst their cars as pilots and that worked well.
When we were eventually all gathered at the beginning of John Wilson Drive, Marjorie counted 51 of us. An all-time record? The views along the drive, with the Chisholm Park Golf Links and city on one side, the beach and sea on the other, was remarked upon by all. Further there were no cars to bother us this early in the day. It was time for morning tea when we reached Lawyers Head, one of a series of basaltic headlands which punctuate much of this section of the Otago coast, (others nearby being Maori Head and Blackhead). This one is named for the likeness of the cliff face to the profile of a lawyer in traditional legal wig, …

Lawyers Head.

… so we supped our cuppas  around the Leonard Wright memorial at the Head.

Lawyers Head Lookout.

Hidden hard nearby was a narrow steep track connecting down to the golf links, around whose Lawyers Head coastal edge the leaders had gained permission for us to single-file our way. We found ourselves right on the crest of the Lawyers Head cliff, the Tomahawk beach stretching out below us. We made quite a strung-out sight.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless applauded tee shot.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless ironically applauded tee shot at the end of our links perimeter stroll.

Now down and away from the links along another narrow, but lengthier track out and across to the Tomahawk Road.

A long line.

Looking back upon another strung-out sight.

We emerged upon a playground on Tomahawk Road.

The suburb beyond us, now called Ocean Grove, was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name being, not a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”. (Wiki).
We descended the road a little way to the lower of the twin-lobed Tomahawk Lagoon, this lobe being its outer one,  whose outlet we skirted on its true left to emerge onto the Tomahawk Beach.
The day’s trip had been selected for one of Dunedin’s low-tides, so the beach was ours, as was the small tidal cave at its end, an addition to the area’s features.

Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Up a small but energetic sand-hill and we were on another track out to the road again, down it a bit, and into a side road leading to yet another side route and out onto a recreation area alongside Tomahawk Lagoon’s inner lobe, this one a wildlife reserve, although both lobes are noted for their bird life.

Here was to be the lunch stop, but prior to that there was a short walk up alongside the lakelet to where our local club members knew of a Trampers’ track leading up to a soldiers’ memorial on by the Peninsula high road. But this was to just to wander the level part of track and enjoy (??) at one spot a strong pong from the the slightly stagnant waters and mud verge. (Roll on a storm flush!)

So we lunched leisurely, variously at tables and on ledges until our leaders judged it time for the return journey.

Out on the road, a motor cyclist stopped to talk and admire our impressive size. He was glad to hear we were returning by the Lawyers Head paper road and invited us to notice the “use it or lose it” graffiti posted in a couple of places before its entrance. (Apparently the City Council proposed closing it.) We were going to be a wonderful “use it” example.

The ‘road’ led us through a corner of the Andersons Bay Cemetery, close by the towering Crematorium and out through the Chisholm Park Golf links. Then across the Pirates Football Club pitch and we were at our cars again and adjacent to a useful new toilet block by the playground.

Now came farewells and dispersal time. There were many appreciative remarks from the Christchurch Club members about the unique difference of such a walk, with its wonderful unexpected variations. ‘The best of their week so far’ was one comment.

I know our club felt quite proud to hear such unstinted praise, and of course are so indebted to Marjorie and Bruce for their careful planning, taking into account the meal stops, the permissions sought, and the trip duration. Bravo. Of course the day’s excellent weather didn’t hurt either. – Ian.

28. 28/11/2012. Trampers. Tomahawk, Soldiers Monument, Buskin Track, Highcliff,  Karatai Rd

GPS Tomahawk Soldiers Monument Buskin Track Karatai Rd, courtesy Ken.

Lunch at junction of Boulder Beach tracks. (Ken caption and pic.)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic.)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic)

27/9/2012. Trampers. Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road.

Topo map of area.

Karetai

Six of us parked at Smaills Beach car-park. We had dropped the idea of Silver Peaks because of the forecast rain with its fog. As we went up Karetai ‘Road’, we reached the rain level at our tea break and had to ‘parka-up’. We turned off further up onto the Highcliff Track …

Boulder Beach from Highcliff Track.

and round to Beatties Cottage where we lunched. We didn’t bother going down to the beach but lazed in the sunshine (temporary but happily well-timed) in the shelter of the cottage’s large hedge from the wind.
The climb up Paradise Track gets no shorter but by and large, with its couple of zig-zags, provides a good gradient.
Along Highcliff Road, we forewent turning down the Buskin Track, with its promised steep climb back up the Highcliff Track, and carried on to the Karetai Road turnoff, returning down it to the cars.
Surprisingly Ken’s GPS recorded we had done 14.5 kms! A useful day’s walk. – Ian

26. 1/6/2011. Both. Bowls Stadium, Cemetery, beach, Fishing Club, Karetai Rd, Smaills Beach, return. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Select only coastal part of GPS for this route. GPS Courtesy Ken. Distance travelled = 11.7km Moving time = 2hr 46min. Moving ave. = 4.2k/hr Stopped time = 1hr 50min.

Twenty-three hikers and trampers set off from the Westpac Bowls Stadium in Tahuna Road at 1000 in cool cloudy conditions and went up the grass verge between the road and the Chisholm Park golf links before entering the first gate on the right to the Andersons Bay cemetery. We walked through part of the cemetery before continuing down the hill, watching some horses train behind a motor vehicle, and crossing the bridge over the outlet from the Tomahawk Lagoon. Immediately over the bridge we followed a gravel road alongside the outlet stream and then, after 80 metres,  a track alongside the stream down to the beach where trucks were removing sand, probably for attempting to remedy the erosion at Middle Beach.

Truck and loader for removing sand from Tomahawk beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We proceeded along the length of the beach to the two caves at the far end and had morning tea on the rocks there. Some inspected the cave, risking getting wet feet in the process with high tide approaching at 1430.

Morning tea near the caves at Tomahawk Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After morning tea we ascended the sand hill to the Tomahawk Road and continued down the private road to the Tautuku Fishing Club, Dunedin and Haast Inc. We arrived there at approximately 1130 and were kindly shown around and given a history of the Club and the fine bluestone building by the club president Brett Bensemann.

Tautuku Fishing Club premises. (Pic: Ken. Caption: Bruce.)

Bob pic.

Bob pic.

The building was originally the homestead of Alexander Smaill and was bought by the club, together with some surrounding land, by the Club in 1972 for $5000.
At 1205 we continued up Karetai Road for 15-20 minutes

Bruce on Karatai Rd. track with others in the background. (Ken pic and caption.)

to the corner near the style leading to a black and white Geodesic Trig on the right.

About nine of the group, following a route pioneered by Ken, went down to the trig …

Ken at the Geodesic Trig looking towards Sandymount (Bruce pic and caption.)

… and then contoured around on a track

Bob pic.

back to the lower reaches of Karetai Road while the others retraced their steps down the non-rutted road in good  condition for walking. We lunched in a sheltered area close to the start of the first track on the left leading from the road to Smaill’s Beach.
After lunch we proceed to the beach via three routes, necessitated by a slip which had damaged the track (a) up the sand hills to avoid the slip, (b) via a narrow edge beside the river, or (c) retreating back to the gate and taking an alternative direct to the beach instead of going alongside the river bank. After briefly looking at the windswept beach and the offshore Bird Island (which has claimed many lives on account of a strong under-current including William and Thomas Henderson of Tomahawk  in about 1900)

Doug and others leaving Smaill’s Beach with Bird Island in the background. (Bruce pic and caption.)

we climbed back up to the gun emplacements at the Jack Fox lookout. Two six inch Vickers coastal defence guns were part of a network of coastal batteries during WW2. The guns were removed  in 1945. A cluster of three similar batteries were present at Taiaroa Head  and the mother of one of the group nursed there.
We returned to the cars via Tomahawk Road, Luke Street, the disused Tomahawk School, the soccer playing fields and the cemetery grounds which we entered via the pedestrian entrance on the left a short distance above the bridge. We arrived back at 1445 somewhat wind buffeted but knowing more about Porbeagle Sharks which are only caught in the local area. (For more information about the Tautuku Fishing Club see: Tautuku Fishing Club) – Bruce.
25. 23/9/2009. Hikers. Tomahawk, Centre Road. Medium. Leaders Arthur and Barbara.
24. 4/6/2008 Both. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial, Centre Road. Leaders: Joyce, Ian, Lesley G
Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Three shaggy dogs

Three Irish Wolfhounds.

23. 26/9/2007 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Memorial. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Although the day dawned very cold, overcast and threatening to rain, 8 intrepid Hikers turned up at Glascow St. carpark for the day’s tramp from Tomahawk Lagoon. In spite of weather we had a very happy and enjoyable day. We left cars in car park by the Lagoon and set off up the track to WW 1 Soldiers Memorial on Highcliff. Although track was very wet and muddy it is now much improved to what it used to be when we tramped in the area many years ago. Morning tea was a very welcome and refreshing break in the slippery slog up the hill. Up to the Monument and lovely views of our beautiful harbour.

Peninsula Soldiers’ Memorial

Highcliff Rd to Centre Rd. was pretty cold but we soon warmed up. Then we had the great views over the other side of the Peninsula. Found a nice sheltered spot for our lunch and were vastly entertained by a very interested audience of 3 Irish Wolfhound dogs. Hard to say whether dogs or people were most fascinated.
Down the road and round the corner, back to cars after an enjoyable, sociable and refreshing day out. – Bev.
22. 25/7/2007. Trampers. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial. Moderate. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

21. 14/2/2007. Trampers. Boulder Beach, Karetai, Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders; Bruce and Marjorie.

20. 31/1/2007. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Mary M.

19. 13/4/2005. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Rosemary and Jack.

18. 3/12/2003. Hikers: Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Dot T

17. 29/10/2003. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Joan H, Chris.

16. 14/5/2003 Hikers. Karetai Road, Boulder Beach. Medium.Leaders: Colleen, Betty.

15. 11/4/2002 Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Ray, Les W

14. 20/3/2002. Alt. Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Smaills Beach. Medium. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

13. 15/8/2001. Alt. Tomahawk, Karetai. Leaders: Nancy, Val, Peg C.

12. 11/4/2001. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Les W.

11. 19/7/2000. Boulder Beach, Karetai Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris, Joan H.

10. 23/2/2000. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Ria H.

9. 30/6/1999 Tomahawk Lagoon. Centre Road. Leaders: Jean Y, Denise, Eleanor W

8. 12/8/1998. Highcliff Centre Road from Lagoon. Leaders: Molly, Frank.

7. 18/3/1998. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road round trip. Leaders: Jean, Ria H.

6. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.

5. 18/9/1996. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Chris, Joan H, Ngaire.

4. 13/4/1994 Tomahawk Lagoon, Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Buskin Road, Soldiers Track and return. Medium. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, June G, Betty H

3. 8/7/1992.  Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Centre Road. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, Bev H, Merle
2. 7/3/1991. Cars park Karetai Road Car Park. Karetai Road from car park. A good peninsula walk. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret S, Les

1. 12/7/1989 Centre Road, Highcliff. Average +. Leaders: Kees & Ria, Diana
B, Ria H

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Sep 14 2016

Street Walk: Town Belt.

Published by under Hikers

5. 14/9/2016. Bullock Track, Town Belt, Ross Creek. E+. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.
Tangled route

Tangled route map.

22 happy hikers left cars at the bottom of the Bullock Track in Malvern St and crawled slowly up the trail to Stonelaw Terrace and around to Cosy Dell for a welcome morning tea stop. Leader Pam had access to the tennis club, with seating and toilets available.  Such luxury!
Cuppa

Cuppa at Cosy Dell Tennis Club grounds.

It was a beautiful sunny morning and we (mal)lingered for a while before raising the energy to proceed.
On round the Town Belt, down into Park St, a false start up the wrong set of Kyber Pass steps (ha ha to those in front!) then round Queens Drive and back up past Prospect Park into Cannington Rd and Pilkington St for an early lunch (nice seats again!) beside John McGlashan College.
Lunch

Lunch beside John McGlashan recreation field.

Looking up towards Flagstaff and Swampy, we wondered if we might sight the trampers, but no luck.  We guessed they were lunching further over, out of sight.

After lunch the trail took us back to Cannington Rd …

Mock assistance

Mock assistance back onto Cannington Road.

…  and onto the Ross Creek Track and a steepish descent through the bush to the pumping station.
Impressive waterfall

Interesting waterfall. (Ross Creek Reservoir overflow?) Taken across Ross Creek while gradually ascending creek’s true right track.

Down Ross Creek with steep cliffs on the right, bubbling brook and beautiful bird song, to the Leith and the wander back to the cars.  A coffee stop at the botanic gardens was enjoyed by all 22 and we were home early enough for a nana nap before dinner. – Judy.

4. 29/3/2015. Amenities Society Town Belt Traverse.
Elaine reports that some of the Club  went on the walk.
“It was a very good trip. Weather was fine and we had a good group. Someone said 600 people did the trip.” Elaine met up and went with Jim and Betty.
She reports on the bus ride back to the Oval. She “was so AMAZED … the bus driver … got out of his seat and helped mothers with prams. … believe it or not  the prams were in the bus. Also, and a lady with a walking frame – he helped in and her frame.” This led Elaine  to reflect: “I can get the bus when I get my walking frame, or if I have a baby I can get on the bus, baby and pram.”
“We did not win any prizes this year. It was a lot of fun.” – Ian.
3. 20/8/2014. Queens Drive. Leaders: Elaine, Fred.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Southern Cemetery, Eglington Rd, path to Maitland St (1km), Upper Stafford St, Alva St (2km), cross Serpentine Av, Jubilee Park Mountain Bike Circuit up to park, cross Maori Rd, steps up to Queens Dr. (3km), cross Rattray St (4km), cross Stuart St, Olveston (5km), Littlebourne Rd, q’s Dr., pat Drivers Rd, Q’s Dr. (6km), Prospect Pk (7km), Bullock Track, Duke St (7.61km)

The Town Belt Walk.

The town Belt walk was enjoyed by appprox 28 hikers on Wed 20th August.
Everyone met at the Southern Cemetery (1858) by the old morgue (1908).

It was a calm Dunedin day as we made our way up thru some very old grave sites and skirted around
to Steep St path. (Was this a street in the early days?)
We approached Maitland St which looked very steep but as we all took it fairly slowly everyone managed it.

Cuppa

Cuppa

Crossing High St was a mission for some. Some of us went to the crossing which proved a very safe option.
Passing High St School, which is now closed, it was interesting to read on a notice that 26 houses are to be built.
We followed the town belt as best we could, passing thru  Robin Hood Park and Littlebourne Grounds, skirted around the back of Otago Boys’ High School and again crossed a busy road – Stuart St – but this had lights so all was well.
We stopped for lunch at Olveston House which was built and owned by David Theomin in 1904.
We ate our lunch outside in the grounds where we had permission …

Lunch

Lunch

Last of the summer wine

Last of the summer wine?

… and admired the house and grounds.

Continuing on to Queens Drive we arrived at the Bullock Track (a track that was formed in the early days of Dunedin to take the cattle to the works).
This track was all down hill on to Malvern St, Duke St, and we made our way to a DCC bus stop. 26 of us all hopped on a bus, free for all of us, as it was before 3pm. Back to our cars which we had left at the south end of Princes St.    23 of us then went for coffee

Coffee

Coffee

at the Kensington pub which has been there since the 1890s. The Mine Host made us all very welcome.

Thanks to FRED for his great skills in leading us thru the belt and for the CHOCS once again.
There is a heap of info on Google if any one wants to find out about the town belt, Olveston, and any of the grounds like Robin Hood. Also the Dunedin Amenities Soc. have a wonderful web page as well. Worth having a look. – Elaine.

2. 15/1/2014. Start of year. Both. Combined streets and bush. Leaders: Pam, Pat R.
(Distance of Duke St from Car Park: 19 km.)
There were 20 of us out for our first tramp of the new year. Pam and Jill had recced the route only the Saturday before after find the scheduled Government Track had been closed due to fallen trees, as yet uncleared. We parked in Duke St and went up the Bullock Track by way of the gravelled route, taking our time to gather alongside Prospect Park under some tree shade while Pam gave us the history of the Bullock Track, originally a route from Leith Valley to Burnside Freezing Works for the poor bullocks. And initial date of 1803 was amended to 1903 after not sounding quite right.
Pam led us across Highgate into Queens Drive which we followed for a short distance before descending a track through the bush to arrive at the Cosy Dell Buckingham Tennis Club where we morning teaed (to coin a word), thanks to Pam being a member and having the key to let us in to the seating. That would be about the one km mark on the route map, perhaps the orange spot beyond the “1”. (Orange means slow or stopped, yellow means a little [perhaps not much] faster.)
Morning Tea

Pam addresses the Morning Tea group

And what a beautiful spot it was. Four courts, beautifully green with their artificial turf, surrounded by lovely bush. From there we made our way down some frighteningly steep steps onto Queen Street, up Park St into Heriot Row and up 103 steps, as counted by diligent Dawn onto Duchess Ave and out briefly onto Drivers Road. Then via Chamberlain St, Henry St and Stonelaw Tce, back to the corner of Prospect Park where we had emerged from the Bullock Track earlier. (Route detail here subject to revision.) But now it was straight along Cannington Rd to reach the John McGlashan Sports Field for an early leisurely lunch on seating aligning a running track that was in the process of having the lanes repainted. Here we were entertained by a father and his two little pre-school sons practising some very competent cricket with bat, ball and wickets.

Lunch

Fred distributing his luncheon lolly largess.

After lunch, we resumed our way along Cannington Rd, to turn off abruptly at its end down one of what turned out to be many confusing Ross Creek  Reservoir tracks, before, eventually, yes, e-v-e-n–t-u-a-l-l-y emerging onto Woodhaugh St, running alongside the Leith, and turning at the bridge along Malvern St back to the cars.  Well  done, Pam and Jill for the recce, and Pat doing a sterling job as back marker. – Ian.
1. 8/6/2011. Hikers. Street Walk: Town Belt. Leaders: Beverley, Chris.

We went anticlockwise round the ‘course’. (Bob pic and caption)

Town Belt walk 1. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 2. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 3. (Bob pic)

Town Belt walk 4. (Bob pic)

 

27/8/2008 Town Belt. Leaders: Carmel, Evelyn
Down from Maori Hill

Down from Maori Hill

Again we were blessed with another fine and pleasant Wed. Because the Pineapple track/Ben Rudd area, where we were supposed to hike, was very wet and muddy our leaders opted to take us on a ‘Street Walk’. This proved to be a good choice and the 11 of us that went had a very enjoyable day out. We started up at the Highgate bus terminus and then went down till we got to the Town Belt which we walked along via Queens drive. Lovely views,
A good view

A good view

interesting scenery and houses to look at made for a relaxed and pleasurable outing. Morning tea and lunch enjoyed sitting in the sun.
Restful surroundings

Restful surroundings

Our walked finished along Highgate, back to the cars. Thanks to our leaders for coming up with a very acceptable replacement. Bev.

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Jul 27 2016

Macandrew Bay – Boulder Beach

Published by under Penguins Dec- Feb,Trampers

Boulder Beach closed  during yellow eyed penguin nesting, moulting, December-February months.

Distance from car-park: 24 km.

13. 27/7/2016. Macandrew Bay – Boulder Beach. M. Leader: Neil M.

Nine trampers left the car park at 9:30am and headed off to Macandrew Bay following the harbour coastline of still, unruffled blue waters to our meet-up parking place. A coffee van set up in the same place was denied patronage as coffee at the start of a tramp was simply ‘not on’!

About 10 am we started the walk up Greenacres Track which was very pleasant although a tad slippery in places.  Upon arriving at the pines and drier ground it was time for a break. It was here we were joined by a walking rider and very placid horse which apparently had a distaste for riding downhill routes and had to be led on foot.

Morning tea. Tempted by alternate form of transport.(Margreet pic and caption.)

Morning tea. Tempted by alternate form of transport.(Margreet pic and caption.)

Snacks for trampers and piece of apple for horse and  with renewed energy we went our separate ways.  At the top of the track, just before High Cliff road, a long-roped swing created a diversion for one who enjoyed a childhood revival …
Swing (Margreet pic and caption.)

Neil enjoying a swing on the way. (Margreet pic and caption.)

… and where others removed a layer of clothing.

Along  High Cliff Road the view across the harbour and city and over to the background of snow sprinkled Maungatua and further behind to the white Lammermoors was beautiful.
Monumentt to old cheese factory site. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Monumentt to old cheese factory site. (Margreet pic and caption.)

  On to Paradise Track which leads down to Boulder bay arriving at Boulder bay at midday for lunch on the sand in the sun— no wind and very pleasant.
Lunch at Boulder Beach. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Lunch at Boulder Beach. (Margreet pic and caption.)

The return route took the eastern side of  Boulder Bay, a fairly constant uphill,  4-wheel track leading on to Seal Point road which in turn joined up with HIgh Cliff Road again and along to Greenacres Track completing the loop.  We enjoyed the day even though it was clouding over and cooling down at this stage. Down Greenacres track and back to the cars  and of course finished the tramp with a coffee at  Bay Cafe.
Walked 12.8 Km; Travelling time 3 3/4 hours;  Climbed 580 metres. – Carole
12. 23/9/2009. Macandrew Bay, Greenacre Street, Highcliff Road, Paradise Road, Boulder Beach, return. Medium. Leaders: Glenice and Keith.
At top of Greenacre Track.

At top of Greenacre Track. Susan, Ken. Sabina, Glenice, Keith, Hazel in background.

Look carefully. Lamb of mixed backgrounds!

Look carefully. Lamb of uncertain parentage!

Bruce and Majorie's Crib

Bruce and Majorie’s Crib

New sign on Beattie Cottage

New sign on Beattie Cottage

Track signs at corner of Beattie property

Track signs at corner of Beattie property

Conservation area sign

Conservation area sign

On beach at last

Arrival at Boulder Beach. Keith, Sabina, George, Susan, Hazel.

View from top of Paradise Road

View from top of Paradise Road

Paradise Track signs

Paradise Track signs

11. 30/1/2008. Trampers. Macandrew Bay, Boulder Beach. Medium. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
10.9/8/2006 Trampers. Macandrew Bay, Boulder Beach. Leaders: Bruce, Glenis
9. 8/6/2005. Trampers. Macandrew Bay – Boulder Beach, return. Leaders: Kerri, Helen S.
g

Up from Macandrew Bay. Doug, Arthur, Tom, Dorothy, Bob

d

Down Paradise. Doug, Tom, Bob

r

World Wide Fund for Nature Conservation Area

b

Returning from Boulder Beach

8. 28/8/2002. Macandrew Bay – Greenacre Street – Boulder Beach. Medium+. Leaders: Ian, Irene, Elaine.
7. 15/8/2001 Macandrew Bay Greenacre Street Paradise Track, Boulder Beach. Medium. Leaders Doug M, Mary L, Evelyn C
6. 19/7/2000 Macandrew Bay Greenacre Street Paradise Track, Boulder Beach. Leaders Jean A, Chris, Joan H
5. 1/12/1999. Macandrew Bay, Larnach Castle, Boulder Beach. Leaders: Molly, Bill H, Pat.
4. 6/5/1998. Macandrew Bay, Greenacres, Boulder Beach, Paradise Road. Leaders: Doug J, Betty, Ted.
3. 21/5/1997. Macandrew Bay Greenacres Street, Boulder Beach return. Leaders: Chris H, Ria H, Jean
2. 6/3/1996. Macandrew Bay – Greenacres Street – Boulder Beach. Medium. Leaders: Dot and Eric, Chris, Joan H.
1. 2/10/1991. Macandrew Bay, up Greenacre Street and over to Boulder Beach. Return by Paradise Road. Windy Ridge!! Lovely views. Leaders: Ria and Kees, Jean A, Ria H, Peg C.

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