Archive for the 'Beach' Category

Nov 01 2017

Pyramids, Victory Beach

No. 48 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Pyramids & Beach Area. (Victory Beach) Beach Walk only. Year Round”
Location: 38 km from car park.

Topo of Area

25. 1/11/2070. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders:  Bruce and Liz.

Route map of Hikers medium sub-group only, less the small pyramid, climbed by others, courtesy Ian. Trampers also climbed the larger pyramid.

Report 1 November 2017. Pyramids and Victory Beach.
Thirty-five hikers and trampers set off from the Pyramids car park in Dick Road at approximately 9. 45 am towards Papanui Inlet passing 7 Sheldrake ducklings and their parents in a pond on the way.

We entered into the saltmarsh at the sign and followed a path to the inlet, turned to the left, walked approximately 400 m around the edge of the inlet, and then climbed a small bank on the left to get on to the 4-wheel drive track. We went along this about 100 m to a relatively sunny spot for morning tea.


A great place for morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

After morning tea, we continued along the 4-wheel drive track towards the sea crossing a plank bridge and then the style into the DCC Okia reserve. We continued on the track to where it veered to the left into the scrub and went instead to the right down a small bank on to the sand bordering the inlet. The bank was about 10 m before where the concrete square on the bank used to be. The square has now fallen down the level of the inlet. We proceeded around the edge of the inlet on relatively firm sand. The tide was coming in, with at 2.0 m high tide due at 3.16 pm. We soon met our first sea lion sleeping in the sun and later sitting up in the water facing us and periodically giving us a view of its oral cavity.
Another sea lion was on the point and lumbered towards us before settling down to rest. After turning to the left around the point of the beach we proceeded up the beach. A group of four sea lions consisting of a mother and 3 younger members of the species where resting…

Sea lions and fur seals were on the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

…near the site of the 1861 Victory wreck, the upper crescent of the fly wheel of which was visible periodically when the waves subsided. We were strung out along the beach as we travelled north passing another sea lion and a dead sea lion or seal pup in a state of partial decomposition.

We congregated for lunch at the foot of the sand hills, about 70 m before the track leading to the pyramids, between approximately 12. 15 pm and 12.30 pm.

The birthday boy Clive in his 70th with chocolates. (Helen pic and caption.)

After lunch a group of 16, led by Arthur, departed slightly before rest with the intention of returning to the car park via the end of the beach, the large pyramid and then the small pyramid.

The remaining 19 went 70 m north to enter the track to the pyramids which is marked by a yellow and black pole, approximately 50 cm high, in a steel square framework. After passing a board referring to the wildlife we split into two further groups with 7 continuing on the grassy track straight ahead to the pyramids, and then the car park, while the other 12 turned to the right and followed a more circuitous route via some initially longish grass, the rosette, and the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff to the cave in the small pyramid which, uncharacteristically, had water covering the floor.

Cave flooded. First time ever for us. Extensive flooding of marshes and tracks never seen before. Wet winter! (Ian pic and caption.)

Approximately 6 members then climbed the small pyramid.

We were then met by the returning trampers and, after some more pyramidal ascents were mad,e we returned to the carpark and then, for most of us, had refreshments at the Bay Café, Macandrew Bay.

A pond was present just before the rosette and a temporary bridge and detour was present on the track just after the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff because the track was flooded. The track was partially built up for a few metres near the small pyramid, evidence of a wetter than usual winter. Some pot holes were present in Weir Road. The Pyramids/Victory beach area remains as a place where a level round walk with varied scenery in the country is possible.

The weather was good with some early mist, relatively high temperatures and a cooling breeze on the beach. The distance travelled, depending on the route chosen was approximately 10.5 to 13 km. Including the rosette and the small pyramid ascent the distance was 11.7 km.
My thanks are due to Liz Griffin for stepping in and performing admirably as co-leader/back marker at short notice.
– Bruce

Trampers’ addendum report.

16 trampers left the main group after the lunch stop, and continued along the beach to the north end. It was rather a scramble to get up the steep sand dune, to find that the track along the top was quite overgrown. However the leader unerringly led the group 100 metres or so until the mown track was reached, and easy going.

As we took a last look at the sea,

Bruce on his first tramp back after surgery . (Helen pic and caption.)

2 or 3 porpoises were spotted frolicking in the surf. The wildlife was wonderful today.

12 trampers climbed to the top of the big pyramid,

Both Pyramids. (Helen pic and caption.)

to gain the superb views on offer. Down again, we continued and caught up with the Hikers, the last of whom were just descending the small pyramid.

4 trampers also ascended it, to claim having climbed both pyramids today.

And so we returned to the cars together, after a most enjoyable day’s tramp. – Art.

24. 2/11/2016. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Thirty-one hikers and trampers met at the Pyramids car park on Dick Road at 9.50 am on a calm sunny morning. Low tide at Dunedin was 0.3 m at 1258 and the Papanui Inlet tide is about 1 hour later. Three of the group (Leslie, Bev and Molly) accepted the shorter route option of taking the direct yellow-marker route to Victory Beach via the Pyramids while the other 28 proceeded via Dick Road past some bovine mothers and children who found us to be of interest.



Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We entered the salt marsh by crossing the ditch opposite the sign

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

and walked straight ahead to the estuary before turning left for approximately 400 m …

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

… to have morning tea on the 4-wheel drive track approximately 200-300 m from the gate at the north end of the road. Overgrowth of the lupins and bank erosion made it easier to walk on the estuary for a distance to where the bank up to the 4-wheel drive track was less steep. A suitable morning tea site, with access to the pine forest and some logs for sitting on, was present after the barbed wire fence on the left stopped.

After morning tea we proceeded along the track, over the railway sleeper bridge and then the style into the Okia Reserve and followed the track with white markers to the estuary edge where a large concrete block was present. The bank was eroded here and most of us went down a slightly easier place a few metres before the block.

We then walked on the firmer sand near the water’s edge going to the end of the estuary, passing some Paradise (Sheldrake) ducks and then around the sandy point with dunes to Victory Beach. We paused to inspect two sea lions.

Sealions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Sea lions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

The fly wheel of the Victory was partly submerged.

[Scroll down to (20. 16/7/2014 tramp report) to view a new photo insertion (I’ve just learnt how to make out of a video frame), of Bruce standing on top of the Victory flywheel back at that date. (There’s also a video to click on just below it.) – Ian.]

At 12.05 pm the groups of 3 and 28 merged and we lunched on the sand at the base of the track marked by an orange pole and two green crayfish pot floats.


Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After lunch Molly and Clive followed the shorter option path back to the Pyramids and cars while the other 29 took the 4-wheel drive track to the right and then when almost at the cliffs at the end of the beach turned to the left to follow the track around to the rock rosette.

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We continued on the loop track to the Margaret Hazel Slope track.

Margaret Hazel slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Margaret Hazel Slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Five of the trampers made a detour from here back to the cars via the top of the large Pyramid.

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.) [of smaller pyramid - Ed.]

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

The rest continued back to the junction near the small Pyramid where most waited while approximately 6 visited the cave in the small Pyramid to inspect the pentagonal and hexagonal basalt column crystal structures.

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Approximately 8 persons took the 10 minute track up to the top of the small Pyramid for the expansive viewbefore following the others back to the cars via Dick Road. Everyone was back at the car park by approximately 3 pm and refreshments were consumed at the Portobello Café.No major calamities occurred on the day. A potential problem may occur if the track up the small pyramid is strayed from because of the steepness of the terrain. The persistent sun may have caused some sunburn. The route followed requires the low tide to be at an appropriate time.

The distance travelled by the main group was approximately 12.3 km with the small and large pyramid ascents adding approximately another 0.15 and 1.2 km respectively. – Bruce.

23. 20/4/2016. Trampers. Pyramids, Victory Beach and Papanui Inlet. Leaders: Neil and Margreet.Ten trampers set out at 0945 on a warm autumn day to explore this scenic reserve and beach.  We stopped for morning tea at a well concealed cave

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.) [Note: Ed. recalls climbed by only an adolescent before.]

and then followed the undulating track to the beach. Even though it was still near low tide, we could only see a small part of the fly wheel of the wreck of the “Victory” at the South end of the beach. Much more impressive were all the seals …

One of many seals on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

One of many sea-lions on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

… lazing on the sand and gambolling in the waves. There was also a lone, grounded Mollymawk …

Mollyhawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

Mollymawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

… on the beach, seemingly injured.

Once we reached the end of the beach we turned into the Papanui Inlet and had lunch in a scenic spot where we were entertained by young seals frolicking in the water nearby.

We meandered around the inlet and then followed the gravel road back to the car-park.

As we had made good time, it was decided to drop our packs at this stage, and do some more exploring. Four trampers climbed Little Pyramid

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

and the other six went up the larger pyramid

Girls on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

Girls on top of big pyramid … (Margreet pic and caption)

Then nen on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

… then men on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

via Margaret Hazel Slope. It was worth the clamber to get great views of the beach and surrounding hills from the summits.

A coffee stop at Portobello completed an enjoyable day’s outing.

In total we walked 11.85 km. – Margreet and Neil Simpson

22. 13/5/2015. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leaders: Chris and Adrienne. Later: also Bruce.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

Today’s tramp was an alternative to Murray’s Farm which was deemed too wet following the previous day’s rain. After regrouping at the gate into the reserve, we resorted to the club’s habitual setting in the nearby cave for morning tea, happily in sunshine.
Then followed the trek out to the beach along along the usual, but surprisingly cleaned-up track, extravagantly cleared to a width greater than we had ever encountered before, complete with side bays as well. Obviously a scrub-cutter operator had enjoyed their job.
But at the beach entrance, whoa! Full tide! Even Keith and Ian’s trek along the narrow wave-touched strip of remaining sand ‘pour encourager les autres’ (to encourage the others) to reach less wave-washed sand further on, failed to inspire the leaders, indeed earned only their rebuke for ‘not staying behind the leader’. Sigh.
An alterative suggestion from Bruce to visit the viewing spot of the 30 metre wide circular geologically-formed rock “rosette” on the cliff-face of the larger pyramid found favour, so thence we trouped.
 This proved an occasion for some interesting discussions. “Where is it?” “There it is. Can’t you see it?” “No, I can’t”. “Look, it’s right THERE.” Well, I suppose we can’t all be brilliant.
Presently, returning the way we had come, we stopped on a slope of the track for an early lunch,
Lazy lunch. (John pic)

Lazy lunch. (John pic)

lazing enjoyably in the sun with not too much wind to disturb us. Following lunch, back on the main scrub-cleared track, came an early afternoon decision time. A goodly half of our number (of 28), elected to return to the cars, but not all …. Now, over to Bruce. – Ian
Loop group. After lunch a group of 13 headed out to the beach some distance north of our earlier entry point to the beach before lunch. A sand cliff was present where the track reached the beach due to sea erosion and we had to make a short detour on a less defined track, 20 m further north, and a short slide to the beach.  Going to the earlier entry point further south would, in retrospect, have been better. We proceeded down the beach…
Along the beach. (John pic)

Along the beach. (John pic)

…past 6 sea lions who were mainly at the southern end of the beach. The fly wheel of the Victory was partly visible between waves.
Flywheel. (John pic)

Flywheel. (John pic)

After rounding the point at the end of the beach we proceeded up a rather boggy narrow stretch of sand on the edge of the inlet until we reach the pine tree stump, approximately 500 m along the inlet, where we climbed a short slope of bank , beside a concrete slab on the top of the bank, to get on to the grass road…
Smile, please. (John pic)

Smile, please. (John pic)

…leading the style at the edge of the reserve. After crossing the style we passed the holiday homes on our right, in the Clearwater property, and then crossed the bridge providing vehicular access to the cribs. It had been repaired with macrocarpa sleepers since our last visit. We continued along this grass track until we reached the gate at the end marked private property (inverted). We then went down a diagonal track to the left of the gate, past Ian’s sheltered morning tea spot, and along the edge of the Inlet. Because of the high water level, approximately 25 cm  deep, it was necessary to cut across the corner of the paddock. We did not cross the water filled inlet/ditch leading to the Salt Marsh sign on Dick road until we were nearly at the road. We then crossed the next ditch parallel to the road beside the sign and walked 2 km along the road back to the car park arriving there at or slightly before 2.45 pm. Another idea for another time would be to consider walking from north to south along the beach to see the fly wheel and any sea lions that might be about and then returning along the beach to cut out the 2 km of walking on the gravel of Dick road. The weather today for this part of the hike remained calm and warm. – Bruce.
Hang on, P.S., BTW or whatever. The Loop Group coffeed at Portobello…
Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

…and the ‘others’ were going to go to Nichols. – Ian.
21. 12/11/2014. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leader: Bruce, with Bev as back-up.


Twenty-two intrepid hikers were undeterred by the forecast of an afternoon southwesterly change and after proceeding through Portobello to Weir Road turned left into Dick road and parked at the Pyramids and Victory Beach car park. They crossed the style and proceeded along the Riddle Road causeway, through the gate at the end and passing to the left of the little pyramid turned to the right on the beach track (not to the left on the loop) and, a short way along, took a short track to the right to have morning tea in the cave at the little pyramid.


Cuppa. (John pic.)

Morning tea. (John pic.)

We confirmed the basalt blocks were five rather than six sided.

After morning tea, we retraced our steps and turned to the left onto the loop track. We passed the Margaret Hazel slope (marker 4) noting that one can reach the top of the large pyramid by going up it and turning left. (Earlier we noted a 10 minute track to the top of the small pyramid started just after the gate at the end of the Riddle Road causeway). We continued to the right on the loop track and stopped at marker 6 to view the circular rock rosette feature …

Rosette (Bruce pic.)

Circular rock rosette (Bruce pic.)

… on the cliff face. Antony Hamel describes this as a 30 m wide pod of lava which is inaccessible to grazing animals and that it contains less common native plants such as the Easter orchid.

We should then have turned sharp right to the yellow marker pole and then a sharp left to the beach at markers 8 and 9 but ended up on a more circuitous route ending up with a short slide to the beach.

Slide (John pic.)

Short slide to the beach.  (John pic.)

We proceeded down Victory Beach noting one sea lion and a partially submerged Victory flywheel (1861) just before the end of the beach where we found sheltered spots for lunch at 12.10 pm.

Lunch (John pic)

Sheltered spots (more or less) for lunch (John pic)

Another sea lion was resting at the water’s edge between our lunch spot and the inlet. After lunch we travelled along the water’s edge to where a grass track leading to the cribs starts. It was marked on the bank by a concrete rectangle but one needed to climb up the bank to see it. It was just past the end of the pine trees between the cribs and Victory beach. Some of our party overshot the turnoff and rejoined the track further on while others backtracked a little to get onto the grassy track. We all met up again …

Met up (John pic)

Met up again. All ‘parkaed-up’ after the short storm blast. (John pic)

…  just before the locked gate and stile at the boundary of the Okia reserve.

After crossing the style we continued along the grassy vehicle track on the inlet side of the fence separating the inlet from the property of Jason Clearwater. We crossed over a somewhat rickety bridge containing a round fencepost alongside the rectangular hardwood decking. At the end of the grass track we came to a locked gate with an inverted Private Property sign. We went down a track then to the left of the gate and along the inlet beach until level with the sign, about 300 m on, marking the salt flat conservation area. We headed at right angles to the sign along a narrow path alongside a snail-containing water course to a corresponding sign next to Dick Road. We crossed the relatively firm ground in the ditch beside the sign on to Dick Road and then walked, mainly in the sun, back to the carpark where we arrived at 1.55 pm.

Distance travelled 11.73 km by Garvin GPS, 10.6 km by Iphone, 12.33 -12.48 km by pedometer. Overall the weather could have been worse. A cold wind blew for a short time near the end of Victory beach and some spots of rain fell shortly after lunch leading us to put on our coats but it soon stopped and it was not enough to get wet with. Several of the group stopped for coffee or fruit juice at MacAndrew Bay …



… on the return journey to Mosgiel. Thanks were expressed to Bruce for leading and Bev for backmarking. – Bruce.

20. 16/7/2014. Hikers. Victory Beach. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.


A Herd

A Herd

Marsh start

A Marsh

Harbour Cone

A Harbour Cone pic

A log

A Log


A Flywheel. (of wrecked Victory)

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

And A rare extremely-low-tide video of the Victory Flywheel, with Bruce standing on the top

19. 24/11/2010. Trampers. Ryans Beach. M.
Since learnt: “Ryans Beach is entered legally only by the landowner (Penguin Place) and scientists.”

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

The climb out of Victory Beach up to the headland.

The descent to Ryans Beach.

Pam supporting the mast.

Close-up of the wreck.

Close-up of the wreck.

Smile please. Enjoying the view from the headland.

View from headland of Okia. Older beach lines showing.

18. 11/8/2010 Hikers Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Dorothy, Chris.

The Logarithmics ? – Lunch on an accommodating log. (Bill pic and caption)

17. 19/8/2009 Hikers Victory Beach, return road. Easy. Leaders: Mollie.
16. 29/7/2009 Trampers. Larger of two pyramids, Victory Beach, return lupins. Leaders: Arthur H, Ian.

click to enlarge

"Elephant" Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption)

“Elephant” Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption) Pat, Ian

"Large" Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

“Large” Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope. George, Pat, Sabina, Doug, Glenice, Bill, Arthur

Ascending Larger Pyramid

Ascending Larger Pyramid. Club members barely detectable on skyline.

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

Starting the descent

Starting the descent. George, Glenice, Pat, Sabina.

Striations on nearby cliff

Striations on nearby cliff

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

Through dunes to beach

Through dunes to beach. Pat, Sabina, Arthur

Paddle Wheel of Victory Ship

Fly Wheel of Victory Ship at low tide. (Arthur pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Returning to Pyramid

Returning to Pyramid

15. 1/10/2008. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Medium. Leaders: Bill H. Lesley, Molly.
14. 20/2/2008 Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Bob, Neil.

Another lovely Wednesday, as we have come to expect over the years. Large muster of 21 hikers today, due possibly because it was another beach walk and a very popular one at this time of the year. It was the Pyramids and Victory beach. After parking cars and getting everyone organised and over the stile, it was along to the Pyramids for morning tea. Refreshed and ready to go, it was on down the track to the beach. How very pleasant and enjoyable it was. The sun made the sea really sparkle, and the seals and sea lions were out frolicing or lying in the sun relaxing on the rocks or the sand as the fancy took them. We went to the left first as far as we could to the rocks. Then we turned round and walked to the other end of the beach, watching the seals and sea lions playing or resting as we went along. Cameras got plenty of use and I’m sure we’ve got some good photos to keep in our collections. Lunch was at the Papanui Inlet end of the beach and a very pleasant place to sit and relax it was. On round the end of the beach and back across the grass by the cribs and then the swampy bit to the road. Some of us didn’t have to walk all the way back to cars as Bob H. and Peter went and picked up drivers to save some of that road walking. Very good hike, enjoyed by all. – Bev

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

13. 15/2/2007. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Margaret D.
12. 15/2/2006. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Mary M.
11. 27/10/2004. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Graham, Ian, Ann R, Chris, Betty
Cave in Pyramid.

Cave in Pyramid.

Ships Wheel? of "Victory"

Paddle Wheel of “Victory” Ship

Drift wood. Dog?

Drift wood on Victory Beach. Dog?

10. 3/9/2003. All. Pyramids. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Catherine.
Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

9. 4/12/2002. All. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Evelyn C, Pam McD
8. 4/7/2001. Combined. Pyramids – Ryans Beach. Easy+. Leaders: George, Ray and Diana.
7. 21/7/1999. Victory Beach, Pyramids. Leaders: Chris, Sylvia, Diana.
6. 10/3/1999. Pyramids – Victory Beach. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
5. 18/2/1998. Victory Beach, Pyramids, Ryans Beach. Leaders: Chris, Bev H, Ria H.
4. 30/10/1996. Victory Beach – Pyramids. Average. Leaders: Joan H, Ria H, Jean
3. 31/5/1995. Pyramids, Victory Beach, Ryans Beach. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Mary Y, Betty B, Margaret D
2. 16/2/1994. Pyramids, Taiaroa Hill. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Denise, Alison, Mary Y. Easier alternative: Leaders: Bev McI, Frances M.
1. 23/3/1988. Victory Beach and Pyramids. Seals, penguins, rock formations. Leaders: Kath R, Dave M.

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Oct 18 2017

Tomahawk Lagoon and nearby tracks/areas

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Ocean Grove, also known as Tomahawk, is a suburb in the southeast of the New Zealand city of Dunedin. … The suburb was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name not being a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”.
No. 23 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karetai Rd via Monument from Lagoon. Year round.”
Distance from car-park: Tomahawk: 19 km; Smaills Beach: 22 km;  Paradise Road: 26 km.’
DCC List: 41 Peg Track. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Oregon St. 3.5 hrs ret. Tramping track – unbenched. Managed: DCC CAM, private land.
Description – This track provides a link between Ocean Grove and Highcliff Road. Access to the track in Ocean Grove is off Oregon Street. An attractive walk around Tomahawk Lagoon then climbs through gorse and native bush. Turn right towards Soldiers Memorial through paddocks with gorse sometimes obscuring the rock walls.
  • Classification – Hard
  • Time – Approximately 45 minutes.
  • Parking – Limited at Highcliff Road. No dogs.
  • Dogs – No

Distance from car-park: 19 km.

24. 18/10/2017. Hikers. Tomahawk. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce


23. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

22. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water
Ducks (Eleanor pic)

Ducks on ice (Eleanor pic)

or swans trying to get out of frozen water?


Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.


Soldiers’ Memorial (Eleanor pic)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…


Tarseal Road (Eleanor pic)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil
21. 29/1/2014. Hikers. John Wilson Drive, Golf Course, Beach, Cave, Tomahawk Lagoon, return Lawyers Head Paper Road. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
A few of the over Christchurch over 40s Tramping Club contingent lodging for the week at Waiora Scout Camp went off with our Trampers but the majority at the car park threw in their lot with the Hikers. The task for the Christchurchian cars to navigate through the city to the St Kilda playground adjacent to the John Wilson Drive was made easier by someone’s suggestion that locals spread themselves out amongst their cars as pilots and that worked well.
When we were eventually all gathered at the beginning of John Wilson Drive, Marjorie counted 51 of us. An all-time record? The views along the drive, with the Chisholm Park Golf Links and city on one side, the beach and sea on the other, was remarked upon by all. Further there were no cars to bother us this early in the day. It was time for morning tea when we reached Lawyers Head, one of a series of basaltic headlands which punctuate much of this section of the Otago coast, (others nearby being Maori Head and Blackhead). This one is named for the likeness of the cliff face to the profile of a lawyer in traditional legal wig, …
Lawyers Head

Lawyers Head

… so we supped our cuppas  around the Leonard Wright memorial at the Head.

Lawyers Head Lookout

Lawyers Head Lookout

Hidden hard nearby was a narrow steep track connecting down to the golf links, around whose Lawyers Head coastal edge the leaders had gained permission for us to single-file our way. We found ourselves right on the crest of the Lawyers Head cliff, the Tomahawk beach stretching out below us. We made quite a strung-out sight.
Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless applauded tee shot.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless ironically applauded tee shot at the end of our links perimeter stroll.

Now down and away from the links along another narrow, but lengthier track out and across to the Tomahawk Road.

A long line

Looking back upon another strung-out sight.

We emerged upon a playground on Tomahawk Road.

The suburb beyond us, now called Ocean Grove, was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name being, not a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”. (Wiki).
We descended the road a little way to the lower of the twin-lobed Tomahawk Lagoon, this lobe being its outer one,  whose outlet we skirted on its true left to emerge onto the Tomahawk Beach.
The day’s trip had been selected for one of Dunedin’s low-tides, so the beach was ours, as was the small tidal cave at its end, an addition to the area’s features.
Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Up a small but energetic sand-hill and we were on another track out to the road again, down it a bit, and into a side road leading to yet another side route and out onto a recreation area alongside Tomahawk Lagoon’s inner lobe, this one a wildlife reserve, although both lobes are noted for their bird life.

Here was to be the lunch stop, but prior to that there was a short walk up alongside the lakelet to where our local club members knew of a Trampers’ track leading up to a soldiers’ memorial on by the Peninsula high road. But this was to just to wander the level part of track and enjoy (??) at one spot a strong pong from the the slightly stagnant waters and mud verge. (Roll on a storm flush!)

So we lunched leisurely, variously at tables and on ledges until our leaders judged it time for the return journey.

Out on the road, a motor cyclist stopped to talk and admire our impressive size. He was glad to hear we were returning by the Lawyers Head paper road and invited us to notice the “use it or lose it” graffiti posted in a couple of places before its entrance. (Apparently the City Council proposed closing it.) We were going to be a wonderful “use it” example.

The ‘road’ led us through a corner of the Andersons Bay Cemetery, close by the towering Crematorium and out through the Chisholm Park Golf links. Then across the Pirates Football Club pitch and we were at our cars again and adjacent to a useful new toilet block by the playground.

Now came farewells and dispersal time. There were many appreciative remarks from the Christchurch Club members about the unique difference of such a walk, with its wonderful unexpected variations. ‘The best of their week so far’ was one comment.

I know our club felt quite proud to hear such unstinted praise, and of course are so indebted to Marjorie and Bruce for their careful planning, taking into account the meal stops, the permissions sought, and the trip duration. Bravo. Of course the day’s excellent weather didn’t hurt either. – Ian.

20. 1/6/2011. Both. Bowls Stadium, Cemetery, beach, Fishing Club, Karetai Rd, Smaills Beach, return. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Select only coastal part of GPS for this route. GPS Courtesy Ken. Distance travelled = 11.7km Moving time = 2hr 46min. Moving ave. = 4.2k/hr Stopped time = 1hr 50min

Twenty-three hikers and trampers set off from the Westpac Bowls Stadium in Tahuna Road at 1000 in cool cloudy conditions and went up the grass verge between the road and the Chisholm Park golf links before entering the first gate on the right to the Andersons Bay cemetery. We walked through part of the cemetery before continuing down the hill, watching some horses train behind a motor vehicle, and crossing the bridge over the outlet from the Tomahawk Lagoon. Immediately over the bridge we followed a gravel road alongside the outlet stream and then, after 80 metres,  a track alongside the stream down to the beach where trucks were removing sand, probably for attempting to remedy the erosion at Middle Beach.

Truck and loader for removing sand from Tomahawk beach. (Bruce pic and caption)

We proceeded along the length of the beach to the two caves at the far end and had morning tea on the rocks there. Some inspected the cave, risking getting wet feet in the process with high tide approaching at 1430.

Morning tea near the caves at Tomahawk Beach. (Bruce pic and caption)

After morning tea we ascended the sand hill to the Tomahawk Road and continued down the private road to the Tautuku Fishing Club, Dunedin and Haast Inc. We arrived there at approximately 1130 and were kindly shown around and given a history of the Club and the fine bluestone building by the club president Brett Bensemann.

Tautuku Fishing Club premises. (Pic: Ken. Caption: Bruce.)

Bob pic.

Bob pic.

The building was originally the homestead of Alexander Smaill and was bought by the club, together with some surrounding land, by the Club in 1972 for $5000.
At 1205 we continued up Karetai Road for 15-20 minutes

Bruce on Karatai Rd. track with others in the background. (Ken pic and caption)

to the corner near the style leading to a black and white Geodesic Trig on the right.

About nine of the group, following a route pioneered by Ken, went down to the trig …

Ken at the Geodesic Trig looking towards Sandymount (Bruce pic and caption)

… and then contoured around on a track

Bob pic.

back to the lower reaches of Karetai Road while the others retraced their steps down the non-rutted road in good  condition for walking. We lunched in a sheltered area close to the start of the first track on the left leading from the road to Smaill’s Beach.
After lunch we proceed to the beach via three routes, necessitated by a slip which had damaged the track (a) up the sand hills to avoid the slip, (b) via a narrow edge beside the river, or (c) retreating back to the gate and taking an alternative direct to the beach instead of going alongside the river bank. After briefly looking at the windswept beach and the offshore Bird Island (which has claimed many lives on account of a strong under-current including William and Thomas Henderson of Tomahawk  in about 1900)

Doug and others leaving Smaill’s Beach with Bird Island in the background. (Bruce pic and caption)

we climbed back up to the gun emplacements at the Jack Fox lookout. Two six inch Vickers coastal defence guns were part of a network of coastal batteries during WW2. The guns were removed  in 1945. A cluster of three similar batteries were present at Taiaroa Head  and the mother of one of the group nursed there.
We returned to the cars via Tomahawk Road, Luke Street, the disused Tomahawk School, the soccer playing fields and the cemetery grounds which we entered via the pedestrian entrance on the left a short distance above the bridge. We arrived back at 1445 somewhat wind buffeted but knowing more about Porbeagle Sharks which are only caught in the local area. (For more information about the Tautuku Fishing Club see: Tautuku Fishing Club) – Bruce.
19. 23/9/2009. Hikers. Tomahawk, Centre Road. Medium. Leaders Arthur and Barbara.
18. 4/6/2008 Both. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial, Centre Road. Leaders: Joyce, Ian, Lesley G
Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Three shaggy dogs

Three Irish Wolfhounds

17. 26/9/2007 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Memorial. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Although the day dawned very cold, overcast and threatening to rain, 8 intrepid Hikers turned up at Glascow St. carpark for the day’s tramp from Tomahawk Lagoon. In spite of weather we had a very happy and enjoyable day. We left cars in car park by the Lagoon and set off up the track to WW 1 Soldiers Memorial on Highcliff. Although track was very wet and muddy it is now much improved to what it used to be when we tramped in the area many years ago. Morning tea was a very welcome and refreshing break in the slippery slog up the hill. Up to the Monument and lovely views of our beautiful harbour.

Peninsula Soldiers’ Memorial

Highcliff Rd to Centre Rd. was pretty cold but we soon warmed up. Then we had the great views over the other side of the Peninsula. Found a nice sheltered spot for our lunch and were vastly entertained by a very interested audience of 3 Irish Wolfhound dogs. Hard to say whether dogs or people were most fascinated.
Down the road and round the corner, back to cars after an enjoyable, sociable and refreshing day out. – Bev.
16. 25/7/2007. Trampers. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial. Moderate. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
15. 31/1/2007. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Mary M.
14. 13/4/2005. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Rosemary and Jack.
13. 3/12/2003. Hikers: Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Dot T
12. 29/10/2003. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Joan H, Chris.
11. 11/4/2002 Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Ray, Les W
10. 15/8/2001. Alt. Tomahawk, Karetai. Leaders: Nancy, Val, Peg C.
9. 11/4/2001. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Les W.
8. 23/2/2000. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Ria H.
7. 30/6/1999 Tomahawk Lagoon. Centre Road. Leaders: Jean Y, Denise, Eleanor W
6. 12/8/1998. Highcliff Centre Road from Lagoon. Leaders: Molly, Frank.
5. 18/3/1998. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road round trip. Leaders: Jean, Ria H.
4. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean
3. 18/9/1996. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Chris, Joan H, Ngaire.
2. 8/7/1992.  Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Centre Road. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, Bev H, Merle
1. 12/7/1989 Centre Road, Highcliff. Average +. Leaders: Kees & Ria, Diana
B, Ria H
10. 15/7/2015. Trampers. Buskin Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track.After a bit of a mix up over pickup points, we parked up beside Penzance Kennels, where we had a discussion on which way we would tackle the days walk. We settled on going down Buskin Track & worrying about the return journey later.
The track was mostly dry apart from a few areas where it has been damaged by water scouring it out quite badly. As two of the party of three, had never been there before we took some time to check out the cribs [baches] at the bottom of the track.We also came across an employee of Otago Pest Destruction [I think that’s what they are called] who was happily banging a possum on the head, after it got caught in one of his traps. He said he got 27 the day before, so much for a possum free peninsula !!!
We then made our way out to the beach for some boulder hopping practice, before gaining the sand at the northern end. As we passed by the log shelter I noticed an intruder lying inside, looking very cosy indeed.

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

It lifted its head to survey me for about two seconds, then just went back to sleep ! What a life !!
We wandered along the beach wondering where all the sand had gone, the bank holding the tussock is badly eroded, & about 1 meter high. So now, there is no way for the Yellow Eyed Penguins to climb up & get to their nests further up the hill.
We walked back past the intruder in it’s cosy shelter,

3 Anothe shot of the intruder.

3 Another shot of the intruder.

& had lunch sitting on a large bit of driftwood,

Boulder Beach, Otago Peninsula New Zealand

1 Lunch spot at Boulder Beach

before walking up Braidwood Rd. to the gate into the paddocks leading along to the Double Bay area, where I had an unsuccessful look for the viewing hide I had seen at an earlier date, but the vegetation had me beat, so we retraced our steps around to the bottom of Paradise Track, made our way up there, & back along Highcliff Rd. to the car.

We walked 10km
ave 3.3km/h
climbed 475m – Ken

9. 28/11/2012. Trampers. Tomahawk, Soldiers Monument, Buskin Track, Highcliff,  Karatai Rd

GPS Tomahawk Soldiers Monument Buskin Track Karatai Rd, courtesy Ken.

Lunch at junction of Boulder Beach tracks. (Ken caption and pic)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic)

8. 26/9/2012. Trampers. Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road.


Six of us parked at Smaills Beach car-park. We had dropped the idea of Silver Peaks because of the forecast rain with its fog. As we went up Karetai ‘Road’, we reached the rain level at our tea break and had to ‘parka-up’. We turned off further up onto the Highcliff Track …

Boulder Beach from Highcliff Track

and round to Beatties Cottage where we lunched. We didn’t bother going down to the beach but lazed in the sunshine (temporary but happily well-timed) in the shelter of the cottage’s large hedge from the wind.
The climb up Paradise Track gets no shorter but by and large, with its couple of zig-zags, provides a good gradient.
Along Highcliff Road, we forewent turning down the Buskin Track, with its promised steep climb back up the Highcliff Track, and carried on to the Karetai Road turnoff, returning down it to the cars.
Surprisingly Ken’s GPS recorded we had done 14.5 kms! A useful day’s walk. – Ian

7. 14/2/2007. Trampers. Boulder Beach, Karetai, Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders; Bruce and Marjorie.

6. 14/5/2003 Hikers. Karetai Road, Boulder Beach. Medium.Leaders: Colleen, Betty

5. 20/3/2002. Alt. Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Smaills Beach. Medium. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

4. 19/7/2000. Boulder Beach, Karetai Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris, Joan H.

3. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean

2. 13/4/1994 Tomahawk Lagoon, Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Buskin Road, Soldiers Track and return. Medium. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, June G, Betty H
1. 7/3/1991. Cars park Karetai Road Car Park. Karetai Road from car park. A good peninsula walk. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret S, Les W, Jack M.



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Aug 09 2017

Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road

Published by under Beach,Farm,Trampers

No. 86 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Heyward Point – Melville’s Farm Farm”

40 km from car park.

Part: Tramping Track, Managed by DOC. Rest: Not during lambing Sept-Nov. Seek Permission.

15. Trampers. Hayward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road circuit. M. Leader: Janine.

On what looked like a lovely clear day, 15 trampers set off in from Mosgiel in 4 cars. Difficulties set in very early when 2 of the cars were delayed by a car accident on the motorway – 2 other cars were fortunate to be able to detour through Fairfield. Next difficulty was the further we drove, the thicker the sea mist became and on reaching the end of Heyward Point Road, after the 20 minute delay, visibility was extremely limited in the murky fog.

We set out through the mist and after a short walk stopped under some pine trees for a late morning tea

Morning tea under the trees.(Helen pic and caption.)

then pushed on to the coast edge above Aramoana- BUT still no view on offer!! Disappointing for those of us who knew what we should be seeing and unable to show those who hadn’t been to the location before just what a spectacular coastline we have!

With care we followed the cliff edge, passed through some pine trees, scrambled a short rocky hill to suddenly find the mist had lifted and we had a view. Along to Heyward Point we were able to see the Mole, Aramoana, 2 ships at sea, numerous seal and pups, and a multitude of seabirds.

(Margreet pic.)

Shags in a hole in the rock. (Helen pic and caption.)

Onward and we tackled a steep hill – up and down still skirting the cliff edge till dropping onto Kaikai beach area. Due to the late start and time limitations we didn’t venture to the sandy beach but cut accrss the paddock straight to the nearby cave/holiday home where groaning stomachs were replenished.

Lunch stop. (Helen pic and caption.)

With the late lunch, we were all delighted with the original Maori fantail legend told to us in real ‘storyteller’ style by Bob.

All refueled, it was another steep climb to the historic ‘Jennings house’- after a quick viewing and discussion on the sturdy foundations of this old homestead – we continued on through paddocks meeting young curious cows and arriving back to the road above Whareakeake beach. The road walk to us back again through thickening mist to where the cars were left. Despite all that water vapour the walk wasn’t too ‘wet’ and the 9.75km ramble appeared to be enjoyed by all. Each car then made their own arrangements for coffee / home drop offs. – Janine.

14. 10/8/2016. Trampers. Hayward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road circuit. M. Leader: Arthur H.
We parked the cars at the end of Hayward Point Road and walked for ten minutes to find our morning tea spot.
The ground was still hard from the frost. The sky was cloudless with just a hint of a cold southerly breeze. We could not have had better weather for our tramp, even if we had been able to arrange it ourselves.

Another short walk took us to the start of the DOC track to Hayward Point itself. Great views up here, of the Otago Harbour entrance, the Aramoana Mole and across to Tiaroa Head.

Mole and Heads. (Margreet pic).

Mole and Heads. (Margreet pic).

A large ship was heading into the harbour. A very scenic spot indeed.

Following the cliff-top track, we came to the grassy headland block on which were grazing a mob of hoggets. We descended down to Heyward Point but could see only two seals (usually twenty or more can be seen) and two shags on the little off-shore islet.

Rock with small and large gulls plus seals and shags. (Helen pic and caption).

Rock with small and large gulls plus seals and shags. (Helen pic and caption).

Plenty of seagulls about though.

We admired the rusty old winch, which had been used to bring up the acetylene gas bottles to power the beacon in years past (solar power now), before continuing.
Uphill next to get above the very steep face, which has recently been fenced off and put into a Q.E.II Covenant Reserve.
Going down again was a bit tricky, and it was necessary to hold on tightly to the fence so as to remain upright for a distance in the wet muddy conditions. Once out onto the grass paddock the going was much easier, but it is a long way down.

The tide was halfway out as we walked along Kaikai beach. A very beautiful place away from civilisation. At the end of the beach we turned inland to admire the holiday cave dwelling.

Cave dwellings (Helen pic.)

Cave dwelling. (Helen pic).

From sea level it is all uphill back o the cars, so we ascended the first hill to lunch at the old house (the Jennings house).

Old house where we had lunch. (Helen pic and caption).

Historic old Jennings house where we had lunch. (Helen pic and caption).

Some stomachs were complaining by then, but morning tea had also been late.

A close inspection of the house followed. Apparently it had last been used during the second world war by the army for coast watching duty.
Up through the paddocks, onto the road, which we followed, returned us to the cars at 2.25 p.m. We had covered 11 kms.
The fine day, together with the great views, had combined to give the seven of us a very enjoyable tramp.
On the way home, a diversion had to be made to observe the weekly ritual at Careys Bay. – Arthur H.

13. 11/5/1016. Hikers. Heyward Point, anti-clockwise loop return over paddocks. M. Leaders: Judy, Adrienne.

Heyward Point Route Map

Heyward Point Route Map

21 intrepid hikers parked at the end of the Heyward Point road and set off in beautiful weather after almost forgetting the Bathgate car load who took a wrong turning….
After a leisurely morning tea …

Morning tea panorama

Morning tea panorama

… in the first group of pines, Dorothy came to grief at the first hurdle (style), making a great job of scraping her leg.  She was ably patched up …

… by a bevy of nurses and returned to the cars with Chris for a quiet sit in the sun for the rest of the day.

Harbour Entrance

Harbour Entrance

The remaining 19 proceeded along the cliff path where the ups and downs tested our fitness in the rapidly increasing heat. Clothes were shed in all directions before we reached the paddocks above the point.  Six keen souls went down to the rocks

Split off 'island' adjacent to lighthouse

Split off ‘island’ adjacent to lighthouse

Birds & seals on 'island'

Birds & seals on ‘island’

and were rewarded by the sight of families of seals cavorting in the rock pools.  The bulk of the party proceeded to the style perched steeply on the hillside above Kai Kai Beach where we stopped for lunch and were soon joined by the other six.



Then it was a steady slog uphill and across farm paddocks for another hour, to reach the track a couple of hundred metres from the cars.
Fantastic weather, incredible views and good company made this a most enjoyable hike, concluding with a coffee stop at the Stadium Cafe.
-Judy and Adrienne.

12. 26/3/2014 Trampers. Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road.

We had 8 people today, our numbers were boosted by 3 young men from Israel, who were bought along by Hazel.
We had good weather apart from a strong wind on the way back up to the top road again, & all agreed it is a good walk. – Ken

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the cave accommodation (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the cave accommodation (Ken pic and caption)

11. 16/1/2013 Trampers. Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach, Whareakeake Road.

We had a very good walk today, with great weather, a good mix of terrain, & we had a good chat to Sue & Partner. Judy is related to both Sue, & the woman who live at the very start by the gate, she is Sue’s sister. So lots of ‘catching up’ was done.

Morning Tea break. (Ken pic and caption.)

Morning Tea break. (Ken pic and caption.)

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Jul 26 2017

Doctors Point area tramps

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Distance from car-park to Waitati: 34 km.
Distance from car-park to Doctors Point: 38 km.
19. 2017 Jul 26. Hikers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Urupa. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
23 hikers reported for duty at the Doctor’s Point carpark on a calm winter’s morning.

The tide was still going out as we made our way along Canoe Beach, through the caves

Clive pic.

 to our morning tea stop at the bottom of Mapoutahi Pa.

Our pathway to Purakaunui Beach was almost blocked by a large tree which had fallen due to the recent floods.
Then, as we headed along the track towards Osborne Road we encountered deep water which made us retrace our steps and walk along the beach.

After a pleasant beach walk,we made our way through the trees to the Maori cemetery.

Clive pic.

We then retraced our steps back to Mapoutahi,where we planned to have lunch. This plan was quickly abandoned,as the incoming tide was threatening our route back to the cars.

Clive pic.

We eventually had lunch on the beach near Doctor’s Point.
 Time and tide wait for no Hikers!!! – Peter B.
18. 2017 Jun 21. Hikers. Orokonui Estuary & Opeke Tracks. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
On a cold, frosty but rather dank morning 27 keen hikers parked their cars at the parking/picnic area on Orokonui Rd., where the Estuary track starts. From there we walked the short distance back. to the Waitati Cemetery where we had morning tea.

Clive pic.

Quite a few people hadn’t been there before so were interested to have a look around the graves. As it was rather cold though we didn’t linger too long. On down Orokonui Rd. till we reached the little bridge crossing the Waitati river which brought us out onto Killarney St. at the end of which was a new bit of track with some board walk coming out onto Doctors Point Rd. From there it was along the road till we reached the far end of Opeke track. By this time we were all feeling somewhat warmer after a reasonably brisk walk. Then it was down onto the Opeke track. This is a very attractive and interesting walk which gives pleasure to the many people who use it. Locals and visitors alike. Near the end of this track is a short detour into an area that has some seats and great views across Blueskin Bay to Warrington and the other side of STH 1. Ideal for our lunch stop.

Wednesday’s walk was the nicest walk I have done. The plantings of native bush out there is so beautiful and the track was great as well. (Eleanor W pic and comment.)

We had a fairly leisurely lunch and then it was off again

At The cove was the royal blueskin Bay yacht club HQ just below the nesting tree of the Royal spoonbills. (Clive pic and caption.)

Clive pic.

to the end of the Opeke track and back onto Doctors Point Rd. The walk along the road helped to warm us up again as it had got a bit chilly sitting at lunch time!. We turned up Chelivode St. and along to the other end of the Estuary track. This took us back to the car park and the end of what everyone agreed was a most enjoyable and ideal walk for a winter”s day. The Estuary track is a lovely track with bush and birds plus lovely views. We all felt it a suitable one to repeat yearly. The day finished off as usual with coffee break at Blueskin Café. Lesley & Bev

17. 2016 Aug 31. E. Hikers. Orokonui Inlet Track via Orokonui Ecosanctuary exclosure fence lower gate. E. Leaders: Leslie and Bev.
Hikers' route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The "55.55' is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Hikers’ route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The “55.55′ is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Cars at tramp start.

Cars at tramp start.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

View from further up along fence.

View from further up along fence.

16. 2015 Jul 22. Hikers. Opeke and Orokonui Inlet track and back blocks of Waitati. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

What to start off with? Well, two things, actually. We are suffering a barrage of birthdays presently. Adrienne had a big one last Wednesday, Dorothy anticipates a bigger one next week and Ian a small one a few days ago. And the other? Maybe a record? A full twenty of the twenty-four hikers of the day socialised for coffee later. A beautiful Birthday Card, crafted by Pam and signed by all present, was presented to Dorothy, who responded with a most pretty speech.
Tramp matters. The day was calm and got really warm.
Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all.

Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all. (John pic)

Many who hadn’t been on the last visit to Opeke were struck with the embellishments added to the trackside. The CAR, and small limestone carvings to mention only two. We had parked at the bridge and road-walked between Opeke and the Orokonui Inlet Track.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch. (John pic)

Two birthdays

Two birthdays (John pic)

The track crowns the inlet’s head and finishes off along the Orokonui Road. We took the foot bridge across the Waitati Stream to skirt a back-blocks or two …

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye (john pic)

… before emerging onto the Doctors Point road and returning to the cars. Lesley and Bev had picked on doing this trek again, foregoing the earlier swap plan of exploring the Old Waitati Road area due to his colder shadiness under the hill. So thanks to Bev and Lesley for opening this newer area to even more Hikers. – Ian.

15. 2015 Apr 15. Hikers. Orokonui, Estuary and Opeke Track. E. Leaders: Bev and Lesley.

*** THE POEM ***


‘Twas a cold and windy morning – the sane ones stayed in bed.

But fourteen hardy hikers, bravely out were led.

They travelled to Waitati, the river was quite high –

They didn’t fancy wet feet, I can’t imagine why.

Instead, the estuary beckoned, with better shelter there.

With coats and hats and gloves on, they didn’t have a care.


The track was easy walking, through bush and flax and trees.

They lingered over morning tea, sheltered from the breeze.

A grassy bank was found for lunch, it wasn’t even wet.

John took lots of photos, you’ll see them on the net.

Leslie found a bird’s nest, she took it home to keep.

(I hope the birdies last night, did find somewhere to sleep).


On to Blueskin they did go, for coffee and a talk,

Joined by Jim and Betty, who didn’t do the walk.

Plans were laid for Luxmore, a short two weeks away,

With satisfaction they went home – It was a lovely day.

– Judy

***  THE REPORT ***

(Sorry, no route map. It seems a bug got into my application. Ian.)
On a day when only heroes and the mad go out, we found the Waitati Stream at the foot of the Waitati Valley Road too full to attempt the intended crossing. So leader Leslie, who with Bev had already recceed  the above  Orokonui Estuary walk set for later in the programme took fourteen of us on a route more suited to the day. We parked at the Estuary bridge and set off, well-clad in storm gear, to the Opeke track’s northern entrance for morning tea at the lovely setting of table and seating near its entrance. Fortunately although windy, (and here we were well sheltered) the day was dry.
Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa at the table and seats by the Opeke track.  (John pic)

We completed the Opeke circuit – for the first time in this reporter’s experience – in an anticlockwise direction. It’s so revealing viewing stuff when going in the opposite direction. As well, quite a number of improvements were there to be discovered, not least an old wreck of a car…

What's this alongside the track? (John pic)

What’s this alongside the track? (John pic)

…tied down and waiting to be wreathed in nature’s verdure – apparently!

Trekking back from Opeke, we turned off just short of the bridge up Chelivode street, passed a hay-baled house, and turned down a newly-made track to skirt the side of the Orokonui Estuary.

Track (John pic)

Track (John pic)

The track wound up, down and around through bush and paddock to emerge at the head of the estuary to cross swampy ground…

Solid (John pic)

A walkway across swamp, solidly built to last a lifetime.  (John pic)

…to reach the back yard of a number of farm sheds accessed from Orokonui Road. The track diverted down around a paddock or two to soon parallel the Orokonui Road on one side, and a heavily swollen Waitati Stream on the other.

Waitati Stream

Waitati Stream (John pic)

We lunched on a now sunny bank, still clad however in our parka-covered woolly underlays.


Lunch. (John pic)

Further along,…

The nest referred toby Judy in her poem. (John pic)

The nest referred to by Judy in her poem. (John pic)

..and we crossed the stream via the Erne Street footbridge to walk along Killarney Street and turn into Foyle Street. Here we came across a garaged honesty stall featuring jams and sauces…

Garage (John pic)

Garage (John pic)

…and lingered a while. Then it was out onto Doctors Point Road, back to the cars and to resort to the Blueskin Nursery cafe,…

Coffee (John pic)

Coffee at Blueskin. (John pic)

…- all 14 of us, augmented by Jim and Betty who turned up.

Thank you to Lesley and Bev, ably supported by back-marker Bob keeping us safely together, for devising such an appropriate alternative for such a challenging day. – Ian.

14. 2015 Jan 21. Hikers. Doctors Point. Mapoutahi Pa, Forestry and Urupu, return. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Jim and Betty, who had been allocated leadership the last three visits to Doctor’s Point, gave the trip an original twist, – by dint of three recces to get matters precisely aligned to the tide. They led 29 of us to the Mapoutahi Pa site for the tea break.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site. (John pic)

Via the beach beyond the peninsula we turned off into the FWD through the sandhills, past the cliffs and on to the beginnings of the road proper, at the corner of the forestry. Here Jim opened the gate and led us past the following sign.

Urupu notice

Purakaunui Urupu notice at forestry’s entrance.

Another FWD track led us a considerable distance through the forest to terminate at a historic Maori graveyard.

A Urupu site

The Urupu site (John pic)

Betty and Jim then led us on through the forest by a route that they had previously explored and marked (well done!) to take us out to the inlet’s entrance, where there was quite a cold wind persuading several to don more protective garments.


Panorama  of Potato Point and Purakauni. (John pic)

Only a little way down towards the beach Jim let us into a well-sheltered spot amongst Marram Grass for lunch, where a warm sun persuaded garment-offing again.


Lunch (John pic)

The return walk along the beach took us over the neck of Mapoutahi Pa peninsula to happily reveal that there was still a stretch of navigable beach at the bottle-neck by the rockfall not yet swallowed up by the incoming tide.

Returning through cave

Returning through the cave. Thought this photo worth displaying. (John pic)

A walk back to the cars ended a most satisfying day, with all of us congratulating and thanking Jim and Betty for the quality time they invested into their recce. Thanks to them here, too. – Ian.

13. 2014 Mar 19. Hikers/ Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, return. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

GPS of Route

GPS of Route

This must be our most popular tramp, as we schedule it about twice a year. This time Arthur and Barbara gave us the full Waitati to Mapoutahi Pa road and beach walk, with Opeke for morning tea in between. The very low tide gave us the largest beach expanse this reporter has ever seen. The sea mist spoilt views but cleared just enough for us to glimpse the rail tunnel from the peninsula. The near record of 30 of us included three new members and one visitor. Thank you Barbara and Arthur for your good careful leadership. – Ian.
12. 2013 Oct 9. Hikers. Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Purakaunui inlet, Mapoutahi Peninsula. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of routes. First Opeke Walk. Second Drs Point to Purakaunui Inlet mouth, return, 8.53 km total.

We parked the cars first at Michies Crossing, and walked across the line Continue Reading »

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Jun 28 2017

Brighton Walks

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers

15 km from car-park.
5. 28/6/2017. Trampers. Kaikorai Estuary to Brighton. E. Leader: Jill.
On a frosty morning 10 trampers ventured south into the sand dunes at Ocean View Domain. Initially we crunched on frozen sand which was a contrast to last weeks creek crossings, rope climbs and the mud. It really was a pristine day the sea gently rolling in with a spray along the tops , sun out in its full glory and a clear horizon and no mid winter dippers !!
We followed the Ocean View coastal walkway

Clive pic.

towards  Brighton. This is a purpose built track, fenced with access points to the beach to help protect the fore dunes. The back dune area has also has been replanted and is an ongoing project along with weed gorse and broom eradication.  The track meanders round a little creek back to the main road just below Big Rock. We climbed Big rock and had wonderful clear views both north up the coast

Clive pic.

and south over Brighton and beyond. That was our hill climb for the day.

Our return was along the beach to the Kaikorai stream estuary where we had lunch along with the seagulls.

Clive pic

Our trip back was over the mud flats into the dunes again along a tussock covered track. We were accompanied by a local farm dog who wasnt really willing to go with his owner who was out training his horses on the beach. We eventually came out on the beach again and back to the cars  the time only being 1 pm. Back on the road towards Westward I had spotted a sign to a B n B and Gallery so all were keen to venture up the gravel road to a hidden gem where we meet the artist Karen Baddock who proudly showed us into her studio  and explained the history of some of her pieces . As I had read the birds look as tho they are ready to fly off the canvas. Her address It’s well worth a visit .We walked 10.2 kms and had our art fix as well . An enjoyable day . – Jill

4. 14/6/2017. Hikers. Brighton walk. Leader: Alex and Liz.

Nike app route map courtesy Ian. Was a bit slow remembering to turn it on.

Eight hardy hikers enjoyed a walk along sand dunes at Ocean View with morning tea stop at playground.

Off to Brighton on a street walk with many points of interest given.

Climbing back down from top of Brighton’s Big Rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

Back to Ocean View…

Liz pic.

…for a one and half hour lunch stop with many topics discussed at the invitation of Marjorie and Bruce Spittle.  The weather was up and down but an enjoyable day had by all and off to Agnes’ coffee shop for refreshments and more wisdom. Great company.  – Liz and Alex.

Route map, courtesy Ian. (Begun a few minutes late.)

Beginning descent from Brighton Big Rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

3. 8/8/2012. Hikers. Brighton Walk. Leaders: George and Chris.
Just thought I would say what a great day we had with our hikers’ day. The leaders Chris and George where the upmost of leaders.
The day started from the rugby club’s rooms at the Brighton Domain. Up and on through muddy fields.  And, I will say, a field with a very huge bull with his lot of cows. One of our group,  whom I will not name due to privacy laws, was very stressed about the bull. So we formed a group around her and we moved through. So far, so good.
Then we were approached by a group of horses  (sorry, are they called a group?). They demanded  food. Lucky for us George had a container of carrots!
Whew – we got through all that!
Then George found a wool stand to have lunch under cover. Well done, George.
What a day!  I think we must have done about  10 km.  Lots of laughs.
P.S.We girls did agree the uniforms of all the guys at the games are wonderful. – Elaine.
2. 14/12/2011. All. Brighton Recreational Reserve. End of Year Tramp. Easy.
George first took 22 of us along a short beach walk and up to his property for morning tea. A light drizzle had set in, but not too discouraging. Thank you George for providing so many chairs.

Part of group on George’s front lawn having morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

Chris then took over and led us around a number of Brighton’s back streets overlooking the Otokia Creek. (I like ‘Stream’ better, but Creek it is.) Non-Brightonians were surprised by the extent of the township’s suburb.

Blooming wild flowers

Overlooking the Otokia Creek from Brighton back streets

 However the light rain wasn’t letting up, so at 11.00 a.m. we adjourned prematurely to the Brighton Rugby Football Club Hall (sic) on the Brighton Recreational Reserve (sic) (you can see I have googled all the correct local nomenclature).
With an hour’s wait till lunch time, Bruce, however, had happily brought along his guitar and songbooks, led us in some merry singing. In seemingly no time at all, we arrived at meal-time. President Bev presented an excellent official welcome and we enjoyed a pleasant sociable hour or so over a generous and varied selection of food. Thus came to its close another successful year. – Ian.
1. 13/12/2006. All. Brighton Domain. End of Year Tramp – Xmas finger food lunch. Easy. Leaders: George, Chris.

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Sep 21 2016

Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth

No. 47 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Toko Beach. M Young”; also No. 65 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Chrystalls Beach Farm”

Location: 59 km from the car park.

Directions: On SH1, before Milton, at Helensbrook intersection, left onto Forsyth Road, right onto Back Road, left onto Glenledi Road.
Best in Summer. The stock winter over.
21/9/2016. Trampers. Cooks Head. Farm walk. Took Mouth. Return beach. M. Leader: Arthur H.
We had a day at the beach.
Seven trampers left Mosgiel at 9.00 a.m. and travelled for 50 minutes to reach Chrystalls Beach, which is out at the coast from Milton.
After parking behind the beach, we walked back up the road we had just descended, – “Irishmans Road”. The overcast sky was beginning to show some blue patches now, the day becoming quite sunny.
An easterly breeze was coming in from the sea, and was noticeably cool. We had dropped Helen off at the top of the hill to find us a sheltered morning tea spot. The rest of us were nicely warmed up by now, and morning tea in the sunshine was most welcome.

Onward we walked, and were soon on one of the lanes of the daily farm. Downhill towards the cowshed …

Towards Toko Mouth. (Helen pic and caption.)

Towards Toko Mouth. (Helen pic and caption.)

… and then followed the main farm lane heading south.

The lanes were dry, and perhaps not too interesting themselves, but it was a pleasure to walk through the farm and enjoy the colour of the fresh spring grass. We had passed the large mob of dairy cows soon after leaving the cars, grazing in their paddock beside the road.
Eventually we came to the end of the lane, and crossing one paddock, arrived at the bank of the Tokomairiro River. Under the electric fence and along the specially cleared track through the gorse and we were at the water’s edge.
We could look across at the Toko Mouth houses as we followed the river for half a kilometre or more to the mouth.
It was getting close to low tide, but just a little early for lunch, so we began  the beach walk, coming to our dining seat before too long. A nice smooth log was perfect, plenty of room for all of us to sit side by side while munching away happily – like a row of birds on a wire.

H-114941Lunch on beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

H-114941Lunch on beach. (Helen pic and caption.)

We could watch the endless waves breaking on the beach and listen to the surf. Sea birds were noticeably absent, however.

Lunch over, we resumed our northward beach walk. The sand conditions were rather trying (and tiring), being a bit soft to walk on. It is about 3.5 km along the beach, and all were glad to eventually reach “Cooks Head” rock.

Rock and then close up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Rock and then close up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Time was taken to inspect the volcanic formations, similar to the “organ pipes” near Mt Cargill, which form the rock. Two were keen enough to climb to the summit …

Arthur and Eleanor on top of Cooks Rock. (Janine pic and caption.)

Arthur and Eleanor on top of Cooks Rock. (Janine pic and caption.)

… and admire the view.

The view. (Arthur pic.)

The view. (Arthur pic.)

The others were content just to watch.

Ten minutes more and we were back to the cars soon after 1.00 p.m. Not a long tramp, at around 10.5 km overall.
An historical note – In 1907 a French sailing ship, the Marguerite Mirabaud ran aground in fog on Chrystalls Beach. No lives were lost and the cargo was auctioned off behind the beach after being recovered. The sea broke up the ship though.
On the way back to Milton we stopped to inspect the sign erected by the Milton Rotary Club on the roadside, to mark where Richard Pearse had lived for 10 years from 1911.

Sign. (Arthur pic.)

Richard Pearse Sign. (Arthur pic.)

He is credited by some as flying a powered aircraft in 1902 or 1903,  before the Wright Brothers.

The cars then made an essential stop at Waihola on the homeward journey. All seemed to have enjoyed their day at the beach. – Arthur.
19/3/2014. Trampers. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy.
 Chrystalls Beach to Toko Mouth & farm walk was the destination for our outing this week. Quite a few of the six who turned up had not done this before, so it was especially enjoyed by them. This time, to make it a bit different, I decided that we would do the trip in reverse, so walked back up the road to the farm house, where we were met by a overfriendly young dog that wanted to follow us, so we tried tying it up, but it went absolutly berserk, so we had to untie it, & really growl at it to make it stay at the house.
There has been quite a change to the look of the farm, with new roads, & the top paddocks bare of vegetation, but the lower paddocks are still the same. We had a lunch break …

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

… along the beach a bit from Toko Mouth, then walked along to Cooks Head & inspected …
Cooks Head rock formation. (Heb pic and caption)

Cooks Head rock formation. (Heb pic and caption [Ed note: on the seaward side of the ‘Head’])

… the rock formations, before walking back to the cars.
The weather was very nice all day, with bright sunshine, & mostly calm conditions, which was enjoyed by all. – Ken.
25/9/2013. Trampers. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy.
Chrystalls Beach Circuit. GPS of route courtesy Ken.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm, circuit.

On a day that looked threatening weather wise, 5 of us travelled to Chrystalls Beach, & after parking the cars away from some loose wandering cattle, we made out way across to Cooks Head where we had morning tea.
Morning Tea stop in the shelter of Cooks Head. (Ken pic)

Morning tea stop in the shelter of Cooks Head.

Then we rugged up for the very windy walk along the beach to Toko Mouth. The sand was just as soft & hard to walk on as I remembered it from last time I was there.
We had a regroup around the corner of the Toko estuary out of the wind, then made our way along there to the point where it is possible to climb through the gorse, & up onto the farm paddocks. It was then a case of deciding which way to go to find the big hay shed where we had lunch the last time. After locating this we walked along the muddy track to where our route turned off into the paddocks, to head back up to the top road again. We had lunch out of the wind, hunkered down behind a large stack of trees that the farmer had torn out of the ground, & stacked up in piles along the new fence line. After lunch, it was just a matter of walking back up the slope that leads past the house on the property, & then along the roads back to the cars.
We all agreed that it was a good walk, despite the wind, & the very occasional light spot of moisture.

14/7/2010. Cooks Head, Chrystalls Beach, Toko Mouth, farm walk return. Easy. Leaders: Ian, Ken.
Because of low tide at 11.00 a.m., we walked the beach first for the first tiime instead of doing the tramp the more usual other way round. So it happened that we came upon Cooks Head from the north instead of the south and discovered a cave we had never noticed before.

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May 25 2016

Doctors Point, Mopanui, north face, return. Clockwise

Published by under Beach,Trampers

7. 25/5/2016. Trampers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Osborne Rd, Purakanui Station Rd, McKessar Rd, Deer Fence, White Rd, Doctors Point Rd. M. Leaders: Neil and Carole.

Wednesday 25th was the perfect day – light cloud, blue seas, 2kph breeze, when 10 trampers assembled at Orokonui (Waitati) junction and headed over to Doctors Point parking area at 9.45am.

The walk along the beach and through the arches (almost dry-footed) led us to the rocky foreshore.  However the tide being an hour off low-tide required boulder-hopping skills on the cliff side of the rocks to ensure dry feet….

Start and round rocks. (Helen pic and caption.)

Start and round rocks. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beyond the rocks we had morning tea under a lone pine tree and then moved on to circuit the Pa site and admire the view.

Beach from the Pa. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beach from the Pa. (Helen pic and caption.)

On to the beach, Osborne Road which we branched off to walk through the pines and view the old Maori Cemetery (Purakaunui Urupa) which a couple had not been to before. 35 minutes later we returned to the road following the estuary, turned into Purakanui Station Road and uphill to the railway line.

Lunchtime:  3 minutes on, no gorse, no blackberries in the middle of the walking track so a good place to sit!  (Not the railway track.)

Lunch up above railway line. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch up above railway line. (Helen pic and caption.)

We passed the old stone house relics at the lower end of McKessler track where someone was doing reparation work for the owner, Jill Hamel, an 84 year old archaeologist who lives in Anne Street, Roslyn.  (Neil rang and spoke to this lady!)

Continued up McKesslar track which ends at the road by the Orokonui predator fence and the drystone wall.

Beautiful rock wall up top of tramp. (Helen pic and caption.)

Beautiful rock wall up top of tramp. (Helen pic and caption.)

We followed the deer fence down, turned into ‘gorse alley’, bypassed an uncleared section by going through a paddock and then back onto the now excellent lower track.  Looking across the slightly misty tidal flats …

Moody view over Estuary. (Helen pic and caption.)

Moody view over Estuary. (Helen pic and caption.)

… and down to White Road brought us back to our cars at 3.00 pm after 14.5 kms. Pleasant tramping days tend to end at the local coffee shop and this was no exception.- Carole.

6. 9/10/2013. Trampers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Osborne Rd, Purakanui Station Rd, McKessar Rd, Deer Fence, White Rd, Doctors Point Rd. Medium.

GPS of McKessar route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, Osbourne, McKessar Track, Deer Fence, White Road.

I messed up with the GPS, as I forgot to turn it off when we got back to the car. However, we estimate that we walked approx 13km [as it was 8.? something to the top of McKessar Track, ] We climbed about 350mtrs to the highest point, which was the top of McKessar Track.

5 of us made our way along Doctor’s Point beach to the Mapoutahi Pa site, where we had morning tea just after 10am in the shelter of a large Macrocarpa tree. We then went & explored the Pa site for a while, before setting off along the Access Rd to Osbourne, where a climb up to the railway line set the blood circulating a bit faster.
The walk up McKessar Track was interesting, as it has been completely cleared, the water tables have been cleaned out, & gravel has been spread on some parts as well. During lunch break,…

Lunch at McKessar Track

Lunch at McKessar Track. (Ken pic and caption.)

… we had a visit from a man who works for the two women who own the land there, & he filled us in with quite a bit of knowledge on the area etc. We also had a discussion on which way to go down to Doctors Point again, either along the Orokonui fence, or down the deer fence. He was sure that the deer fence route was not available, but as I had rung Ian on his cell phone from our lunch spot, & he had told us to go down the deer fence, that is what we decided to do, & that worked out OK, with just a bit of gorse on the way down the 4WD track below the deer fence to negotiate. It was then just a walk along White Rd, & Doctors Point Rd back to the cars.
All agreed that it was a good day, especially after we stopped off at the Waitati Coffee shop for refreshments on the way home!- Ken

5. 21/3/2013. Ken and Ian found the gorse alongside the deer fence had been sprayed and passage was possible again. But ascent to Mopanui from McKessar Track, although the track is detectable at both ends has still a middle bit where we could not find a way through to the track on the other side! Perhaps two, one coming down from Mopanui and another up from McKessar, equipped with radio contact could find the way through, because that part must not be very extensive.

4. 27/5/2009 Trampers. Doctors Point, Canoe Beach, Osborne Rd, Purakanui Station Rd, McKessar Rd, Mopanui, Mopanui Rd, White Rd, Doctors Point Rd. Medium+. Leader: Ian

The feeling was magical starting out on the beach on such a clear morning.
click to enlarge

Beach expanse. Doctors Point. Cave in distance.

Beach expanse. Doctors Point. Cave in distance. Beach expanse. Doctors Point. Cave in distance.

The tide was so far out it was easy to walk even round the outside of the caves, to stop for morning tea at the far end of Canoe Beach.

Morning Tea. Canoe Beach. Looking back at cave.

Morning Tea. Canoe Beach. Looking back at cave. Morning Tea. Canoe Beach. Looking back at cave.

We were shocked to find the road from the beach under so much flooding. After MUCH thought, there was nothing for it but to charge? through.

Ria carefully negotiating flooded road just up from beach.

Ria carefully negotiating flooded road just up from beach.

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Mar 16 2016


Published by under Beach,Uncategorized

Distance from carpark: 40 km.

7. 16/3/2016. Hikers. Warrington. E. Leaders: Judy, Shona.

Nike app GPS of Warrington route.

Nike app GPS of Warrington route.

Trip Report Wednesday 16th March 2016 – Warrington Beach

A calm but overcast morning provided good tramping weather for 23 hikers. We left the cars at the picnic ground and a half-hour walk took us up Hill Road to the junction with Park Road then round to the Esplanade for a pleasant morning tea just above the beach.

After a quick scramble down to the beach, it was a short walk to the track leading back to the Surf Club. Here we turned left along the track through the pines, to reach the sewage ponds after about 30 minutes. The track to the left led us back to the beach, and a long trudge to the end of the spit and an early lunch, disturbed only by loud screams from Liz as a mouse invaded her territory.

Lunch at end of spit. Happily before the mouse invasion.

Lunch at end of spit. Happily before the mouse invasion.

As it was just past high tide the beach on the inlet side was still covered in places and the sand very soft in others. We alternated between beach and the track above for some way

Alternating between beech and track. (Judy pic)

Alternating between beach and track. (Judy pic)

before returning to the main beach and the walk back to the cars. This was a short but pleasant hike, and left plenty of time for the now customary coffee stop at Blueskin Nurseries. –  Judy and Shona

6. 30/10/2013. Hikers. Warrington. Leaders: Peter and Wendy
5. 4/4/2012. Both. Warrington beach. Leaders: Margaret and Les.

Along the inner beach

Interior of St John’s Church

Lunch in the graveyard

Durable cedar tiles on St John’s Anglican Church, Warrington

4. 13/4/2011. Hikers. Easy. Leaders: Bev, Lesley.
3. 13/1/2010. All. Picnic at Warrington. Leaders: Bathgates.
Low Tide at end of Warrington Peninsula. Rabbit Island behind. Pat, Margaret, Dot, Angela.

Low Tide at end of Warrington Peninsula. Rabbit Island behind. Pat, Margaret, Dot, Angela.

Fishers at Doctors Point

Fishers at Doctors Point

On return along the beach. Peter, Wendy and grandchildren.

On return along the beach. Peter, Wendy and grandchildren.

Warrington Surf Club setting up for the day.

Warrington Surf Club setting up for the day.

Climbing path up former Church Street.

Climbing path up former Church Street. Margaret, Who? Les, etc.

Bus Shelter. Fred, Les, George.

Bus Shelter. Fred, Les, George. (Bill pic)

"Ooh look! House to rent." "KITTENS TO GOOD HOME!" "Hmm..Local activities." "B.....! I wish I'd brought my glasses." (Bill pic)

“Ooh look! House to rent.” “KITTENS TO GOOD HOME!” “Hmm..Local activities.” “B…..! I wish I’d brought my glasses.” (Bill pic and caption) Fred, Ian, Chris, Lesley, Margaret, Dot, Pat, Wendy.

Returning back down past Warrington's old shop.

Returning back down past Warrington’s old shop. Neil, Joyce, Lesley, Bev, Angela, Fred, Wendy Pat.

A start for the new year. (Bill pic)

A query for the new year. (Bill pic)

2. 15/11/2006. Hikers. Warrington. Easy. Leaders: Bev H, Bev M.

1. 20/1/1993 All. Beginning of Year. Picnic at Warrington. Bring your grandchildren. Leaders: ?

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Feb 24 2016


Published by under Beach,Trampers,Year round

No. 97 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Purekanui & Canoe Beach Year Round”

Meet Dn cars at Pt Chalmers. Park at Jetty. 39 km
At LOW TIDE it is possible to walk along the shore to Doctor’s Point.
Also pleasant stroll 1 km down southeastern end to mouth of inlet with scattered cribs.

14. 24/2/2016. Hikers. Beach, Caves, Spit, Urupu. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

GPS of Hikers' route.

GPS route map of Hikers’ tramp.

A turnout of 24 walkers enjoyed extremely good weather. Leaders were Betty & Jim Finnie.

On the day the planned section of the walk from Mapoutahi Pa site …

Cuppa stop on the Mapoutahi Pa peninsula.

Cuppa stop on the Mapoutahi Pa peninsula. Evidence of a new sandbar is visible at top of photo.

Just managed to catch the railcar before it got right into the tunnel.

Just managed to catch the railcar before it got right into the tunnel.

… to Doctors Point had to be curtailed due to the sea’s erosion of sand at the boulder pile. It appears that this had occurred in the last approximately 10 days.

After a short delay, seven of the more adventurous walkers made the difficult crossing of the boulder pile to inspect the caves while the balance of the walkers started into the remainder of the planned walk.

There was a regrouping for lunch part way along the Purakanui beach.

Following lunch on sand spit.

Getting up after a lazy lunch on sand spit.

The walk continued along the beach after an extended lunch …

View down sandspit. Potato Point

View down sandspit. Potato Point.

… and followed the inlet into the pine trees to the fenced Maori cemetery.

From the cemetery it was along the vehicle track back to the car park. – Jim and Betty.

13. 5/8/2015 Both. Purakaunui, Purakaunui Urupu, Doctors Point. Moderate. Leaders: Judy, Bob.
Purakanui Maori graves beach caves

GPS of route courtesy Ken. Purakanui Maori graves beach caves. (Ken pic and caption.) Walked 18km; 4.9km/h; 3hr 40min moving; climbed 260m.

Today was a joint tramp with the hikers, so we all drove to Purakanui & parked down by the old garage at the far end. Here, Judy, the leader on the day, suggested that as it was already late, the trampers carry on with what they had planned, & not worry about walking with the hikers. So we took off along the waterside track, & stopped at the picnic spot for a very late morning tea break.

The group at morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

The group at morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was on around the rest of the bay, & into the pine forest on the other side, to try & find the Maori graves in there. Now I have walked past, & driven past this point many times without realising there were any grave sites in amongst these trees, until about a year ago, when they were mentioned to me. I think most, or all of the other 7 trampers with me didn’t know about them either. So it was good to find the site & have a look at the few headstones there.

Headstone with nice inscription

Headstone with nice inscription (Ken pic and caption)

Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

More Maori Graves

More Maori Graves (Ken pic and caption)

We then went onto the old PA site, had a quick look around, before settling down for lunch. Then it was a quick dash along the beach to the caves on the way to Doctors Point, & back again, before the tide forced a return route over the large rocks halfway along the beach.
All that remained was the long road walk, & the bayside track, back to the cars. – Ken.

Mopanui Reflection

Mopanui Reflection

Someone's dream cottage

Someone’s dream cottage (John pic)

A quirky letter box

A quirky letter box (John pic)

Hikers grouped at the plantation entrance

Hikers grouped at the plantation entrance (John pic)

Urupu Sign

Urupu Sign (John pic)

Lunch at the Cemetery

Lunch at the Cemetery (John pic)


Memorial. “In Memory of Richard Driver, Late Gunner, N.Z. Permanent Artillery. Died April 6th 1887, Aged 27 Years. Erected By His Comrades.” (John pic)

Occasion? Location?

Coffee at Careys Bay Hotel. (John pic)

12. 27/5/2009 Hikers. Purakaunui, Canoe Beach. Medium-. Leaders: Lex, Fred, Elaine

Flooded beach access road deterred Hikers from attempting to reach Canoe Beach.
11. 16/4/2008. Hikers. Purakaunui, Canoe Beach. Easy. Park at Picnic Ground. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
10. 26/9/2007 Trampers. Purakaunui Circuit. Moderate. Leaders: Shirley, Helen.
8 trampers met at the wharf at Purakaunui and welcomed Peter back into the fold after his long holiday in Australia. The day started out as rather cold and dreary but soon picked up after morning tea in the park at the head of Purakaunui Inlet. We wound our way around the inlet and over the causeway where the kingfishers love to fish. We tramped around the other side of the inlet all the way to Canoe Bay over the steps at the end of Purakaunui beach.
Canoe Beach group. Pat, Peter, Tash, Leoni, Lex

Canoe Beach group. Pat, Peter, Tash, Leoni, Lex

Canoe Beach Trio. Lex, Pat, Abe

Canoe Beach Trio. Lex, Pat, Abe

 Lunch in the sun sitting on the most beautiful beach in the world, before climbing on to the old pa site, Mapoutahi, with views in every direction.
Railway tunnel shot from Mapoutahi Peninsula

Railway tunnel shot from Mapoutahi Peninsula

We admired all the different colours of the flowering currants along the sandy path leading back to the track and talked to a chattering and busy Tui on the way back. The tide had come in since the morning and we kept to the path all the way rather than cutting across the tidal flats. A magic place to spend the day! – Tash
9. 5/4/2006. All. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Leaders: Doug M, Bob H, Anne R, Eleanor W.
8. 15/9/2004. Both. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Glenys P, Bev H, Les and Margaret.
7. 6/11/2002. All. Purakanui, Canoe Beach. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Betty, Colleen.
6. 1/8/2001. Combined. Purekanui – Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Bev H.
5. 3/11/1999. Purakanui – Canoe Beach. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Chris.
4. 22/7/1998. Purakanui, Goat Island. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire.
3. 6/8/1997. Purakanui area. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Barbara McC.
2. 1/11/1995. Purakanui – Canoe Beach. Easy. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Chris, Joan H.
1. 15/11/1989 Purakanui and Doctors Point. Interesting ancient Maori redoubt. Average+. Leaders: Dorothy W, Eric & Dot

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Jul 30 2014

Quoin Point Bull Creek

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 79 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Quoin Pt – Bull Creek – Farmland (see George) Farm”
45 km from car park.
“quoin” definition: 1. An exterior angle of a wall or other piece of masonry.
2. Any of the stones used in forming such an angle, often being of large size and dressed or arranged so as to form a decorative contrast with the adjoining walls. Seek permissions.
Coast and farm walk. Bull Creek nature walk to waterfall (tiny!) recommended.
30/7/2014. Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good group of eight set out from the farm road at Quoin Point to walk along to Bull Creek. there was a bit of a wind blowing which kept the temperature down, & it was VERY muddy going across the paddocks. We didn’t get onto the beach very much as the tide was quite high, even although on the tramp program it was stated to be low at 11:30 approx. [Yes, a 0.3 m low tide i.e. on the higher side – Ed]
It was surprising to see that the gates along the coastal paddocks had “Walking Access” signs attached to them, so good on the land owners for allowing this.
We had morning tea in the shelter of some rocks, & lunch at Bull Creek. Lunch was a reasonably hurried affair, as the sandflies were eating more than we were!!! The exit of Bull Creek onto the beach was probably passable, but we didn’t fancy getting wet feet so we stayed on the Nth. side.
After lunch, it was just a return walk mostly back along the paddocks to the cars. The wind had started to dry out the very muddy parts, so it was only just a little less muddy going back. But, unfortunatly, one member slipped over at one point, & has some dirty washing to attend to !! We walked 12.3km in approx 4hrs. – Ken.
5/3/2014 Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: Lex and Peter.
Failed to reach Bull Creek. Ed note.
13/2/2013 Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. (9)
Nine of us enjoyed the tramp, three of us oldies, six newies, to show it off to. And they did appreciate it.
We saw lots of seals/sealions (?) on the way.
It was surprising to see such a high sandbar at Bull Creek.

A high extensive sandbar now

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Apr 30 2014

St Clair Beach Walks

Published by under Beach,Year round

30/4/2014. Hikers. St Clair – St Kilda. Easy. Leaders: Liz and Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route

This reporter was new to this particular hike and was most impressed with the clever planning of a satisfying route. 35 of us set out from our cars parked in Albert St, St Clair. We walked up it to turn right into Beach St, left into Sandringham St and right into Norfolk St to reach the foot of Jacobs Ladder. How many steps? 250? Well, MANY! And relentlessly steep as well (a red spot on the map, at abt 500 mtrs indicates our slower progress. We all eventually made it up to Ravenswood Rd where we had to negotiate a multi-holed footpath being prepared for broadband fibreglass cable. The views of suburb, beach and sea were rewarding. We carried on down, (1 km mark) crossed to briefly climb Cliffs Rd alongside its steep roadside banks and interesting variety of houses to finally emerge at its end by the beachfront and to turn (2 km) via Second Beach Rd (where did that name come from??) to morning-tea at its track’s end, in lovely sunshine.

Morning tea at Second Beach (John pic)

Back to St Clair (3 km) beach, or rather the sandhills track above it, before descending to walk along St Kilda beach (4, 5 & 6 kms) to its terminus at Lawyers Head, where we lunched.

Lunch at end of St Kilda Beach.

After lunch, we struggled up a soft sandhill track nearby to reach the road above.
View from Lunch

Panorama of view from John Wilson Drive immediately above lunch stop (John – from 4 [slightly obvious!] pics)

We returned along the drive. (7 & 8 [hidden behind ‘5] kms) …
Race Course

Panorama of Forbury Race Course from John Wilson Drive. (John pic)

… to re-group at the St Kilda children’s playground. From there we climbed up to Kettle Park Road to descend again to cross Kettle Park behind the impressively large rear of the indoor Ice Rink. We turned down Moana Rua Rd, crossed Victoria Road to go down Moreau St (was it?) (9 km) to turn left into Richardson St (was it?) (10 km) and make our way back to cross Forbury Road and reach Albert St again. 10.5 km all told. Not too bad.
Then, under Elaine’s bad growing influence, a large number of us resorted to the Salt Cafe for the customary leisurely and companionable coffee or what have you before returning to the cars. Thanks, Liz and Dawn. You done good. – Ian.


9/5/2012. Hikers. St Clair beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Betty and Jim.
27/7/2011. Hikers. St Clair. John Wilson Drive  Lawyers Head and Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
24/3/2010. Hikers. St Clair. Beach Walk. Lawyers Head. Easy. Leaders: Elaine and Jean.
29/7/2009. Hikers. St Clair. Beach Walk. Lawyers Head. Easy. Leaders: Les and Margaret
28/1/2009. St Clair Beach Walk. Leaders: Lance and Lois
11/10/2006. St Clair – Lawyers Head beach walk. Easy. Leaders: Jim and Thelma
31/8/2005. Hikers. St Clair: beach walk to Tomahawk/Lawyers Head Leaders: Chris, Jean.
23/8/2000. St Clair – Tomahawk – Smaills Beach. Leaders:  Betty B, Eleanor B, Evelyn M
5/4/2000 St Clair – Kew. Street walk Leaders: Colleen, Bev H
12/5/1999. St Clair: beach walk to Tomahawk/Lawyers Head Leaders: Daphne, Margaret, Betty
12/3/1997. St. Clair to Tomahawk Beach. Leaders: Denise, Margaret D, Jean.
15/11/1995. Beach Walk – St Clair to Tomahawk. Leaders: Peg A, Peggy M.

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Feb 27 2010

Brinns Point to Seacliff

Brinns Point to Seacliff.
The North Otago coast is lined with old Maori settlements, and Brinns Point is no exception. The bay south of the historic urupa (cemetery) on the headland was occupied by Moa-hunters, and much later was an out-post whaling station. A channel has been cleared through the boulder beach to enable boats to reach the shore especially at high tides. This is thought to be the work of the whalers but the channel clearance may date from much earlier, for all we know. This bay was investigated in the 1950s by the Blake-Palmers of Seacliff. This was published in the Journal Polynesian Society by Blake-Palmer senior who was superintendent of Seacliff Mental Hospital at the time. This was the first ‘proven’ association of man with the largest species of moa: Dinornis Maximus, thought by some scientists to be extinct before arrival of man. Later studies showed Dinornis had been found on archaeological sites beforehand however. There was an old Maori settlement on the flat at Ross’ Rocks. The next known settlement south is at Omimi, where moa bones have been excavated on what was largely a fishing site.
The cliffs after which Seacliff township gets its name are lined intermittently with Maori umu, most being umu ti. Parts of the coast road from Warrington to Karitane followed original Maori tracks according to early survey plans in LINZ archives. The hills along this coast were heavily forested and only cleared  when the land was subdivided for framing. The original route of Coast Road has been modified in places since the 1960s but many portions of the old routed can be seen with associated stonework on both sides of the present road. Coast Road remains an active connection with the distant past.
– Taken from Karitane … Split Rock … Seacliff Coastal Walk. Notes by Brian Allingham, Archaeologist, January 2010.

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Aug 10 2005

Aramoana, Heyward Point, Murdering Beach Road

Published by under Beach,Trampers

No. 59 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Aramoana to Heyward Point. Farm.”
10/8/2005 Aramoana, Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach. Leaders: Ian, Hazel


3/5/2004. Trampers. Aramoana, Heyward Point, Kaikai Beach. Medium. Leaders: Arthur H, Lex.
20/8/2003. Trampers. Heyward Point, Murderers Beach. Medium. Leaders: Arthur H, Lex.
27/3/2002. Aramoana – Kaikai Beach – Murdering Beach Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Margaret and Les.
10/5/2000. Heyward Point – Kaikai Beach from Aramoana. Leaders: Bill H< Lesley S, Graham.
28/4/1999. Aramoana – Heyward Point. Leaders: Barbara McC, Marion M, Shirley McN
22/10/1997. Murdering Beach from Heyward Point to Aramoana. Park at Aramoana. Leaders: Colleen, Evelyn M, Barbara McC.

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Jan 12 1994

Beginning of Year: Picnic Day: Livingstonia Park

Published by under Beach,Either ends of years

31.5 km from car park
12/1/1994. Picnic. Livingstonia Park. Bring children and grandchildren.
24/1/1990. Taieri Mouth Picnic Day. Bring the grandchildren. All meet at Livingstonia Park.

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Nov 04 1993

Tomahawk Lagoon, Paradise Track, Boulder Beach round trip

Published by under Beach,Penguins Dec- Feb

20 km from car park.
4/11/1992 Tomahawk Lagoon, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track. Round Trip. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Bev H, Jean A, Noel.

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