Archive for the 'Trampers' Category

Apr 11 2018

Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Rongomai

Published by under Trampers

Location: 37 km.
From Evansdale Glen. Route. DOC. Stream crossings. Preferably February when water most likely to be low.
Track up Careys Creek alone: an easy walk.
Click information on the Seacliff Dam, historical creek track and pipeline.

13. 11/4/2018. Trampers. Evansdale Glen –Rongomai/Honeycomb. M. Leader: Dave.

How could 5 trampers’ turn down coffee out with Margreet and Neil and Jill’s fresh hot muffins on a cold wet morning?

Well they did! It was off to Evansdale Glen with a little snow on the side of the motorway on the way. The weather cleared a bit as we started. The creek was up after the rain so it was wet socks and boots as we made our first crossing of Careys creek.

Just out of the car and into it…brrrrr. (Phil pic and caption.)

The discussion then started on having waterproofing on the inside of boots? We were sheltered in the gorge of the creek. The bird song was very pleasant – bellbirds, tuis, fantails and the odd wood pigeon.

Trying to get heat to the feet! (Phil pic and caption.)

  At the Honey  comb/ Rongomai intersection we decided to take the Rongomai track just to guage how slippery it might be. The track was a little steep to start with.  As we followed the well-defined track we walked through very attractive areas of quite big Kanuka with smaller plants of Lancewood, Mapau, Broad leaf and the odd small Totara.

Because of the wetness of the track, we took the connecting track to the honey comb track. This was pleasant with the many ferns green and lush. We then followed up to the top of the honeycomb track to meet Semple road.

Standing on the ‘snowline’. (Phil pic and caption.)

Skyline from the top of the Honeycomb Track. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch was had in the shelter of trees and a disused gravel pit at the top.

We then followed back down the Rongomai to Careys creek again – illusion the creek seemed to be higher!  The leader who shall be nameless slipped on the slippery rocks and got wet!  Phil to the rescue. Thanks Phil.

The discussion continued on the design of new boots, with a special one way valve and pump to eject the water from within them .  Arthur gave us a demonstration.  He is now applying for a special patent for boots with these features.

Afternoon tea started with a taste of blackberries on the side of the track, followed by coffee at Blueskin Bay Nurseries and Café. – Dave

12. 17/8/2016. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Honeycomb, Rongomai. M. Leader: A Heenan.
Seven Trampers were delighted to discover that some thoughtful person had placed stepping stones to allow us to cross Careys Creek with dry feet, at the beginning of our day’s tramp. The second crossing also had the stones.
It was cold walking up the Careys Creek track in the shade, and with evidence that the frost had not thawed for some days in parts.
We stopped at the first sunny spot that was encountered to have our morning tea. It was only a very tiny spot, just adequate but welcome for our purpose.
Continuing on up this very good track, we eventually came to the junction.

A year ago our group did the circuit in a clockwise direction, so to be different (I like being different), we went up the Rongomai Track.

Up the Rongomai. (Margreet pic.)

Up the Rongomai. (Margreet pic.)

This is always a good dry track, if an energetic climb at the lower end.

Turning left we followed “the old nature trail”, the cross track to Honeycomb. This track generally follows the contour, but goes up and down continually, with a number of well placed steps in places. In one place, a large fallen tree proved a little awkward to climb through carefully. Considerable bird song was noted here – Bellbirds and Tuis, etc, and several pigeons were seen. A little Tomtit had kept just in front of us for a short distance, as close as two metres to me.

Coming to the Honeycomb track, we turned left again and following it for a short distance, found our lunch spot bathed in sunshine.

Lunch in the sun. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch in the sun. (Margreet pic.)

The Honeycomb Track was drier than expected and we made good progress going down, only the last 200 metres or so needing extra care – steeper and wetter here.
Following Careys Creek now, the track was quite wet in places and the air noticeably much colder in the gully.

There are five river crossings along here on the way back to the Rongomai junction.

Care had to be exercised at the crossings as the rocks were just a little slippy. …

One of the crossings. (Margreet pic.)

One of the crossings. (Margreet pic.)

… One member narrowly avoided disaster.

Back at the junction. (Margreet pic.)

Back at the junction. (Margreet pic.)

Around a further hour’s tramp returned the group to the cars, having covered 12.4 km.
Some members of the group wanted to stop at “Blueskin Nurseries” on the way home. In my simplicity(?) I presumed that the lovely spring-like afternoons of the previous days had brought out the ‘gardening desire’ in some. But the plants and flowers were ignored, the group heading indoors. I tagged along to see what the score was.
I soon found that the score was:- 3 coffees, 2 hot chocolates, 1 tea and 1 juice! Discussion followed, and as noted on previous occasions, has a tendency to include food. Today such culinary delights as lamb shanks, pork bellies, pumpkins, sweet breads and tripe were avidly mentioned.
Personally I avoid tripe myself, although some may suspect that what I write here is a load of tripe(?).
Eventually seven happy Trampers returned to Mosgiel after enjoying a day’s exercise in the sunshine and fresh air. We couldn’t have had a better day out. – Arthur.
11. 12/8/2015. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Honeycomb, Rongomai.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Evansdale Glen Honeycomb joining track Rongomai (Ken pic and caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Evansdale Glen Honeycomb joining track Rongomai (Ken pic and caption). Walked 12.4km; 4km/h; 3hr 20m moving; climbed 253m; max height 340m.

Today’s tramp was to Evansdale Glen, then up Honeycomb, & back down Rongomai tracks.Now normally this is not a problem, BUT there was still a lot of snow on Flagstaff, &  around my place on the hill, so I was sceptical about our chances of getting up Honeycomb very far. However, after a bit of a conference among the 7 trampers at the carpark, we decided to go & see what was in store for us. As we got over to the other side of the Northern Motorway, it was a different world, no snow, & everything looked really normal.
The walk along to Honeycomb was accomplished with only one member getting wet feet, from the many creek crossings. The track was quite wet & muddy in places, & Honeycomb looked a bit slippery as well. However, we all made it up the steep climb without to much drama, but a few rest periods, & arrived at the junction of the joining track that goes across to Rongomai, where we had another short rest. We then headed off along here to hopefully find a sunny lunch spot on the road at the top end of Rongomai, before the track proper starts into the bush. So we stopped for lunch…

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

…in a quite sheltered spot just before entering the bush, but if we had gone a little further, we would’ve found an even better spot!!
After lunch we made our way down to the creek at the bottom of the ridge, & back out to the cars. The day was enjoyed by all, especially the ones who had not been in there before.
An incident free day, with good weather conditions, life is good !! – Ken

10. 16/10/2013. Trampers. Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Mountain Road, Rongomai. Medium.

GPS

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Honeycomb and Rongomai from Evansdale. Distance: 11.8km; time: 3hr 3mins; ave: 3.9 km/hr; climbed: 507mtrs; max elevation: 378mtrs.

 

We parked at Evansdale Glen, walked up the Careys Creek track to the bottom of Honeycomb track, stopping off on the way to have morning tea at one of the drier spots we found. The grass on the track looked like it had been covered with a frost, & the whole track was quite wet, but not as wet as one team member got after slipping on some rocks while crossing one of the numerous creek crossings. Honeycomb is quite steep, as one member found, when the plant he was clutching pulled out of the ground, & he was sent tumbling downhill for a couple of meters, before a handy tree arrested his fall. So there were numerous halts to regroup & get our breathing under control. It does get less steep for the last 1/4 – 1/3 of the climb, & some good views are obtained. We had lunch at the top of Honeycomb …

Lunch

Lunch at top of Honeycomb track

…  then walked the couple of hundred mtrs. along to the top of Rongamai track, which is now just a forestry rd. This goes down past the shortcut track which goes back across to Honeycomb, & continues for some distance beyond there. It eventually reverts into the original Rongomai track, which follows a ridge, & then as it gets to the toe of the ridge, it steepens greatly, until the valley floor is reached. From here, it is just a reverse walk along the Careys Creek track back to Evansdale Glen.
A good day, with basically no wind, even at Mountain Rd. end, & all 4 of us said it was a good walk, which had never been done by 3 of the party.

9. 18/3/2009. Trampers. Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Mountain Road, Rongomai. Medium. Leaders: Sabina, Ian

It was half a tramp, half a blackberry-plucking expedition as Hazel discretely filled a bag for next weekend’s blackberry crumble. Careys creek showed signs of a flood in recent past weeks but its level was down to a tolerable crossing and re-crossing shallowness. A notable hurdle was Bill’s aptly-dubbed “Beaver Dam” at the second crossing which we made by precariously struggling over small and large fallen branches.

The first pic shows Rongomai Ridge ahead of us.

click to enlarge

Rongomai Ridge from Careys Creek

Rongomai Ridge showing ahead

A little while later we reached the junction heralding the beginning of the loop we had decided upon doing clockwise.

The next pic shows the beginning of the steep climb out of Careys Creek up the beginning of the Honeycomb track, a climb during which at least two of the seven strong group vowed that this was their last tramp here.

Start of Honeycomb steep climb from Careys Creek at Double Hill route sign. Bill's gaiters.

Start of Honeycomb steep climb from Careys Creek at Double Hill route sign. Bill – well, his boots and gaiters.

We made it across the ridge at the top of the climb and then on further up to the Mountain Road exit. A short walk up the road and it was into and down the Rongomai with a large expanse of clear-felled forest to the left.

Back down to Careys Creek and the blackberry plucking continued with George assisting Hazel, with his long picking-pauses on the trip back filling a hefty bag of berries.

The high-light/low-light of the tramp towards its end was Hazel wrenching an ankle, which proved to be a broken fibula at the ankle on inspection the following day, leading to six weeks in plaster. However she bravely continued to limp along with the benefit of two trekking poles, even to the extent of four of us tackling an exploratory Beaver Dam by-pass track on the creek’s true right, a rather hair-raising steep up and down track in places, never to be repeated again.

Best wishes for a p-a-t-i-e-n-t recovery, Hazel. You have joined the recovering-ranks of Tash (ankle broken in three places), and Ken (two broken wrists). Best wishes to you all. Although only you Hazel can claim to have suffered your mishap on a tramp. How you made it back to the cars the rest of us will never understand. – Ian

8. 25/10/2006 Leaders: Peter B, Nelson

7. 16/11/2005. Trampers. Honeycomb, Rongomai. Medium. Bob H, Ian.
[There have also  been six earlier circuits of Honeycome-Rongomai tracks made from Mountain Road but I have managed to lose any record of them!]

 

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Mar 21 2018

Broad Bay, Turnbulls Bay, Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill, Broad Bay

Published by under Trampers

No. 49 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill Larnach Castle – Farm”

Location: 32 km.

Trampers park cars at Broad Bay. DCC Public Land; Hikers park at top of Bacon Street.

(15) 21/3/2018. Hikers. Bacon Street only.

The planned tramp to Harbour Cone had 22 trampers depart from Mosgiel in light rain.  During the drive to the start point the rain intensified, and it became a simple decision to abandon the tramp.  A coffee stop was suggested for the return trip to Mosgiel …

Coffee at the Good Oil. (Ian pic and caption.)

… which was attended by 19 of the party. -Cheers Jim.

14. 9/11/2016. Trampers. Harbour Cone.E+. Leader: Arthur.

The early rain cleared before assembly time at the car park and conditions were looking good. Ten eager trampers travelled in three cars to park by the Broad Bay Boating Club. The sky was brighter in the vicinity compared to the cloud down on the hilltops back in the city direction. A northeast wind to start with, which later turned southwest.

As an experiment we had decided to do this (circuit) tramp anticlockwise. The club had previously only ever gone clockwise. A short road walk back took us to Camp Road. The ascent was variable, with some easier gradients in between the steeper ones.

Morning tea was taken after 30 minutes with the worst behind us. From there the view was excellent and we could look across to Harbour Cone which seemed a long way off.

We continued uphill, gently now, past the two decrepit old buildings where “elf and safety” signs warning of the hazard they presented were noted. A little further and we turned left towards Harbour Cone, down hill. Funny, but it didn’t seem that steep going down as it had climbing up that part on a previous occasion. And then up a little took us to join the uphill paddock track from Bacon Street. Easier going for a while got us to Highcliff Road, with a stile on each side to climb over. And then climbing some more.

A brief rest stop on Rocky Knob gave us good views, especially over Hoopers Inlet. On  a bit, before descending a little to view the ruins at Nyhon Farm (there is a sign at the site now).

From then on it was uphill all the way to the summit. Comments such as “don’t look up”, “take short steps”, and “just keep putting one foot in front of the other” were heard. All good advice.

The cool (but not cold) wind was behind us as we climbed, and helped push us up, at least psychologically. In a short time we were picking our way through the rocks and came to the trig station on top.

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

The 360 degree views available to us were just a tad hazy, but the Mt Cargill mast stayed hidden in the clouds. What a great place to be! Not far below us, to the east of north, the white buddhist shrine stood out clearly in the sunshine. It was only 11.40 but on the summit was the only place to have lunch, even if a little early. Just over the brow it was sunny and nicely sheltered for this important ritual.

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Thirty minutes for lunch and then it was downhill all the way.

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

We descended to the ruins of the Allen Farm

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

(no sign seen here), crossed the road, before going down the old track to Bacon Street.

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

A walk back around the harbourside took us back to the cars at 1.00 p.m. The day’s distance was 8.25 km, not long perhaps, but we had quite a bit of uphill work. The summit of Harbour Cone is 315 metres by the way.

Several commented that doing an anticlockwise circuit had worked very well and it gave us the opportunity to have our lunch on the summit.

On the way home two cars stopped at Macandrew Bay to allow their occupants to visit the coffee shop. Another very enjoyable day’s tramp out on the fresh air over. – Art.

13. 22/7/2015 Trampers. Harbour Cone

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken.

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 10km; 3.6km/h ave; 2h 45min moving; total ascent 586m; max height 358m.

I must be getting old, I put the group wrong on where we were starting the tramp from, I had it in my mind that we were going to Portobello — how wrong was I !!! I apologise for the mix up !
Anyway, after we arrived at Bacon St. we parked up & made ready for the days exercise. 10 trampers, some new to the group set off, & we stopped at the normal spot under the Macrocarpas just past the top end of Bacon street, where the ground is dry, for morning tea. For today’s tramp, I had decided that we would go up the marked track in the paddocks, instead of climbing up the fence line track. This was a new way for all of us, which made it more interesting.
As we made our way up, I could see that it was going to be a longer walk going this way up to Harbour Cone, than the fence line track would be. However the gradient is much more gentle.
We all made it to the top of Harbour Cone, some in better condition than others !! So we spent some time up there admiring the views,…

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

… & resting up before carefully negotiating the boulders on the way back down.
Now, there was a water trough down near the bottom where you go through the gate by the stone wall in the next paddock, this water trough is fed by a pipe running down the hillside from above, & it is constantly overflowing, with the ground around & below it VERY WET, So, what does one member do — he walks down through the wet patch & promptly falls on his butt, then after standing up, he repeats this, just for good measure, & to make sure he was well covered in mud.!!! He arrived at the lunch stop by the stone wall looking very muddy & wet.
After lunch, we retraced our steps down into the valley, then up the other side to the Camp Rd. track below Larnachs Castle. This climb was almost the last straw for a couple in the group, but with some help everybody made it up there, & we had a lengthy rest break here for them to regain some energy, before setting off down Camp Rd.
When we reached the car park with the toilet in it at broad Bay [ where we should’ve stopped originally !!] I suggested that anybody who wanted to wait there could do so, & we would pick them up on the way back from getting the cars. this suggestion was eagerly pounced upon by 6 members of the group. [ now if we had parked there in the morning, all party members would’ve had to walk the full distance, so my mistake let them off the hook !]
The other 4 of us walked back to the cars, & then returned to pick up the ‘survivors’, & then we headed off to Macandrew Bay coffee shop for a chat session, & to keep up the ‘Trampers Coffee Club’ tradition.
I hope this trip which is really quite hard, doesn’t put off the new members we had on this tramp, as most of our tramps are not this steep. So hope to see you all again next week for our assault on Swampy summit.

12. 12/2/2014. Hikers. Harbour Cone from Bacon Street in Turnbull Bay. Leaders: Dorothy and Chris.

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Discretion being the better part of valour, the leaders spurned the steep fence track, choosing instead the much more graduated DCC yellow poled line one to the right, despite its many fence stiles. We had our cuppa amongst the clump of macrocarpa trees, (a point where a side track leads off to the right, through a gully and steeply up to underneath Larnachs Castle). But after our stop, we carried on up and across Highcliff Road to turn left and further up to Rocky Knob. Here the leaders and one or two others forewent the option of going further, allowing a hardy 12 to go over and across the next paddock, down through the gate by a stone wall and on up endlessly, it seemed, to the rocky-strewn summit of Harbour Cone.

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone.

We returned down to lunch on the stone wall before going on to join the others on Rocky Knob. Then it was just simply to retrace our steps back down to the cars. Threatening rain on a couple of occasions failed to eventuate. The day was lovely and calm and not too hot. A perfect and satisfying tramp, well-planned by the leaders. – Ian.

11. 21/8/2013 Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

Anti-clockwise GPS of route, courtesy Ken, (omitting Harbour Cone climb).

Stone walls of old settlement, adjoining Highcliff Road and below Harbour Cone.

After Harbour Cone climb, we went round via Rocky Knob and under Lanarch Castle. Half of us chose to go partly by Highcliff Road and then contour round Peggys Hill, the other half to follow the track poles over paddocks, deeply down through a gully and then very STEEPLY up to meet the others under the north side of Larnach Castle, where we lunched. – Ian

Heads from lunch spot on north slop under Lanarch Castle, just above derelict sheds of Lanarch’s old Model Farm.

Panorama video clip from north slope below Lanarch Castle

Hedge invariably beautifully trimmed

Hoopers Inlet to Highcliff Rd. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Hoopers Inlet Road. 2.20 ret. Route. Manager: DCC CAM
Very steep track. Suitable for experienced and agile parties only.

10. 28/4/2010. Trampers. Harbour Cone from Hoopers Inlet Track and Nyhon Track. Hard. Leader: Ian

The day was fine. A week of wet weather had stymied any recce, so this was it. Thanks to Antony Hamel’s description and map in his book Tracks and Trails around Dunedin, the leader was confident we could readily find our way. Not. First mistake up the Nyhon track was to turn right at the first stile. (It should have been the second). However, an inviting gully presented itself, so this was the route up, we thought. Not. It was very steep but we made it to what we first thought must be Rocky Knob, even if it looked a little different from what some of us remembered it as.

Hoopers Inlet from first knoll. (Ken pic.)

Morning tea in the sun on the knoll was very pleasant. But confusingly, a small distance away was another knoll, slightly higher.

Second knoll across from first knoll. Doug. (Ken pic.)

This too, when reached, didn’t quite match up to our recollections. It was only when we had made our way through an old homestead macrocarpa-surrounded block of stone walls

Interesting remains.

and up a further rise that we realised where we really were.  There, down a slope to our left was the obvious vehicle track that descends from the true Rocky Knob. An easy walk up, and we were there.

From there it was over well-remembered ground

Rocky Knob behind us.

to then grind our way up to Harbour Cone.

The long climb up.

A short stop to admire the view and then back down again, across to Rocky Knob, and down the vehicle track to zigzag  into the gully below the knob – the gully we should have taken on the way up. There we stopped for lunch.

About to stop for lunch. Beyond, track angles up hillside.

and were met by Ken who had more adventurously taken the original steep descent down through the bush.

Overlooking steep marked descent, adventurously taken by Ken from Rocky Knob.

He had made it all right, but not without entangling a hand in some vicious bush lawyer.
After lunch, accompanied by the squawks of a complaining bellbird, we made our way down through some bush, and across some marshy reeds on a narrow netting-covered boardwalk.

But then, surprise. Markers took us up steeply to hug a fence line over a rise to descend further along, now very steeply and to the marshland again.

The steep fence line track. Wasn’t there another way?

Another board, bridging a stream, stile to climb and we were out into a grass paddock again.

Before us loomed the Nyhon Track climbing (plenty of steepness again) up over a hill. We had plenty of time available so we decided to follow it across to Sandymount Road. It was muddy and slippery but we made it. (Was this now the fourth or fifth hill we had climbed that day?)  At the top we decided to carry on to Sandymount Road rather than retrace our steps back down again) and do a round trip. At the road,

Nyhon Track sign on Sandymount Road. (Ken pic.)

we carried on down and back across to Hoopers Inlet and the cars. It had been a good hard day, but all seemed to have enjoyed it, even a visitor who had learnt about us and had seen the website. And there were nine of us too. We had done good, to quote a client’s words to his barrister. – Ian

9. 8/12/2010. Hikers. Harbour Cone. Leaders: B Harvey, C Hughes.

8. 15/7/2009. Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

We were immediately into macrocarpas and elected to stop here for our morning tea.

Cuppa under macrocarpas.

Cuppa under macrocarpas. Pat, Bill, Hazel, Doug, Arthur, Ria, George.

Despite DCC-inserted yellow-topped poles leading off up a valley, we stuck to the original public walkway taking us directly up the steep hill to the macrocarpas on Highcliff Road. Across the road and past the building ruins we turned our attention to the relentlessly steep ascent of Harbour Cone. The polled track took us straight up and through the boulders at the rocky top to the trig.

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Amongst the wonderful views was the sight of two strange monuments in a property above Portobello as seen in the following pic.

Strange

Strange structures above Portobello. Viewed from top of Harbour Cone.

Returning down the south side of Harbour Cone we stopped for lunch in the saddle between the Cone and Rocky Knob. Then it was up a stone-walled track to the Knob. A virtual former cliff-face track led down to Hoopers Inlet, although now a new polled track made an easier descent around a farm track to the left, but that was not the way we were going today. We stopped to enjoy the sights of Sandymount, Hoopers Inlet and Varleys Hill but it was too windy to tarry.

Varleys Hill

Varleys Hill viewed from top of Rocky Knob. (Bill pic)

Going on down and back to Highcliff Road, most elected to go on up the road to enjoy a more level approach to Camp Road while four hardier (stupid?) ones took the yellowed poles track on across the road, down through a deep gully and then very steeply up to join the others where Camp Road enters the trees under Lanarchs Castle. Here we could take in another wonderful number of views.

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

The poled track took us around a contour under the Castle to eventually go steeply down into Broad Bay and so back to the cars. – Ian.

7. 30/11/2007. Broad Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill. Leaders: George
6. 11/7/2007. Trampers. Park Broad Bay Boat Club. Turnbull Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill. Leaders: George, Glenis
5. 2/12/1998. Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill – Larnach Castle. Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.
4. 23/7/1997. Broad Bay, Peggys Hill, Larnach Castle Road. Leaders: Doug J, Irene, Jack R
3. 8/6/1994. Harbour Coone. Peggy Hill. Leaders: Jack R, Bob H, Barbara, Peg C
2. 29/1/1992. Harbour Cone. – A good warm up to start the year. Average+. Leaders: Jack R, Ted, Betty B, Jean A, Peter R

1. 21/12/1988 Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.

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Mar 21 2018

Tunnels Track, Yellow Hut, The Gap, Gap Ridge

Published by under Trampers

Click Silver Peaks Forest for background information on the area.

Accessed from Mountain Road from old forest HQ 6 hr ret, Route, DOC and private land.

(Green Hut access: 41 km from car park.)

6. 21/3/2018. Trampers. Tunnels Track. (Yellow Ridge.) Leader: Arthur.

The rain started as we left Mosgiel, but despite this, it wasn’t cold and the eight trampers were VERY DETERMINED to go tramping.

The cars regrouped at Waitati, and ONWARD was the only option – no one wanted to cancel. So it was up Double Hill Road and Semple Road to Mountain Road. A key allowed us through the locked gate and we drove up to, and parked at, the beginning of the Tunnels Track. The rain continued.

Our plan was now just to do a short tramp. It was very dark in among the trees as we descended the track, some wag asking for the street lights to be switched on!

After twenty minutes we came to the old gold mining tunnels …

At tunnels…no one home. (Phil pic and caption.)

… where we had a stand-up morning tea. No one was electing to sit on the wet ground. A N.Z. robin kept us friendly company here, which was nice.

From the Tunnels we followed the old water race to the main track, and then descended to the South Branch of the Waikouaiti River which was up a bit and a little discoloured.

At South Waikouaiti Branch. (Phil pic and caption.)

No use going further in the rain, so it was uphill back to the cars to finish at 11.15 a.m.

We had travelled slightly less than 4 km, and all had greatly enjoyed our little excursion, which had taken one and a half hours.

Surprisingly, the tracks were not slippery, even on the steepest bits.

Into the cars and to Blueskin Nurseries for hot drinks, before returning to Mosgiel.

Eight trampers had decided that a little but of rain was not going to spoil their day, even if it was a shortened tramp. Thanks to all participants. – Art.

5. 11/2/2015. Trampers. The Gap, via Yellow Ridge.

GPS Yellow Ridge to The Gap, courtesy Ken.  We walked just on 12km We climbed 1000mtrs.
ave speed 3km/hr moving time just over 4hrs. Stopped time 3hrs max elevation 700mtrs.

A good number of 6 trampers, & one visitor + dog turned out for the 8:30 start for the tramp to the Gap via Yellow Ridge. 4 members of the group had not been there before, so it was a bit of an experience for them. We started by walking down to the tunnels, for the ones that had not seen them before, then it was along the old water race back onto the main track, where we had morning tea…

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

…at the grassed area before crossing the Waikouaiti River, & then climbing the steep track up to the new Philip J Cox hut for a breather.
We then carried on towards the Gap, but two of the new members were starting to struggle a bit by now, & as we approached the last couple of climbs up to the Gap, they decided that they would find a nice spot for lunch, & then go back down to the hut & wait for us there. The rest of us carried on to the Gap, where we had lunch,

Lunch at the Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

& admired the views.

View looking north from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking north from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South west from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South west from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South-West from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South-West from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

A quick trip was taken up to the trig on the northern side of the Gap to say we had been there, & then it was on with the packs, & back the way we had come. We caught up with the others at the hut, just a few minutes after they had got there, so an extended break was in order for refreshments,…

At Philip J Cox hut on the way back out. (Ken pic and caption)

At Philip J Cox hut on the way back out. (Ken pic and caption)

…& another breather before the steep decent into the Waikouaiti River again.
At this time, one of the group decided that he would start off down the track, thinking that he had told somebody that he was leaving, & it was not until we all got about 15mins down the track that I noticed he was not in our group, & asked where he was. We stood around waiting, thinking that he was still behind us, but in the end I asked our fittest member if he would go back & check. While he was doing this, we decided that the others would go down to the bottom, & see if he was down there, while I stayed to wait on the member we had sent back up the track. All this took approx 1/2 hr to accomplish, so we knew we would be a bit late getting back to the cars. As it turned out, the missing member was at the bottom waiting for the rest of us to arrive, & was very apologetic for his mistake.
We took another break at the grassed area…

Resting at Philip J Cox hut on the way out. (Ken pic and caption)

Resting at Philip J Cox hut on the way out. (Ken pic and caption)

…before we tackled the last climb up the steep track back to the cars. We had decided beforehand to go out the north end of Mountain Rd. as the road is in much better condition at that end. However, when we got to the last locked gate, we couldn’t unlock the padlock with the key that was given to us by City Forests, so it was about turn & drive all the way back to the south end & down to Waitati.
The weather was good, with no wind, & not too hot, & the low cloud that we observed when driving in was non existent when we got to the Gap. This is probably one of the harder tramps that we do, & is one that I might forgo in the future, although I managed it quite well, a result I put down to drinking Gatorade, & more fluids than I normally do on a tramp. – Ken.

4. 14/11/2012 Tunnels Track, Yellow Ridge, The Gap, Gap Ridge

GPS Yellow Ridge to The Gap, courtesy Ken. We climbed just over 1000mtrs.
ave speed 3km/hr
moving time just over 4hrs.
max elevation 668mtrs.

Four intrepid trampers gathered at the Bush Rd. car park before setting off at 8:30am on an adventure that 3 of us had never done before. The fact that Dermot had managed to get a key from City Forests for the gates on Mountain Rd. saved us about 9km of walking time, as we were able to drive right to the start of the Tunnels track. We set off down this track at about 9:30, & went to explore the tunnels themselves, a new experience for 2 of the group. Arriving at the grassy area at the bottom by the river, we had morning tea, & then set off across the river, without getting wet feet, & started the relentless climb up Yellow Ridge. On reaching the new Philip J. Cox hut, we had a short break to regain our breath, admire the hut, it’s fixtures & facilities. {We even swept the floor when we left]

Ready for the next part of the trip. (Ken pic and caption)

The next task was to get to the Gap for lunch, however remote this possibility seemed as, the track actually goes past it, instead of towards it for a while, & you start to wonder when you will be getting closer.

Nearing the top with The Gap showing. (Ken pic and caption)

At this point, one member of the group decided that he would go back to the hut & wait for us there. We eventually did get to the Gap,

Sign at the top. Thank God for something to lean on. (Ken pic [taken by Heb] and caption)

where we had lunch, then a short walk up to the trig on the top of the Northern part of the Gap,

Trig above Gap north rock. (Ken pic and caption)

where the views are magnificent, despite the lowering cloud/fog that had been hanging around all day. We then retraced our steps, carefully, due to the slippery nature of parts of the track that were very steep. Someone commented ” why didn’t they just provide a ladder” !! We stopped again at the Phipip J. Cox hut to have another drink, & to pick up our other group member, who we discovered had left a note for us, saying that he had left the hut 1/2 hr ago, & was making his way slowly back to the car. As we travelled back to the river, & up the Tunnels track, he had left numerous arrow signs, & the time that he had drawn them in the soft ground. So we knew how far in front of us he was, & when I arrived at the car, he had only been there about 3 minutes or so.

Everybody agreed that it was a worthwhile trip, & even although it’s a bit of a ‘gut buster’ it’s worth doing, but the early start, & the gate key is a must if you want to get home at a reasonable time. We made it back to the Bush Rd. car park just after 5pm, & I was home by 5:30pm. – Ken.

3. 20/2/2002 Tunnels Track, Yellow Ridge, The Gap, Gap Ridge Leaders: George, Ian, Hazel
Mountain Road, Tunnels track, Yellow Ridge, the Gap.
On Monday 4 Feb 2002, George Haggie, Hazel Leslie and Ian Fleming receed the route for the Taieri Recreational Tramping Club. We left Green Island meeting point at 8.30. On George’s prompting we drove further north and entered Mountain Road at Merton and drove 17 kms back to the Tunnels Track DoC sign on a good well metalled road arriving there a 9.30.  The south branch of the Waikouaiti River was shallow enough but the track up to the manuka scrub was in poor condition with a large slip crossing it.
Once in the trees conditions improved greatly and it was most pleasant all the way to Yellow Hut which we found to be in poor condition inside.  A DoC sign recommended going any further for experienced trampers only due to Silver Peaks notoriously changing weather conditions.
Beyond the hut we were into large tussock which being largely dry was not too much trouble to wade through although we walked more by faith than sight through the sea of tops, confirming we were still on the track with our feet. in many cases.
The route does a left-hand semicircle on a broad ridge. We lunched at the Gap at 12.15 in a very slight smirry rain but under dry rock overhang.
Returning, the tussock, now wet was much more difficult to push through, with the wet leaves lying lower onto the track, tangling our feet and tripping us up. The notorious steep never-ending climb back up from the Waikouaiti to Mountain Road keeps getting longer with more rest stops as one ages.
We got back to the car at 3 pm and continued round Mountain Road, now striking many potholes with several spots so severe as to be almost impassable.  This part was 13 km from Tunnels Track to Waitati. The sandy road metal contrasts with the rock metal on the northern part and although a few kms shorter and with many main highway kms eliminated  is not to be recommended at the moment. Returned home just on 5 pm, having driven 103 kms.
2. 23/2/2000. The Gap via Yellow Hut. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ian.
1. 12/11/1997. Tunnels Track to Yellow Hut and Gap. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Claude.

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Feb 28 2018

Maori Peak

Published by under Trampers

Background Notes on Maori Peak
No. 15 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Seacliff. Enchanted Forest & Maori Hill. Farm.”
46 km from car park.
15.

28 February 2018 – Maori Peak and Split Rock

After parking the cars in Russell Rd (at Seacliff) 12 trampers set out on the day’s hike. It was a calm, warm Dunedin morning and in fact during the course of the day the temperature got up to 24 degrees; so conditions were ideal.

We walked up the road, entered a farm, and enjoyed morning tea in a sheltered area past the wool shed.

Then we rambled through grassy paddocks until we reached Maori Peak at 11.30. It was a nuggety climb to the top but well worth it to get the spectacular coastal and mountain views.

Atop Maori Peak. (Phil pic and caption.)

Still too early for lunch so we descended and started making our way towards Split Rock.

We enjoyed a leisurely lunch at a sun-drenched ‘possie’ overlooking Karitane.

The hike through the paddocks to Split Rock was spoiled a little by waist high thistles

Sting’s next hit…Fields of Thistles. (Phil pic and caption.)

but we had forewarned our crew to wear appropriate protective clothing, so no real issue.

Split Rock was new to some and they were most impressed by the narrow cleft in the rock that we all had to squeeze through. The red colour of the rock lichen was beautiful

Split Rock. (Margreet pic and caption.)

and there were also lots of bush orchids to admire. The views from the top of the rock were not to be missed.

Atop Split rock towards the Harbour heads. (Phil pic and caption.)

Then it was an easy walk through paddocks and farm tracks back to the cars. Before going for coffee at Blueskin Bay we ventured into the Seacliff Recreational Reserve for a quick look at the memorial plaque that gives a brief history of the lunatic asylum that used to be there. The lawns are now beautifully manicured and it is a very peaceful place to reflect on the former infamous history of this place and its unfortunate inmates.

In all we hiked around 11 km and comments about the day were very positive.

Margreet & Neil

14. 21/10/2015. Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock.
On a very windy day, 12 trampers set out for the walk to Maori Peak, & Split Rock. After walking up the road, we had morning tea at the woolshed …
Morning tea break

Morning tea break

… before setting out for Maori peak, where some clambered up to the top for a look around. We then had a leisurely early lunch …
Lunch alongside Maori Peak (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch alongside Maori Peak (Ken pic and caption)

… before heading off to Split Rock.
There were a few in the group who had not been here before so they all had a good look around,
Exiting the split (Ken pic and caption)

Exiting the split (Ken pic and caption)

Getting back up to flat ground from the split (Ken pic and caption)

Getting back up to flat ground from the split (Ken pic and caption)

& some even climbed up onto the top for a great view.
Admiring the view from on top of Split rock

Admiring the view from on top of Split rock

On the way back, the majority of us decided we would follow the farm track back out to the road, while 3 others decided they knew best & went out the way that we had returned on a previous trip. Having now done the return both ways, I think i prefer the walk back through the paddocks, instead of the farm track, which is a bit boring, although it does offer some new views.

When everybody was ready to leave, we all decided that a stop at Blueskin Cafe was a good idea to keep up the coffee club tradition. On the way to the cafe, we caught up with the steam train that was visiting Dunedin for Labour weekend [powered by the steam engine ‘The Passchendaele”] which stopped at Waitati, where some of the group went to have a look at it.

Apart from the strong wind all day, everybody enjoyed the walk.

walked 9.1km
4.1km/h
climbed 530mtrs. – Ken.

 13. 18/6/2014. Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium.
Mud, mud, glorious mud !!!!
From the above statement, you will have guessed that we had a very muddy tramp. We started early as one of our party had an appointment at 3:30pm, so we had to be sure of getting home in time for that.
When we arrived at Russell Rd. outside the Truby King Reserve, the condition of the road surface gave us a taste of what was to come, it was very wet & sloppy. As we walked up Russell Rd. the farmer came by on his tractor, so we had a good chat with him before moving on to the top of the road & into the farm land where we had morning tea at the woolshed not far from the road. We squelched our way over to Maori peak, where some climbed to the top to admire the view, & then it was off again retracing our steps back up to the top, & around to Split Rock, where it was obligatory for some to make their way through the split, & back again.
Enter

Enter

Exit

Exit

We had lunch at Split rock,

Lunch

Lunch

then it was off for more squelching back to the cars for an early trip home. It was a good walk, made harder by the amount of mud we were carrying on our boots, & by the very wet/soft ground.
We walked 9.4km; moving time 2h 17min; ave 4.1km/hr; climbed 342mtrs; max elevation 431mtrs. – Ken
12. 25/7/2012. 7 Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. 

Average speed: 4.1km/hr
2h 39min actual moving time
311 max elevation of walk
GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

As you might determine from the GPS of the route,  we pioneered/recconnoitred some new ways of connecting Russell Road, Maori Peak and Split Rock, some better, some worse.
By going across at the immediate end of the road, we avoided having to climb the paper road over the top and the deep gully across to Maori Peak. Our gradients were more gradual. Bravo. However, on the return, at the large water tank, instead of going down, we went across and got into a no-trespassing area. (Compare route on map below on previous tramp for difference.) So, we climbed up and up and came out at the top of the road again! Ah well, it was still a good day out, and the extra exercise did nobody any harm. – Ian

Karitane from the top of Maori Peak. (Ken pic and caption)

NE from the top of Maori Peak (Ken pic and caption)

Ian and Jill at lunch below Maori Peak (Ken caption)

Ian about to go through Split Rock (Ken pic and caption)

Jill turns to go through Split Rock (Ken pic and caption)

Jill at the exit, before returning back through.

11. 10/3/2010. Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. Leaders: Ken, Hazel, Ria.

Map of route. (Scanned by Bob from Google Earth)

We were late arriving at Russell Road, delayed by a Fulton Hogan “mill” relaying a long stretch of road near St Barnabas Church. We morning-tead up the road, crested the ridge and then down to avoid the heavy gorse infestation to skirt a large winter turnip paddock to make our way down, across and up to what Ian was sure was Maori Peak.

First peak. What Ian THOUGHT was Maori Peak. (Bob pic)

It wasn’t. So it was down again and on, down, and then up to the real peak.

Approach to Maori Peak. (Bob pic)

Several of us scrambled up its last steep ascent to lunch on the top and drink in the great views all around.

On top of Maori Peak. Ken, Ian, Ria, Hazel. Other peak behind to SW. (Bob pic)

Then it was back down again (carefully).

A careful descent. From top: Hazel, Sabina, Ian, Ria. (Bob pic)

The recce had been a failure due to opaque low fog so from here on it was a case of relying on memories as hazy as Ian’s. Despite some mutterings, George charted an original route to get us to the bush marking the track through it to Split Rock.

Taking in the view from the top of Split Roc. Bob, Sabina, Ken.

George at Split Rock entrance. (Bob pic)

Ken inside split rock. Fortunately no earthquake occurred at the time.

Ken near the split rock exit.

From here, we traced, in some places originally again, the general route back via a water tank and implement sheds to the side road above the old Asylum buildings to Russell Road and the cars. A good day for seven of us – and for three of whom, a visit to Maori Peak and Split Rock for the first time. We shall generously excuse faulty route memories of the old hands due to the six years’ time lapse since the last visit to Maori Peak. – Ian

The old Seacliff Asylum buildings.

10. 9/6/2004 Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. Leaders: Hazel, George, Dot B
9. 9/6/2004. Hikers. Seacliff, Maori Peak. Medium. Leaders: Peter and Wendy
Tea Break. Recognisable: Dot, Glenice, Arthur, Wendy, Margaret, Doug, Claude

Tea Break. Recognisable: Dot, Glenice, Arthur, Wendy, Margaret, Doug, Claude

Sheer climb. Lex, Ria, Glenice, Who? Arthur, Who? George

Sheer climb. Lex, Ria, Glenice, Who? Arthur, Who? George

Split Rock Exit. Bob (Hi, Shirl), George

Split Rock Exit. Bob (Hi, Shirl), George

8. 23/4/2003. Trampers. Seacliff: Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Arthur H, Graham.
7. 12/12/2001. Alt. Enchanted Forest – Maori Peak, from Russell Road. Easy. Leaders: Catherine, Margaret D, Val.
6. 18/3/1998. Seacliff and Maori Peak. Leaders: Nancy, Lesley S, Bill H.
5. 4/12/1996. Karitane – Seacliff to Maori Peak. Park at Old Hospital. Leaders: Nancy, Joyce, Peg C.
4. 28/8/1996. Seacliff to Maori Peak. Combined. Park Seacliff Hospital entrance. Average. Leaders: Nancy, Joyce, Daphne.
3. 1/12/1993. Karitane, Maori Peak. Round trip. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Marie, Nel
2. 15/4/1992 Seacliff to Maori Peak. Round trip. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Nancy, Peg A, Stan R
1. 14/4/1989 Leaders: Catherine T, Nancy, Lesley S

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Feb 14 2018

Cleghorn St, Signal Hill tramps

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Distance Chingford from carpark: 20 km.
Follow Old Main North Road to Cleghorn Street which has the best view of the harbour. Walkway sign.
Walk starts starts at the gate on right, up McGregors Hill. Beyond stile Pine plantation on 3rd stile at summit.
Gravel road 10 minutes to end. Locked gate. Last stile. Signal Hill road.
15. 14/2/2018. Hikers. Cleghorn Street to Normanby Pub via Signal Hill and Centennial Memorial. M. Leaders: Pam and Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Clive pic.

Clive pic.

14. 14/8/2013. Hikers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip. M. Leaders: Lex and Graham.
We parked near Chingford Park and walked up the hill on the Mt Cargill Rd to the turn-off to Signal Hill.  Morning tea on the side of the road about halfway up.  It was blowing a gale and pretty cold but with everyone rugged up well there were no dramas.  Margaret and Les chose to turn back – it was hard going and I don’t blame them!
Elaine in bath. (Judy pic).

Elaine enjoying bath. (Judy pic).

 Lunch in the shelter of the trees near the top …
Lunch. (Judy pic)

Lunch break. (Judy pic)

… then across to the masts, and down to the road.  135 steps on the steep descent and a few stiff knees. – Judy
13. 29/6/2011. Trampers. Chingford Park, Cleghorn St, Signal Hill, round trip.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken

We enjoyed the harbour view as we walked along the rather wet and muddy 4WD track after leaving Cleghorn Street.

The view down the harbour was wonderful

With younger members among the trampers now, we are making a faster pace than formerly and reached the ‘signals’ on Signal Hill a bit half an hour earlier than lunch time, so decided to carry on. We found a sunny calm spot on the Signal Hill Road side to enjoy lunch.

Lunch on Signal Hill roadside

12. 8/7/2009 Trampers Chingford Park, North Road, Cleghorn Street, McGregors Hill, Signal Hill, Signal Hill Road round trip. Medium. Leaders: Pat & Bill
Start

First view of harbour and Peninsula. Bill, Pat, Wendy, Ken.

 

St Leonards

St Leonards below.

Charles Cone

Mount Charles and Harbour Cone on Peninsula

Heads

Roseneath, Port Chalmers and Heads

Lunch

Lunch at top of hill. Doug, Arthur, Wendy, Ian, Pat, Bill. (Ken pic)

Dunedin

Down from Signal Hill with Dunedin beyond. Wendy, Ken, Arthur, Pat.

11. 13/5/2009 Hikers. Signal Hill, Cleghorn St. Leaders: Bev H, Joyce

10. 20/7/2005. Trampers. Cleghorn St, Signal Hill.
Harbour view. "Hi Shirley". Bob, Pat, Who?

Harbour view. “Hi Shirley”. Bob, Pat, Dot.

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

Dunedin from Centennial Memorial

9. 14/8/2002 Logan Park High School, Signal Hill, Cleghorn St, NEV Road. Leaders: Molly, Hazel, Barbara McC
8. 22/5/2002. Alt. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Betty, Colleen.
7. 24/1/2001. Normanby, Signal Hill, Opoho. Leaders: Lance and Lois, Shirley R.
6. 16/8/2000 Bethunes Gully, Opoho. Leaders: Jack & Rosemary, Shirley R.
5. 26/4/2000. Chingford Park, Signal Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Denise.
4. 24/1/2000 Chingford Park, Old Brown House, Signal Hill, Opoho, Leaders: Lance & Lois, Peter R
3. 22/4/1998. Chingford Park, Brown House, Signal Hill. Leaders: Shirley McN, Shirley R.
2. 16/6/1993. Bethunes Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Round Trip. Easy. Leaders: Shirley, Doreen, Diana, Nel.
1. 1/7/1992. Bethune’s Gully, Signal Hill, University Observatory, Bennetts, Bethunes Gully. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Marie, June, Ray.

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Jan 24 2018

Spiers Road, Davies, McGouns Creek Extension

Published by under Trampers

Click Ben Rudd Article for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
Antony Hamel in his Dunedin Tracks and Trails book has interesting information on the “Snowy Mountain Track” under his Spiers Road entry.
3. 24/1/2018. Trampers. Wakari Road, Davies Track, Flagstaff Walkway, Spiers Road Track, Wakari Road. M. Leader: Helen.

Tramp report.

 13 hardy trampers set off from the carpark and headed to the  bike tracks park in Wakari Road.
Started badly with the leader (me) taking the wrong tack. However quickly rectified and onto the correct one. It wound its way up to the top onto a gravel road and along to the start of the Davies Track.
As was 10am we had our morning tea there.

Morning tea at start of Davies Track. (Helen pic and caption.)

One of our nameless men accidently left his pole there and got it back at the end. Up the track we went which wound round in places  and steeper in parts. Ross Davies whose Grandfather developed the track took a turn at leading. Was very appropiate. Ended up on the Pineapple track

Group on the Pineapple track (Helen pic and caption.)

and after some rest time made out way to the top for our lunch stop.

Lunch at the top and views over Dunedin. (Helen pic and caption.)

On the way up passed various people and in particular a young lady who almost made the male members fall off the track. 4 tummy piercings I was told and a lovely figure. Made their day.
After lunch we went down a bit till we got to the Speirs Road track. Down through the tussock and flax some bits quite steep.Some grasdy areas as the gorse had been cut. Lots of markers except in one spot but we soon found our way to the road after passing two horses with a lovely baby. From there we wound our way round two streets back onto Wakari Road and along to the cars. Altogether we walked 10.8kms and I would grade it medium to hardish. Most people had not done this circut before so was very enjoyable.
 Coffee at Blackstone ended our day.  Helen.

2. 20/11/2013. Trampers. Wakari Road, Davies Track, Flagstaff Walkway, Pineapple Track, McGouns Creek Extension.

We started at the top of Tanner Road. We went west along a 4WD track and turned up into Davies Track. The track through the bush was average condition. We heard mainly bell birds. At the top of the bush was where we had our morning tea. The track from this point on was through tussock and flax. The higher we got on this track, the harder it was to find. The last two or three minutes we lost the track completely. At the flat stone which generally indicates the top of the track, Neil built a small cairn of rocks there.
Then we went west along Flagstaff walk, and across a short track to the Fire Break. Then we turned right along this track to the top of the Pineapple track. By this time we had seen three other groups in the same area. We turned down the Pineapple Track, and just before heading into the bush we stopped for lunch, with a light breeze and in the sun.
Carried on down to the junction of the Pineapple and McGouns. Went south on McGouns with its steps, bridges and boardwalks to the bottom with the seats around the cairn.
Back along the 4WD track to the cars.
We met one other group plus one Botanist who was very interested in the area as such. He obviously comes from England, by his accent. – Heb.

1. 11/11/2009. Trampers. Wakari Road, Spiers Road, Flagstaff Walkway, Davies, McGouns Creek Extension. Leaders: Ian, Ken.
For variation we parked the cars at the north end of Wakari Road and street-walked from there to Spiers Road via Gilkison and Salmond Streets, critiquing gardens on our way.
Up Spiers Road, over the first stile, through gorse and broom recently cleared, thank goodness, then out on a paddock bypass where we stopped for our cuppa.
Cuppa View

Cuppa View. (Ian pic and caption.)

 

Then up through more scrub, open but gorsed paddock following the white posts, temporarily onto the road past the communication tower and Ben Rudd’s stone dyke.
Route past transmission tower

Route past transmission tower. (Ian pic and caption.)

A little further and it was over another stile and through some dense scrub that could do with a pruning, through another gate up and into the waretah posted route that struck to the right and led on up to the Flagstaff Walkway.

Approaching stile. Ken, Ria.

Approaching stile. Ken, Ria. (Ian pic and caption.)

Bivvy just NE of Flagstaff trig. Ken, Sabina, Ria

Bivvy just NE of Flagstaff trig. Ken, Sabina, Ria. (Ian pic and caption.)

Near the end of the Walkway we turned off down the Davies Track. The good bit about going down rather than up was that we were able enjoy the views, and later, the lovely woodland vista. At the bottom, we lunched at the Dunedin City Forestry  2006 Plantings Centennial stone cairn plaque seating before making our way down the road and through the McGouns Creek Track Extension back to the cars. – Ian.

Track interest on McGoun extension

Just a bit of interest on McGouns Creek Track Extension. (Ian pic and caption.)

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Jan 24 2018

Jim Freeman and Ben Rudd

Published by under Trampers

Distance from car-park: 16 km.

3. 24/1/2018. Hikers. Bull Ring, Where Flat Road, Jim Freeeman,Ben Rudd, Flag Staff, Bull Ring. M. Leaders: Judy, Dawn.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

27 hikers gathered at the car park, but this number soon diminished to 26 as one member collapsed before we even started.  (He is okay). Two others waited to provide assistance, leaving 24 of us to head for the Bull Ring.

Here five opted to do a shorter trip to the summit and back, while the remaining 19 set off down the road to the Possum Busters turn-off.  This was an easy, half-hour, down-hill stroll, mostly in the shade of the trees.

Morning tea was had just inside the track, …

Morning tea break at start of Possum Busters. (Kevin pic.)

… and then we headed for the Jim Freeman turn-off and the long, slow, hot climb up to the Ben Rudd shelter.  With frequent stops for water and breath, this took just over an hour.  Not bad under the conditions experienced!  We were all glad to be in the shelter of the bush and even gladder to emerge and collapse at the shelter for a long leisurely lunch break.

Lunch at Ben Rudd. (Kevin pic.)

The two good Samaritans met us here, having come up the fire-break track and down to the shelter.  They informed us that the patient was okay and that the other five were on their way to the summit and would head straight back down.

After lunch it was up to the fire-break, …

Coming out onto fire-break. (Kevin pic.)

Junction of Fire Break and Ben Rudd tracks. (Kevin pic.)

… and another split, with nine heading straight down to the cars, and the rest taking the track towards Swampy and then around and up (again!) to the Flagstaff summit.  It was slightly misty with a welcome cooling breeze, but the views were great, and we enjoyed the leisurely descent to the cars.  A good number then enjoyed a social hour at Topiary.

The decision to do this trip in reverse made sense, as it avoided the long hot climb up the road at the end, and also meant that most of the climbing was in the bush. – Judy

2. 19/4/2017. Hikers. Bull Ring, Ben Rudd, Jim Freeman, Whare Flat Road return. M. Jennifer and Adrienne.

Seven ‘not-so-young-and-not-feeling-fit’ members decided on a shorter(?) version of the day’s trip.  While the others went up the fire-break track, we opted for the track to Flagstaff summit,with great views across the Taieri and then the city before the cloud came down.  Morning tea was had sheltering in the rocks just past the summit,

(Judy pic.)

before following the track down over rocks and through mud to the junction with the fire-break.  It was cold pushing into the wind and we were glad to reach the Ben Rudd turn-off and head down into the bush where it was more sheltered. (We could hear the main party somewhere down the Jim Freeman track below). The picnic shelter was much appreciated for a longish lunch as it was a bit wet outside.

(Judy pic)

Glimpse of end of six seater above Ben Rudd Shelter. (Ian pic and caption.)

View from the six-seater. Ben Rudd shelter roof top. (Ian pic and caption.)

The climb back to the firebreak was quickly dealt with and the descent to the Bull Ring was uneventful – almost.  (Chris explored a ditch quite closely at one point).  It seems we walked as far if not further than the main group – not sure how! – Judy.

1. 24/9/2008. Trampers. Booth Road, Jim Freeman, McQuilkin, Moon Track. Medium. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

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Jan 17 2018

Post Office Creek, Reid’s Station

Published by under Trampers,Year round

 No. 27 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mahinerangi – Post Office Creek. J Shaw. Year round.”
Impassable gorse-infestation beyond old Waipori School building (aft 2008).
33 km from car park..
15. 17/1/2018. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Leader: Jill.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

13 trampers met at Reid’s woolshed on Mahinerangi Road.  We walked down the hill to Post Office creek, and had morning tea at the “camp” before taking the track through gold mine sluicings to the top end of Lake Mahinerangi – a very low lake today!  After viewing the old Waipori school (which had been moved to this site to use as a musterer’s hut before Waipori village was drowned) …

School inspection. The “old” Waipori School moved to Post Office Creek before the raising  of Mahinerangi. (Phil pic and caption.)

… we backtracked about 1 km and shortly after went up a very steep stock lane …

Onwards and upwards to the trig. (Phil pic and caption.)

… and lunched by the trig there, enjoying expansive views of the area.

Trig A4GT -618 m altitude. (Phil pic and caption.)

We continued up the farm track towards the back of the Maungatuas – the intention had been to look over to Waihola, but it was decided that was a bit far on this occasion!  It was an easy return down hill to the bridge over Post Office creek – and to our cars.

 

Jill proudly displaying the new charging station for e bike travellers. (Phil pic and caption.)

An 18.5 km tramp enjoyed by all. – Jill.

14. 7/5/2014. Both. Reid homestead, Verter Burn to Post Office Creek and old school buildings. Leaders: Ken and Peter.

GPS

iPhone GPS distance: 12.1 km. Garmin stats: We walked 12.9km; Moving ave 4.3km/hr; Moving time 2h 58mins; Climbed 342mtrs; Max elevation 572mtrs. Allow a further km or two for the pedometer distance recorders, and then pick the figure that suits you!

21 of us parked in the Reid’s homestead backyard and made our way through one or two fences down to a bridge over the Verter Burn (near ‘1’ on the map) for morning tea.

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Morning tea at Verter Burn crossing. (Heb pic, Ken caption)

We followed a road on the stream’s true left, which begs the question as to where originated the pond with its beautiful reflection on our left. (About ‘2’ on map.)

Reflection

Reflection

Between 3 and 4 on the map, is where we approached the Verter Burn ford, into which we were to plunge later, but at this stage we swung off to our left to make our way through early gold-sluiced cliffs (8/4 on map) to finally cross the Post Office Creek and arrive at (5) the former Waipori School building (as reported to the writer) of the one-time but now submerged Waipori Township.

 

Waipori Township

The Township of Waipori. The valley is now flooded and the town site is inundated. Photograph taken in 1890 by Charles Kerr.

We climbed the steep hill alongside the Post Office Creek’s true left to skirt on our right a forestry of densely branched trees  (larches? [and unpruned!] with a scattering of eucalypt among them) for a lunch where the forestry road levelled out at the top (6).

Then it was back down to the school building and out to the aforementioned ford, which this time we crossed with variously successful attempts in keeping feet dry, (but mostly wet).

Beyond that, was the further challenge of the BIG CLIMB, of un-fond older members’ memory. A taranaki gate at its top was new to us, but Neil successfully unscrambled its complexity. Three more paddocks and gates took us out to the Mahinerangi Road ( 11) and along it to the homestead (12.1) again.

At Outram, the majority of the (now well-established) coffee club socialised at the Wobbly Goat, …

 

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

Apres-tramp coffee at Outram

although some betook themselves to the No 8 w Herbs cafe across the road. And that’s it. – Ian.

13. 28/11/2007. Trampers. Post Office Creek, fishermen huts return. Skyline track was closed on the day. Working on roads, trees. Easy. Leaders: Bill & Pat.
The day was fine and not too hot for
13 of us to tramp the Lake Mahinerangi water-race track to the fishermen huts. We had morning tea at the Post Office Creek Old School.
Tea Break

Tea Break. Hazel, Wendy, Doug, George, Ken, Shirley, Pat, Joyce, Arthur L

Immediately beyond that, the leaders had found for us the clearest approach to the larch forest that borders the lake, the tussock and bog being now badly infested with gorse. A leisurely lunch in the sun at the fishing huts and the return back. The Verter Burn barring the way in and out, as always, inspired a variety of creative crossing techniques, from direct plunging through the water boots and all, to bare feet, to plastic bags over boots and even to gumboots carried in.
Crossing

Crossing techniques. Abe (bare feet), Peter, Pat (getting plastic bags), Doug (bags), Barbara and Wendy (boots on rocks), Arthur (gumboots)

The long hill climb back out of the Verter Burn gets no easier with age, but all agreed it was another good day out. – Ian

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

Back at cars. Pat, Barbara, Abe, Peter, Ken, Wendy

12. 8/11/2006. Trampers. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Doug M
11. 18/5/2005. Both. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Doug J, Bill M, Joyce S, Lesley G
10. 29/10/2003 Forestry roads return. Leaders:
Hut

Crib by the ford. Bob Peter Arthur Barbara Who? Molly

Crss

Crossing Verter Burn. Peter Who? Molly

gate

The gate beyond Verter Burn.

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

School. Arthur H Bob Peter Arthur L

Art

Lunch stop. Arthur & Barbara on a tea break on forestry road back out.

9. 25/4/2002 Leaders: Joyce S Shirley, Wendy B
8. 30/1/2002. Post Office Creek. Medium. Leaders: Joyce, Bob H, Donny.
7. 25/4/2001. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Shirley McN, Wendy.
6. 5/4/2000. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Bill McL, Nancy.
5. 26/5/1999. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Nancy, Patricia.
4. 26/8/1998. Post Office Creek. Leaders: Joyce, Pat.
3. 4/2/1998. Post Office Creek to Huts and return from Robert Reids. Leaders: Denise, Ria L, Nel K.
2. 30/4/1997. Post Office Breek (sic) to huts round trip. (Robert Reids). Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H.
1. 8/4/1992. Post Office Creek – off Mahinerangi Road. Average. Leaders: Hartmann, Ted, Barbara M, Mary M

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Jan 10 2018

Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards, McArthny, Varleys Hills

Published by under Trampers

Distance Portobello from car-park: 32 km.

Map of area

9. Trampers. Varleys Hill. M. Leader: Janine.

While the weather report was forecasting showers, my barometer just continued to climb towards ‘dry’ – so we had another rain free day which provided ideal conditions for our first tramp of the year .An eager 15 individuals set off from Portobello across farmland where we stopped for morning tea at an old milking shed site, allowing those mechanically minded to study remains.

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continuing on we passed both live bunnies and dead ones! Then ventured back onto a gravel road leading us to Papanui Inlet,

Towards Papanui Inlet. (Helen pic and caption.)

such a busy piece of road – we stepped aside for one car! We detoured from the road into private farmland and began the uphill climb through the bush protected by a  QE2 covenant.

The traditional stone walls in this area are always amazing but the stone fortress around the top of Varleys Hill never ceases to astound all and constantly query ‘who and why?’ But dispite rigorous research into the history of this block of land and it’s history, present owners have been unable to answer these questions.

After lunch within this fortress overlooking the amazing views of Harbour Cone, Papanui Inlet. Hoopers Inlet and the Pacific ocean, most tried to detach bidi-bids from backpacks, socks, jerseys, gaiters etc. This proved a futile exercise as the tramp down the other side

Pretty Ragwort. (Helen pic and caption.)

of Varleys Hill proved to be a further tangle of this weed and most were unable to rid themselves of this attachment untill we reached the Hoopers Inlet Hall.

After another short road walk we cimbed up and over the ‘Leith’Track (I think thats what the sign referred to} back to Portobello.A lovely walk in mostly warm overcast conditions – covering just over 10 km – and finishing up at MacAndrew Bay for leisurely coffee/ ice cream and conversation. – Janine.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

8. 8/2/2017. Hikers. Portobello, Sheppards Road, Varleys Hill, Leith Track. M. Pam and Dawn.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

We parked the cars in Allans Beach Road.  33 people set off and 3 people went as far as they could cope and went back to Portobello for lunch.   We walked from Allans Beach Road to Hoopers Inlet and turned into Sheppard Rd where we  had morning tea on side of road.  We then walked along Sheppard Rd turning right at Papanui Inlet Road.   At Parkers property, 150 Papanui Rd, we walked up their driveway to start of track up to Varleys Hill.

Varleys Hill driveway. (Clive pic and caption.)

Quite a steep climb up to top where there was a lot of very large stones forming a circle.   We had lunch there …

Lunch among Varleys Hill biddibids. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and enjoyed  magnificent views of sea and hills.

Adrienne pic.

After lunch we went down through the track (heaps of biddi biddis that we had ben warned about) …

Finding the path. (Clive pic and caption.)

… to Hoopers Inlet Hall, where some group photos were taken.

Obligatory photo at Hoopers Inlet Hall. (Ian pic and caption.)

21 people went back to Portobello via the Leith track and 9 people chose to return walking back via Allans Beach Road.  We arrived back at Portobello at 2.30 where we enjoyed a coffee at the lovely café.   A very enjoyable day. – Dawn

7. 9/3/2016. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium. Leader: -.

Once again we had a very nice day for our tramp around Clarks – Varleys Hill at Portobello. And it was another opportunity to show this area to some who had not been there before.
This is not a long tramp, so the pace for the day was a bit slower than we normally travel at, but it does give time to absorb the scenery.
We had to fill-in a form for Brendon at the first gate, but after discussing this with him over the phone when I was seeking permission, it was no problem, & only took a minute to fill out the necessary bits. We then had morning tea in the normal place by the willows, & made our way up the hill past the “twisted” tree, & through the hard to open gate [ which thankfully was already open] at the top of the hill.

Scene of Portobello from Clarks Hill (Helen pic)

Scene of Portobello from Sheppards Hill (Helen pic)

On reaching Weir Rd. we travelled down here to Papanui Inlet, & along the road to the private driveway leading up to Varleys Hill. Here we stopped to retrieve an information sheet from the letterbox, that the owners had left for us. This sheet describes the work they have carried out, & some history of the property. I will forward this sheet to Ian for possible addition to the website.

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, Page 1

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, Page 1

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, page 2

Varleys Hill Information Sheet, page 2

Some made hard work of the climb up to the top “ring of stone” where we had lunch among the bidi bids !!

Lunch on Varleys (Helen pic)

Lunch on Varleys (Helen pic)

Hoopers Inlet from Varleys Hill (Helen pic)

Hoopers Inlet from Varleys Hill (Helen pic)

Then it was off down the other side of the hill following a very indistinct track, to the turn off through the bush, which leads down to the Hoopers Inlet Hall.
Another lengthy road walk followed, till we reached Leith track end which goes over the hill back to Portobello. We stopped at the top of this before going down to the cars.

Once back at the cars, it was decide to continue the “coffee club” tradition, by calling in at the Macandrew Bay cafe for a chat, before moving off home.

The day was enjoyed by all, & we only had one problem with one member using new boots, & getting a blister on a heel, which was ably seen to by our nursing member.

Walked 9.6km
4km/h
climbed 376mtrs. – Ken.

6. 23/4/2014. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium.
The tramp around Clarks, Varley Hill area is one I have now done quite a few times, but always enjoy, especially when the other members of the party have never been there before, which was the case on this occasion.
The weather was not looking good when I got up in the morning, it was raining gently, but as the day progressed it got somewhat better, & we had a fine day for our walk, with hardly any wind, & mild temperatures. The grass in the farm paddocks was a bit wet, but not too long so we all stayed dry the whole day.
We had morning tea in the willows on the first farm, & lunch at the top of Varleys Hill…

Lunch on Varleys Hill (Ken pic)

Lunch on Varleys Hill (Ken pic)

… in the ring of rocks, after having a good chat with the lady of the property before we climbed up through the bush to the top. Lunch was a bit early at 11: 40, but that gave use the option of getting back to the car early, or just loafing around to fill in the time. As it turned out, we did a bit of both, before we took off down the hill to the Hoopers Inlet Hall. Then it was the lengthy walk around the road to the track leading up & over the hill, back to Portobello, which we reached at about 12:50pm. This allowed us [ the No 2 coffee club ] to stop at MacAndrew Bay for our ‘fix’ & a chat before heading home. – Ken

5. 25/5/2011. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium.

GPS of clockwise-tramped route, courtesy Ken. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards, Varley Hills and Leith track over saddle back to Portobello.

Looking over to Quarantine Point – again (v. below)

Mount Charles from Weir Road

A break on way

Returning from viewing plaque

Closer look at the letter boxes

4. 16/6/2010. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Medium. Leader: George

Looking out over Quarantine Point from Clarks Hill

Descent from Varleys Hill ending at Hoopers Inlet Hall

New plaque at Sheppards Road corner

Track sign of route over saddle to Portebello

Still going? Shed in Hereweka Street.

A local told us distant object on hill was a Buddhist Temple

3. 25/3/2009. Trampers. Portobello, Clarks, Sheppards, McArthny and Varleys Hills. Medium. Leaders: George, Lex
A pleasant, mild, windless day with clear views to both sides of the peninsula were ideal for the 6 who set out to conquer Varley’s Hill, etc.  We parked in the centre of Portobello and then followed Harington Pt Rd for a short distance before ascending lush paddocks (with a few good mushrooms) to skirt the slopes of Clarks and Sheppards Hills which provided good views to Port Chalmers at the morning tea stop.
Tea break. Sheppards Hill

Tea Break. Lex, Sabina, Ria, George

We crossed Weir Rd at its summit and headed towards McArthny Hill.  Inadvertent deviation led us to short-circuit the circumnavigation of said hill, (in other words, we took a shortcut) and leader George directed our paths east around the hill and down to Dick Rd on the Papanui Inlet.
Gate

Gate. Sabina, George, Ria, Lex

Turning right, we passed the Sheppard Rd turnoff, with George trying the mudflats as the tide was well out,
but soon becoming “an old stick-in-the-mud”, according to Bob.  We turned off into the driveway up to Varleys Farm.
Track

Varley’s Farm driveway. Ria, Sabina, Lex, George.

At the farmhouse, we had another debate about the route, which led to some getting to the summit easily and others, “biddibid and bracken bushbashing” to reach it. At the top is NZ’s own ‘stone circle’ a dry stone wall with a ‘gateway’. One imagines it would have been used as a sheep pen, but over lunch, the talk was of ancient barrows and tombs and mysterious rituals. The plaque on one of the stones stating it was a QE II National Trust Protected Open Space added no further explanation.
Varley's Hill

Papanui Inlet and Sandymount from Varley’s Hill

Stone wall

Lunch on Varley’s Hill. Ken, George, Ria, Sabina, Lex

A pleasant descent on the other side of the hill
Cone

Harbour Cone & reflection coming down from Varley Hill

(past a mysterious, bush-surrounded, irregularly-constructed platform that no one could explain) towards Hoopers Inlet Hall led us to Allans Beach Rd, passing the other end of Sheppard Rd and thence into Hooper’s Inlet Rd.
To conclude the tramp, we turned into a farm road by some picturesque letterboxes,
Boxes

Picturesque letter boxes and thence right again onto Leith Track (an old road perhaps an extension of Hereweka St) which took us over the hill to join the top end of Hereweka St again and so down to the cars.

Some great views, good terrain and interesting and varied scenes along the way.
Building

Scene en route

Thanks to George for getting the landowners’ permissions, and the leadership from Lex and George.  Bob M
2. 25/6/2008 Clarks, Sheppards and Varleys Hills. Leader: George
The scheduled tramp for the Hindon Pipe Line was cancelled due to 13cm of frozen snow in the area. Instead, under George’s leadership (co-leader Ria was too ill to come on the day), a small band of 5 trampers met at the foot of Hereweka St, Portobello for a previously perforce cancelled tramp. Here conditions were much milder than those up at the Pipe Line would have been, but there was still a cold northerly wind to wrap up against. We set off along the Harington Pt Rd for a short distance before turning up through a gate to skirt the slopes of Clarks and Sheppards Hills. A track further up led us through several gates. En route, we paused to admire the deeply furrowed trunk of a Ngaio tree, looking for all the world like a mass of thick entwining vines.
Plaited Ngaio trunk

Plaited Ngaio trunk

We eventually arrived at the summit of Weir Rd where McArthny Hill loomed directly ahead of us. George elected, for time’s and effort’s sake, to bypass that part of the tramp and take us down to Dick Rd on the Papanui Inlet. Turning right, we passed the Sheppard Rd turnoff and a short distance ahead reached the steep driveway up to Varleys Farm. We bypassed the farm up a track on the left stepped where necessary to reach the summit of Varleys Hill. Here we found a circular dry stone wall with a plaque on one of the stones stating it was a QE II National Trust Protected Open Space. We late lunched sheltered by wall and bush, enjoying spendid views all around.
Harbour Cone from Varley Hill

Harbour Cone from Varley Hill

Descending the other side of the hill we found ourselves at the Hoopers Inlet Hall
Hoopers Inlet Hall. George, Ian, Lex, Ken.

Hoopers Inlet Hall. George, Ian, Lex, Ken.

where we set off to walk along the Allans Beach Rd, passing the other end of Sheppard Rd.
It was here the highlight of the day occurred.
A cheeky grin (?) from a tagged seal.

A cheeky grin (?) from a tagged seal.

A frolicsome young seal swam up to us, reaching the stone wall of the road and looking right up at us. We remained there, fascinated at its twistings and turnings, for a considerable time.
It capped off its performance by steaming away across the water at a great speed, the water parting and streaming away on either side.
To conclude the tramp, we turned into a track roughly paralleling the sealed road turn-off to Portobello and on its left, which took us over the hill to join the top end of Hereweka St again and so down to the cars, passing a surprisingly well equipped Village Tourist Park and a sleek coastguard rescue vessel.

A great introduction to some Peninsula hills our club hasn’t experienced before. Thanks to George for getting the landowners’ permissions at a moments’s notice and providing this excellent alterative for the day. – Ian

1. 25/4/2008. Trampers. Portobello, Varleys Hill. Easy. Leaders: George, Ria.

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Nov 29 2017

Orbells Cave & Fiddlers Hut; ABC Cave & The Gap

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 10 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lamb Hill to 3 o’clock creek. Farm. Lambing.”
Farm walk. Lamb Hill Station, Hindon Road, Hindon. Seek permission. Check at house before you do any tramping.
Lamb Hill: 43 km from car-park.
Bendoran: 75 km from car-park.
8. 29/11/2017. Trampers. Bendoran over-night, Orbells Cave. H. Leader: Art.

Route Map, Bendoran to Orbells Cave/3 O’Clock Creek/Fiddlers Hut, courtesy Art.

This tramp was a First Time for our club.
Two cars(six trampers) left Mosgiel at 8.00 a.m. rendezvousing at Cherry Farm before travelling together to reach the Bendoran Huts at 9.30. Morning tea was taken, and five eager trampers set out just after 10 am on the day’s adventure. One stayed in camp to heat water for showers later.
The day was sunny and warm enough. High cloud drifted across after an hour, but it remained hot. We stopped several times to take on water – and we were going downhill!
We descended down to Orbells Creek, and followed it for some distance, being on a grassy 4WD track all day. Tussocky hills surrounded us, with many interesting rocks, such beautiful country.
A mob of grand Hereford cows with calves (beef) moved in front of us for a time, before going up a side gully.
Eventually we came to the first ascent of the day, leaving Orbells Creek for a time, the 4WD track going up and over a saddle. At the top we had a short descent and then a climb up to a second saddle.
But from here it was downhill all the way to the cave. We met Barney, the Bendoran Farm Manager, out with his dogs shifting a mob of cows and calves – black with white faces this time (Angus Hereford Cross).
We came back to Orbells Creek by the cattleyards, crossed over, and in a few minutes were at Orbells Cave (with Orbells Garden flourishing in profusion in front (foxgloves). It had been hot work, but to our great relief found that it was very pleasantly cool in the cave. The time was 12.20 pm. We sat and rested for half an hour here, while eating our lunch.

In the cave for a cool place to have lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

 Fiddlers Hut was our next objective, about 2 km further on. Was we left, bird calls from high above the cave alerted us to the presence of a N.Z. falcon circling there. We saw it – or another one –  later in the day, too. Crossing 3 O’Clock Stream, we arrived at Fiddlers Hut at 1.3. We admired the stone walls, very neatly constructed, and with a vey sound modern corrugated iron roof.

Fiddler’s hut. (Helen pic and caption.)

But sadly the interior had been badly neglected, birds obviously had been the only tenants for some years past.

As we began the homeward journey, a light and very pleasantly cool north-east breeze arrived to provide some relief, especially helpful on the uphill bits. Five tiny little Paradise duckings were on the water when we crossed back over 3 O’Clock Stream. All water bottles were refilled.
The same route was followed going back as we had travelled out earlier. It was a long climb back up to the two saddles. At the top of the first one, 10 minutes was well spent in resting, while taking on water, eating fruit, etc.
In time we came back down to Orbells Creek, and walked, the kilometres behind us, with an occasional brief stop (water).

One long hill awaited us – the climb out from Orbells Creek. The hill seemed to go on forever, but by putting one foot in front of the other, we found the top. But our legs were mighty tired now, and there was only a few hundred metres left to go. And so we arrived back at the Bendoran Hilton …

View of Bendoran huts. (Helen pic and caption.)

… just before 5 p.m. A good list down and rest seemed to be the logical thing to do now, so that’s what we did!

All five had thoroughly enjoyed the day. An energetic tramp to equal any other that our club has done. VERY SATISFYING.

Total distance was 20 km. Orbells Cave was approx. 8 km from Bendoran, and Fiddlers Hut a further 2 km beyond. Bendoral Huts are at an altitude of 500 metres, Fiddlers Hut about 200 metres. – Art.
On completing the tramp we had a lovely muffin and cup of tea before showers and liquid refreshments. Fire lovingly looked after by camp mum Jennifer. Eleanor our great organiser had Also arrived by this time.
Tea was prepared consisting of silverside, stuffed chicken, new potatoes, carrots and two salads. Dessert: chocolate brownie berries and yogert. All had bought some part of it.
Jill Arthur Phil Wyn and Helen the walkers.
It helped revive us. – Helen
75 km from car-park.

11. 8/3/2017. Trampers. The Gap, and ABC Caves. M. Leaders: Arthur and Eleanor.

After a one and a half hour drive from Mosgiel, we arrived at Bendoran Huts.  David Malloch the station owner arrived to welcome us and give us a brief history of the 5000 acre property.

Us with David Malloch. (Helen pic and caption.)

After unpacking and eating lunch, we walked in a cool s.w. wind, overcast with a few skiffs of showers to Mount Misery @ 714 metres.

Eleanor on Mt Misery. (Arthur pic and caption.)

A great view for those brave enough to tackle the wind on such a rocky peak.  From there we ventured onto “Terry’s Knob” (refer Hamel’s book page 7:13), …

Terrys Knob. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… before returning to Bendoran for drinks and muffins.  After lighting up the coal range to heat the water and apple crumble, we then enjoyed home baked Chicken, vege’s and salad.  Next job was firing up the open fire, sitting round chatting for the evening.

Before 8.30am next morning we were up and away tramping in ideal conditions for 3 hours to the “Gap” @ 670 metres.

The Gap from morning tea stop. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After numerous photo shots of surrounding valleys, peaks, ranges and the trig,  we then headed down onto a new track, where after a lunch stop, we approached the A.B.C. Caves.

Helen Janine & Eleanor at abc caves. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After a challenging tramp, we were impressed by the cave interior, …

From in ABC cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

… but were disappointed the “visitors book” left no room for our claims to reaching this  monumental milestone!   We then had to return steeply uphill a little before bush-bashing a track across a gully to join back onto our original track, leading us back to our cosy “Bendoran home”.

Bendoran where we stayed. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Arriving back @ 4.15pm, we found 2 members (who returned without going to A.B.C. Cave) had the coal range going with the kettle boiling for drinks and a HOT shower!!  All fresh and clean again, we dined …

Dinner. (Helen pic and caption.)

… in front of the open fire on beef casserole, new potatoes, peas and salad, followed by brownie and peaches—-not your average tramping food, and certainly above standard accomodation.

It was an exceptional tramping trip for Arthur, Neil, Carol, Helen, Janine and Eleanore, with new tracks and experiences for some of the party. – Janine and Eleanor.

10. 25/3/2015. Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

On a day when the weather was a bit suspect, we arrived at the Bendoran Huts to see fog in the valleys, but clear around the tops. Because of the distance travelled to get there, we decided to have a late morning tea break,…

Late morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Late morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

…at one of the high points on the track. After this, we walked around the road [farm track] to a point at the head of the valley leading to ABC cave, where we arrived for a late lunch in sunshine.
After lunch we more or less retraced our steps back to the cars, with a couple of refreshment stops on the way.
The day turned out ideal for tramping, with just a trace of breeze at times, a little bit of sunshine for lunch, & the temperature just right, & the fog actually lifted during the day.
Next time we do this, it would be a good idea to start early, as it’s a long way to drive, & the road in is all narrow gravel. – Ken.

9. 8/5/2013 Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 13.6km, 4hrs moving, 2hrs stopped, total ascent 839mtrs, max elevation 701mtrs.

There have been MANY new tracks bulldozed in around the area, making it very difficult to know which track to take. The original idea was to go to the Gap, & then down to the ABC cave, but we were running out of time, due to the distance travelling there, getting held up for about 1/4 hr by a very large mob of sheep with no sign of humans or dogs anywhere. Plus as we didn’t know where to go, we ended up bush-bashing our way down a ridge on the top side of the bush, as you can see by the Google pic. We eventually got down to the DOC track leading between the GAP & ABC, so just carried on to ABC, had a quick drink/snack, & left there at just on 2pm. Then we struggled up another ridge that was a lot clearer than the one we had came down, but it was steep, & it took us an hour to reach the top. From there, it was a relatively easy walk back to the 4wd track that we had left to go down past the bush. One or two of the climbs on the track back to the car were certainly a bit ‘trying’, but we all made it back to the cars OK, & after the drive back to town, got home at just after 6pm.

George didn’t go down the ridge to the cave, so he sheltered for a while, then wandered back to the cars, leaving suitable signs that he had passed that way. There were 7 of us in the group, one of whom was heard to say on the way in, “you think this group is a serious walking group?” so by the end of the day when I asked if they still didn’t think we were a serious walking group, the answer was ” that was a serious walk”. – Ken.

8. 22/2/2010. Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

It had been many years since any of us had done this tramp, and memories were hazy. So much so, that we parked the cars at the end of Blucher Road, mistaking the shearing shed location there for the actual Bendoran Huts site about six kms further on. So we walked the farm 4WD route to the huts, instead of driving it!

 

A hut ruin on the route. The fog was round us all the way. But it was dry! A fog, not a mist, as one of us distinguished.

An pic of interest on the way.

Lunch across from one of the Bendoran huts. (Ken pic)

Lunch in lee of the hut. (Ken pic)

We walked on beyond the huts on the track we should have originally started on, for a further km, but there was nothing to be seen through the fog which accompanied us all the way, except for only one brief respite. We then retraced our steps to the cars. About 14 km walked that day. – Ian
7. 30/1/2013 Trampers. Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.
Lunch at the old hut.

Lunch at the old hut.

Orbells Cave from the track.

Orbells Cave from the track.

Running repairs before we start the real climb back out

Running repairs before we start the real climb back out

6. 19/1/2011. Trampers. Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.

Small scale GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

If you look closly at the small scale pic, you can see the shed at the Nth. end of the airstrip, right at the bottom of the pic where the track starts. As you can see from the spacing of the GPS squares, we were still driving for a while till the squares become very close together. this is where we started to walk from. You can also see the track going off to the left of the airstrip at it’s south end, going down to the ford where the track peters out, & then starts again on the other side. That is where the 2003 tramp went (see below).

Large scale GPS map of route, courtesy Ken.

The large scale pic shows the decent via the wrong ridge, we should’ve been one over to the right. Anyway, we ended up just a short distance from Orbells creek, so walked into that valley, & up to Orbells caves which is the track on the RH side of the pic.

Cute cave we found on the way down to Three O’clock Stream. (Ken pic)

Orbells Caves. (Ken pic)

Dermot in the obviously lived-in cave. (Ken pic)

We then retraced our steps back to Three O’clock Stream, and went downstream to a crossing, where Dermot and I went to the old hut to have lunch (which is the track on the left side of the stream in the GPS pic).

Hut on the other side of Three O’clock Stream. (Ken pic)

Relaxation area of the hut. (Ken pic)

Then after walking across the river flats, we struggled up the very steep hills back to the cars.
The weather was fine, but VERY windy, and I nearly lost my footing a couple of times coming back up the steepest parts. BTW, the hut is not on Lambhill Station, it’s on the neighbours property.
Everybody did very well, including George, who didn’t go to the caves, along with Hazel. They just went over to the hut to have lunch there.

Hazel packing prior to leaving. (Ken pic)

George got a dose of cramp on the way back up the hills, but managed to overcome it ok, and carry on. – Ken.
5. 21/5/2006 Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.Leaders: George, Keith, Glenice, Hazel
4. 21/5/2003. Both. Lamb Hill to Three O.clock Creek. Medium. Leaders: Wendy B, Bob H, Nancy & Molly
View when we first arrived.

View when we first arrived.

Morning tea break.

Morning tea break.

Descent to creek

Three O'clock Creek

Three O’clock Creek

At creek ford.

Lunch at top of climb.

Lunch at top of climb. Pat, Lex, Doug J, Evelyn, Doug M, Bob, Arthur.

3. 17/5/2000 Lamb Hill, Three O’Clock Creek. Leaders: Wendy, Colleen, George
2. 15/4/1998. 3 O’Clock Creek, Lamb Hill. Leaders: Nancy, Wendy B
1. 8/11/1989 Lamb Hill to Three O’Clock Creek and old stone hut. Harder grade. George, Mary M, Molly, Catherine

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Nov 22 2017

Allans Beach, Cape Saunders, Puddingstone Rock, Mt Charles

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 99 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mt Charles Mr Neil Farm”

27 km from car-park.

Click here to read about Cape Saunders Lighthouse and the two graves

9. 22/11/2017. Trampers. Mount Charles. M. Leader: Phil.

Mt Charles – 22 November 2017 – Leader: Phil.

Following a quick rendezvous of 4 vehicles at Macandrew Bay it was follow the leader via Allans Beach Road, with the leader doing a feint turn the wrong way at Hoopers Inlet, just to test the following car drivers, before arriving and parking under the pine and macrocarpa at the end of the road.  There was then a few recounts on the numbers of intrepid trampers as I was reliably informed we had 16 when we left Mosgiel, but now we had 18!  Wow Mt Charles must have a reputation!

So off we set at 10 to 10 back down the road to the gate with ‘closed’ on it; there was a promise of the most well earned morning tea for the year at the stile at the top of the first paddock….this was achieved comfortably by all but clearly the steep start had an affect,

Up, up, and more up. (Helen pic and caption.)

with everyone sitting for a good 20 minutes…maybe it was the views?  This was said to be about ‘halfway up- yeah right!’

We then set off up a variety of knobs and farm tracks, and following the fence lines to ridges and little saddles and then via a track – commented to be the stairway to heaven –  that dissected some remnant native bush (and where the level of craic was very low), before we emerged on a little plateau, and veering left and with the help of some gentlemanly fence lifters to get under the barbed wire arrived and ‘summited’ Mt Charles at 11.30.

 

Group at the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

On the last part of the ascent we had been accompanied by a herd of inquisitive and very well conditioned cattle, that set about corralling and dividing us before realising we had no barley sugars to give them so off they bashed through the forest. At the summit we were greeted by the mist clearing and revealing 360 degree views, only to be tested by a swarm of bush flies and other flying objects, so after admiring the views and taking the obligatory photos

View from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

we headed off through the fences and along the ridge to start the descent down the sea side (East) of the mountain. Around half way down the lumpy and steep hillside we found a spot for lunch, where someone had nicely placed boulders and logs for us all to be comfortably seated and take in the surroundings,

Lunch stop. (Margreet pic and caption.)

including a top dressing plane, piloted by Snoopy. The plane  made numerous and continuous sorties along the coast

‘’Snoopy buzzing the team’’ (Phil pic and caption.)

and around the mountain for the duration of the rest of the walk. At about this time the sea mist moved back and the summit was shrouded in….

Gradually we descended and returned along the ‘flat’, parallel with the coast, and then over a small saddle and down to the road end and carparks, where we were warmly met at 1.15 by Jill D and Clive, who having completed 90% of the ascent, returned and undertook a walk along the beach.  Well done folks for the inspiring effort.

We then had sometime at the beach, walking to the headland, dipping toes in the sparkling seas, or just lounging and taking in  the peace and tranquillity, but for Snoopy! Then onto the Mac Café, where as a sign of the season, and in very Mediterranean like conditions,  there were probably more ice creams, and cold drinks consumed  than coffees and tea.

Although the walk was ‘only’ 5.7km it was 403 m up a mountain, and of course 403m down!

This was NZ walking at it’s best; a mountain, 360 degree views of land and sea scapes, and lovely weather followed by a walk on the beach and admiring wildlife, with great company. – Phil

 8. 8/4/2015 Trampers. Mount Charles M.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 7km; 2 hrs moving time; 3.1km/hr; climbed 452mtrs; max elev.412mtrs

Having met up with the others at the meeting place in Andy Bay, 6 of us travelled to the end of Allans Beach Rd. where we parked under the pines, & geared up for the climb up Mt. Charles. We walked back along the road for the 3-400m to the stile over the fence at the start of the climb, then it was up, up, & more up!
We stopped just after 10am for morning tea break, then resumed the climb. An hour later we reached the trig on top of Mt. Charles,…

1 At top of Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

1 At top of Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

…where we spent some time admiring the view, which was fantastic.

2 View from Mt. Charles, with Harbour Cone on left. (Ken pic and caption)

2 View from Mt. Charles, with Harbour Cone on left. (Ken pic and caption)

4 Allans Beach, & Hoopers Inlet from Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

4 Allans Beach, & Hoopers Inlet from Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

We also found the trig station was falling to bits, with all of the bolts securing the stays to the legs missing.

3 looking at he damaged trig. (Ken pic and caption)

3 looking at he damaged trig. (Ken pic and caption)

As there was a bit of a breeze blowing up there, we decided to go down the seaward side, & walk back around that area to the cars. So we set off following sheep trails through the bracken, & Onga Onga, down a steep slope until we were approx halfway down, where we had lunch in a pleasant spot with a great view.

5 Lunch stop with a view. (Ken pic and caption)

5 Lunch stop with a view. (Ken pic and caption)

6 Allans Beach with Sandy Mount in the background

6 Allans Beach with Sandy Mount in the background. (Ken pic and caption)

We then finished the descent,…

7 The clay road down there was our destination for the walk back out. (Ken pic and caption)

7 The clay road down there was our destination for the walk back out. (Ken pic and caption)

…& made our way back past Belmont House out to the cars.
As it was still quite early in the day, we then went out to the beach, where we had to detour around a sleeping sea lion on the track. There were others on the beach also, ignoring the presence of humans.
The trip up Mt. Charles is a serious climb to get to the top, but I think we all enjoyed the experience. And we stopped off at Mac Bay for a coffee & chat before driving back to town. – Ken.

7. 10/8/2011. Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock, return. Medium.

GPS of route from Allans Beach to Puddigstone Rocks, return, courtesy Ken. 13.8 Km. Total metres climbed: 690.

It was a brilliant winter’s day as can be seen from the pics.

Looking South at Allans Beach. (Ken pic and caption). – Sandymount beyond.

Looking north towards on Cape Saunder’s coast. (Ken pic and caption)

Cape Saunders ‘LightHouse’. (Ken pic and caption)

The site of the old Lighthouse Keeper’s house which was vandalised and later destroyed by fire. Site very tidily cleared.

Our intention had been to return via Mount Charles, but an early evening appointment of one of our party indicated a return by the way we had come would be more prudent than risking the – perhaps over-time commitment – of tackling Mount Charles as well. (Note: Making this a summer tramp would lessen such time constraints.) – Ian
6. 11/2/2009. Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock Cape Saunders Road, Mt Charles, round trip. Medium. Leader: Bill

45 minutes’ drive to Alans Beach by Hoopers Inlet. 37.5 km from car-park.
(Click to enlarge thumbnail pics)

Route Map
The trip this time was enhanced by a group from the Christchurch Over Forties Tramping Club joining us for the day. The day was pleasant as we made our way from the Belmont homestead over a ridge or two to our tea break spot with a fine view of a small beach and the Wharekakahu Rock islet.

Down to tea break

Down to tea break

Beach and Whatekakahu Rock Islet at tea break

Beach and Whatekakahu Rock Islet at tea break

A bit of a climb from there brought us to the experience of an abrupt cliff face

A cliff edge

A cliff edge

before climbing a fence line to make our way across to the Cape Saunders road and down to the Matakitaki Point lighthouse.

While there we showed our visitors the ancient grave site of two young children (see information at bottom of this post)

Picket fence grave site

Picket fence grave site

before climbing back up to the Kaimata Road and down to our lunch stop.
click to enlarge

Lunch time

Lunch time

Then it was down a paddock or two to view the seals on the Puddingstone Rock ledge,

Seal and offspring?

Seal and offspring?

Seals frolicking

Seals frolicking

before climbing the road back out to the Cape Saunders Road and along to the NE of Mount Charles to climb through paddock and bush to the trig.

Sandymount from Mount Charles

Sandymount from Mount Charles. Hazel, Angela

Last climb to trig

Last climb to trig

After that it was down the conventional ascent route, much steeper than the one we had climbed, and along to the cars.

5. 23/5/2007 Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock Cape Saunders Road, Mt Charles, round trip. Medium. Leaders: Bill, Pat
Keyhole in rock

Keyhole in rock (31/3/2004)

click to enlarge
Lunch time

Lunch time

4. 29/11/2006. Trampers. Allans Beach, Mount Charles, Cape Saunders. Medium. Leaders: Bill, Pat

click to enlarge

Off-shore islet

Off-shore islet

Surf on Cape Saunders

Surf on Cape Saunders

Cute gate

McLeods’ gate

Victory Beach from Mount Charles

Victory Beach from Mount Charles

Struggling against the wind up Mt Charles Pat, Wendy, Hazel

Struggling against the wind up Mt Charles Doug, Pat, Wendy, Hazel, Glenice.

Cresting Mt Charles. Who? Doug, Ian, Pat, Wendy, Hazel

Cresting Mt Charles. Who? Doug, Wendy, Pat, Hazel, Glenice.

Cautious descent in wind. Pat, Wendy.

Cautious descent in wind. Wind, Glenice, Pat, Hazel, Wendy.

Allans beach from Mt Charles. (Bill pic)

Allans beach and Sandymount from Mt Charles. (Bill pic)

Papanui Inlet, Otago Harbour from Mt Charles.

Papanui Inlet, Otago Harbour from Mt Charles.

3. 7/12/2005. All. Cape Saunders from Allans Beach. Leaders: Bill, Pat, Bob, Nadia
2. 26/1/2005 Mount Charles Hoopers Inlet, Allans Beach. Leaders: Dorothy S, Shirley
Prospect. Before the climb.

Prospect. Before the climb.

Mount Charles summit. Dorothy, Pat.

Mount Charles summit. Dorothy, Pat.

Lunch

Lunch lee Mt Charles. Peter, Lex, Ian, Dorothy S, Dot B, Ria, Pat Wendy, George, Margaret, Tom

1. 31/3/2004. Trampers. Cape Saunders, Puddingstone Rock. Easy+. Leaders: Bill, Pat
Tea Break. Pat, Molly, Bill, Joyce, Nancy

Tea Break. Pat, Molly, Bill, Joyce, Nancy

Peter, Bob & Bill on edge

Peter, Bob & Bill on edge

Wave surge. Lunch. Margaret, Who? Bev H, Peter. Old grave.

Wave surge. Lunch. Margaret, Who? Bev H, Peter. Old grave.

Keyhole in point.

Keyhole in point.

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Nov 15 2017

Walrus Bridge. Nardoo Scientific Reserve. Little Peak.

Published by under Trampers

Distance from Bush Road Car-park: 50 Km.

Tramp area map

8. 15/11/2017. Trampers. Nardoo Reserve Walrus Bridge. Leader: Art.
3 vehicles conveyed 9 Trampers out past Lake Mahinerangi to the Nardoo Reserve, for a day in the tussock. It was an hour’s journey.
On the last few kilometres up the farm road on Waipori Station we were able to admire all the ewes with their lambs. They obviously wanted to keep up their fitness, as instead of moving off sideways, they preferred to run uphill on the road in front of us!
From our car park we walked for 10 minutes to have smoko by the D.O.C. sign, as we entered the Reserve.
Up the zig zag and into the tussock. There was a faint trail to follow all the way, but concentration was needed at times so as not to lose it.
We stopped a few times to regroup and have a rest, uphill all the way. But our precautions taken to guard against sunburn were wasted as we remained under low cloud all day.
At one of the rest stops it was noticed the cloud was flowing up the gullies on either side of us, converging, and then going upslope in front of us. The cloud was close above us further up, but we had good visibility of several hundred meres on the group in all directions.

‘’ come on up Bruce, there’s a better view of the mist here”. (Phil pic and caption.)

And so we came to Walrus Bridge, some time being spent on admiring and photographing it, before drawing up to the festal board (we ate our lunch).

Walrus Rock. Dave up on top. Rest underneath. (Helen pic and caption.)

A swallow arrived, and to our pleasure began flying backwards and forwards over the water and under Walrus Bridge, no doubt looking for a snack.
Before turning for home, some time was spent by the botanists among us, in studying the large area of mosses, etc, just beyond Walrus Bridge.

There was a lot of interest in the flower. ‘’Possibly the buttercup ranunculus gracilipis (slender) ( A Mark ‘ Above the treeline’)’’. (Phil pic and caption.)

We retraced our path in the beautiful tussock, downhill now of course, and eventually arrived back at the D.O.C. sign for a photo opportunity.

The group. (Helen pic and caption.)

And so it came to pass the 9 very happy trampers returned to the cars after a very enjoyable day in the tussock.

A brief stop was made at the Waipori Cemetery on the way back. A tranquil place. And Lake Mahinerangi was very low, we could see.

Back at Outram refreshments were obtained at the “Gobbly Woat”.

A few figures now – our day’s tramp distance was 8.7 km. We parked the cars at an altitude of 624 metre, and Walrus Bridge was at 934 metres.

My thanks to all my fellow “tussock jumpers” for such a good day out. – Art.

7. 28/10/2015 Trampers. Nardoo Reserve.
On a cool morning, 11 trampers, 9 who had not been there before, set off to visit Nardoo Reserve,
After a tentative drive along the road from Lake Mahinarangi, past the old Waipori cemetery, desperately looking for any sign that I remembered where we were, we finally arrived at the parking spot where we would start walking from.
As it was already just after 10am, we decided to have morning tea before setting off on our walk. Then it was off along the old 4WD track around to the boundary fence of Nardoo Reserve, where we were puzzled by the fact that the gate was open into the reserve. This was later explained to me by the owner of the surrounding land, who had a legit reason for it being open.
On the way up…
Some great scenery (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Some great scenery (Heb pic, Ken caption)

… the long climb to Walrus Bridge, I let some of the group take turns with the GPS so they could follow the track on the GPS display of our previous trips here.
Taking a break on the way up (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Taking a break on the way up (Heb pic, Ken caption)

I also did this on the way home again, as I think it wise to let others see how the GPS can guide you in this type of featureless country, which is all tussock, with no track showing in most places, as it’s many years since anybody has had a vehicle up there. Most agreed that they had no idea how to return to the cars, & I think there would’ve been a lot of head scratching going on if they had to find there own way back.
After having lunch at Walrus Bridge,
Lunch at Walrus Bridge (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Lunch at Walrus Bridge (Heb pic, Ken caption)

where everybody was suitably impressed by the sight of the pool under it, we decided to go on a little further as it was still quite early. Se we trudged across to another rocky point where we had a rest & a good look around, trying to decide in which direction Lawrence, & some other towns were. Then we made our way all the way back to the cars,
Exiting the reserve (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Exiting the reserve (Heb pic, Ken caption)

where some expressed amazement that the walk was quite short, but felt as though they had walked much further.
There were some appreciative comments made about the trip, so I think everybody enjoyed the day out on the open tops. And I for one have some sunburn on the back of the hand I use with my Trekking Pole.Walked 9km
3.1km/h
2h 54mins moving
climbed 382mtrs
max height 972mtrs.
6. 27/10/2010. Trampers. Nardoo Scientific Reserve. Little Peak. Medium. Leader: Ian.

GPS of Tramp. 10km. courtesy Ken.

The day was hot. Tempered by a strong but pleasant cool wind. Five of us enjoyed a return to Little Peak. To access Nardoo Reserve we had to drive through part of Waipori Station, whose permission was kindly given. The protected tussock of the Reserve was as long as ever but the 4WD track was still detectable. We stopped early at the customary zig-zag for the tea break.

Morning tea on the zig-zag. (Ken pic)

Then it was on up, across to the left, then right, along a bit of a gully before climbing to top the wee hill to our left, (see the first left point of the two major zigs on the GPS map.

View of Little Peak just discernable on skyline. About to climb wee hill on our left. 4WD track visible in tussock.

Then the swing down to our right, across a wet mossy decline, and up again, angling on a long reach to our left to reach Little Peak, (see the second major left point on the GPS route). Here we rested beside Walrus Bridge rock.

Break at Walrus Bridge. (Ken pic)

We had made good time and it was too early for lunch. We decided to head in the direction of Peak No. 2. The tussock on the top here shares pride of place with a large variety of mosses, and a profusion of celmisias. We made our way across these to a solitary rock on a bit of a rise and decided to lunch there.

Rock where we had lunch. Little Peak rocks in back-ground.

We were struck by the deep blue of a group of able 5 tarns in a dip, looking towards the Lake.

Deep blue of tarns viewed from lunch spot. Lake Mahinerangi. (Ken pic)

Then it was back down and across to Little Peak and to retrace our steps back to the car. Ken let us take turns with holding his GPS navigator to note just how accurately we were keeping to the track it had marked out on the ascent. (A good tool were we ever to get lost.) Only five of us, but good company. Wish there were more to share our enjoyment of yet another brilliant Wednesday. – Ian
5. 16/1/2008 Trampers. Walrus Bridge, Red Rock, Nardoo Scientific Reserve. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Bill M
Today, which saw the mercury rise uncomfortably high , 10 of us travelled in 3 very different cars to the start of the tramp, well past the turnoff to the Waipori cemetery beside Lake Mahinerangi.
This was going to be the day we all needed a large supply of water. Luckily it was only a slow leak from the water bladder and Ian did not run out of water. Ria, who is very fit, found the slow pace hard to take , although the rest of us appreciated the regular breathers Bill allowed us on the rather hot, tussocky ascent. Wonderful views surrounded us over the nearby slopes of the Lammermoors, and back over lake Mahingerangi. The area we were in was a scenic reserve called Nardoo and had been fenced off from the stock which roamed over the rest of Waipori Station.
Nardoo sign

Nardoo sign. (Bill pic)

This had allowed regeneration of the native plants and tussocks and on the summit of Little Peak 1 the Celmisias were everywhere and a real treat to see their lovely silver foliage and white, daisy like flowers. Walrus bridge is a large rock spanning a deep dark tarn and it was here we sought shelter from the midday sun and had our lunch.
Walrus Bridge

Close-up view under Walrus Bridge/ (Bill pic)

We posed. Emma, Marjorie, Tash, Doug, Hazel, Ian, Bruce.

We posed. Emma, Marjorie, Tash, Doug, Hazel, Ian, Bruce.

Bruce suggested it was called Walrus because a walrus moustache is shaped like a bridge over the mouth and droops down the sides rather like a walrus’ long incisor teeth. Hazel needed a good wake up call
Lunch snooze.

Lunch snooze. Ken, Doug, Bruce, Tash, Emma, Marjorie (Bill pic)

Overhang rock

Rock overhang. A walrus? (Bill pic)

Mahinerangi view

Mahinerangi view

as we headed back down after lunch and Ian managed to end up fighting to get up from the tussocks after falling dramatically into them. And so back the way we came, but this time all down hill.
Us on way back down. Ria, Hazel, Doug, Tash, Emma, Bruce, Marjorie, Ken, Ian

Us on way back down. Ria, Hazel, Doug, Tash, Emma, Bruce, Marjorie, Ken, Ian

A great day out in beautiful, wild country with blue skies, and white shaped clouds.
Cloud effect

Cloud effect (Bill pic)

A quick visit to Waipori Cemetery and memorial on the way out, and we still hadn’t seen a living soul.- Tash
4. 15/2/2006. Trampers. Red Rock, Nardoo, Walrus Bridge. Leaders: Ian, Bob H, Judy G.

Walrus Bridge.

3. 20/4/2005. Both. Nardoo, Walrus Bridge. Leaders: Helen S, Ria, Lance and Lois.
2. 19/3/2003. Both. Lake Mahinerangi, Red Rock, Walrus Bridge, Nardoo. Medium. Leaders: Ria, Evelyn, Molly, Mary M.
1. 14/4/1993. Lake Mahinerangi, Red Rock, Walrus Bridge, Nardoo. Medium+. Leaders: Ria L, Ria H, Jean, Lesley S.

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Nov 08 2017

Rollinsons, Swampy, Swine Spur

Published by under Trampers

Location: 15 km.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.

6. 8/11/2017. Trampers. Swine Spur. M. Leader: Dave.

Last Wednesday’s tramp could have been called a number of names and probably was!!

(a) Swine spur – was it the pig rooting or the steepness of the trail in a gale?

(b) A walk on snow in wintery gale conditions in November    or

(c) How many differently named tracks can you do in a day?

Ten keen trampers’ left the car park having some idea what the weather might be like for the day ahead. We parked in Rollinson’s road just below the bridge adjacent to the entrance into the bush with the sign ‘swine spur’.  The bushes and trees were wet from the rain the night before. It was pleasant walking through the Kanuka with lots of clematis flowering.  However it wasn’t long before the colour of the track resembled the colour of the clematis! SNOW WHITE!!

Started off in snow.!! (Helen pic and caption.)

As we wandered up the track the snow got thicker and the wind got stronger. We decided to have morning tea in the last bit of shelter before the track upwards became exposed. The wind was very strong – we could just stand up! Keeping together we supported each other, through flax and dracophylum, up to the top to the green building on Swampy. The wind was so strong that there was little shelter even behind the building.

A very short break and then we followed down ‘swampy ridge road’ until we reached ‘Porkys track’ – this faced into the gale. We slipped and slid where the snow lay on the grass. Gradually we headed down to where the shrubs became trees. After a while we came to a track junction and then followed ‘possum busters track’. There were a number of creeks, full of water, from the rain the night before. To cross – you had to get wet again!

 

Tricky creek crossings. (Helen pic and caption.)

A welcome lunch was had amongst the trees in the shelter.

It was then on to the junction with ‘smithies track’ which we followed for a while through attractive natives.  ‘Whare Loop track’ was then followed to Whare lake.

The group at Lake Whare. (Helen pic and caption.)

At this spot the Maoris of the past used to soak the flax in the lake – later making both twine and linen. See Flax in New Zealand – Wikipedia. The remains of a stone house were inspected before completing the loop and out onto the road where the cars awaited.  A distance of approximately 10.2 km was covered.

The group decided to go for a well, deserved coffee at a usual coffee shop but alas the power was off, probably because of the winds. We soon found another where we recounted our adventure which was enjoyed by all.

Many thanks to Neil M and Arthur for the track clearing they have done, this was very evident. Others have volunteered to help them.

– Dave M

5. 12/3/2014. Trampers. Rollinsons Rd, Swine Spur, Swampy Ridge, Rollinsons Rd, Picnic Tables, return to cars.
Swine Spur route.

Swine Spur route done. Red indicates the heavy Swine Spur work, yellow the faster road work!

At the car park, the trampers lacked a leader knowledgeable of the Swine Spur track programmed for the day, so this hiker was dragooned into going with them, with his traitorous act objected to strongly by one of the hikers (who shall considerately remain nameless) with his friendly invitation for the writer to never go with the hikers again.

A careful inspection of the access road roadside eventually elicited the heavily grassed over entrance to the Possum Busters track. We made it through Manuka-Kanuka wood and the two steep guts of Mckenzie Creek and the other unnamed one, to stop for the cuppa at the traditional stop at the intersection of Possum Busters and Swine Spur tracks.

Then we turned left up the Swine Spur through the easily graduated track that was to inevitably bring us to the foot of the near vertical strenuous climb to Swampy Ridge roadway.

A word of appreciation here of the sterling track clearing from the route of all the impedimenta the once-in-a-life-time wet snow storm of last August brought down across it. Bravo, you track clearers! It was obviously a massive job.

Anyway, we reached the small concrete-block aerial navigation building sitting there at the top and turned left along the road to pass the Airways Corporation combined VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Radio) and DME (Distance Measuring Equipment – where’s an easier name?) setup to head down the access road. We forewent going on through Swampy to Hightop, as had been programmed, indulging in an easier day instead. (A concession to the hiker, the writer suspects.)

Well, that was to be just a boring road walk back to the cars, but most pleasantly interrupted with a lunch stop at the 0ld-trampers’ picnic area at the head of the Steve Amies track. With all the time in the world, we just lazed there around the tables before eventually deciding to head back out and down to the cars. We arrived back at the car park BEFORE the hikers! One for the record book? – Ian.

4. 20/10/2010. Trampers. Rollinsons Road, Possum Busters, Swine Spur, Swampy Ridge, Rollinsons Track, Rollinsons Road. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

Navmap of tramp, courtesy Ken. Rollinsons Track at top, part of it hidden on slope behind Swampy Ridge

Ria and Hazel led us into the start of Possum Busters from off Rollinsons Road. The two deep gullies were still there, but with the steep banks provided with wonderful sets of steps. Bravo, track-clearers. We stopped for a tea-break at the Swine Spur junction, wishing we had the tools to re-attach Les Murcott’s track signs to the remaining-standing manuka trunk. Then it was up the gentle incline of the Swine Spur track before it steeply climbed onto the actual Swine Spur.

Snow on track near top of slope of Swine Spur.

We were delighted to find the last bit onto the Spur was now a well-defined route, replacing the half-dozen or so attempts through the over-grown area. Reaching the top, we stopped for a brief shelter from some cold wind.

Sheltering from wind at building at top of Swine Spur.

Then it was along the road to Swampy Summit.

Snow on Swampy Summit

The Swampy Summit Track beyond the summit led us down through slippery frozen snow and on to our next turn-off. The Rollinsons Track was well-indicated and its route well-defined with copious track markers. Another good change from a time when it was really hard to detect parts of the track. Again, thanks to some excellent recent work by some good people, added to by our leaders on their recce.

Lunch scene. Foreground: track marker on bush, background: left to right, Pulpit rock, Silver Peaks No. 2, Rocky Ridge, The Gap.

The track kept high on the slope, avoiding the wetter parts of Swampy.

Tarn at heart of Swampy

The track wound its way back up and out of Swampy to join with the Rain Gauge track. Again, the track sign had been clearly renamed “Rollinsons” instead of the “Swampy Tarns” sign that had been put over the old faded sign. Then it was just out to Rollinsons Road at the hairpin bend and on down to the cars.
Thanks to Ria and Hazel for this lovely tramp over the whole Rollinsons again – a replacement for the trip into Jubilee Hut that  had been thoughtlessly scheduled for during lambing. – Ian.
3. 15/3/2006. Trampers. Rollinson, Burns, Swine Spur. Medium+. Leaders: Doug J, Ian, Shirley.
2. 30/4/2003. Both. Access Road, Rollinson Track, Swampy Saddle, Swine Spur Track. Medium+. Leaders: Ria, Bill and Pat, Denise, Anne R.
1. 19/9/2001. From Access Road, Rollinsons Track, Swampy Saddle, Swine Spur Track. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Doug and Myrie, Joyce.

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Oct 25 2017

Careys Creek track, Black Gully Dam to Evansdale.

Published by under Trampers

Distance from car-park: 40 km

Black Gully Dam. Accessed from Semple Road. Black Gully Dam/Seacliff Dam. Av Time 1 hr; Route. Manager: DOC.
Click http://trtc.blogtown.co.nz/1980/12/14/seacliff-dam-historical-track/ for information on the Creek and pipeline.
Extension of Route to Black Gully Dam/Seacliff Dam. to Honeycomb track  junction. return. 4 hours return. Managed by DOC.
Best done in summer when Careys Creek is low, as there are many crossings. Attractive bush surrounds, which give good shelter from a hot sun.

8. 25/10/2017. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale. M. Leader: Keith.

Nine trampers left the car park and after delivering one vehicle to the tramp end,we left the car park at Semple road at 9.50am.

We made good progress on an times slippery and steepish track and stopped for smoko at 10:15.
As we followed the old pipe line down, the creek crossings became more frequent…

River crossing. (Helen pic and caption.)

 …and the track more muddy.
Lunch was had at 12:15…

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and soon after the rain began, so it was on with the coats.

The hairy goat and his kids. (Helen pic and caption.)

Every one was quite wet by the time we got to Evansdale Glen but it was a good tramp and a great coffee at Blueskin cafe.
Distance Semple Rd car park to Evansdale walk bridge 11.6 km – Keith
7. 16/3/2016. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale. Leader: ?
On a day that didn’t promise much weather wise, we had 9 trampers on the Careys Creek tramp. For a change, the women outnumbered the men as well !!!
After doing the car shuttle thing, & having morning tea,

1 Packing up after morning tea (Ken pic and caption)

1 Packing up after morning tea (Ken pic and caption)

we all met up not far down valley from the Black Gully Dam,

2 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

2 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

3 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

3 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

& continued on at a leisurely pace,

4 track (Ken pic and caption)

4 track (Ken pic and caption)

being careful  of the quite slippery conditions.
The many creek crossings …

5 Crossing the creek (Ken pic and caption)

5 Crossing the creek (Ken pic and caption)

6 An easy crossing (Ken pic and caption)

6 An easy crossing (Ken pic and caption)

… were also treated with great care, as the boulders were mostly treacherous to stand on. It was pleasing to see the new much larger orange triangle track signs that have been installed along the places where it is necessary to walk the riverbed.
We had lunch alongside the creek at a suitable place, & then continued on downstream, where we met up with a quite a large group of Kings High School boys with two supervisors. They were making a lot of noise, & could be heard from some distance away. We spent the rest of the trip mixing with these boys, as they would race ahead, then stop to pick Blackberries, which they were going to make into a Blackberry Pie later that night.
We had some of our group who had not done this tramp before, & all agreed that it was a good day, which most of us finished off with a coffee & chat at Waitati.Walked 11.7km
3.6km/h
3h 13mins
climbed 173m – Ken.

6. 1/10/2014. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale.
Careys Creek track was the destination for this tramp, & 6 trampers turned up for the day out. We drove to Evansdale, & left one car there, & then drove up to the top of the track at Black Gully Dam track. Morning tea was taken at the wooden seat part way down this track just before the steep steps leading down to the creek. The dam was inspected, along with the old hut that is situated there, & then we made our way downstream over the many slippery creek crossings to a late lunch spot, not far from the signposted junction of Rongomai track. We then made our way back out to Evansdale Glen via the ‘new’ track, where two of us left the others to have a spell, & a look around the area, while we went & retrieved the two cars, so we could ferry everybody back to town. Once again, this tramp had not been done by some, & for others it had been a long time [many years] since they had been there, so even although most got wet, or damp feet, it was enjoyed by all, & the weather was brilliant !
We walked 10.8km
2h 45m moving time
ave 3.9km/h
climbed 163m – Ken.
5. 18/9/2013. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale.
Seven trampers gathered at the top of the Careys Creek track after leaving a vehicle at the Evansdale end.  The descent through the bush was pleasant easy going, with a stop to view the Black Gully dam and then another in a patch of sunlight for morning tea, where George shared his birthday goodies.

The creek was low so the numerous crossings were made with dry feet, except for one member who measured her length over slippery rocks and now sports a bruised cheek and knee, not to mention scratched specs.

The party then split, with three opting for an early lunch and the rest pressing on to the Rongomai junction.  Here the others caught up again, for an easy ramble out to the road.  – Judy

4. 26/1/2011. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale. Ken, Ian, Sabina.

GPS of Careys Creek track route, Semple Road to Evansdale, courtesy Ken.

With two cars between only three of us we nevertheless decided to do a car shuttle between Semple Road and Evansdale and to do the entire Careys Creek track. Ground conditions were wet and slippery, which would have ruled out the steep Honeycomb track anyway.
We were reminded again of just how many and how steep the steps down to the dam were. But they are well benched-in, so not too bad.

One of the more level parts of the track down to the Dam.

We took Sabina up to see the Dam and the slightly greater overflow didn’t auger well for the many creek-crossings and creek-wadings ahead, where the track is just the actual creek-bed. But again, things weren’t too bad.

The Dam waterfall was slightly heavier than usual.

Along the way we met up with several small groups of the Green Hut Track Group. They have almost completed clearing the entire track. Bravo! We were delighted to find several areas modified. These were where difficult parts of the track had, where occasion warranted, been either better benched, stepped or even completely re-routed. Again, bravo!
And then, just past the foot of the Rongomai, behold, a track now mown where  at all possible, all the way down to Evansdale Glen.

An example of the mown track nearer Evansdale.

This had been the first time the club has done the entire 10 km of creek in a long time. And it felt good. – Ian
3. 31/12/2009. Holiday tramp. Black Gully Dam, down Careys Creek some distance and back. 4 hours. Ian, Ken, George.
The weather forecast had promised a fine day but it turned out overcast. Rain on the previous wet day had left the track muddy and slippery necessitating great care not to slip. Exposed parts of the track produced lush rank grass and buttercups, and rain during the day left steep grassy slopes extremely slippery. The track is well-cleared for a considerable distance but from near its highest point and onwards, it was much more heavily overgrown than when we did the recce. First of all, of course, we climbed the track to the old Seacliff dam.
Looking across dam. Ken, George.

Looking across dam. Ken, George.

Dam and overflow.

Dam and overflow.

Peering through foliage to see extent of dam pond.

Peering through foliage to determine extent of dam pond.

Then it was down the Careys Creek old pipe-maintenance track. As mentioned above, this part was well cleared.
Track down Careys Creek. George, Ken.

Track down Careys Creek. George, Ken.

Of course there were very many stream crossings, some entailing a walk quite a distance down the creek before entering the track again. These were well-marked with indicators suspended from branches overhanging the stream-bed.
One of many stream crossings. George, Ken

One of many stream crossings. George, Ken

There was a restriction on time as George had belatedly discovered he had to be back home mid-afternoon, so although we managed a short-notice early 8.15 a.m. setting out, we were unable to make the full distance down to the Honeycomb Track turn-off before having to turn back. A memorable part of the tramp was a (unnoticed at the time but decidedly stinging later on and into the night) brush with some concealed onga-onga, Ken on his left wrist, George on a finger and Ian on his right knee. But all in all, a very enjoyable way to finish the old year off. – Ian
2. 5/12/2009. Recce of Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, returned Mountain Road, Semple Road. 5.5 hours. Ian, Keith, Glenis.
Track is well-cleared for most of its length.
The road-walk back is about 8 km.
1. 19/10/1994 Evansdale, Black Gully Dam/Seacliff Dam, Double Hill. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Marie F, Jack R, Bob H

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Oct 18 2017

Grahams Bush, Organ Pipes, Buttars Peak, Mount Cargill.

Published by under Trampers

Click Grahams Bush history for background information.
Click Mount Cargill history for background information.
No. 19 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sawyers Bay – Grahams Bush. M Deuchrass. Summer.”
Sawyers Bay Road 28 km from car park.
18/10/2017. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast. M. Leader: Helen.

Only eight trampers today. Lots away. Started at Hall Road in Sawyers Bay. Parked cars at the start of the Grahams Track. Lovely walk up through bush and also some muddy areas. Had our morning tea stop on this section of the tramp. Up the steep steps to the Mount Cargill Road.

(Margreet pic.)

Across that and up to the Organ Pipes most which have fallen down now.

Organ Pipes. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continued on up to the top of Mount Cargill going past Buttars Hill. Had our lunch up there in the shelter as was quite windy on the top. Down we went again after conversations with other hikers and workman on our way down to the road. From there we decided to walk

View from road. Roseneath Quarantine Island and Portobello. (Helen pic and caption.)

in a large loop back to Sawyers Bay and cars. Distance was 16.5kms. Coffee at Blackstone in Mosgiel. A very enjoyabld day with lots of chatting. – Helen

10/6/2015. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast.M.
We had a good turnout of 10 trampers for todays assault on Grahams Bush — Organ Pipes, & track up to the transmitter mast on top of Mt. Cargill.
We had morning tea break at the junction of the private road, & the left turn onto the track. I should’ve waited till a bit later as once into the bush the ground was nearly dry, whereas where we stopped was quite wet.
We made good time up to the road at the top of the Grahams Bush track, & after a short rest stop where we learnt that a couple from the Czech Republic had their car broken into, in the Organ Pipes car park, & a backpack stolen, which contained their passports along with other items, we carried on up to the Organ Pipes.
Those that had not been there before, or for a long time took the opportunity to view the tumbled down remains of the once great landmark, before we set off for the junction with the track leading up to the transmitter mast. We found a reasonably sheltered spot among the bush edge to sit down for lunch,
Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

before going up the rough track [in places] with the big steps up to the top, where it was very windy.
After having a good look around up here, & admiring the great view, we started to retrace our steps back down & along the Organ pipes track to the Mt. Cargill Rd. I was very pleased to see that the boardwalks that I built in the mid ’90’s are still like new after nearly 20 yrs.
Once at the road, two of the women members decided that they would walk back via the road down into Sawyers Bay, instead of negotiating the Grahams Bush track in reverse direction.
The walk back out to the cars was uneventful, with everybody making it safely.
A good workout for the lungs, & legs, with almost 1 KM climbed, but I didn’t hear any complaints, so I guess they all enjoyed the day.
Walked 11.6km @ 3.6km/hr.; moving time 3h 15min; Climbed 891mtrs. – Ken.
9/2/2011. Hikers. Old Mt Cargill Rd car park, Organ Pipes, Mt Cargill, return. Leaders: Bev. and Lesley.
The title of the walk was “Tracks and Trails” – which allowed our leaders licence to take us anywhere. And so the 15 of us climbed to the organ pipes and continued past Butter’s (DOC signboard) or Buttar’s (expert Lex who remembers the family farming there from when he lived in Leith Valley) Peak and on to Mount Cargill …

And so on the Mt Cargill. (Bob pic and caption)

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