Oct 22 2017

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2017

 

Spring Start Time: 9.00 a.m.

25 Oct.
Trampers. Careys Creek. (Car shuttle.) M. $8.00. Keith.
Hikers. Woodhaugh/Ross Creek. E. $4.00. Dawn and Pam.

1 Nov.
Both: Pyramids/Victory Beach. E+. $9.00 Marjorie and Bruce.

8 Nov.
Trampers: Swine Spur Circuit. E+ $4.00 Dave M.
Hikers: Three Mile Hill Forest. M+* $3.00 Bev and Adrienne. Continue Reading »

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Oct 18 2017

Tomahawk Lagoon and nearby tracks/areas

Published by under Beach,Hikers

Ocean Grove, also known as Tomahawk, is a suburb in the southeast of the New Zealand city of Dunedin. … The suburb was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name not being a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”.
No. 23 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karetai Rd via Monument from Lagoon. Year round.”
Distance from car-park: Tomahawk: 19 km; Smaills Beach: 22 km;  Paradise Road: 26 km.’
DCC List: 41 Peg Track. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Oregon St. 3.5 hrs ret. Tramping track – unbenched. Managed: DCC CAM, private land.
Description – This track provides a link between Ocean Grove and Highcliff Road. Access to the track in Ocean Grove is off Oregon Street. An attractive walk around Tomahawk Lagoon then climbs through gorse and native bush. Turn right towards Soldiers Memorial through paddocks with gorse sometimes obscuring the rock walls.
  • Classification – Hard
  • Time – Approximately 45 minutes.
  • Parking – Limited at Highcliff Road. No dogs.
  • Dogs – No
*****

Distance from car-park: 19 km.

24. 18/10/2017. Hikers. Tomahawk. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Twenty-three hikers parked at the Tomahawk Beach Reserve carpark on Tomahawk Road, at the bottom of the hill at the end of Tahuna Road, just past the bridge over the Tomahawk Lagoons outlet. We proceeded back across the bridge up Tomahawk Road for approximately 100 m and turned up the path to the left at the green transformer. At the top of the path we continued straight ahead on to the golf course and turned to the left following the perimeter

Lawyers Head. (Clive pic and caption.)

of the golf course until we came to the back of the Sir Leonard Wright lookout on John Wilson drive. We got to the lookout by walking across the tee off area and taking a narrow path up to the road.

After looking at the view,

View back to Tomahawk Lagoon. (Clive pic and caption.)

The view along Ocean Beach towards St Clair. (Clive pic and caption.)

we proceeded west along John Wilson drive to the St Kilda playground where we had morning tea.

…challenge for us to find a spot out of the wind for morning tea.  We found the spot at the Ocean Beach playground. (Clive pic and caption.)

A chilly wind was blowing from the sea necessitating, for many, the use of a wind proof jacket. After morning tea we crossed the Pirate Rugby Club grounds and entered the golf course near by a tree approximately midway between Victoria Road and John Wilson Drive. We walked around the left hand margin of the golf course observing a rabbit and noting the greens had been top-dressed with sand and fertilizer for maintenance. At the end of the left hand margin of the course, rather than going straight ahead onto the road leading the golf club car parks, we turned to the right and went up the course margin and around the club house to link up with the public walkway through the course. We noted a sign indicating the course was closed.

At the end of the path through the golf course we continued on through the cemetery grounds and passed several large gas cylinders behind the crematorium. At the end of the path we were back where we had originally entered the golf course and went down the path to our left, turned right into Tomahawk Road, crossed the bridge, took the 4-wheel drive track to the right immediately over the bridge and then, at the sign, the track down to the outlet creek and beach.

We walked along the beach until we came to the correct place on the sand dunes to enter the path leading back to a playground on Tomahawk Road. It was marked by a short tantalized post. We turned left down the hill and then right into Oregon Street until we reached the Walking Track sign on the left and met Margaret and Les at the Tomahawk Lagoon picnic area at 1208 for lunch. After lunch, most of us walked around the track leading to the end of the lagoon and some climbed over the style and went through the bush up the hill, over another style and across a grassy hillside track with a dip to the right angled turn on the path. We observed the view back over the lagoon but then turned back rather than carrying on up the 41 Peg Track to the Soldiers Memorial.

When we rejoined the group waiting at the Lagoon at approximately 1335 most of us took a slightly longer but grassier route  than that available on Tomahawk Road and walked past the Otago Anglers Club Rooms in Luke Street to the end of this street before continuing straight ahead to the closed and apparently still for sale Tomahawk School. The old swimming pool with a black plastic heating system was no longer visible. We continued to the right up the hill path and ambled past the yellow and black sports pavilion, down the concrete steps, and then along the playing field to the end of the grassy field adjacent to the car park. We got back to the cars at approximately 1.48 pm.

Refreshments were shared by 21 slightly weary hikers at Nichols. The weather had been fine and breezy with it being cold when exposed to the ocean winds and warm in the shelter of the golf course. The distance covered was approximately 10 km. – Bruce

Bruce

23. 13/1/2016. Trampers. Tomahawk – Peg Track – Memorial – Karetai Road.

Eight trampers turned up for today’s tramp. Due to weather conditions, we decided to change from Hermits Cave in the Silverpeaks, to the peninsula circuit from Tomahawk Lagoon up to the monument, then up Highcliff RD, along Karati Rd. & back down to Tomahawk via the old part of Karati Rd.

We had morning tea in the paddock 1/2 way up the gorse lined track, lunch in the shelter of the NZBC buildings along Karati Rd. as the wind was quite strong, & cold. We then hurried down to the end of Karati Rd. where we regrouped before heading off down the track towards the coastal cliffs. As the wind was strong, we decided that it would be prudent to just walk down the 4WD track, instead of going around the outside of the fence next to the cliff edge, where we have previously gone.
Then it was a long road walk back to the cars, where it was decided to meet at Nichols coffee shop for an after event catchup!! Just to keep up tradition you know !
walked 11.7km
4.3 km/h
climbed 511mtrs – Ken.

22. 24/6/2015. Trampers. Tomahawk – Memorial – Karetai Road.
walked 12.1km
2h 56min
4.1km/h
climbed 442m.
max height 392m – Ken.
Tomahawk – Memorial -Karetai Rd
9 am rolls around and lo and behold there is a record number of 11 intrepid trampers ready to set out for the day’s tramp. Arriving at the Tomahawk lagoon and on our way by 9.45 am, after some who did a few extra circuits to find the starting place.  Past the lagoon partly frozen over: ever seen ducks trying to land on frozen water
Ducks (Eleanor pic)

Ducks on ice (Eleanor pic)

or swans trying to get out of frozen water?

Swans

Swans on Tomahawk Lagoon. (Eleanor pic)

It was a steady climb along the marked walkway (often a corridor of gorse), with views over the pig farm and across to the east.  It was here we had morning tea and shed the first layer of clothes as the day was warming up and no wind.  On and up to the 10 metre high monument of the Soldiers’ Memorial – the lone soldier figure standing on blocks of bluestone.

Memorial

Soldiers’ Memorial (Eleanor pic)

The 360 degree view right around the Peninsula, over the city and across to the west is spectacular.  After the oohs and ahhs, and photos taken we wend our way down to Highcliff Road. The tarseal  walk…

Track

Tarseal Road (Eleanor pic)

… along Highcliff road and Karetai road leads us to a pleasant stopping place for lunch at the end of Karetai Road.  Lunch over, up over the stile, through the paddocks and to the cliff edge track …

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

Cliff Walk (Eleanor pic)

… where the dramatic sheer cliffs get a second or third look before we head down beside Smailles Beach.

Out on the road is the  beautiful building of Tautuku Fishing Club to which one of our members declares:  “I used to live here!” Oh yeah?  “See that window?  That was my bedroom.”  So the clock winds back to when this was a farm-house – and we believe his story!  What next? Well,  we pass the two gun emplacements from WWII and then back to our cars.  A 12.1 kms walk with a variety of most interesting aspects. A great way to spend five outdoor hours. – Carol and Neil
21. 29/1/2014. Hikers. John Wilson Drive, Golf Course, Beach, Cave, Tomahawk Lagoon, return Lawyers Head Paper Road. E. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
A few of the over Christchurch over 40s Tramping Club contingent lodging for the week at Waiora Scout Camp went off with our Trampers but the majority at the car park threw in their lot with the Hikers. The task for the Christchurchian cars to navigate through the city to the St Kilda playground adjacent to the John Wilson Drive was made easier by someone’s suggestion that locals spread themselves out amongst their cars as pilots and that worked well.
When we were eventually all gathered at the beginning of John Wilson Drive, Marjorie counted 51 of us. An all-time record? The views along the drive, with the Chisholm Park Golf Links and city on one side, the beach and sea on the other, was remarked upon by all. Further there were no cars to bother us this early in the day. It was time for morning tea when we reached Lawyers Head, one of a series of basaltic headlands which punctuate much of this section of the Otago coast, (others nearby being Maori Head and Blackhead). This one is named for the likeness of the cliff face to the profile of a lawyer in traditional legal wig, …
Lawyers Head

Lawyers Head

… so we supped our cuppas  around the Leonard Wright memorial at the Head.

Lawyers Head Lookout

Lawyers Head Lookout

Hidden hard nearby was a narrow steep track connecting down to the golf links, around whose Lawyers Head coastal edge the leaders had gained permission for us to single-file our way. We found ourselves right on the crest of the Lawyers Head cliff, the Tomahawk beach stretching out below us. We made quite a strung-out sight.
Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless applauded tee shot.

Silently viewing an about-to-be missed, nevertheless ironically applauded tee shot at the end of our links perimeter stroll.

Now down and away from the links along another narrow, but lengthier track out and across to the Tomahawk Road.

A long line

Looking back upon another strung-out sight.

We emerged upon a playground on Tomahawk Road.

The suburb beyond us, now called Ocean Grove, was known as Tomahawk until the 1930s, the name being, not a reference to the weapon, but rather possibly an anglicised form of the Māori words tomo haka, meaning “dance by a gravesite”. (Wiki).
We descended the road a little way to the lower of the twin-lobed Tomahawk Lagoon, this lobe being its outer one,  whose outlet we skirted on its true left to emerge onto the Tomahawk Beach.
The day’s trip had been selected for one of Dunedin’s low-tides, so the beach was ours, as was the small tidal cave at its end, an addition to the area’s features.
Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Emerging from the Tomahawk Beach cave.

Up a small but energetic sand-hill and we were on another track out to the road again, down it a bit, and into a side road leading to yet another side route and out onto a recreation area alongside Tomahawk Lagoon’s inner lobe, this one a wildlife reserve, although both lobes are noted for their bird life.

Here was to be the lunch stop, but prior to that there was a short walk up alongside the lakelet to where our local club members knew of a Trampers’ track leading up to a soldiers’ memorial on by the Peninsula high road. But this was to just to wander the level part of track and enjoy (??) at one spot a strong pong from the the slightly stagnant waters and mud verge. (Roll on a storm flush!)

So we lunched leisurely, variously at tables and on ledges until our leaders judged it time for the return journey.

Out on the road, a motor cyclist stopped to talk and admire our impressive size. He was glad to hear we were returning by the Lawyers Head paper road and invited us to notice the “use it or lose it” graffiti posted in a couple of places before its entrance. (Apparently the City Council proposed closing it.) We were going to be a wonderful “use it” example.

The ‘road’ led us through a corner of the Andersons Bay Cemetery, close by the towering Crematorium and out through the Chisholm Park Golf links. Then across the Pirates Football Club pitch and we were at our cars again and adjacent to a useful new toilet block by the playground.

Now came farewells and dispersal time. There were many appreciative remarks from the Christchurch Club members about the unique difference of such a walk, with its wonderful unexpected variations. ‘The best of their week so far’ was one comment.

I know our club felt quite proud to hear such unstinted praise, and of course are so indebted to Marjorie and Bruce for their careful planning, taking into account the meal stops, the permissions sought, and the trip duration. Bravo. Of course the day’s excellent weather didn’t hurt either. – Ian.

20. 1/6/2011. Both. Bowls Stadium, Cemetery, beach, Fishing Club, Karetai Rd, Smaills Beach, return. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.

Select only coastal part of GPS for this route. GPS Courtesy Ken. Distance travelled = 11.7km Moving time = 2hr 46min. Moving ave. = 4.2k/hr Stopped time = 1hr 50min

Twenty-three hikers and trampers set off from the Westpac Bowls Stadium in Tahuna Road at 1000 in cool cloudy conditions and went up the grass verge between the road and the Chisholm Park golf links before entering the first gate on the right to the Andersons Bay cemetery. We walked through part of the cemetery before continuing down the hill, watching some horses train behind a motor vehicle, and crossing the bridge over the outlet from the Tomahawk Lagoon. Immediately over the bridge we followed a gravel road alongside the outlet stream and then, after 80 metres,  a track alongside the stream down to the beach where trucks were removing sand, probably for attempting to remedy the erosion at Middle Beach.

Truck and loader for removing sand from Tomahawk beach. (Bruce pic and caption)

We proceeded along the length of the beach to the two caves at the far end and had morning tea on the rocks there. Some inspected the cave, risking getting wet feet in the process with high tide approaching at 1430.

Morning tea near the caves at Tomahawk Beach. (Bruce pic and caption)

After morning tea we ascended the sand hill to the Tomahawk Road and continued down the private road to the Tautuku Fishing Club, Dunedin and Haast Inc. We arrived there at approximately 1130 and were kindly shown around and given a history of the Club and the fine bluestone building by the club president Brett Bensemann.

Tautuku Fishing Club premises. (Pic: Ken. Caption: Bruce.)

Bob pic.

Bob pic.

The building was originally the homestead of Alexander Smaill and was bought by the club, together with some surrounding land, by the Club in 1972 for $5000.
At 1205 we continued up Karetai Road for 15-20 minutes

Bruce on Karatai Rd. track with others in the background. (Ken pic and caption)

to the corner near the style leading to a black and white Geodesic Trig on the right.

About nine of the group, following a route pioneered by Ken, went down to the trig …

Ken at the Geodesic Trig looking towards Sandymount (Bruce pic and caption)

… and then contoured around on a track

Bob pic.

back to the lower reaches of Karetai Road while the others retraced their steps down the non-rutted road in good  condition for walking. We lunched in a sheltered area close to the start of the first track on the left leading from the road to Smaill’s Beach.
After lunch we proceed to the beach via three routes, necessitated by a slip which had damaged the track (a) up the sand hills to avoid the slip, (b) via a narrow edge beside the river, or (c) retreating back to the gate and taking an alternative direct to the beach instead of going alongside the river bank. After briefly looking at the windswept beach and the offshore Bird Island (which has claimed many lives on account of a strong under-current including William and Thomas Henderson of Tomahawk  in about 1900)

Doug and others leaving Smaill’s Beach with Bird Island in the background. (Bruce pic and caption)

we climbed back up to the gun emplacements at the Jack Fox lookout. Two six inch Vickers coastal defence guns were part of a network of coastal batteries during WW2. The guns were removed  in 1945. A cluster of three similar batteries were present at Taiaroa Head  and the mother of one of the group nursed there.
We returned to the cars via Tomahawk Road, Luke Street, the disused Tomahawk School, the soccer playing fields and the cemetery grounds which we entered via the pedestrian entrance on the left a short distance above the bridge. We arrived back at 1445 somewhat wind buffeted but knowing more about Porbeagle Sharks which are only caught in the local area. (For more information about the Tautuku Fishing Club see: Tautuku Fishing Club) – Bruce.
19. 23/9/2009. Hikers. Tomahawk, Centre Road. Medium. Leaders Arthur and Barbara.
18. 4/6/2008 Both. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial, Centre Road. Leaders: Joyce, Ian, Lesley G
Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Going down on way up. Margaret, Neil, Bob, Lesley, Joyce, Doug, Arthur, George.

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Lunch. Peter, Barbara, Arthur, Bob, Bill, Tash, Claude, Lesley, Evelyn, Bob, Joyce

Three shaggy dogs

Three Irish Wolfhounds

17. 26/9/2007 Tomahawk Lagoon – Soldiers Memorial. Leaders: Joyce, Eleanor.
Although the day dawned very cold, overcast and threatening to rain, 8 intrepid Hikers turned up at Glascow St. carpark for the day’s tramp from Tomahawk Lagoon. In spite of weather we had a very happy and enjoyable day. We left cars in car park by the Lagoon and set off up the track to WW 1 Soldiers Memorial on Highcliff. Although track was very wet and muddy it is now much improved to what it used to be when we tramped in the area many years ago. Morning tea was a very welcome and refreshing break in the slippery slog up the hill. Up to the Monument and lovely views of our beautiful harbour.

Peninsula Soldiers’ Memorial

Highcliff Rd to Centre Rd. was pretty cold but we soon warmed up. Then we had the great views over the other side of the Peninsula. Found a nice sheltered spot for our lunch and were vastly entertained by a very interested audience of 3 Irish Wolfhound dogs. Hard to say whether dogs or people were most fascinated.
Down the road and round the corner, back to cars after an enjoyable, sociable and refreshing day out. – Bev.
16. 25/7/2007. Trampers. Tomahawk Lagoon, Soldiers Memorial. Moderate. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
15. 31/1/2007. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Mary M.
14. 13/4/2005. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Rosemary and Jack.
13. 3/12/2003. Hikers: Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders: Colleen, Dot T
12. 29/10/2003. Hikers. Tomahawk Lagoon. Easy. Leaders: Joan H, Chris.
11. 11/4/2002 Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Ray, Les W
10. 15/8/2001. Alt. Tomahawk, Karetai. Leaders: Nancy, Val, Peg C.
9. 11/4/2001. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Les W.
8. 23/2/2000. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Ria H.
7. 30/6/1999 Tomahawk Lagoon. Centre Road. Leaders: Jean Y, Denise, Eleanor W
6. 12/8/1998. Highcliff Centre Road from Lagoon. Leaders: Molly, Frank.
5. 18/3/1998. Tomahawk Lagoon, Centre Road round trip. Leaders: Jean, Ria H.
4. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean
3. 18/9/1996. Tomahawk Lagoon. Leaders: Chris, Joan H, Ngaire.
2. 8/7/1992.  Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Centre Road. Average. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, Bev H, Merle
1. 12/7/1989 Centre Road, Highcliff. Average +. Leaders: Kees & Ria, Diana
B, Ria H
10. 15/7/2015. Trampers. Buskin Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track.After a bit of a mix up over pickup points, we parked up beside Penzance Kennels, where we had a discussion on which way we would tackle the days walk. We settled on going down Buskin Track & worrying about the return journey later.
The track was mostly dry apart from a few areas where it has been damaged by water scouring it out quite badly. As two of the party of three, had never been there before we took some time to check out the cribs [baches] at the bottom of the track.We also came across an employee of Otago Pest Destruction [I think that’s what they are called] who was happily banging a possum on the head, after it got caught in one of his traps. He said he got 27 the day before, so much for a possum free peninsula !!!
We then made our way out to the beach for some boulder hopping practice, before gaining the sand at the northern end. As we passed by the log shelter I noticed an intruder lying inside, looking very cosy indeed.

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

2 Intruder in the log shelter on beach

It lifted its head to survey me for about two seconds, then just went back to sleep ! What a life !!
We wandered along the beach wondering where all the sand had gone, the bank holding the tussock is badly eroded, & about 1 meter high. So now, there is no way for the Yellow Eyed Penguins to climb up & get to their nests further up the hill.
We walked back past the intruder in it’s cosy shelter,

3 Anothe shot of the intruder.

3 Another shot of the intruder.

& had lunch sitting on a large bit of driftwood,

Boulder Beach, Otago Peninsula New Zealand

1 Lunch spot at Boulder Beach

before walking up Braidwood Rd. to the gate into the paddocks leading along to the Double Bay area, where I had an unsuccessful look for the viewing hide I had seen at an earlier date, but the vegetation had me beat, so we retraced our steps around to the bottom of Paradise Track, made our way up there, & back along Highcliff Rd. to the car.

We walked 10km
ave 3.3km/h
climbed 475m – Ken

9. 28/11/2012. Trampers. Tomahawk, Soldiers Monument, Buskin Track, Highcliff,  Karatai Rd

GPS Tomahawk Soldiers Monument Buskin Track Karatai Rd, courtesy Ken.

Lunch at junction of Boulder Beach tracks. (Ken caption and pic)

View of city from Soldiers Memorial. (Lester pic)

8. 26/9/2012. Trampers. Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Highcliff Track, Boulder Beach, Paradise Track, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road.

Karetai

Six of us parked at Smaills Beach car-park. We had dropped the idea of Silver Peaks because of the forecast rain with its fog. As we went up Karetai ‘Road’, we reached the rain level at our tea break and had to ‘parka-up’. We turned off further up onto the Highcliff Track …

Boulder Beach from Highcliff Track

and round to Beatties Cottage where we lunched. We didn’t bother going down to the beach but lazed in the sunshine (temporary but happily well-timed) in the shelter of the cottage’s large hedge from the wind.
The climb up Paradise Track gets no shorter but by and large, with its couple of zig-zags, provides a good gradient.
Along Highcliff Road, we forewent turning down the Buskin Track, with its promised steep climb back up the Highcliff Track, and carried on to the Karetai Road turnoff, returning down it to the cars.
Surprisingly Ken’s GPS recorded we had done 14.5 kms! A useful day’s walk. – Ian

7. 14/2/2007. Trampers. Boulder Beach, Karetai, Tomahawk Lagoon. Medium. Leaders; Bruce and Marjorie.

6. 14/5/2003 Hikers. Karetai Road, Boulder Beach. Medium.Leaders: Colleen, Betty

5. 20/3/2002. Alt. Tomahawk Lagoon, Karetai Road, Smaills Beach. Medium. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

4. 19/7/2000. Boulder Beach, Karetai Road. Leaders: Jean, Chris, Joan H.

3. 9/7/1997. Tomahawk Lagoon, Monument, Highcliff Road, Karetai Road Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean

2. 13/4/1994 Tomahawk Lagoon, Smaills Beach, Karetai Road, Buskin Road, Soldiers Track and return. Medium. Leaders: Ria H, Jean A, June G, Betty H
1. 7/3/1991. Cars park Karetai Road Car Park. Karetai Road from car park. A good peninsula walk. Leaders: Daphne, Margaret S, Les W, Jack M.

 

 

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Oct 18 2017

Grahams Bush, Organ Pipes, Buttars Peak, Mount Cargill.

Published by under Trampers

Click Grahams Bush history for background information.
Click Mount Cargill history for background information.
No. 19 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sawyers Bay – Grahams Bush. M Deuchrass. Summer.”
Sawyers Bay Road 28 km from car park.
18/10/2017. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast. M. Leader: Helen.

Only eight trampers today. Lots away. Started at Hall Road in Sawyers Bay. Parked cars at the start of the Grahams Track. Lovely walk up through bush and also some muddy areas. Had our morning tea stop on this section of the tramp. Up the steep steps to the Mount Cargill Road.

(Margreet pic.)

Across that and up to the Organ Pipes most which have fallen down now.

Organ Pipes. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continued on up to the top of Mount Cargill going past Buttars Hill. Had our lunch up there in the shelter as was quite windy on the top. Down we went again after conversations with other hikers and workman on our way down to the road. From there we decided to walk

View from road. Roseneath Quarantine Island and Portobello. (Helen pic and caption.)

in a large loop back to Sawyers Bay and cars. Distance was 16.5kms. Coffee at Blackstone in Mosgiel. A very enjoyabld day with lots of chatting. – Helen

10/6/2015. Trampers. Grahams Bush – TV Mast.M.
We had a good turnout of 10 trampers for todays assault on Grahams Bush — Organ Pipes, & track up to the transmitter mast on top of Mt. Cargill.
We had morning tea break at the junction of the private road, & the left turn onto the track. I should’ve waited till a bit later as once into the bush the ground was nearly dry, whereas where we stopped was quite wet.
We made good time up to the road at the top of the Grahams Bush track, & after a short rest stop where we learnt that a couple from the Czech Republic had their car broken into, in the Organ Pipes car park, & a backpack stolen, which contained their passports along with other items, we carried on up to the Organ Pipes.
Those that had not been there before, or for a long time took the opportunity to view the tumbled down remains of the once great landmark, before we set off for the junction with the track leading up to the transmitter mast. We found a reasonably sheltered spot among the bush edge to sit down for lunch,
Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

Lunch stop. (Ken pic)

before going up the rough track [in places] with the big steps up to the top, where it was very windy.
After having a good look around up here, & admiring the great view, we started to retrace our steps back down & along the Organ pipes track to the Mt. Cargill Rd. I was very pleased to see that the boardwalks that I built in the mid ’90’s are still like new after nearly 20 yrs.
Once at the road, two of the women members decided that they would walk back via the road down into Sawyers Bay, instead of negotiating the Grahams Bush track in reverse direction.
The walk back out to the cars was uneventful, with everybody making it safely.
A good workout for the lungs, & legs, with almost 1 KM climbed, but I didn’t hear any complaints, so I guess they all enjoyed the day.
Walked 11.6km @ 3.6km/hr.; moving time 3h 15min; Climbed 891mtrs. – Ken.
9/2/2011. Hikers. Old Mt Cargill Rd car park, Organ Pipes, Mt Cargill, return. Leaders: Bev. and Lesley.
The title of the walk was “Tracks and Trails” – which allowed our leaders licence to take us anywhere. And so the 15 of us climbed to the organ pipes and continued past Butter’s (DOC signboard) or Buttar’s (expert Lex who remembers the family farming there from when he lived in Leith Valley) Peak and on to Mount Cargill …

And so on the Mt Cargill. (Bob pic and caption)

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Oct 11 2017

Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track, Booth Road

Published by under Trampers,Year round

(David Nicol was an early settler and dairy farmer. He reputedly bought land here in the hope that the railway line woould be routed north through Leith Valley.)
Click Pineapple Track for background information.
Click Pineapple and Flagstaff walk for background information.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
Click here for an EXCELLENT MAP of Nicols Creek showing the location of The Basins (called the Cup and Saucer on the map), and the 5 waterfalls. (It also shows the Pepper Tree track location.) Scroll further down below the map and click on the truncated video of all five waterfalls!)
No. 17 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Nicols Creek. D McCabe. Year Round”
 Nicols Creek circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group.
DCC land.
15. 11/10/2017. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Pepper Tree Track, Pineapple circuit. M. Leaders: Ian, Clive.
The programmed Deep Creek Tramp was out because of Lambing. Where to go instead? Well, Nicols Creek had not been programmed since 2004, (Except for one calendared for mid-winter but not carried out). So a last minute recce, relying on one old man’s 13-year-old-memory, (helped by an above-listed clickable excellent map q.v.), rediscovered the route, – a new tramp for most of the club’s current hikers. Contrary to last month’s Trampers’ route, ours was up the Nicols Creek true right side, uncomplicated by the newer Mountain Bikers’ zigzag track on the other side.
18 Hikers had turned up, after some unnecessary precautions taken by the leaders about helping drivers locate the parking spot.

We set off, and there we were, after first stepping out of the wide smoothy graded Glow-worm route, (nostalgically for the writer) on the old, steep, boulder- and root-strewn track, taking us up and yet up. But it wasn’t too long before we could gratefully turn off to the right and follow an easy side track taking us down to the first of the stream’s 5 waterfalls. We morning-teed there,…

Unpacking for tea break. (Ian pic and caption.)

…drinking in the scenery of this local rival to Fiordland’s fabled attractions. A 15 metre bush waterfall!

(Clive pic.)

Refreshed, we forewent the opportunity afforded to us by the track continuing on across the stream that would have led us up the further side and out into the zigzagged area. Such a venture to disentangle the original track from the new zigzags could wait another day.

So we returned back out to our original track, which was now taking an easier grade. Soon a fork ahead gave us an option of continuing ahead on the original track or swinging level and wide on a newer one to our left. We took the latter. Both would lead out into open grassland on our left, with our choice swinging out further before returning into the bush. Now it was just steady up and up and up, with many regrouping stops for rest and recovery, but there was plenty of day ahead of us, anyway. Eventually we were on a part of the track that was newer and wider, and that just alluringly continued on straight up. However, an old memory had prompted the writer, on the reece, to turn off this, when discovering an insignificant narrow side track on the right, which he recognised as the actual original track, the other newer one leading who knows where.

At this point, stern reminder to the writer! On realising an intended regrouping immediately following the turn-off was proving impracticable due to broom restricting vision, he neglected leaving a guide at the fork for any late-comers.  This oversight led to a potentially serious consequence, because a little further along the track, we noticed the absence of 3 of our number. Back-marker Clive went back and eventually found them, returning back down the newer track. They had become distanced from both us ahead and those yet further behind being looked after by Clive, and, seduced by the newer track, had carried on up it, failing to notice the side track’s orange marker, its significance. and with no guide there to prompt them.

Reunited again, we went on. Here, the writer’s memory failed him at a critical point. He was looking for yet another  fork, this time to the left, and in his mind had pictured it as an obvious T-junction, but which in reality was much less significant, and he led right past it! It was only when descending to cross one of Nicols tributary crossings that he realised his oversight. About turn! Retrace!

Back at the aforementioned junction, we lunched…

(Clive pic.)

.. and the leaders did a short reconnoiter of the turn-off and reassured themselves it was indeed the route they had planned.

Lunch consumed, legs rested, it was now Clive’s turn to take up the leadership. So it was along, through, and eventually up, out of the forest, past the bushes of the well-named Pepper Tree Track, across the grass…

(Clive pic.)

…and onto the wide well-paved Pineapple Track.

(Clive pic.)

All downhill now and out onto the Booth Road entrance. A few here opted to wait for Bob to drive back and pick them up. The rest of us carried on, down Islay Street, out onto Leith Valley Road, up past the Old School Building and around a last corner to the Nicols Creek Bridge and the cars. And  to the start of the afternoon’s rain! We had completed our 8 kilometre tramp in the dry.
A wet drive to Mosgiel and a coffee-break finish. And behold, just as we were draining our last mugs, in trooped the Trampers, who, poor things, unlike us, had had to finish their tramp in the wet! – Ian.
14. 27/9/2017. Nicols Creek, Pineapple. M. Leader: Jill.

15 trampers set off up the Switchback Nicols Creek Mountain bike track from Leith Valley on a mild overcast morning. Originally we were going to visit the waterfall but the track was suffering the effects of the recent stormy weather we’ve experienced. The MBT was of  a gentle gradient with some very narrow areas following washouts but generally in good condition. We walked through native bush and often accompanied with pleasant birdsong.

Note the rock that looks like a Kea!!!(Margreet pic and caption.)

Morning tea was in a open area a  with lovely vista over  Dunedin all looking pristine.This mountain bike track continued for approx 6 kms up,  round and round again, at 1 stage  passing through a glade of very gnarly old macrocarpa trees. .Eventually the mountain bike track disappeared and is being prepared for a further extension of same so very much like a mini river bed at present. There was much evidence of pig rooting at the higher end of the track. Eventually we traversed tussock land coming along the Moon track to Swampy ridge track. The sun came out to allow a pleasant lunch break…

Lunch on the tops. Swampy.(Helen pic and caption)

…before continuing in a southerly direction to the junction of the Flagstaff, Pineapple track. Down the Pineapple track provided us with again amazing vistas of Dunedin. 2pm saw us back at the cars having completed approx 14.5 kms. The day finished with our coffee fix

Coffee at Roslyn Fire Station.  (Helen pic and caption.)

(and a  big  thanks to Eleanor’s Uncle) at the Roslyn fire station. – Jill.

13. 22/4/2015. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track.
Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track

Nicols Creek Swampy Ridge track Pineapple track. (GPS courtesy Ken)

A good turn out of eight trampers, including one new member, met up at the car park on Leith Valley Rd. to start the tramp up Nichols Creek. We walked up to where the glow worms hang out [pardon the pun], but of course there were none to be seen at that hour of the day, so we then went & had a look at the Nichols Falls, which were really quite spectacular, after all the recent rain.
1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind

1 Dermot with Nicols Falls behind. (Ken pic and caption)

We crossed the creek here & made our way up the track on the other side, to find ourselves on the cycle tracks that had been made in this area.
The original idea was to go up Nichols Creek, onto Moon Track, then along to the pole line track, & back down there. After making our way up the numerous cycle tracks in the bush above Nichols creek, where none of us really knew where we were going, except we all agreed that UP was the correct way. We eventually found ourselves on what Dermot assured us was the Moon Track, which is badly overgrown, has lots of gorse, & has very deep ruts in it, many containing water, which caught a few members out, as it was very slippery, & easy to slide off the sides into these pools. 
On arriving at the top, at the junction with the Swampy Ridge Track, we had an early lunch, while I contemplated the weather over Swampy, where we would be going. It was completly covered in cloud, almost down to where we were sitting at times, & I decided that it wouldn’t be much fun going that way, so after a consultation, it was decided that we would go over to the Pineapple Track, & back down there. I think this was a good decision, as when we got down to McGouns Track, we went along there to the seating area with the monument, & had a lengthy break sitting in the sun.
3 Happy group relaxing in sun

3 Happy group relaxing in sun. (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was back out to the road, & along to the cars.
A reasonable day, & a bit of a challenge in places.
 Walked 10.1 km
3.7km/hr
2 3/4 hr walking
Climbed 463mtrs. – Ken.
12. 22/8/2007. Trampers. Booth Road, Moon Track circuit. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Sabina.
11. 25/10/2006. Trampers. Nicols Creek, Swampy, Moon Track. Medium. Leaders; Ian, Arthur H
10. 3/11/2004. Both. Nicols Creek, Basin. Leaders: Lex, Ria L, Val and Brian, Irene.
9. 24/9/2003. Hikers. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, Skyline, Pineapple. From Booth Road. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Irene.
8. 27/11/2002. Both. Nicols Creek, Moon Track, to Skyline. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Ria L, Eleanor, Joyce.
7. 17/3/1999. Nicols Creek, Basins. Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
6. 20/2/2002. Alt. Nicols Creek – Moon Track to Skyline Track. Start Booth Road. Medium+. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
5. 28/5/1997. Leith Valley, Nicholls Creek return Skyline. Leaders: Bob H, Bev H, Molly.
4. 9/10/1996. Nicols Creek, Basins from Booth Road. (Park Booth Road.) Average. Leaders: Jack R, Dot T, Patricia J.
3. 18/10/1995. Nicols Creek, Swampy. Medium. Leaders: Jack R, Barbara McC, Mairie and Doug.
2. 6/7/1994. Nicols Creek/Moon Track, Alternative – Pineapple Track.  Medium. Leaders:Nancy, Bob H, Shirley R, Joyce.
1. 26/7/1989. Swampy round trip from Pineapple Track carpark. Average+. Great views. Leaders: Denise P, Mary McG, Peggy M.

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Oct 11 2017

Tracks between Racemans and Rollinsons Road

Published by under Uncategorized

11. 11/10/2017. Trampers. Little Coal Creek and Steve Amies Circuit. M. Leader: Helen.

Eleven trampers left the car park and travelled to Whare Flat parking at the pump house car park. Walked along Racemans track until 9.50am. Too early said one unnamed tramper. Had our morning tea…

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and carried up Racemans and then up Little Coal Creek Track. Views over to Green Hill, Pulpit Rock…

Pulpit Rock in the distance. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and over to Powder Ridge were seen. Then continued right up to the picnic tables almost at the road to Swampy.  A very pleasant lunch was had there.

Lunch at the top at the picnic tables.(Helen pic and caption.)

Had to go to the road for a look as well looking at the new trees and also older memorial ones which had been planted. Les Murcott, Steve Amies and some others.

On the down trip we went onto Steve Amies track…

Start of Steve Amies Track. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and then down the short cut track. Very steep down it was. Then onto the Tunnel Track and over the swing Bridge and back to the cars.

‘Our lady of October’ (as some botanists know Clematis paniculata) in all her glory. Great to see so many – a sign the possums are being beaten! (Raewyn pic and caption.)

A  very enjoyable 14.5km walk with lots of steep up and down. A few slipped and an unnamed person fell backwards but had a soft landing. We adjourned  to Blackstones for coffee and guess who was there, all the Hikers having their debrief. – Helen.

10. 21/1/2015. Trampers. Racemans, Raingauge, North Coal, Powder Ridge Loop.
Racemans Raingauge North Coal. (Ken pic and caption.) GPS courtesy Ken.

Racemans Raingauge North Coal. (Ken pic and caption.) GPS courtesy Ken.

Eight people plus Finn the dog turned up to do this tramp. We stopped at one of the track junctions for morning tea break, & then it was along to the end of the Racemans track by the top Silverstream weir, & up the first steep climb on Raingauge Spur. [Oh to have 4WD drive like Finn has !!!]

We had lunch in the grassed clearing…
Lunch stop, with an expectant dog ! (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop, with an expectant dog ! (Ken pic and caption)

…not too far from the top of Raingauge, then walked down the road to the Steve Amies Picnic area, where we stopped for a short breather before tackling the North Coal track. We paused long enough to check out the helicopter landing pad, which really needs some serious clearing work done, & then it was off down Little Coal track to the junction with North Coal track. This was when things got a little interesting !! The first part of this is quite steep,…
Another tricky decent (Elinore pic and caption)

Another tricky decent (Elinore pic and caption)

…& there was some storm damage which made the going a bit difficult, but we decided to press on, as going back up didn’t seem to be an option. As we progressed down the track it was obvious that it was going to be a lengthy climb down, as the storm damage didn’t get any better,…
Struggling through the storm damage (Elinore pic and caption)

Struggling through the storm damage (Elinore pic and caption)

…& navigation became an issue, as the track markers were badly obscured, or the trees that they were attached to were no longer standing. Under normal conditions, the track was very well marked in both up & down directions with orange triangles, it was just the storm damage that upset things, & we often had to search around for the correct way down. However, if we had just followed Finn, he would’ve led us down the correct way at all times. It really was uncanny how he knew where the track was, although Dermot had him down there a few months ago, so maybe he was remembering it from then.
We eventually made it…
Nearing the end of a difficult decent (Eleanor pic and caption)

Nearing the end of a difficult decent (Eleanor pic and caption)

…back out onto the Racemans Track, & then back to the junction that leads down to the Silverstream crossing onto the Powder Ridge track, where we wanted to check out some trees that were down across the track, with a view to taking chainsaws in to remove them. From there it was back across the bottom weir, & back to the cars.
The day turned into a real adventure, with the climb down North Coal, but everybody seemed pleased that they made it ok, although one  [who shall not be named !] took a tumble off the track at one point, into the scrub below the track surface. No damage was done, except to their pride, which was a relief to all party members. – Ken.
9. 7/11/2001 Bob H, Winifred, George

8. 29/4/2009 Rollinson Road. Picnic Area. Trig Q. North Coal Creek Track. Racemans. Weir. Rain Gauge Spur. Rollinson Track. Elbow. Rollinson Road. Leaders: Ian, Glenice.

Only five of us ventured. Dry for a start before the mist descended.
Pupit Rock hidden in mist. Ken's watch.

Pupit Rock hidden in mist. Ken’s watch.

Lip of lookout.Cuppa time.

Lip of lookout. Cuppa time.

Light rain as we got lower down. Heavier on Racemans. Odd break on Rain Gauge Spur until heavy soaking mist towards top.
Doug (rather wet) nearing top.

Doug (rather wet) nearing top.

George sans parka. Looking drier than he really was.

George sans parka. Looking drier than he really was.

We ended up fairly wet and glad to get back back down Rollinson road to car. – Ian.

7. 17/9/2008. Access Road, Picnic area, North Coal, Raingauge Spur. Hard. Leaders: George, Ken.

6. 27/7/2005 Rollinson Road. Elbow. Rollinson Track. Turn off down to Rain Gauge Spur. Leaders: George, Dorothy S

View from Raingauge Spur

View from Raingauge Spur

5. 1/11/1999 Silverstream Weir, Raingauge, Elbow, Raceman’s Track. Leaders: Margaret D

4. 17/8/1994. Silverstream Weir, Raceman’s Elbow. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Peg C, Frances, Jack R

3. 28/4/1993. Silverstream Weir, Elbow, Raceman’s Track. Two groups. Medium or Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Les W, Diana, Joan A.

2. 1/5/1991 Elbow – Swampy – Raceman. Steep parts. Harder. Alternate route for some. Leaders: Mary McG, Daphne, Bob, Barbara McC

1. 11/1988 Leader: Peg C

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Oct 04 2017

Karitane beach to Huriawa Pa, Beach walk

Published by under Hikers,Year round

No. 12 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Karitane to Maori Pa and Beach Walk. C Tither. Year Round.”

Pa accessed from Karitane wharf. 2 hr ret. Walking Track. – Manager: DOC.

If you want a history of Huriawa Pa, Sir Truby King or early Methodist missionary James Watkin, it’s all just a click away here.

57 km from car park.

4/10/2017. Both. Huriawa Pa Peninsula, beach walk. E. Leaders: Jan and Bev.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Started recording late, so true distance 7 km. Trampers did 8 km.

A large contingent of trampers and hikers (40 in total) set off from the rivermouth area  along the edge of the estuary to the Huriawa Pa  peninsula.  Track then headed upwards, and we had morning tea on a bank under a large marcrocarpa tree.

Morning tea on the start of the walk up the Huriawa peninsula. (Clive pic and caption.)

Track climbed steadily tho not steeply up to a totem pole, then along the edge of the cliffs to the blowhole.  A group of trampers went up a steep little track to the highest point on the headland with great views.  Past the blowhole we  detoured off the main track along a mown pathway which looped round a newish planting of natives.  Then took another detour down to the water’s edge and back up to the main track which led on to the beach.  The weather had turned warm and sunny with no wind, so perfect beach conditions.

There’s a hole in my tooth. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

Came across a sea lion sunbathing on the beach, but he eventually trundled his way back to the water.

Basking sealion. (Margreet pic and caption.)

Walked to the end of the beach, and came back a little way to a lunch spot.

Cape Karitane launching pad. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

There were  lots of large slips along the bank which runs along  the edge of the beach and one of these slips provided good seating on the various tree trunks, rocks etc.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Some of the hikers carried on back down the beach to the cars, whilst the rest took a track off the beach and meandered round the streets of the Karitane township before returning to the car park via the main road.  The tide was well in by  then, so quite a different look to the estuary.  The majority stopped off for coffee at the Blueskin Nursery  Cafe on the way home, but the staff coped well with the rather large crowd. – Jan.

10/12/2014 All. End of year Christmas shared lunch. Karitane Fishing and Boating Club Hall. Tramp: Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Elaine and Eric
Route

Route

Elaine’s planning for the day did not disappoint us. Eric, obviously under precise instructions, ably led those who came for the tramp around the peninsula…

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

The peninsula. (Helen pic)

last climb as we approach saddle near ocean end of peninsula.

Last climb as we approach saddle near seaward end of peninsula track.

…and along the beach and return to get us back to the hall right on the dot of the appointed time of 11.30 a.m.to meet up with those who were able to come only for the occasion. Well done Eric, for someone who had never done the route before! So thanks, Eric – and Elaine, who stayed behind. And what was that for?

Surprise! Yes, meantime Elaine had been busy secretly putting up countless photos with questions attached, pens and slips of paper to write the answers down on, not forgetting bags to put them into. What preparation! What inventiveness! What tramper was the child in the photo? In what year was the camp in the photo held? Identify the car. How many pages in the day’s ODT? The puzzles went on and on, around the walls of the small hall, inside and out.

Of course there was wonderful food in all its variety…

The spread. (Helen pic)

The spread. (Helen pic)

After we were all satiated, came the declaration of the winners. from the bags accompanying their respective photos, Elaine drew answers, correct, facetious and otherwise.  Each winner was awarded a Christmasy-wrapped present fetched and delivered by Eric from a large bag of presents donated by – who knows who? Where does Elaine get her sponsors from? Present after present. And we mustn’t forget the lucky numbers handed out when we first went in. It seems every number holder was awarded a present also.

After this was all over, Elaine got the Four Jolly Tramping Mates to perform their song, a song which has now come to be sung on one or two previous occasions. Well, it’s really Peter’s song as he has written the lyrics and chosen the tune. Over the years,  the membership has perforce had to slightly change, with Heb now replacing Ray who has retired from the Club. And that’s not the only change either. Peter had added two further brillian verses to include Fred’s chocolates and Margaret’s red brolly. The lyric’s subjects are so pertinent, cheeky and entertaining, it has stood up well to repetition over the years. Thanks, Elaine, for arranging this part too.

The Three Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

The Four Jolly Tramping Mates. (Helen pic)

Well, that was it, unless you include the coffee stop (another of Elaine’s innovations) at Blueskin Cafe on the way home for some.

Well, Elaine. You have certainly put your stamp on the social side of our Club’s activities. Thank you, and Eric, for providing a most enjoyable finish to the year’s activities. – Ian.

28/5/2014 Hikers. Karitane, Huriawa Pa, beach walk. Leaders: Bev and Lesley
GPS of route

GPS of route

Here we were at Karitane, all ready to set out, with Leader Bev out there on the right waiting for us to follow.

Before tramp. (John, Panorama)

At cars before tramp. (John, Panorama)

And as you can see from John’s second panorama below,

Tramp ending

Tramp ending (John panorama, showing both ending and starting points)

at either end of the pic you can see both the the tramp’s end on the left and its entrance point onto the peninsula. We made our way along right on the harbour inlet’s edge to a lovely spot for the morning tea cuppa. We we surprised by the occasion whiff of warm air which accompanied us for the day, until a norwester blast hit us just as we were returning to the cars, a trace of which can be seen on the above panorama.

Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa alongside inlet’s entrance  (John pic)

Following the leisurely sit down, was a bit of moderately steep climbing to reach the top of the track where it returned  back on the peninsula’s southern side. We admired the following blowhole.

 

Cavern (John pic)

Blown out blowhole. (John pic)

Les recalled how once he and Ivan McIntosh had braved the ledge along the top. Not now!

By various stops and starts (part of a track we found too flooded to negotiate so had to find another way) we made it back to the peninsula’s beginning, and onto and along the long firm beach, to lunch at its southern end. Here John and Elaine combined to make this stunning photo.

Elaine

Elaine

After another leisurely break, we made our way back along the beach, across the peninsula’s neck and back to the cars.

A great day out for some 30 hikers, well led by Bev and Lesley, to whom much thanks. – Ian.

22/3/2006. Hikers. Karitane, Maori Pa. Leaders:  Graham, Arthur & Barbara
25/9/2002. Alt. Karitane – Maori Pa. Leaders: Mary Y, Jean, Chris.
14/4/1999. Karitane – Maori Pa – Beach Walk. Leaders: Catherine, nancy, Lesley S.
20/8/1997. Karitane Maori Pa and Church. Leaders: Catherine, Nel K, Denise.
15/2/1995. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Mary Y, Denise P.
1/6/1994. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Mary Y.
3/3/1993. Karitane. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Mary Y.
27/1/1993. Karitane. Round Trip. Average. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Nel, Marie.
/9/2002 Mary Y, Jean A, Chris
19/8/1992. Karitane Beach to Maori Pa. Round trip. Average. Catherine, Ria L, Nel K, Marie F
8/4/1990. Karitane to Maori Pa. Also beach walk. Interesting history. Easy walking. Leaders:  Peg C, Joan A, Audrey, June W
14/4/1989 Catherine, Nancy, Lesley S

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Sep 27 2017

Harwood – End of year picnic

37 km.
5. 27/9/2017. Hikers. Portobello to Harwood. E. Leaders: Chris and Dot.

Map of route, courtesy Ian.

The track from Portobello to the aquarium being made difficult with slips and mud, the leaders decided on a new hike for the day.  20 keen members left the cars at the Portobello show-grounds and headed the short distance up the hill to the cemetery for morning tea.

Coming away from morning tea.(Ian pic and caption.)

It was a glorious morning, calm and mild, and there were many comments on the fact that cemetery sites always seem to have the best views…. this one right across Portobello and the tranquil, beautiful harbour.

The thought of walking all the way to Harwood seemed a bit daunting to some, but in fact was very pleasant, following the cycle track all the way so that traffic was never a problem.  The predicted north-east breeze never arrived and jackets were gradually shed along the way.  Round Lower Portobello Bay several slips were commented upon, and we reached the picnic grounds for a leisurely lunch by mid-day.

Lunch at the Harwood Picnic Grounds. (Ian pic and caption.)

After the young-at-heart had a play on the swings…

Stop gazing round. Swing!.(Ian pic and caption.)

…and slides not to mention the hammock,

Help! Someone get me out. (Ian pic and caption.)

we made our way back to the cars by the same route, and so to Macandrew Bay for coffee etc.

A hike not done before, so thanks to Chris and Dot for some thick quinking (thanks Jay!) in finding a great alternative for the day. – Judy.

4. 17/12/2012. All. Harwood. End of year picnic. Leaders: Chris and Dorothy.
3. 15/12/2004. All. Christmas finger food lunch at Harwood. Leader: Chris.
Pause at sign.

Pause at sign.

Lunch in Harwood Hall. Dorothy, Wendy, Carmel.

Lunch in Harwood Hall. Dorothy, Wendy, Carmel.

x

Lunch in the Harwood Hall. Wendy, Carmel.

2. 17/12/2003. All. End of year Tramp. Share finger food. Leaders: Jean, Chris.
Setting off.

Setting off.

1. 19/12/1998. Xmas Lunch, Harington Point. Leader: Chris.

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Sep 20 2017

Waipori Gorge to Meggat Burn, Berwick Forest

Published by under Trampers

5. 20/9/2017. Trampers. Berwick Forest – Meggat Burn, Shaw Road. M. Leader: Arthur.
There were 14 keen Trampers out today for a walk in the forest – one member of the group used the word “intrepid” in describing us.
It must be a few years since our Club has tramped this track? Anyway, the cars parked at the usual spot by the old woolshed on the road into the “Berwick Forest Lodge”.
It was noticed that the toilet facilities by the carpark were absent, as about a month ago some “empty head” had burned it down!
There was a brief paddock walk in the sunshine (sunny all day) before crossing the footbridge over Boundary Creek, to the beginning of the track up into the pine trees. After about 150 yards we came to 6 large trees down over the track, which were successful negotiated by going under, over, or around.
Smoko was taken in a sunny trackside spot, at the appropriate time.

Gathering on way up. (Helen pic and caption.)

Continuing uphill we soon came to and crossed a Forestry Road (Prentice Road). Now descending slowly we eventually came to the Meggat Burn, which was crossed without mishap using a variety of techniques. Electing to just plough through, not worrying about wet feet, and some crossed on the shallowest part of the rock ledge where it was maybe only 3 inches deep. The burn was only slightly up after all of the rain a few days ago.

(Margreet pic.)

While the track was muddy in many places, it was surprisingly good after the quantity of rain that had fallen. Further up there was vegetation, especially gorse, beginning to encroach but not impeding our progress.

The track came out onto a forestry road, Tobermory Road; and in 10 minutes more we reached Shaw Road before 12 noon. Down Shaw Road for a few minutes took us to our lunch spot in a sunny area under the Pole Line that parallels Shaw Road. There was a limited view down on to the Taieri from here, with Hope Hill in the background. We could even see the sea.

Lunch spot. (Helen pic and caption.)

The sunshine was most enjoyable, ideal for lying back forma little nap after eating – one tramper having to be roused to begin the return journey!

Our return followed the same route, some care being necessary descending a slippery clay section before arriving back at the Meggat Burn. All crossed in safety again although a piece of equipment may have been lost?

It was uphill for a little while, and then it was down all the way. It was very noticeable that the leaders were in a hurry to get home (I was at the back of the group here), and not wasting any time – probably they could detect the aroma coming from the coffee shop? But it was just their imagination!

We were back in the lovely sunshine at the cars by 2.30 pm, having tramped 13.5 km for the day’s effort.

The Leader was most gratified to hear that all of the party had thoroughly enjoyed the day’s walk (and talk). Considerable birtdsong was heard in the forest.

As per the usual custom, a stop was made in Outram for refreshments and  discussion. And then back to Mosgiel, and then home for boot cleaning duty. – Art.

4. 7/6/2006. Old Woolshed to Shaw Road, return. Leaders: Bob H and Arthur H.

3. 26/5/2004. Old woolshed at Berwick to Waipori Return. H. Started from the old woolshed, through the forest, Meggat Burn to Shaw Road, and down the track to the picnic ground near the Waipori River Bridge to have lunch there. Returned the same way. It must have been a long, tough tramp to do that. (Recalled by Art.)

2. 19/3/1997 Waipori Gorge to the Megget Burn stream, Berwick. Leaders: Molly, Diana and Ray
1. 14/5/1989 Waipori Gorge to Meggetburn stream, Berwick. Bush and Pine walk. Leaders: Daphne, Helen W, Mavis

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Sep 20 2017

Portsmouth Drive to Marina

Published by under Uncategorized

17 km from car park.

3, 20/9/2017. Hikers. Portsmouth Drive to Marina. E. Leaders: Judy and Dorothy.

Twelve harbour strollers, went to Andy Bay.
We parked beside the inlet – it was a windy day.
Along the Portsmouth Drive we went, trudging in a row.
We passed the harbour molars, and onward we did go.

A sunny sheltered spot was found, and morning tea was had,
Relaxing in the sunshine, it wasn’t half too bad.
Then on we went, around the wharves, and round the harbour basin –
We found that walking in the wind, was really somewhat bracin’.

We viewed the plaque in memory of “Neptune”, sunk in war.
She hit a minefield in the Med, and then she was no more.

We passed the Neptune memorial at the wharf and some members were able to point to the names of loved ones who were involved in this tragedy. (Clive pic and caption.)

On we went and onwards, across the Leith we strode,
Then Clive led us along the groyne, to where the water flowed.

We took a walk out on the groyne at the boat harbour and nearly got blown away in the 20 knot winds. (Clive pic and caption.)

Back around the boat harbour, some picnic tables found,
For lunch and chatter in the sun, then homeward we were bound.

Lunch outside the Yachting Club. (Raewyn pic and caption.)

A cracking pace was soon set up, the wind was at our backs.
Perhaps the increase in our pace, was due to lighter packs?
We viewed a lot of logging trucks, a queue a mile long –
Sending all those logs away, we feel it is quite wrong.

A photo stop was taken, beside the harbour molars –
And so we coined the title, “The Mosgiel Harbour Strollers.”

The Molar strollers. (Clive pic and caption.)

The cars in view, we stepped it out and headed fast for home.
A coffee stop at Blackstone – and then I wrote this “pome”….
(Well, try to find a better rhyme!) – Judy.

Stats for the day: 11.7 kms; 3 hours and 4 minutes walking time; 480 calories. – Clive.

2. 14/1/2015. Hikers. Portsmouth Drive to Marina. E. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

GPS of route

GPS of route

We parked in the carpark by the Bayfield High School. And 21 of us set out.

Some of us waited while others investigate the doings of a suspect prowler.

The bulk of us waiting for others investigate the doings of a suspect prowler back a the carpark and to call the police to investigate. Helen found a passing cyclist friend to chat to.

We walked along Portsmouth Drive past the molars, turned down Kitchener St, huggiing the harbour edge and stopped off for morning tea.

Sheltering from a cold wind for morning tea.

Sheltering from a cold wind for morning tea.

Carrying on, we turned round into Birch St, across the top of the harbour basin then down along Fryatt St almost to its end. Then it was up Wickliffe St, across the railway overbridge, briefly on Anzac Avenue, down Parry …

 

Skirting the Statium.

Skirting the Stadium.

…and Minerva Streets to cross the Leith on SH88 bridge, and on the north side to turn under the bridge and out along Magnet St to get to our lunch stop at the Marina.

Lunch

Again sheltering from a cool wind, this time for lunch.

On our return, we walked the length of Anzac avenue. Then onto the railway station platform, where Dorothy performed a most believable but all too brief strut down the catwalk. Out at the other side, on past Toitu Settlers Museum and along the grassy verge ahead where we stopped, briefly thwarted by the railway bridge overpass pathless on-ramp ahead. So it was across all four laned SH1 Cumberland St, with the assistance of the lights further back. This safely accomplished, it was Les and Peter led us up Water St, along Vogel St, back down Jetty St and onto the pedestrial spiral ramp to get us onto the bridge. Then via Birch St, Buller St and French St we rejoined Kitchener St which took us back out onto Portsmouth Dr and back to the cars. From talking to one or two others, I must say coming to the end of eleven kilometres on hard pavement had taken its toll of leg muscles, on this the first tramp after the holidays. A good walk, not too hot or windy. Thanks to Peter and Wendy for a good start to the year. – Ian.

1. 20/11/2013. Hikers. Midland St, Portsmouth Drive to Marina. Leaders: Bev and Chris.

Route

Route

The walk was most inventive and interesting, leading us along back streets few of us had ventured on before. We parked at the bottom of Midland Street where we could cross onto Portsmouth Drive with the safety assistance of traffic lights. The laying of cable along the walkway forced us onto a less inviting traffic-coned path along the road till we returned to the walkway at the molars.

Molars

Molars. The 20 of us are almost all in the pic.

A little further on we turned down to the length of Kitchener St turning left up at its end into Birch St to join Wharf St esplanade and have morning tea on the seats, to admire the inner harbour view as well as a gentleman, lent back on a camp seat, fishing, hat over face, asleep.

A happy surprise was Lex sharing round chocolate marshmellows in anticipation of his 85th birthday the following day.

Then it was up and on again, down virtually the entire length of Fryatt St to turn left up Wickliffe Street and over the elderly railway overhead bridge, down the other side to the right, and to stop and admire (?) the special road-coned entrance/egress of Hall’s work-yard and the still-hooded traffic lights. We gingerly made it across Anzac Ave, across Frederick St, back again across Anzac Ave to join Parry St, make way across the SH88 Leith Bridge very wide pedestrian walkway, down, back, under the bridge and along Magnet St. (4 km)

and the Harbour Walkway (5 and 6 kms) to lunch at the northern end of the map in what shelter we could find from the nor-easterly wind.

We retraced our steps to the SH88 Bridge underpass, this time following the Leith bank up to Anzac Ave (7 and 8 kms)

which we followed right to the St Andrew St lights where we turned down along it to the roundabout, followed Mason St, then into Tewsley St and into Fryatt St to retrace our route alongside Wharf St (9 km), Birch St, Kitchener St and Portsmouth Drive back to the cars.  11 km in all. The harbour wind-blast along Portsmouth Drive almost blew us off our feet. Many thanks to Bev and Chris for a varied and interesting streets exploration around a corner of the harbour. – Ian.

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Sep 13 2017

Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully.

Published by under Trampers,Year round and tagged: , ,

Click Mount Cargill history for background information.

No. 11 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bethunes Gully to T.V. Mast Organ Pipes. Wiggins. Year Round.”

No. 100 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Bethunes Gully – Brown House – Signal Hill – Chingford Park Year Round”

Cars meet at Bethunes Gully. A broad gravelled track from picnic ground. NB. Opposite Brown House corner is an RSA Memorial to First World War servicemen the old Junction School.

21 km from car park.

21. 13/9/2017. Trampers. Bethunes Gully. M. Leader: Eleanore.
A record number (9 female and 8 male) trampers drove to car park at Bethunes Gully and started the steady climb up, up and up some more on a well maintained track.

Firstly, alongside Lindsay Creek.  The track climbs steadily up the flank of Mt. Cargill, first through pine forest and then regenerating native forest.  We found a cosy spot and enjoyed a smoko break.  Once again we climbed steadily to the top of the ridge between Mt. Cargill and Buttars  Peak.  The intersection to the Organ Pipes Track was reached, by now we knew the mast was getting closer.  Only to find we had to climb steps to reach the top!

(Margreet pic and caption.)

The weather was calm and the views fantastic.

On top of Mt Cargill looking towards Taiaroa Heads. (Phil pic and caption.)

For quite a few members it was a first time visit to this track.  Also, the company of the intrepid adventurer Judy Knox was enjoyed.  We continued onto the A.H. Reed track where lunch was had.

Lunch view. (Helen pic and caption.)

The beauty of this track is the downhill—all the way to the car park!
We chose the little coffee shop near Baldwin Street for coffee, cake and a chat.

Coffee. (Helen pic and caption.)

We travelled 10.9km and climbed 676 metres to the mast on top of Mt. Cargill
Another great outing had by all. – Eleanore Ryan.

20. 28/9/2016. Hikers. Bethunes Gully. H. Leaders: Adrienne and Judy K.
Route map

Route map of trek only to the top. (Sorry, jammed up the app.)

21 hikers with an age range of 12 to 89 (is that a record?) gathered at the car park at the start of the Bethunes Gully track. It was fine (well, not raining anyway) when we left Mosgiel, and dry at the start of the track, but a nasty creepy little drizzle hung round us the higher we went. Loud bird calls accompanied us for the steady climb up the gully on a well-formed track, slightly muddy in places, across several bridges where the creeks were running a bit higher than usual, to a welcome morning tea break on the side of the track.

Morning Tea. (Adrienne pic.)

Morning Tea stop. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

Slow and steady was the order of the day, with plenty of stops to get breath back. Up – and up – and up. Several fell by the wayside – first two, then two more. When at last the junction for the Organ Pipes and the Mt Cargill summit was reached, 10 more subsided and declared “Lunch!”
An intrepid 7 continued another half hour to the summit (a first for some), up the steps in annoying drizzle. No views available from the top.

Cloud Mountain. (Adrienne pic.)

The misty summit. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

so it was down to the junction again for lunch.

Lunch in cloud. Where had the others gone? (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch in the cloud, back down from the summit and at the junction. Where had the others gone? (Ian pic and caption.)

By which time the other 10 had departed, it being a bit cold and damp to hang around.
Down – and down – and down – collecting strays as we went. Fred wasn’t present but his chocolates were, and much appreciated, thanks Fred. It was warm and sunny back …

Our welcoming crowd at the end. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

Our welcoming crowd at the end. (Adrienne pic and caption.)

… at the cars so parkas were discarded for the ride to the Botanic gardens and a well-earned (we think) coffee stop.  – Adrienne and Judy K.

19. 30/9/2015 Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Organ Pipes return.
Bethunes Gully track was the destination for the day, & 9 keen trampers arrived at the car park in Bethunes Gully, ready to tackle the continuous climb up to the transmitter mast at Mt. Cargill.
We arrived at the picnic spot about 3/4 of an hour up the track, but the leaders misread the sign, & decided that it wasn’t the correct place, but they were called back, & we all had a relaxing morning tea break in the sun. Then it was up the track some more, with a few rest breaks till we reached the junction with the Organ Pipes track, where we had another short break before heading off up the terrible track with the very large steps to arrive at the transmitter mast on top. This section is getting worse as time goes on, or is it just the mind thinking that way ??
After a good look around…
Top photo One (Ken pic)

Top photo One (Ken pic)

Top photo Two (Ken pic)

Top photo Two (Ken pic)

… & a chat with a guy from the university language department who had a group of very well dressed [all in black suits] Chinese visitors to the city, we made our way back to the Organ Pipes track. After a regroup here, we walked down to the Organ Pipes …

Eric (Ken pic)

Eric (Ken pic)

 … where I could see how my handiwork on the boardwalks was standing up from nearly 20 years beforehand. We had lunch at the Organ Pipes, then retraced our steps back down to the cars at Bethunes Gully. It was a very nice day for a tramp, with only the slightest breeze at the top, & some weak sunshine all day. I think everybody enjoyed the day, despite the grumbles about the steep climb, & those terrible steps !! We stopped off at the new cafe in the shop at the bottom of Baldwin Street for a coffee, just to keep up the tradition of the Trampers Coffee Club. This cafe is owned by the former owner of the ‘Flax’ cafe in Caversham.
Walked 10.9km
2h 53m moving
3.7km/h
climbed 679m
max height 672m – Ken.
18. 21/9/2011. Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes, Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully.

GPS of tramp, clockwise, courtesy, Ken

Nine of us did this tramp, the most we have had out for a while, and one that the club had not done since 2006!
We were surprised with the new (?) bike barriers, although we still met a biker further on up the track.

Cycle barrier

Doug (nice knees?) and this reporter (the eldest two in the group) elected to remain at the track junction, letting the others (one or two who had never done it before) go on up to the top.

Relaxing in sheltered comfort

Their only reward was to reach the summit. Mt Cargill was entirely cloud-capped. Too bad! Doug and I rested in complete shelter from the cold Norwester. Even down where we were, we could see the mist still briskly blowing across the saddle below us. See Moving Mist
It was a surprise later on, on the former main road and nearing the old Brown House site to see the lovely-but-misleading external sight of the cloud cover we had bracingly experienced from the inside.

Cloud over Mt Cargill. Mast just peeking above cloud, barely discernible to the left of the cloud’s apex..

Another good tramp. Bethunes Gully track is still no less steep at the beginning before easing off further up. – Ian
17. 27/10/2010. Hikers. Bethunes Gully, track junction with summit/Organ Pipes. Medium. Leaders: Lesley G, Joyce.
16. 5/5/2010. Both. Bethunes Gully, Bike Tracks. M-. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn.

We parked cars at by the toilets at the end of Cluny Street (that’s  what the Map said. Didn’t know that before.) in Bethunes Gully. Bob and Evelyn were  to turn on a delightful surprise for us all. They led us back down the road to the gate to discover for us on the left a bike track leading up through the trees. We admired the loving attention lavished on the system of tracks by bike devotees as we climbed up through the un-pruned Oregon plantation. After a morning tea stop we ascended yet further to reach the plantation’s NE corner. Then it was down to our left back into the gully.

Looking up at the tops

The tops of the tall Oregons.

Looking up at the tops.

Looking up at the tall Oregons. Wendy, Sabina, Peter, George, Lex, Ken.

We emerged at the head of the grassed part of the gully at the bridge across the Lindsay Stream.

Sturdy bridge
From here it was up the Mount Cargill walking track, stopping for frequent rests, one of which was by a small track on our left promising to lead eventually to Campbells Road in Pine Hill. (Bob and Evelyn had recced it, but it ends in dense gorse.) Eventually we reached the Lookout down on the right of the track where we stopped for an early lunch.
Bush view from the lookout.

Bush view from the lookout.

After the leaders had ascertained all seventeen of us were back up onto the walkway from the Lookout, (with Ken obtaining dispensation to carry on on his own to Mount Cargill, as he had come in his own car), they took us part way back down the walkway before striking off on the right up a rutted vehicle track through the bush,

Rock on rock

How did they lift the smaller on top of the larger? Leader Bob strikes a pose on the vehicle track

… from which eventually a track led off to the left and down to parallel the walkway back down the bridge and then it was just a short walk to the cars.

Thanks to Evelyn and Bob for finding us a new set of tracks in a Bethunes Gully we had thought we knew all about already. – Ian
15. 24/5/2006 Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully. Leaders: Judy, Tash
14. 15/6/2005. Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Leaders: Hazel, Ria.23/5/2007. Hikers. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Medium. Leaders: Betty, Dot T.
13. 5/11/2003. Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Buttars Peak, round trip. Medium. Leaders: D Jenkins, B McCabe
12. 10/9/2003. Trampers. Bethunes Gully, Buttars Peak, Round Trip. Medium. Leaders: Doug J, Barbara McC.
11. 28/8/2002 Bethunes Gully to Mount Cargill, Organ Pipes return. Leaders: Ray & Diana, Val
10. 16/5/2001. Bethunes Gully. Leaders: Nancy, Dot and Nelson.
9. 19/4/2000. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Leaders: Judy C, Mary M, Bev McI.
8. 27/5/1998. Bethunes Gully, Organ Pipes, North Road. Leaders: Hugh and Judith.
7. 25/3/1998. Bethunes Gully, Organ Pipes return. Leaders: Betty, Denise.
6. 25/3/1998 Bethunes Gully to Mount Cargill, Organ Pipes return. Leaders: B Bryce, D Pearce
5. 30/7/1997. Bethunes Gully, Mount Cargill. Leaders: Diana and Ray, Catherine.
4. 9/7/1997. Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully, Opoho. Leaders: Shirley McN, Pat, Wendy.
3. 27/9/1995. Pine Hill, Mount Cargill Track, Waitati Road, Bethunes Gully, North East Valley. Medium+. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Ria H, Shirley R
2. 12/5/1993 Pine Hill Road, Cowans Road, Mt Cargill, Old Mt Cargill Main North Road, Return Bethunes Gully, North East Valley.  Back to Pine Hill Road. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine T, Penny & Peter
1. 11/4/1990 Bethunes Gully, Mt Cargill, Buttars Peak, Organ Pipes,Old Main North Road, Brown House corner, Norwood Street, Bethunes Gully. Leaders: Margaret S, Hartmann, Bev H, Peter R



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Sep 13 2017

Street Walk – Willowbank-Opoho area.

Published by under Uncategorized

13/9/2017. Street Walk – Willowbank-Opoho. E. Leaders: Lester and Peter B.
After some difficulty in finding car parks in Duke St, 18 Hikers began their walk with a look at the Wilson’s Distillery at Willowbank.We then made our way via George, Duke & Queen streets

View half-way along Queen Street North (just off Duke Street). Nelson Mandela? Martin Luther King? Opinions divided. House directly in front, plus two to the left (one out of sight) originally all one. Two to the left were disconnected and moved to the street front. (Ian pic and caption.)

to our morning tea stop at Woodhaugh Gardens.

With everyone refreshed,we continued on our journey to North Rd where we split into 2 groups, the first group going up Glendining Ave, while the second (and much fitter} group went up Chambers St. When we met up again at Arden St, Lester asked the Finnies what they had seen on their climb, and they both said THE FOOTPATH.

Our next stop was a visit to Knox College,where ‘Deputy Master’ Caroline gave us a woderful guided tour of Knox for the next hour. This was particularly interesting for Ian, as his parents had both worked at the college about the time he was born.

Carolyn was happy to take a group photo of us on the front steps. (Ian pic and caption.)

Looking down the stair well from the 3rd floor. There was still two more flights up the tower to go. (Ian pic and caption.)

Ah! On the top. Santa Sabina Convent (now commercial apartments, which we didn’t explore due to time constraints)  straight ahead. (Ian pic and caption.)

Onwards and upwards, we headed to the Gardens for lunch. Margaret and Molly joined us here. After lunch, it was a short walk up to the new Propagating Unit, where Alice took us into the various rooms, each with >a different temperature and all the latest watering equipment.

It was all down hill from there, with the coffee drinkers calling into the Kiosk to conclude the day’s activities. A big thanks to Lester,as he had obviously done a lot of preparation in making this such an enjoyable day. -Peter B.
18 Hikers walked the Willowbank-Opoho area. Many places of interest were explained. Morning tea was enjoyed in the Woodhaugh Gardens.
Down North Road where half our group went up Glendenning Avenue and the other half up Chambers Street to report in Arden Street at the top on the merits of each.
Down to Knox College for a great conducted tour, …… with Ian adding his family connections back in the early 1930s period.
Then up to Hatfield Street to look at the spiral chimney and gate posts of a property. Lunch in the upper Gardens where we added 2 more Hikers.
After a tour of the Propagation Unit, we headed down to the lower Gardens for coffee.
Great weather, company and walk, with many interesting places. A really enjoyable day. – Lester. [Report supplied by one who never reads them and wishes he had never taken up with emails and the internet! We were all impressed by the many property features Lester pointed out to us. Thank you, Lester. – Ed.]

 

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Sep 06 2017

Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, transmitter tower. Also Rustlers/Burns Tracks

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

Click Swampy ridge track for background information.
See also: Leith Saddle and Morrison Tracks
Leith Saddle, Waitati Valley Road, Sawmill Track, Swampy Ridge, Burns Track
Click boardwalk history for account about the original Leith Saddle Track  and the establishment of the boardwalk in 1993.
For our Club’s part in the boardwalk venture see boardwalk for an ODT account of its construction.
See also TRTC Jack Merrilees (who died January 2015)

Cars park off motorway at Leith Saddle yard (alternatively down side road at bridge (restricted space). 25 km from car park.
Walk across side road to track.
Gravelled track 1.5 km. (morning tea on lookout seats a little further on)
Transmitter tower 2 hours.
Going further: along road past doppler radar to DoC sign.
Right along Rustlers Ridge track to junction with Burns Track.
Through junction and up and round hill on Rustlers Ridge Track. (Lunch on hill)
Down ridge to pipeline. (Alternatively turn right at junction for Burns and down to pipeline)
Turn right along pipeline.
5.5 hours in all.
Burns/Rustlers circuit Maintained by Green Hut Track Group. DCC land.

32. 6/9/2017. Both. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Burns, Pipeline Tracks circuit. M. Leaders: Betty and Jim.

A total of 33 persons started.
The total party walked to the Lookout Point for morning tea and at this point George Haggie served chocolates to celebrate his birthday.

George plus chocolates. 89 yesterday. (Helen pic and caption.)

Some of the party turned back because of the increased steepness and slipperiness of the track caused by recent rain.

From this point 15 trampers split off and forged ahead for an extended tramp that brought them down to the gravel road and back to the cars at the saddle.

7 hikers had lunch at the micro wave tower at the summit before returning to the cars at the Saddle where they met up with the members that had returned earlier.

We then adjourned to the Plaza Cafe and the tramping party arrived a short time later.

Weather conditions were pleasant.
Cell phone coverage to stay in contact with the split up groups was of assistance. – Betty and Jim.
…..
The combined group split after morning tea on the Leith Saddle Track, 15 trampers forging ahead to go further.

We reached the Microwave up on Swampy soon after 11 am…

At the Microwave. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and decided to carry on to Swampy Summit and do a circuit instead of returning down the same track.
The breeze up top was decidedly chilly but the views were superb – 360 degrees. Whichever way you looked there was something to see.

 Taken after the trampers had left the hikers en route to the Burns Track from Swampy. (Phil pic and caption.)

We rested briefly beside “The Space Ship” (Aviation V.O.R. Beacon) at the highest point of Swampy while Neil2 explained its use.

Further on we turned off onto the “Access Track to Burns and Rustlers Tracks” – so the sign stated. Wouldn’t it be simpler to call it “Rustlers” Track – or would that not be logical?
It was lovely walking through the tussock on the upper part of this track. After a time we stopped to ear our lunch in the sunshine, sitting in the shelter,

(Margreet pic.)

and still with nice views to the north-east.

Lunch looking down to Blueskin Bay. (Helen pic and caption.)

Further down, the track was a bit slippery in the bush but we soon came to the Junction.

It is some years since I was last on the lower half of Burns Track, and had forgotten how much pleasure could be had while slip-sliding down the first steep and muddy part. There were also some muddy patches further down, and several members of the group made the most of the opportunity provided to add some mud to their clothing, etc.
However, most of the Burns Track was very pleasant. At the bottom it was along the Pipeline Track and then the road for a kilometre to gain the cars where they had been parked.

Today’s tramp had provided a good variety – bush tracks, tussock, and views – what a great day it had been. Distance – 10.8 km.
The hikers had already returned, so most of the trampers followed to rejoin them at the Stadium’s coffee shop to complete the day. – Art.
31. 23/11/2016. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Rustlers, Pipeline Tracks circuit. M. Leader: Arthur.

It was a bit of a shock to the system when we climbed out of the cars at the Leith Saddle carpark beside the Northern Motorway. A cold wind was funnelling up from the south, bringing low cloud with it.

But the Leith Saddle Track was nice and sheltered and we soon warmed up as the first ten minutes had a distinct uphill flavour to it. A good gravel track, with nice native forest to enjoy. Lot of ferns too, but not much birdlife today.

We reached the observation point at about 10.00 a.m., but the only view we got was of lots of cloud. We had our morning tea in the shelter of the vegetation close by.

As we climbed higher the low cloud cleared a little and we could get the occasional glimpse of the city, and back towards Blueskin Bay.

The wind was cold and most unpleasant

Theresa getting blown around up top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Theresa getting blown around up top. (Helen pic and caption.)

when we reached ‘Swampy Spur Trig S’, which is quite exposed. Otherwise the track was more sheltered till we reached the microwave, where we found a group of six trampers having their morning tea. A five minute stop with them was taken. They had proceeded us up the track, but were returning by a different route to us.

From the microwave we had a half hour road walk on top of Swampy.

Space shuttle for the planes. (Helen pic and caption.)

The doppler radar navigation complex. (Helen pic.)

We kept moving as the wind was rather coolish, but we could get quite a good view down over Mosgiel and the Taieri, if a little hazy.

We turned off onto the good track through the tussock, heading down “Rustlers Ridge”. The sign at the top states “Access track to Rustlers and Burns Tracks.”

The weather seemed to be clearing a little and we could get a good look at the Silver Peaks. We stopped a little early for our lunch, while there was still a good view of Blueskin Bay. Unfortunately a light shower arrived while we were eating but we were well hunkered down in shelter.

Lunch out of the wind. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch out of the wind. (Helen pic and caption.)

A chocolate treat from birthday girl, Judy K, keep our spirits up. – Thanks, Judy.

Only a few minutes’ travel got us to the junction with Burns Track. We continued down Rustlers, eventually reaching the Pipeline Track which would take us back in the direction of the cars.

The Pipeline Track had a few muddy patches on it, but also some very pleasant parts. The rocks were a bit slippery when we crossed Burns Creek, and we were soon out onto the road for the last kilometre or so.

The eight trampers out for the day’s fun had walked 12.1 km – a good training day for the tougher tramps coming in the next two weeks. And it had been an enjoyable day’s tramp. Moving time was 2 hrs 40 mins.

It came on to rain lightly as we got back to Dunedin, where we stopped at the Hot Chocolate Shop (some did have coffee though). And then back to Mosgiel, all fired up for next week. – Art.

30. 25/11/2015. Trampers. Burns-Rustlers.

Garmin GPS of Route, courtesy Ken: Burns Swampy Summit Swampy Ridge Burns Rustlers Pipeline tracks

Garmin GPS of Route, courtesy Ken: Burns Swampy Summit Swampy Ridge Burns Rustlers Pipeline tracks

Today, we did a tramp that maybe only one member of the group had done before.

We started off at the beginning of Burns Track from the Leith Valley Rd. car park, made our way up the short climb to the Pipeline track, where we turned right, & walked along to the short track leading to the Intake for the pipeline. We thought this was the entrance to Burns track, as Hamel’s book states that the entrance is hard to find. However, we soon ran out of track, so retraced our steps, & walked further along the Pipeline track until we found the large sign proclaiming Burns Track, & this was where we had morning tea.

1 Morning tea spot at start of Burns track. (Ken pic and caption)

1 Morning tea spot at start of Burns track. (Ken pic and caption)

As we were making our way up to Burns saddle, we came across two Green Hut track workers, who were doing a great job of track maintenance. The climb up to Burns saddle is quite steep, but with a few rest stops we all made it ok.
After some discussion, we decided to take the track to Swampy Summit, & have lunch at the Airways building at the start of the Swampy Ridge track.

2 Lunch at Airways building. (Ken pic and caption

2 Lunch at Airways building. (Ken pic and caption

After lunch we walked along the Swampy Ridge track till we found the sign at the top of Burns track. We followed this sometimes muddy/swampy track back to the Burns Saddle, & then took Rustlers track back down to the Pipeline track. This was also a bit muddy in places, so I don’t think anybody got home with clean boots. From here it was just a walk back along the Pipeline track [also a bit muddy] back to the cars.

There were some tired bodies at the end, but all enjoyed the walk on a very nice [25° C] day to be out tramping.

Walked 12km
3.4km/h
3h 30min moving
climbed 562m
max height 740m – Ken

29. 4/2/2015. Both. Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, Transmitter Tower. Leaders: Ian, Jill.

Twenty-three of us turned up for the scheduled Leith Saddle Track route. To accomodate our differing individual climbing speeds, the leaders advised us to climb at our most comfortable rates, to all meet at the view point seats for the morning cuppa. After a sociable meeting, Jill led us on again, ever onwards and upwards. However rain set in, getting only heavier and colder with even some hail appearing. And it did get HEAVY. At the trig on the exposed Swampy Spur, the wind was so fierce that leader Jill made a prudent decision, given the uncertain outlook at the time, for the Hikers to turn back,  allowing seven Trampers among us to carry on. Unbeknownst to us at the time,  the worst was over and the storm was passing. For the Trampers, of course, there was the immediate shelter in the dip in the track beyond the Trig, where it drops down from the Swampy Spur.  For the Hikers, it was back down into the shelter of the bush.
The Trampers reached the Telecom Tower on Swampy Ridge. The possibility of going on along Swampy Ridge to the point where the Rustlers Ridge track turns off, and returning along the Burns track was complicated with one or two of the party being found to be part of car loads with Hikers who were already returning back.
Meantime the Hikers had spent some time down at the Lookout, allowing all to regroup and make sure everyone was all right. As it turned out, Elaine had taken a fall on one of the wet wooden step side edges but was still mobile. During that time, the Trampers caught up on the Hikers just as the latter were setting off down again.
At track’s bottom, we separated. A few stopped off nearby to lunch in the sun.
Several Trampers, (whose car-loads were not complicated with some Hiker passengers), set off down the Waitati Road and along the pipeline track to take a look at the end of the Burns Track for those among them who hadn’t seen it before.
Here is Ken’s account of that part:
“These pics…

1 lunch stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop 1. (Ken pic and caption)

 

2 lunch stop (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop 2. (Ken pic and caption)

 

…were taken on the pipeline track at the bottom of Burns track. We just went for a little bit of a recce to see what the area was like, with a view to doing something in that area later. -Ken.”
The majority of the Hikers lunched at Sullivan’s Dam in calm sunny air on a nicely warmed-up concrete slope.
Somewhat approaching a dozen caught up on each other at Topiary’s later for a convivial coffee.
An interesting day. A different day. All ended well (except for Elaine). – Ian (for the leaders).
28. 5/12/2012. Both. Leith Saddle. Leaders: Bev and Leslie.

27. 13/11/2013 Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Rustlers, Pipeline tracks.
From the Leith Saddle we went up a very well constructed and maintained track to the picnic area (where the seats are) where we had our morning tea. In the quiet, the roar of trucks on the motorway was very noticeable.
We encountered fog from that point on, very light of course, but when we got to the top it was clear only at the place we were and a short distance ahead.
We passed the place where it seemed the aliens had landed (the airplanes navigation complex) and headed down the track that that led to the junction of the Burns and Rustlers tracks.
We lunched about halfway down Rustlers in a good sheltered spot. We eventually got down to the bottom and headed along the almost flat pipeline track. The end part of it was mown grass! Instead of heading down the farm track we continued right ahead, across the bridge and out onto the road and back up to the car.
I must say all track signs were very clear. – Heb.

26. 14/9/2011. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy, Rustlers, Pipeline tracks.

Bush sheltered us for the first bit along the now step-less, if still steep in places, beautifully gravelled DoC track. It looks like what one of us said that those in the UK would disparagingly call a Yellow Brick Road or pedestrian motorway. Perhaps however, the only practical way to overcome the bush underfloor condition. Even beyond the bushline, the track was still wonderful underfoot, accompanying and crossing only muddy traces of the original. Here we took our ‘cuppa’ on the lookout seat there, after wiping the remaining snow off it.
Now we were exposed to the gale coming straight up from the Antarctic as we tackled the steep hill-side beyond.
 At the Swampy Ridge Trig, we were exposed to the wind blustering from our left so much so that we were blown off our feet. It was a relief after negotiating past the trig’s stay-wires to slip down through the rocks into the comparative shelter of the dip beyond.
Across the dip, the last bit of a climb and we scurried into the shelter of the Post Office building.

We had planned the clockwise direction so that the wind would be behind us on Swamp Ridge. Well, not quite behind us, more on our left shoulders. But it was still preferable to battling it head-on.

Once we turned off onto the track linking down to the Burns/Rustlers junction, the wind was now more comfortably behind us. Relief. And then when the track started its plunge down from the tops, – no wind. Ahh. Had it stopped or were we just sheltered?
We should pause here to acknowledge the benefit of the most magnificent track-clearing work we have ever experienced on this track. Bravo. Where tussock, celmisia and flax often used to overhang and impede, the track was open all the way! In fact, when we got to the steepest and slipperiest part just before the junction, it was hard to find anything left to hang onto!
At the junction, all was sheltered and most pleasant with bits of sun shining through. We lingered for a while after lunch.

 

Rustlers had been cleared too, but it was the same old Rustlers Ridge, tree-rooted and bits of bog in places.
Then we were down on the contoured Pipeline track, level – did I say level? – all the way except for its now many ups and downs.
And its boggy bits get not better. Except, that  someone has where possible put sodded tracks alongside some of the worst of them. Except for the following one.

Remember the detour that led around to the Burns Creek weir crossing? Well, it’s still there, but now relegated to redundancy. The former disused track that lead down to the old non-existent bridge, has been reopened and steps dug down into the creek and back up the farther side.

Whom to thank for all the track work we benefited from today? The Green Hut group? Task Force Green? Well, thanks all, anyway. You made it all so much easier and pleasanter.

Then it was just onto the really level part of the Pipeline track, past the foot of the Burns Track, out the old Waitati Road and up the cars. As you can see from the pics, we were well wrapped up, we survived and enjoyed a good workout. – Ian.

25. 24/3/2010. Trampers. Leith Saddle, Swampy Ridge Track, return Burns Track, Pipeline Track. Moderate.

Today was the first time we tried out the track since it had replaced the steep stepped boardwalk two years ago.

 

It turned out to be an excellent tightly-packed gravel path bordered all the way to the lookout with staked sides. In contrast to the former stepped boardwalk, (a few of whose boards had also suffered breakages), we encountered no steps until well up the hillside. (This didn’t exclude some quite steep slopes also at times.) But what a path!

Doug and Sabina stop for a chat on the track.

On the steeper slope past the lookout excellent steps had replaced the former scramble. It was gravel with occasional heavy metal all the way, past Swampy Spur right up the telecommunications tower at the top.

As we walked along swampy ridge, the glint of sunshine on cones of the doppler radar navigation complex caught our attention

Further on, as we turned off swampy to go across and down to the Burns Saddle for lunch, we found the track to be beautifully cleared for most of the way. Thanks to the clearers.

We found parts of the Burns Track well cleared also, but prior to entering the bush it was so heavily covered by what appeared to be rank hook grass (but fortunately seedless at this stage) that we could detect the track only by pushing through by feel. Down at the bottom, the pipeline track had been recently mown making for easy walking. Then it was up the road and back to the cars. Seven of us ventured out. It was a good day. – Ian.

24. 24/11/2008 Trampers. Leith Saddle, Rustlers Ridge, Swampy, Leith Saddle Tracks. Leaders: Peter & Wendy

Once again the weather forecast was chancy but nine of us had the best of the day, striking rain just as we got back to the cars at the end. From just a little way down the Waitati road from the Leith Saddle, by a bridge where we parked our cars, we made our way up to and then along the nicely level Waitati-Leith pipe-line track (that takes water to Sullivans Dam), passing the foot of the Burns track and going further along to the Rustlers as we had decided to do the circuit anti-clockwise this time. Rustlers proved well cleared and we made our way easily up to the crossing junction of the 4 tracks, viz. Rustlers Ridge (and the extension of Rustlers up to Swampy Summit) and Burns (and the Burns extension to the Swampy Ridge track further north) and early-lunched at 11.30 a.m.

 

Lunch at Rustlers-Burns. Wendy, Peter, Glenice

Lunch at Rustlers-Burns intersection. Wendy, Peter, Glenice

 

Lunch at track junction. George, Hazel, Pat, Bill

Lunch at track junction. George, Hazel, Pat, Bill

Returning on the Burns, we soon crossed the Burns Creek…

Burns Creek crossing. Sabina, Hazel, Glenice, Bill Pat, Wendy

Burns Creek crossing. Sabina, Hazel, Glenice, Bill, Pat, Wendy

…and enjoyed the walk through the flax and later the bush, back down to the pipe line and out to the cars. We heard a bell-bird and two or three grey warblers but that was all. We enjoyed the bush and were rewarded by the magnificent views. – Ian

 23. 29/10/2008. Trampers. Burns-Rustler. Medium-. Leaders: Leonie, George, Ria L

22. 24/10/2007. Trampers. Rustlers, Burns. Medium. Leaders: Wendy and Peter.
21. 20/9/2006 Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, return Rustlers Ridge. Leaders: Ian, Sabina
20. 1/9/2005. Both. Burns, Rustlers. Shirley, Bruce, Doug M, Bob and Nadia, Kerri
19. 20/10/2004. Both. Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, return Burns Track. Leaders: Barbara M, Val, Arthur and Barbara.
Dunedin from Swampy. Pat

Dunedin from Swampy. Pat

View

View?

18. 2/7/2003. Trampers. Burns – Rustler Track. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Ian.

On Swampy Summit

Crssg3

Sign on Tracks' Crossing

Snow on Burns Track

Rustlers Track Sign

Near end of tramp. On pipeline.
17. 25/9/2002. Leith Saddle – Rustler Track. Medium. Leaders: Hazel, Bill and Pat.
16. 8/5/2002. Alt. Burns – Rustler. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Joyce, Val.
15. 26/9/2001. Leith Saddle, Rustlers. Medium. Leaders: Claude, Les and Margaret.
14. 31/1/2001. Rustler – Burns Track. Leaders: Nancy, Frank and Lesley.
13. 7/9/2000 Leaders: Bob & Nadia, Shirley
12. 12/7/2000. Leith Saddle – Rustler Track. Leaders: Bob H, Shirley McN, Val.
 11. 9/2/2000. Burns – Rustler Track. Leaders: Eleanor, Bev McI, Daphne.
10. 31/1/2000 Burns-Rustler. Leaders: Nancy, Frank & Lesley
9. 10/2/1999. Burns – Rustler Tracks. Eleanor, Nancy, Lesley S.
8. 30/9/1998. Pigeon Flat, Swampy, Burns Track. Leaders: Ted, Les W.
7. 15/9/1998 Leith Saddle, Swampy Spur, return Rustlers Ridge. Leaders: Les W
6. 1/7/1997 Leith Saddle, Gold Trail return Swampy Spur Leaders: Jack & Rosemary, Daphne
5. 11/11/1996 Leith Saddle, Gold Trail return Swampy Spur Leaders: Bev H, Ria L
4. 30/8/1995. Pigeon Flat, Swampy Spur, Burns Track. Medium+. Leaders: Bob H, Doug and Ngaire, Ted.
3. 13/5/1992. Burns Rustler Track. Combined bush and open country. Great views. Average. Leaders: George, Margaret S, Ivan & Bev
2. 18/10/1989 Burns Rustler Track. Average+ Native Bush. Leaders: Bob H, George H, Mary Y, Margaret S
1. 10/2/1989 Burns Rustler Track. Leaders: Eleanor B, Nancy, Lesley S

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Aug 30 2017

Clarksbrae, Clarks Junction

Published by under Uncategorized

35 km

30 August, 2017. Hikers. Clarksbrae, Clarks Junction. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Tramp Report from the hikers group.  Our walk today comprising of 21 enthusiastic  folk started at “Clarksbrae” Farm, Clarks Junction. Farm owner, Richard Nichol gave permission to us to walk along the stock lane way which was very comfortable under foot.   The walk was a gentle climb with three steep short gullies to get the heart rate up a bit. Very doable for all concerned.  The scenery encompassed The Maungatua, the Lammermoors, the Rock and Pillar Range and the Kakanui Range.  We had lunch at the trig station which gave us 360 degrees views. The walk back was all down hill. All up we walked 10.3ks.  – Jay and Jan.

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Aug 30 2017

Government Track and beyond

Published by under Trampers

32 km from carpark.
2.5+ hours from road to pole-line and Styx Road.
No. 22 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Government Track Waipori Rd. Year Round.”
Link:  DCC: Mountain biking on Government Track
Link: DCC: Government Track map.
[DCC brochure extract: Government Track. 4 hr 30 min, 17 km (return).
The track entrance is 5 km down Waipori Falls Rd on the right; parking is 100 m further on the left. Traversing the slopes of the beech-and mānuka-forested Waipori Valley south of Dunedin, the Government Track was built in the 1860s to provide access to the central goldfields. For mountain bikers there is an option of riding up and returning the same way. Alternatively, once at the top follow the pylon track left and steeply down into Waipori township, then follow the road back to the start.]

26. 30/8/2017. Trampers. Government Track. M. Leader: Dave.

14 keen  trampers met at the carpark near the start of the Government track on Waipori Road.  We soon started on the track noting the 4 twisted manuka trunks at the side of the track.  The track has a gentle grade and is 8.5km long.

The reason for the gentle grade and generous width of this track lies in its origin as the original “road” from Berwick through to the Waipori gold fields. Over 20 men were employed during the 1860’s to form this publicly-funded work, which was never much more than a bridle track unsuitable for wheeled traffic. When completed, it provided a cheaper alternative route to bring in supplies (horse drawn) from Dunedin, which previously had to be carted round via Lawrence.

Morning tea was had over the style, up the ridge, in the sun and on time at 10am!

(Margreet pic.)

We continued up the track which is through native bush, mainly manuka, kanuka and silver beech

(Margreet pic.)

. There were occasional views out to the Waipori valley and surrounding hills. A number of big tree trunks lying over the track were either scrambled under or over. There was plenty of talking and hilarity on this trip which was great!

Lunch break was at the top of the track, again in the sun.

(Margreet pic.)

We then continued along the forestry road and stopped at the highest point (580 metres) where there were great views all around,

(Phil pic.)

particularly Maungatuas, Lammerlaws and Rock and Pillar range.  Moving on to the top of the kowhai spur we stopped to get panoramic views of the Taieri plain, very clear because of the fine day. The kowhai spur is aptly named as it is steep and feet can move to the front of your boots! The next break was at a farmer’s workers hut

(Margreet pic.)

before heading down the ridge, through some bush and back on to the bottom of the Government track.  A number of birds were heard and sighted including kereru (wood pigeon) and bellbirds. On getting back to the cars we found we had covered 18.5km. A fair walk!

It was then off to the wobbly goat (with some wobbly legs) in Outram for a well, deserved coffee and more chit chat.

A great group to be with – Dave M.

25. 23/11/2016. Hikers. Government Track. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

Route map courtesy Ian. (N.B.) Used shortcut route on return. Regular route a bit longer.)

Route map, Government Track, courtesy Ian. (N.B. Used old shortcut route on return. Regular route a bit longer.)

The party consisted of 23 people.

The weather’s appearance was indifferent.  But the Government track up the Waipori Gorge afforded good shelter in the bush.  The condition of the track was excellent [thanks to track-clearing by the leaders on their recce, especially on the zig-zag beginning – ed.] and this track has a very moderate consistent gradient.  The return was a slight downhill grade & a total of approximately 9.5 kms was covered. Lunch stop …

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch on Government Track. (Ian pic and caption.)

… was brief as there was drizzle approaching.   On the return to the car park some hikers took an old short cut which gave them a minute advantage.

Hot drinks were enjoyed at the Wobbly Goat in Outram, …

Last of the Summer Wine. (Adrienne pic.)

Last of the Summer Wine. (Adrienne pic.)

… before returning to Mosgiel. – Betty and Jim.

 24. 17/2/2016. Trampers. Government Track. Leader: Various.
At the car park, Bush Road, we looked towards the silver peaks. It was raining. We were told the wind was 50k plus, so we changed our mind and decided on the Government Track.
Arrived at the lower Waipori car park. In front of us was bright blackberries. To the left a tree full of apples, and a deafening sound of crickets.
Five of us set off up Government Track. Morning tea at the grass clearing. No wind, little sun.

At the top of the Government Track, we had lunch in the sun.

Lunch in the sun. (Helen pic)

Lunch in the sun. (Helen pic)

After lunch, walked along …

Along the pole line (Helen pic)

Along the pole line (Helen pic)

… and down the pole line to the hut.

Down the pole line to the hut (Heb pic and caption)

Down the pole line to the hut. (Heb pic and caption)

Turned right, found a tape marker which led us over and down to the style on the track just below where we had morning tea. Carried on down the track to the car park.
Heard lots of wood pigeons and bellbirds. A great day’s tramp. About 17k, and quite warm temperatures. – Heb.

23. 21/10/2015 Hikers. Government Track. Leaders: Betty and Jim.
22. 27/5/2015. Trampers. Government Track, return part Kowhai Spur.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Government Track-part of Kowhai Spur (Ken pic and caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Government Track-part of Kowhai Spur. Walked 17.1 km; ave 4.4 km/hr; moving time 3hr.54min; climbed 480mtrs. (Ken pic and caption)

The day looked suspect, with some light drizzle, but the turn out at the carpark was very good, & we had 6 members on our adventure for the day. We motored out to the carpark at the Government Track where it was cold & still drizzling, so it was on with the rain jackets before we set off. Once into the bush, the rain became a non issue, but everybody kept their jackets on to combat the cold.
We had a short stop for morning tea,
1. Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic)

1. Packing up after morning tea. (Ken pic)

then pushed on towards the very muddy part of the track, just before the open grassed area, where we hoped that our planned route would bring us back to on the return journey. The track was in excellent condition, as it had just been cleared, apart from some large trees down across the upper part, which we had to crawl under.We stopped just short of the top for lunch, as there was a cool wind blowing, & the bush gave us shelter. Then it was onto the Poleline track…
2. Looking back along Poleline track. (Ken pic and caption)

2. Looking back along Poleline track. (Ken pic and caption)

…which had some snow remnants lying on it.
3. Trudging through the snow grass. (Ken pic and caption)

3. Trudging through the snow grass. (Ken pic and caption)

We estimated the distance to the top of Kowhai Spur to be about 1Km, but were surprised to find it was actually over 2kms, but when we got to the top & looked down on the amazing views of the Taieri & surrounds,
4. View from top of Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

4. View from top of Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

5. another view from top. (Ken pic and caption)

5. another view from top. (Ken pic and caption)

it was worth the trudge through the snow. We made our way down the steep track till we came to the hut on the true right of the spur,
6. Hut where we turned off Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

6. Hut where we turned off Kowhai Spur. (Ken pic and caption)

where we left the spur, & went down through a very steep paddock heading back to the Government Track. This part of the trip was quite hard, due to the steepness, & the muddy tracks formed by cattle movement. However, we were soon within sight of the Government Track, & didn’t even have to climb a fence to get back onto it. We came out at the first fence with a stile over it, [the boundary of the privately owned land] on the uphill side of the grassed area. Then it was a brisk walk back to the cars, & the trip home, punctuated with a stop at Outram…
7. Latest Cafe footwear fashion. (Ken pic and caption)

7. Latest Cafe footwear fashion. (Ken pic and caption)

8. Trampers coffee club. (Ken pic and caption)

8. Trampers coffee club. (Ken pic and caption)

…for the “Trampers Coffee Club”. – Ken.
21. 12/6/2013. Trampers. Government Track. Styx Rd return.
6 trampers ventured out for the walk up Government Track today. We stopped at a “dry area” for morning tea, at about 10am, then carried on to the top at Styx Rd. where we had lunch in the sun. The sign at the bottom had said 2 1/2 hrs to the top, & that’s very much what it took us.
Lunch

Lunch at top of Government Track. (Ken pic and caption)

After lunch we had a discussion on whether we tried Kowhai Spur, or just go back down the way we had come. The unknown condition of Kowhai Spur [very steep & slippery] meant that the decision was made to go back the way we had come, so we set off, & arrived back at the cars at 3:00pm.
Thanks to the earlier start time of 9:00 instead of 9:30, we were able to complete this 18.5km walk before it got too cold in the afternoon, & it gave us a time buffer if somebody had injured themselves.
We walked 18.5km
moving time 4hr 15mins
climbed 364mtrs
– Ken.
20. 3/10/2012. Both. Government Track. Leaders: Graham, Judy.
There were 17 of us, (but one turned back before the paddock). We did between 8-10 km in total, getting up to the beech section for lunch (much further than the Hikers did last time). The wind across the farm paddock was as severe as the last time the Trampers had done it. Several in the group were doing the track for their first time and were equally amazed at the ease of the gradient, and appalled at the muddy section just prior to the paddock. (They didn’t know how much better the present marked route was than some earlier routes through the slough.) This, and some other tricky bits took careful negotiating for those unsteady on their feet.
Four of the Trampers left early and did the whole track. Ken’s GPS record shows that they did 18.2 km at 4.4km/hr average. Moving time was only 4hrs 9min.Total ascent was 523 mtrs. They took an extended lunch break, making stopped time 1hr 19min. – Ian.
19. 6/4/2011. Both. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret.
There is no comment from the hikers on this one, so here is a report from the trampers.
It mitigated against the intended ‘bothness’, but the leaders generously permitted three appreciative trampers to set off to do the whole track. The sign posts indicate 2.5 hours up and 2 hours down. The trampers almost made the 2 hours down but fell well short of the time up. 19 km there and back!
When we arrived at the ‘paddock’, the predicted wind was there in full force and it was a real battle to make our way across and around its slope and back into the shelter of the bush. The sloppy muddy gully just below the paddock gets no better as time goes by, despite the many attempts to re-route the track to avoid it.

GPS of Government Track from the road to the Pole Line. Courtesy Ken. Depicts how close Kowhai Spur is to the track. The multitude of gullies traversed by the track are clearly depicted. 19 km ret.

The track was well-cleared and the gradient as usual beautifully steady.

A shot of beech trees taken looking across one of the upper gullies.

Track disappearing up into the gully. Taken from the same spot as the one above.

The above pic shows only a modest amount of pig rooting. It was much worse in other places with us having to tread a new path amongst the upturned soil.
Temperatures were cooler up at the Pole Line so we retreated from it back from the gusty wind into the shelter of the manuka bush to munch a quick lunch. There was nothing tempting us to linger long.
Doug set a good pace on the return trip and the clear track allowed us to step it out with a good swing.
Back at the exposed paddock, we found the wind had lost none of its force, but fortunately it was a tail-wind this time. Then it was the atrocious gully again. The paddock and its gully had to be the worst features of the tramp. – Ian
18. 3/2/2010. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Neil, Lex.
Location: 30 km.
17. 9/9/2009 Government Track, return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Ian, Sabina.
Starting Government track. George

Beginning Government track. George, Susan

A bit further along the track. Susan, Sabina

A bit further along the track. Susan, Sabina, Glenice

Morning tea on the paddock.

Morning tea on the paddock. Susan, Ken, George, Glenice, Sabina

Through the silver beech section. Ken.

Through the silver beech section. Ken, George, Susan, Glenice, Sabina

Lunch at the pole line. George, Glenice

Lunch at the pole line. George, Glenice

Lunch on other side of track. Sabina, Susan

Lunch on other side of track. Sabina (showing her colourful hat), Susan

DOC sign pointing back down the track.

DOC sign indicating back down the track.

Start Kowhai Spur. Ken.

View from top of Kowhai Spur. Waipori Lake and Taieri River gorge beyond. Ken Susan, George, Glenice, Sabina.

Further down.

Shaws Hill road and ridge from a little further down Kowhai Spur. Sabina, Susan detectable.

Rest by former hut site. Glenice, Sabina

Preparing to rest near site of former hut which had been moved up the hill behind camera.. Glenice, Sabina

16. 17/9/2008 Waipori Gorge Area, 1860s Government Track, Waipori Leaders: Bill H, Peter B
The 'disturbed' kanuka

The ‘disturbed’ kanuka

The ‘disturbed’ kanuka

The programme said ‘Waipori’, but it really meant Bill H’s traditional walk up the “Gummint Track”. As a past long-serving employee in the area (both on a farm and in electricity supply) he was the ideal leader.  As slips had made the upper reaches of the track difficult, the 15 of us began walking from the end of the seal up the Waipori road, then crossing farmland and having morning tea beside the river. After that we were following the route taken by early prospectors up the steady incline of the old 1860s Government standardised track for drays and horses to the Central Otago Goldfields. After an initial 3-minute climb, the track maintains a remarkably consistent, gentle gradient considering theodolites were not used and the construction teams used handtools!  The day was calm and mild, and spring growth was evident in the lovely mixed broadleaf forest, with signs of fuschia flowers and kowhai. The track was carpeted with innumerable ’skellingtons’ of fuschia leaves (the fuschia is one of the few deciduous NZ trees) which made it soft and springy and patterned.There were also Kanuka, Matai, Totara and juvenile Lancewood. At one point there were 4 Kanuka alongside the track that must have had a disturbed childhood as they all had right-angle bends in them! The sound of the river gradually receded, and at lunchtime we came out onto cleared farmland with cattle and a good view up the gorge to look at while we ate. We returned by the same route.  There was some birdlife to remark upon– paradise ducks, bellbirds, warblers- but the most remarkable was at a willow tree on the river flat in which Arthur counted 13 wood pigeons, all greedily gorging great gulps of green tips.  A very pleasant walk of about 16km through lovely local terrain.  – Bob

15. 12/12/2007. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Bill H

Resting among the trees

Only seven hikers took advantage of the ideal place to be on a very warm & humid day, the lovely bush of the Government Track in the Waipori area. It is a lovely place for a hike. Beautiful bush and beech forest. Lots of birds singing in the trees and great views of surrounding bush and road to Waipori Falls. The track is not too difficult and although you go fairly high it is a relatively gentle climb most of the way. With only a small number we took our time and lapped up the cool and pleasant conditions of the track. Morning tea sitting by the track just after 10am, and then, about 12noon, 5 of us decided we would stop for lunch. Two of the group thought they’d like a bit more of a challenge so went further up the track and had lunch before heading back. Those of us in the larger group found a really lovely spot in the beech forest to sit, chat and enjoy our lunch break. Then it was back down the track, (down hill all the way!) to the cars. All agreed we had had a very enjoyable days hiking. – Bev.

14. 29/11/2006. Hikers. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
13. 5/7/2006. Both. Government Track. Leaders: (Easy+): Doug M, Bob H; (Easy):  Arthur & Barbara
12. 21/9/2005 Arthur & Barbara, Bill H, Lance & Lois
11. 22/9/2004. Hikers. Government Track, return. Easy. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Frank and Lesley.
10. 26/5/2004 Lesley S, Irene, Les W, Mary M, Ray
9. 22/10/2003. Both. Government Track. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Helen S, Kerri; Hikers: Mary M, Barbara L.
8. 13/2/2002. Combined. Government Track. Leaders:
7. 6/12/2000. Government Track. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Mary Y.
13/9/2000 Bill H, Bill & Pat
6. 7/7/1999. Government Track. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Ray.
5. 7/10/1998. Government Track. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
4. 16/7/1997. Government Track. Leaders: Hugh, Bill H, Lesley S
3. 23/10/1996. Hikers. Government Track, Waipori. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Ted.
2. 14/12/1994. Government Track. Easy. This is a morning walk only, and as it is our last official tramp for the year, please bring some finger food to share for lunch, to be eater at the picnic ground. Leaders: Denise, Mary Y, Les and Mavis.
1. 13/3/1991 Government Track, Waipori Gorge, return Kowhai Spur. Nice bush and tussock walk. Average+. Leaders: Denise, Hugh and Judith, Ria de J

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Aug 23 2017

Taieri Ferry and Finlayson Roads, Bells farm, Kennedys, Millennium.

Published by under Trampers,Year round

Click Taieri River Geology for background information.

Wardell’s/White House 25 km from car park.

12. 23/8/2017.Trampers. Millennium Track, Kennedys, Bells. M. Leader: Arthur.

Galloway Road tracks map. (Map courtesy Arthur.)

Only 8 trampers were out today to enjoy the good weather and the  tramp. The Taieri Ferry Bridge was closed for ongoing (all winter, so far) repairs, so we travelled to the south end of the flood free highway before turning back onto Taieri Ferry Road.

Parking at the usual parking area, it was 10 am as we began walking. The low lying bits of the track were quite wet and muddy, as expected.

Looking at the damage from the rain. (Helen pic and caption.)

After 15 minutes we came to the picnic area on the riverbank for our smoko stop. It was about low tide and the river was very low.

Following the Millennium Track again, a side trip to the river was made at John Bull Gully where two DOC workers were cutting the grass around the picnic area. They had arrived by boat, which was sensible.

At John Bull gully where some maintenance was being done. They traveled by boat. (Helen pic and caption.)

From John Bull Gully it is rather a good uphill grunt for some way, but eventually the highest point of the track was gained – a 5 minute stop being taken here at the observation seat to admire the views.

View from the seat. Magic. (Helen pic and caption.)

We turned off the Millennium Track now, uphill beside the gorse, and then through the pine trees to reach the end of the deer fenced lane on the Kennedy Farm. It was up slope all the way but the lane took us up to Finlayson Road. It was 12.30 pm now, so was time for the lunch stop. High cloud was making the sunshine a bit weak, but with almost no breeze, so it was a pleasant, high up spot for the occasion.

We had to follow Finlayson Road towards Waihola before turning onto Galloway Road and followed it down to its end. We were high up here giving us very good views to enjoy.

The last leg was down through a recent logged forestry block.

Down through the felled forestry and lots of sticky mud. (Helen pic and caption.)

The going was good at first, but further down a digger rowing up the “slash” had left the dozed dirt track in rather a mess. But by taking care we negotiated this area safely. It was about 200 metres down through the standing pine trees to get to the bottom, where we emerged back at the carpark.

Today’s tramp was 12.7 km, and all were happy. On returning to Mosgiel THE BLEND coffee shop enjoyed our patronage.

It had been another good day’s social tramp for our group. Thanks to all. – Art.

11. 23/7/2014. Trampers. Millennium Track, Kennedys, Bells.

GPS

GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 13.4 km; moving ave 4.5 km/hr; moving time 2 hr 44 min; climbed 530 m.

Ignore the missing piece of track on the Google Earth view, as I forgot to reset the GPS before we started off.
With the day looking promising weather wise, 4 set off to walk the Millennium Track from Henley , then up through Kennedys property, & back down one of the ridges onto the river road again. We stopped at the Taieri Scenic Reserve picnic table for morning tea, & then went on to John Bull Gully, where we had a short rest before tackling the steep climb up to the seat on the John Bull track, & over the fence behind here to walk up past Kennedys house & onto Finlayson Rd. where we stopped for lunch in the shelter of some flax bushes.

Neil enjoying his cuppa at lunchtime.

Neil enjoying his cuppa at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

Arthur and Ian at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

Arthur and Ian at lunchtime. (Ken pic and caption)

It was then a short walk along to the turn off onto Galloway Rd. We walked the full length of Galloway Rd. & climbed the fence into a very wet & sloppy grassed paddock, which was quite steep in places, but luckily nobody fell over. All this area was new to everybody on the tramp, so it was a case of following our instincts to find the way back to the cars, which was accomplished without any trouble.

10. 11/7/2012. Millennium, John Bull, Kennedy’s Farm, Finlayson Road, Galloway Road, Bell’s Farm ridge, Ferry Road. 12 km.

Kms indications 1 & 2 are Millennium, 3-4 is thru John Bull Gully, 5 is up Kennedys Farm, 6 is Finalyson Rd turning off into Galloway Rd, 7-10 is down ridge, 10 to end  is Ferry Road. (Phone died before completing circui!)

Seven of us enjoyed a good winter tramp, warm in the sun and calm, even on the top. Went down the same ridge on Bells Farm that we did last time. Note: the way to find it (better than last time!) is to turn down 4WD track adjacent to a large corrugated shed part-way down Galloway Rd before the road swings away over to the right. The track skirts the top of a gully before emerging onto the ridge. Then just follow your nose down.
We elected to do this ridge rather than the even better one at the end of Galloway road as the leasee had reported he was running bulls in a paddock near the bottom of the ridge! – Ian

9. 17/6/2009 Trampers Taieri Ferry Road, Millennium, Kennedys, Finlayson Road, Bells Farm. Leaders: George, Bill M
It was only at the carpark that we were sure that frosty road conditions were going to turn out safe enough for setting out. Four of us in Bill’s car met George at Wardells cottage. George had planned a clockwise walk this time, starting on the Millennium Track. We stopped off soon at the track turn-off to the river for morning tea.
Cuppa on Millenniu. Lex, George, Bill

Cuppa on Millennium. Doug, Lex, George, Bill

Snow on the track was more obvious as we ascended to the seat on the John Bull where we planned to turn off up to Kennedys farm.

Pause at seat on John Bull. Bill, George, Doug, Lex.

Pause at seat on John Bull. Bill, George, Doug.

As we got up near the house snow (and a chilly breeze) was at its thickest.

Snow thicker here. Doug.

Snow thicker here. Doug, George, Lex, Bill.

At this point George had already determined to ask at the house where we might lunch in a bit of shelter. “Boots off and come inside!” was the response, providing a lunch stop in the most civilised of surroundings.
A long time after, we (reluctantly?) resumed the tramp. Snow had been graded off Finlayson Road and only semi-melted slush was left. We turned down Galloway Road, but had gone only a short distance before George decided it was time to turn off to to descend a ridge. After descending the ridge for a considerable distance we were bushed out by heavy scrub and had to return up far enough to try another next-door ridge. This gave clear access to the marshy flats below.

Going down farm ridge.

Returning down farm ridge. Doug, Lex, Bill, George.

Matters got a little dodgy at the ridge’s base but we soon got onto a squelchy paddock yielding to a less squelchy track that led out alongside a drain to Ferry Road.
A final walk along the road back down to the cars ended a most enjoyable walk out on the snow.
I now realise there are at least three navigable ridges between Finlayson and Ferry Roads, although George seems to have done them all some time in the past. There was the one we did 7 years ago, the one we did today and a further one from the foot of Galloway Road that Bill recalled Mr Kennedy advising we take but which George must have failed to pick up on. – Ian.

7. 12/4/2006. Trampers. Henley, Waihola Road, Millennium Track. Medium. Leaders: Irene, Dot B.
6. 12/1/2005. Trampers. Wardells, Waihola Road, Millennium Track. Leaders: George, Bob H.
5. 31/7/2002 Taieri Ferry to Waihola Road and Bells farm. Kennedys, Millennium. Bell Farm. Seek permission. Lambing Aug to Oct. Cars park halfway down Taieri Ferry Road, end of forest. Up hill till lunch time. Wenita permit.  Wenita Map. Leaders: George, Bob H, Colleen
4. 13/11/1996. Henley Ferry to Waihola Road and return. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Bev McI.
3. 21/8/1996. Taieri Ferry to Waihola Road and Bell’s Farm. Medium. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Bev McI
2. 15/3/1995. Between Galloway Road and Waihola Road. Medium. Leaders: Doug and Ngaire, Margaret and Les.
1. 6 Apr 1994 John Bull track, over paddock to Finlayson Road, back on John Bull Track. Leaders: Les S, Bill H, Doug & Ngaire.

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