Apr 20 2018

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2018

Autumn Start Time: 9.00 a.m.

25 Apr. ANZAC Day
Trampers: To be announced
Hikers: Street Ramble from 1 pm $4.00 Margreet, Neil and Lester Both tramps cancelled.

2 May.
Both: Millennium Track from Henley. M. $5.00. Eleanor.

9 May.
Trampers: McKendry Road/Maungatuas. M-H. $4.00. Jill R.
Hikers: Varley’s Hill. M. $7.00. Dawn and Pam. Continue Reading »

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Apr 18 2018

Deep Stream, Rocklands Station. Welshs Road. Lawlors Old Farm.

Published by under Hikers

Background Information to Deep Stream project
No. 60 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lawlor Farm”
Closed for lambing Sept-Nov.
50 km from car park.
Seek permissions.

14. 18/4/2018. Trampers. Welshs Road, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leader: Keith and Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Keith.

It was a beautiful autumn day as 14 trampers travelled for about 40 minutes, out past Clarks Junction to Welshs Road.

The cars were parked by the woolshed near Deep Stream on Steve Nichol’s farm. We all had to sign the visitors book on arrival, for “elf and safety” reasons.

The sun was lovely, but the breeze was decidedly cool, as we made our start.

To be different, the leaders had planned on a clockwise circuit, and also climbing uphill through the paddocks to extend the distance.

The steeper beginning warmed all the participants nicely, before having morning tea in the head of a gully – somewhat sheltered from the breeze.

Morning tea towards Deep Stream. (Phil pic and caption.)

Continuing up through the paddocks the scenery was magnificent wherever we looked. At the highest point of our day we came back to Welshs Road. The wind was keen here, but there was a good view over to the Lammermoors – the “ship at anchor” was visible.

Now it was downhill all the way to Deep Stream, road at first and then following the farm’s boundary fence.

The “Te Papanui Conservation Park” was just over the fence which we had to climb through at the last. The views looking down in to Deep Stream were great as we descended to the weir.

Time for some photographs …

The weir! (Phil pic and caption.)

… before walking the 4W.D. road above the stream.

Follow the leader. (Phil pic and caption.)

Near the mouth of Deep Creek we stopped for an early lunch on a long table thoughtfully provided. A nice spot in the sunshine, and ideal for the occasion.

….and if one should accidentally fall there would be…….sitting on the wall! (Phil pic and caption.)

The 4W.D. road was up and down a bit, but took us back to the cars, after having walked 9.8 km.

All agreed that the walk down through the Deep Stream gorge, below the weir, was the highlight of the day. It had been another very successful and happy day’s tramp for our group.

And so back to Outram, to stop at a the ‘Goat’ for water, food, tea, coffee, hot chocolate, cold beverage, etc (tick the boxes applicable please). – Art.

13. 17/2/2016. Hikers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leaders: Bob and Peter.

GPS of route alongside Deep Stream.

GPS of route alongside Deep Stream.

The leaders considerately stopped the cars about 3k short of the old farm house to give some level walking to those who didn’t wish to tackle, beyond there, the climbs over the three steep ridges on the way into the weir. (As matters turned out, they did tackle a further climb or two after all.) We all stopped first, a kilometer or so along the road, for a cuppa.

Hikers. Cuppa. A km or two from the cars.

Hikers. Cuppa. A km or two from the cars.

Eight of us went on  to reach reached the barb-wired locked gate, (some getting further)!

A nostalgic shot (yet once again, couldn't resist it) of the 'confluential' point where the Deep Creek tributary enters Deep Stream.

En route, a nostalgic shot (yet once again, couldn’t resist it) of the ‘confluential’ point where the Deep Creek tributary enters Deep Stream.

En route, (whoops, too many ‘en routes’), we passed a couple of bee hive sets of frames, with Betty getting stung several times from one of them. Happily Lester was there to help remove the bees and their stings.

On our return, we stopped in the a patch of shade for lunch.

The leaders (& Doug) lunching in the shade.

The leaders (& Doug) lunching in the shade.

The day grew warmer but fortunately not nearly as exceptionally hot as it was a fortnight ago. We enjoyed a brief cooling passing shower when getting close to the cars on our return.

The ridges are getting higher and steeper than ever to climb over and the tramp extension by the extra three or so kilometres gap between cars and house wearied this reporter a bit but for the others it was a breeze. A good day out. A good reminder of a tramp the club has enjoyed many times before. – Ian.
12. 23/4/2014. Hikers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir. M. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS

GPS of route. The tail with “2” in it was a false uphill recce with none of the necessary downhill bits one or two of us had remembered.

A good memory is an attribute we came to wish we collectively had more of. Driving down Welshs Road, we  made two false stops before plucking up enough courage to take our cars yet further on to the actual Holiday Camp yards. (However, from recollection (what’s that again??) the “Both” 8/2009 group [indicated below] walked virtually the length of Welshs Rd just to reach the HP, well-notified on its gate).

Neat Caption (John pic)

Neat Caption editing, John! (John pic)

Well, we eventually made it there by car and walked on and up a bit to stop for our morning cuppa.

After that stop, taken briefly because of a strong cold wind at the time, memory let us down again. A few recalled the road had several ups and downs in  it, but the road that we then took led us only up and up and up. After some confused conferring, with nervous hope of finding the right way, we retraced our steps back down the way we had come, to a gate just adjacent to our morning tea stop. Soon the reassuring ups and downs emerged, and a morning tea spot taken on an earlier tramp confirmed we we on track. (See Trampers 11/2009 for the morning tea break pics)

However the earlier uphill foray had served to discourage four of our 22-strong group from further uphill struggles and they returned to the cars. That was too bad. But eighteen still persisted.

The stream views were most rewarding. The view of the Deep Creek (exit/entrance?? – well, confluence, then) into Deep Stream looked better from an angle different from that of a pic below taken on an earlier trip.

 

Confluence

A more picturesque view of Deep Creek debouching into Deep Stream. (See “Deep Creek Tributary” below for the other one)

A locked gate (part of which can be seen at the right in the pic below) just prior to the weir proved a further deterrent, and only five persisted beyond it. On rejoining the other twelve they found them already getting into their lunch. It was the right time too.

Lunch

Lunch by the locked gate. (John pic)

We straggled back to the cars in a long drawn out string of ones and twos, but all eventually made it, to unsurprisingly  find the earlier four long gone.

Then it was only for a dwindling ten (did Elaine deliberately hide herself behind Pat?) of us to reunite at the No 8 w Herbs cafe for a drink of …

Cafe

After tramp coffee at Outram.

… – you’ve guessed it – coffee, not to mention a tasty treat of chips and dips, courtesy Elaine. – Ian

11. 26/2/2014. Trampers. Welshs Rd, Old Farm, Deep Stream, Weir.
GPS of route

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We only walked 7.6 km; 1 hr 57 mins moving time, 3.9 km/hr; climbed 318 mtrs; max elevation 544 mtrs.

This was a tramp that most of the 9 that turned up had never done before.
We walked up the gorge all the while looking down to Deep Stream to see if we could find a more interesting walk than on the road with it’s quite steep climbs. Once again most of the ones who are going on the Motatapu trip next week were carrying their big packs with some weight in them.
We found some nice rocks to sit on for morning tea …
Morning tea breakHeb

Morning tea break. (Heb pic and caption)

… at the top of one of the hills we had to climb, so we got a good view of the countryside. Then it was further into the gorge, until we arrived at the weir.
The weir. (Heb pic and caption)

The weir. (Heb pic and caption)

After a look around there, & a drink to freshen up …
Topping up the fluids at the weir. (Heb pic and caption)

Topping up the fluids at the weir. (Heb pic and caption)

… it was decided that we would go up the steep road opposite to where we were sitting, & walk back through the paddocks. George & Rea both remembered doing this in earlier times, so we set off, & headed away from the gorge up into the paddocks where we split up a bit & had lunch in two groups. Then it was down a gravel road that George assured us we would find, & back a short distance to the cars. The stream looked inviting, as it was a reasonably hot day, without a cloud in the sky, but nobody was game to get wet !!
After examining some peoples’ packs, & the way they were wearing them, we had an adjustment session to see if we could improve the fit for one member of the group, & I’ll also be looking at mine before next week, as it seems to be sitting too low on my hips.
We are becoming the Coffee Club No. 2 as we once again called into Outram for a chat over a cuppa on the way home, although Rea, & Hazel walked  all the way around to the Berry Farm shop for a Yoghurt Ice Cream !!
Everyone agreed that it was a good walk with interesting scenery along the way. – Ken.
10. 25/11/2009. Trampers, with a lot of Hikers! Deep Stream Holidays.  Pipeline Road. Deep Stream Weir. Easy+. Leaders: Bill and Pat.
It was 10.00 a.m. before our cars reached the Deep Stream Holidays Park. So we walked on along the pipeline road before stopping for a delayed morning tea in a sheltered corner of the road.
cuppa

We stopped for a late cuppa.

Other group at tea break

Other group at tea break. (Bill pic)

The road wound on up and down as the pipeline followed up beside the stream.
road

The road stretched on.

A point of interest was to see the Deep Creek confluence point with Deep Stream.
Deep Creek tributary.

Deep Creek tributary.

Eventually we arrived at the weir.
Weir. (Ken pic).

Weir. (Ken pic).

We climbed the steps from the weir to the road above. Some of us found a way up to the rock looming behind.
Steps up from the weir.

Steps up from the weir. (Ken pic).

From the rock buttress, we had a grand view of weir and dam.
dam

View of dam from the rock buttress. (Ken pic)

On the way back, Bill pointed out a rock wall built by Chinese goldminers to divert the stream.
wall

Old diverting wall from Chinese goldmining days.

9. 5/8/2009 Both. Welshs Road, Deep Stream, Lawlors Old Farm now Deep Stream Holidays. Easy+. Leaders: George, Bev.

click to enlarge

RomdalesB4

Romdales. Where there’s a wool…. (Bruce pic and caption)

RomdalesAftr

….there’s away (Bruce pic and caption!)

Climbing Welsh Road by Deep Stream. (Bill pic). Molly

Climbing Welsh Road by Deep Stream. (Bill pic). Molly

Another view of Deep Stream

Another view of Deep Stream. (Bill pic)

Deep Stream above the weir. (Bruce pic and caption)

Deep Stream above the weir. (Bruce pic and caption)

In holiday mood.

In holiday mood. (Bruce pic and caption). Evelyn, Pat, Bev, Molly, Fred, Bill, George

Pot of Gold

If we just keep straight ahead we should hit a pot of gold (Bruce pic and caption)

8. 14/4/2004 Hikers. Deep Stream. Lawlors Old Farm. Easy+. Leaders: Joyce , Jim & Thelma
7. 15/5/2002 Alt. Deep Stream, Lawlors Old Farm. Easy. Leader: Mary L, Margaret and Les.
6. 23/9/1998. Lawlor Farm, Deep Stream. Leaders: Mary L, Sabina.
5. 25/9/1996. Deep Stream from Rocklands Station to Dam. Leaders: Jack M, Diana and Ray
4. 10/5/1995 Lawlor Farm. Medium. Leaders: Peg C, Mary L, Sabina, Diana W
3. 2/12/1992 Welsh Road, Deep Stream, Lawlors Farm. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Peg A, Peg C, Peg M
2. 25/4/1990 Welsh Road, Deep Stream. Great tramping area. Easy+. Only one small hill. Leaders: Mary Y, Diana B, Hugh D, Betty B
1. 1/2/1989 Deep Stream. Rocklands Station. A long but not difficult walk. Follow pipeline to dam. Leaders: Daphne, Denise, Mary

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Apr 18 2018

Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream

No. 89 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Outram Glen – Lee Stream Year Round”

11. 18/4/2018. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. H. Leaders: Clive and Jim.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Remembered to switch app on only at morning tea stop, so total distance more like 9 km.

26 Hikers and Ramblers set out from Outram Glen scenic reserve alongside the Taieri River to Lee Stream.   This was our first visit since the storm last year caused a lot of damage to the track and trail.   Repairs are on going, apparent from the pile of gravel on the track and washouts still to be repaired on the trail.   Several trees still block the trail.

We arrived at the end of the track about 10.15am and had morning tea on the rock strewn beach beside the river.

Morning tea at the end of the track. (Clive pic and caption.)

Several ramblers and a couple of the hikers then turned back to the start.   An intrepid 19 hikers continued over the trail, followed by fantails and tom tits to Lee Stream.   There seemed to be more hills to climb and they seemed steeper.   Maybe that’s an age thing!

Arriving at Lee Stream around lunch time we picked spots out of the wind to have lunch.

Lunch at Lee Stream – not quite there. (Clive pic and caption.)

It was pointed out by a senior hiker that we hadn’t actually reached Lee Stream and should continue to the stream.   Walking a further 100 meters got us there. (see photo)

Lee Stream. (Clive pic and caption.

Lunch of others at Lee Stream. (Ian panorama pic and caption.)

The return journey took longer than normal and unfortunately one member suffered a wound to her calf muscle on a broken bush stump whilst trying to cross a washout.

A tired crew arrived back at the carpark after 3.30pm.   It was intended to visit a local coffee shop, but when we got there it was closing,.so 2 cups of coffee next time!  Happy Tramping.  – Clive

10. 9/11/2006. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jennifer and Dorothy S.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Total elevation of 433m the product of  ALL the UPS on the track, – the by-product of all the downs!

Morning tea by the Taieri. (Ian pic and caption.)

Morning tea by the Taieri. Threatening rain cautioned some to don parkas but there were hot sunny periods in the day as well.  (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream “beach” at the confluence of the stream with the Taieri River. (Ian pic and caption.)

9. 10/8/2016. Hikers. Outram, Historical Park and Museum, Outram Glen. E. Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Nike GPS Route Map

Nike GPS Route Map

A good frost today but lovely and sunny for our hike around Outram

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

which was varied with a visit to the Museum,

Museum

Waiting in the sun outside the Museum to regroup.

Vintage Park and then onto the Glen track.

Wheelbarrow

Standing aside to allow a motorised tracked wheelbarrow returning empty from delivering gravel to resurface the track. A sunny spot. (Liz pic.)

Frost (Liz pic.)

And a shaded spot. Frost. (Liz pic.)

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point.

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point of the Outram Glen – Lee Stream Track.

We numbered 25 and finished off with the Local Coffee Shop.
It was a wee bit different owing to the unknown conditions from the nasty weather three days earlier but as usual the company was good and we achieved our goals thanks to everybody. – Liz and Alex.

8. 26/3/2014. Hikers. Taieri Musem, Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of track to Lee Stream

GPS of track to Lee Stream

We were met with a surprise variation to simply walking the Outram Glen track. The leaders took us first up to the Taieri Historical Museum via an interesting side track shortly up the George King Memorial Drive by the bridge over Traquair/Whare Creek. We were seduced by the machinery museum building at the top of the property with its wonderful variety of early Taieri farming implements. They found it hard to drag us away.
We made our way down the driveway this time, and past a surprising number of cars to the track beginning. Time had passed so the leaders made our cuppa stop at the crest of the track’s large rise just past the entrance and in a nice sunny spot.
Then on we went till we reached the great set of steps that took us up from the river side to the high undulating bush track, or more officially, ‘route’. From the top of the steps on to the end of the route was a long series of regrouping pauses, where the more able waited for the less able to catch up. But get to the end we did.
A note to the side: On our way to the start of the track, we noticed Bob’s ute had joined our parked cars while we were up at the Museum. Some knew that he did have a prior commitment and must have presumed he would have caught up with us somewhere on the track but knew nothing of the leaders’ plan to visit the museum first. Eventually we did meet him, towards the end of the track, returning. It was all just too sad a misunderstanding.
We discovered the reason for the group of cars at the start when we reached the end. By the Lee Stream mouth was a large group of young St Mary’s School pupils being instructed on safety measures pertaining to launching inflatable rafts drawn up nearby.

Launching

Launching the rafts

There were eight rafts in all, four setting out at a time to practise the art of paddling in the stiller waters upstream before heading off down over the first set of rapids below.
Afloat

The paddling rehearsal before negotiating the first rapids

By this time we had finished our lunch and just prior to entering the bush track again, were surprised again to see the rafts anchored against a cliff on the opposite side of the river, and each pupil being required to leap off a ledge in the cliff into the water, resurface, and to drift with their life jackets down to and be helped back into their rafts immediately downstream. They did this wonderfully, some choosing a yet higher ledge to leap from. Bravo.
We seemed to make much faster return time down the track than when earlier coming up, and were regaled from time to time by excited shouts and screams below us as the rafters made their way downriver.
As we neared the end, it was just a case of now of negotiating the rise at whose summit we had earlier in the day had our cuppa, (it’s steeper and more laborious on the up-track side of the rise and this reporter, at the tired end of the tramp, hates it) and we were back at the cars and en route to home.
Thanks to Betty and Jim for their imaginative planning of the day and careful looking after us. – Ian.
7. 5/10/2011. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Leader: George.
Lambing got in the way of the programmed Lee Stream ramble. The Outram Glen walk was a most successful replacement. 20 of us went. The first bit’s nice and flat in general. We stopped early for morning tea by the river. A cold wind drove us back up to shelter in the approach track.

Down-track view.

Up-track view.

Beyond the sign indicating the more difficult part of the track was the (never less) challenging (never-ending as well) set of steps. They are now well-worn but still very serviceable. We all made the ascent at our individual rates of speed. Beyond that, the various ups and downs are still well serviced by the sets of stone steps. They have stood the test of time and are firmly embedded. Well made. We all made our way to the Lee Stream confluence with the Taieri, some arriving earlier, others later. Again an early lunch enjoyed with the warmth of sun and calm, and cooler bits of  breeze. But still comfortable enough.

Some of us at lunch.

The confluence of the two streams at lunchtime.

Again, we wandered back each at our own pace. A pleasant day, sheltered by bush from the coolish wind. – Ian
6. 3/9/2008. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Easy. Leaders: Evelyn and Bob.

Nineteen of us walked the riverwalk from Outram Glen to Lee Stream. The weather was threatening but we had just a little rain, and with no wind and a mild temperature it was an enjoyable 12 kilometre expedition. Many of us had not seen the Taieri River so brown and surging for a long time.
The track in the upper reaches was quite slippery so we needed to watch our feet. Some birdsong from bellbird and fantail was appreciated as was the presence of wood pigeons. We had lunch at Lee Stream where a number could remember past picnics beneath willow trees.
Congratulations to Evelyn and Bob for leading the group. Evelyn did a stalwart job in trying to keep the group together, trying to both race ahead to hold back the fast movers and take care to see the rear guard were still with us. She even managed to end up with one more tramper at the finish than she had at the start. Well done Evelyn!
Bob provided us with some drama by taking a tumble. However he bounced back and even did it again to keep the medics on their toes. He finished the tramp in fine fettle and good humour, leading the bulk of the group on the homeward stretch. We hope the scratches and bruises do not cause too much discomfort.
George celebrated his 80th birthday and first great grandchild by handing out beautiful chocolates to all.
Altogether it was a satisfying day with a return to home base before the southerly caught up with us. – Marjorie

5. 6/6/2007 Ian, Doug M, Eleanor B, Joyce S

4. 3/5/2006. Both. Outram Glen. Leaders: Ian, Doug, Les & Margaret S, Bev H
3. 9/2/2005. Both. Outram Glen. Leader: Nancy
2. 19/8/1998. Outram Bridge, Taieri Gorge. Leaders: Nelson and Dot.
1. 25/3/1992. Outram Bridge – Taieri Gorge. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Doreen, Molly

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Apr 11 2018

Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Rongomai

Published by under Trampers

Location: 37 km.
From Evansdale Glen. Route. DOC. Stream crossings. Preferably February when water most likely to be low.
Track up Careys Creek alone: an easy walk.
Click information on the Seacliff Dam, historical creek track and pipeline.

13. 11/4/2018. Trampers. Evansdale Glen –Rongomai/Honeycomb. M. Leader: Dave.

How could 5 trampers’ turn down coffee out with Margreet and Neil and Jill’s fresh hot muffins on a cold wet morning?

Well they did! It was off to Evansdale Glen with a little snow on the side of the motorway on the way. The weather cleared a bit as we started. The creek was up after the rain so it was wet socks and boots as we made our first crossing of Careys creek.

Just out of the car and into it…brrrrr. (Phil pic and caption.)

The discussion then started on having waterproofing on the inside of boots? We were sheltered in the gorge of the creek. The bird song was very pleasant – bellbirds, tuis, fantails and the odd wood pigeon.

Trying to get heat to the feet! (Phil pic and caption.)

  At the Honey  comb/ Rongomai intersection we decided to take the Rongomai track just to guage how slippery it might be. The track was a little steep to start with.  As we followed the well-defined track we walked through very attractive areas of quite big Kanuka with smaller plants of Lancewood, Mapau, Broad leaf and the odd small Totara.

Because of the wetness of the track, we took the connecting track to the honey comb track. This was pleasant with the many ferns green and lush. We then followed up to the top of the honeycomb track to meet Semple road.

Standing on the ‘snowline’. (Phil pic and caption.)

Skyline from the top of the Honeycomb Track. (Phil pic and caption.)

Lunch was had in the shelter of trees and a disused gravel pit at the top.

We then followed back down the Rongomai to Careys creek again – illusion the creek seemed to be higher!  The leader who shall be nameless slipped on the slippery rocks and got wet!  Phil to the rescue. Thanks Phil.

The discussion continued on the design of new boots, with a special one way valve and pump to eject the water from within them .  Arthur gave us a demonstration.  He is now applying for a special patent for boots with these features.

Afternoon tea started with a taste of blackberries on the side of the track, followed by coffee at Blueskin Bay Nurseries and Café. – Dave

12. 17/8/2016. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Honeycomb, Rongomai. M. Leader: A Heenan.
Seven Trampers were delighted to discover that some thoughtful person had placed stepping stones to allow us to cross Careys Creek with dry feet, at the beginning of our day’s tramp. The second crossing also had the stones.
It was cold walking up the Careys Creek track in the shade, and with evidence that the frost had not thawed for some days in parts.
We stopped at the first sunny spot that was encountered to have our morning tea. It was only a very tiny spot, just adequate but welcome for our purpose.
Continuing on up this very good track, we eventually came to the junction.

A year ago our group did the circuit in a clockwise direction, so to be different (I like being different), we went up the Rongomai Track.

Up the Rongomai. (Margreet pic.)

Up the Rongomai. (Margreet pic.)

This is always a good dry track, if an energetic climb at the lower end.

Turning left we followed “the old nature trail”, the cross track to Honeycomb. This track generally follows the contour, but goes up and down continually, with a number of well placed steps in places. In one place, a large fallen tree proved a little awkward to climb through carefully. Considerable bird song was noted here – Bellbirds and Tuis, etc, and several pigeons were seen. A little Tomtit had kept just in front of us for a short distance, as close as two metres to me.

Coming to the Honeycomb track, we turned left again and following it for a short distance, found our lunch spot bathed in sunshine.

Lunch in the sun. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch in the sun. (Margreet pic.)

The Honeycomb Track was drier than expected and we made good progress going down, only the last 200 metres or so needing extra care – steeper and wetter here.
Following Careys Creek now, the track was quite wet in places and the air noticeably much colder in the gully.

There are five river crossings along here on the way back to the Rongomai junction.

Care had to be exercised at the crossings as the rocks were just a little slippy. …

One of the crossings. (Margreet pic.)

One of the crossings. (Margreet pic.)

… One member narrowly avoided disaster.

Back at the junction. (Margreet pic.)

Back at the junction. (Margreet pic.)

Around a further hour’s tramp returned the group to the cars, having covered 12.4 km.
Some members of the group wanted to stop at “Blueskin Nurseries” on the way home. In my simplicity(?) I presumed that the lovely spring-like afternoons of the previous days had brought out the ‘gardening desire’ in some. But the plants and flowers were ignored, the group heading indoors. I tagged along to see what the score was.
I soon found that the score was:- 3 coffees, 2 hot chocolates, 1 tea and 1 juice! Discussion followed, and as noted on previous occasions, has a tendency to include food. Today such culinary delights as lamb shanks, pork bellies, pumpkins, sweet breads and tripe were avidly mentioned.
Personally I avoid tripe myself, although some may suspect that what I write here is a load of tripe(?).
Eventually seven happy Trampers returned to Mosgiel after enjoying a day’s exercise in the sunshine and fresh air. We couldn’t have had a better day out. – Arthur.
11. 12/8/2015. Trampers. Evansdale Glen, Honeycomb, Rongomai.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Evansdale Glen Honeycomb joining track Rongomai (Ken pic and caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Evansdale Glen Honeycomb joining track Rongomai (Ken pic and caption). Walked 12.4km; 4km/h; 3hr 20m moving; climbed 253m; max height 340m.

Today’s tramp was to Evansdale Glen, then up Honeycomb, & back down Rongomai tracks.Now normally this is not a problem, BUT there was still a lot of snow on Flagstaff, &  around my place on the hill, so I was sceptical about our chances of getting up Honeycomb very far. However, after a bit of a conference among the 7 trampers at the carpark, we decided to go & see what was in store for us. As we got over to the other side of the Northern Motorway, it was a different world, no snow, & everything looked really normal.
The walk along to Honeycomb was accomplished with only one member getting wet feet, from the many creek crossings. The track was quite wet & muddy in places, & Honeycomb looked a bit slippery as well. However, we all made it up the steep climb without to much drama, but a few rest periods, & arrived at the junction of the joining track that goes across to Rongomai, where we had another short rest. We then headed off along here to hopefully find a sunny lunch spot on the road at the top end of Rongomai, before the track proper starts into the bush. So we stopped for lunch…

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch break (Ken pic and caption)

…in a quite sheltered spot just before entering the bush, but if we had gone a little further, we would’ve found an even better spot!!
After lunch we made our way down to the creek at the bottom of the ridge, & back out to the cars. The day was enjoyed by all, especially the ones who had not been in there before.
An incident free day, with good weather conditions, life is good !! – Ken

10. 16/10/2013. Trampers. Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Mountain Road, Rongomai. Medium.

GPS

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Honeycomb and Rongomai from Evansdale. Distance: 11.8km; time: 3hr 3mins; ave: 3.9 km/hr; climbed: 507mtrs; max elevation: 378mtrs.

 

We parked at Evansdale Glen, walked up the Careys Creek track to the bottom of Honeycomb track, stopping off on the way to have morning tea at one of the drier spots we found. The grass on the track looked like it had been covered with a frost, & the whole track was quite wet, but not as wet as one team member got after slipping on some rocks while crossing one of the numerous creek crossings. Honeycomb is quite steep, as one member found, when the plant he was clutching pulled out of the ground, & he was sent tumbling downhill for a couple of meters, before a handy tree arrested his fall. So there were numerous halts to regroup & get our breathing under control. It does get less steep for the last 1/4 – 1/3 of the climb, & some good views are obtained. We had lunch at the top of Honeycomb …

Lunch

Lunch at top of Honeycomb track

…  then walked the couple of hundred mtrs. along to the top of Rongamai track, which is now just a forestry rd. This goes down past the shortcut track which goes back across to Honeycomb, & continues for some distance beyond there. It eventually reverts into the original Rongomai track, which follows a ridge, & then as it gets to the toe of the ridge, it steepens greatly, until the valley floor is reached. From here, it is just a reverse walk along the Careys Creek track back to Evansdale Glen.
A good day, with basically no wind, even at Mountain Rd. end, & all 4 of us said it was a good walk, which had never been done by 3 of the party.

9. 18/3/2009. Trampers. Evansdale, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, Mountain Road, Rongomai. Medium. Leaders: Sabina, Ian

It was half a tramp, half a blackberry-plucking expedition as Hazel discretely filled a bag for next weekend’s blackberry crumble. Careys creek showed signs of a flood in recent past weeks but its level was down to a tolerable crossing and re-crossing shallowness. A notable hurdle was Bill’s aptly-dubbed “Beaver Dam” at the second crossing which we made by precariously struggling over small and large fallen branches.

The first pic shows Rongomai Ridge ahead of us.

click to enlarge

Rongomai Ridge from Careys Creek

Rongomai Ridge showing ahead

A little while later we reached the junction heralding the beginning of the loop we had decided upon doing clockwise.

The next pic shows the beginning of the steep climb out of Careys Creek up the beginning of the Honeycomb track, a climb during which at least two of the seven strong group vowed that this was their last tramp here.

Start of Honeycomb steep climb from Careys Creek at Double Hill route sign. Bill's gaiters.

Start of Honeycomb steep climb from Careys Creek at Double Hill route sign. Bill – well, his boots and gaiters.

We made it across the ridge at the top of the climb and then on further up to the Mountain Road exit. A short walk up the road and it was into and down the Rongomai with a large expanse of clear-felled forest to the left.

Back down to Careys Creek and the blackberry plucking continued with George assisting Hazel, with his long picking-pauses on the trip back filling a hefty bag of berries.

The high-light/low-light of the tramp towards its end was Hazel wrenching an ankle, which proved to be a broken fibula at the ankle on inspection the following day, leading to six weeks in plaster. However she bravely continued to limp along with the benefit of two trekking poles, even to the extent of four of us tackling an exploratory Beaver Dam by-pass track on the creek’s true right, a rather hair-raising steep up and down track in places, never to be repeated again.

Best wishes for a p-a-t-i-e-n-t recovery, Hazel. You have joined the recovering-ranks of Tash (ankle broken in three places), and Ken (two broken wrists). Best wishes to you all. Although only you Hazel can claim to have suffered your mishap on a tramp. How you made it back to the cars the rest of us will never understand. – Ian

8. 25/10/2006 Leaders: Peter B, Nelson

7. 16/11/2005. Trampers. Honeycomb, Rongomai. Medium. Bob H, Ian.
[There have also  been six earlier circuits of Honeycome-Rongomai tracks made from Mountain Road but I have managed to lose any record of them!]

 

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Apr 04 2018

Quoin Point Bull Creek

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 79 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Quoin Pt – Bull Creek – Farmland (see George) Farm”
45 km from car park.
“quoin” definition: 1. An exterior angle of a wall or other piece of masonry.
2. Any of the stones used in forming such an angle, often being of large size and dressed or arranged so as to form a decorative contrast with the adjoining walls. Seek permissions.
Coast and farm walk. Bull Creek nature walk to waterfall (tiny!) recommended.
14. 4/4/2018. Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. M. Leaders: Ian,  Arthur and Bob.

Hikers’ Route map, courtesy Ian.

The day was fine when twenty-seven of us started down from a  busy shearing shed at the end of Quoin Point Road to morning-tea down by the Quoin Point rocks. Both we and a multitude of inquisitive young seals were amazed at the sight of each other.

Quoin Point at the sealions gathering. (Clive pic and caption.)

Morning tea at Quoin Point.(Clive pic and caption.)

Ten trampers set off first, closely followed by eleven Hikers…

(Kevin pic.)

… leaving seven Ramblers behind to enjoy a more leisurely walk, which they took as far as the first house, returning along the beaches before having to regain the paddocks. They got back to the cars at 1.15 p.m.

For the others, the route varied between the flats of rocks and beach where practicable, and paddocks and gates where necessary. Towards lunch-time the query of “how much further” was beginning to be raised by some of the newer hikers. The hut-on-the-paddock’s site had complicated matters with new electric fencing forcing skirting around it before reaching the familiar route again. (We did better on the return trip.)

The trampers arrived at Bull Creek …

Bull Creek. (Clive pic and caption.)

.. in time to get round to including the picnic area and the  Bull Creek Bush Walk.

Along the waterfall walk. Clive pic and caption.)

Along the waterfall walk. (Clive pic and caption.)

The Hikers, with their much later arrival, (their walk enriched however with much mushroom-picking) had time only to get through their lunch

Brief lunch. (Kevin pic.)

before the low-tide’s turn prompted getting back across the creek.

On the return trip, our two groups were mixed and strung out as people moved off from Bull Creek in their own time. Admirably, Bob, our back marker, kept his disciplined place, to ensure we all got back in one piece.
This time, at the second stile, fortunately Arthur remembered to remain on the flat until we had got past below the little paddock hut before resuming the paddocks.
So we straggled back to the cars, strung out in various groups, some faster, others slower as the weariness of a 12 km tramp set in. Bob’s sterling work as back marker, at this point really paid off.  Several paddocks short of our destination one of us found the going too much and needed rescuing. Gordon, a new member of the club who had accompanied Bob stayed back to keep watch, while Bob strode on to fetch his large four-wheel-drive ute back to the rescue.
So all’s well that ends well. with the day ending with a congenial “coffee” stop off at Brighton. – Ian.
13. 30/7/2014. Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good group of eight set out from the farm road at Quoin Point to walk along to Bull Creek. there was a bit of a wind blowing which kept the temperature down, & it was VERY muddy going across the paddocks. We didn’t get onto the beach very much as the tide was quite high, even although on the tramp program it was stated to be low at 11:30 approx. [Yes, a 0.3 m low tide i.e. on the higher side – Ed]
It was surprising to see that the gates along the coastal paddocks had “Walking Access” signs attached to them, so good on the land owners for allowing this.
We had morning tea in the shelter of some rocks, & lunch at Bull Creek. Lunch was a reasonably hurried affair, as the sandflies were eating more than we were!!! The exit of Bull Creek onto the beach was probably passable, but we didn’t fancy getting wet feet so we stayed on the Nth. side.
After lunch, it was just a return walk mostly back along the paddocks to the cars. The wind had started to dry out the very muddy parts, so it was only just a little less muddy going back. But, unfortunatly, one member slipped over at one point, & has some dirty washing to attend to !! We walked 12.3km in approx 4hrs. – Ken.
12. 5/3/2014 Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: Lex and Peter.
Failed to reach Bull Creek. Ed note.
11. 13/2/2013 Trampers. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. (9)
Nine of us enjoyed the tramp, three of us oldies, six newies, to show it off to. And they did appreciate it.
We saw lots of seals/sealions (?) on the way.
It was surprising to see such a high sandbar at Bull Creek.
Sandbar

A high extensive sandbar now. (Ian pic and caption.)

Backed up

Bull Creek water backed up by the sandbar. (Ian pic and caption.)

Although a souwester was very strong at times it was good tramping weather.
A feature of the tramp at its end was the discovery of a very flat battery in Ian F’s car, whose parking lights had been accidentally knocked on and left for 5 hours! With an AA call-out rescue, we got all got home by teatime. – Ian.

10. 2/6/2010. Both. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Leaders: George and Dot.

It was a most unusual start. Various reports had it that after the recent rainy period the paddocks would be too wet or the coast road would have been damaged. As it turned out, not – in either case. The upshot was though, that one of the leaders led a number on a round trip road walk up the Scroggs Hill from Brighton. 12 went on to Quoin Point. Of the 12, only 4 went to Bull Creek.

It was a nice low tide, but the Bull Creek flood waters were too deep to comfortably cross.

Packing up after lunch. Ken, Doug.

The remainder stopped for lunch a few gullies back.

Bull Creek minus 30 mins. (Bill caption and pic) Lex and who?

The day was brilliant with little wind.

How did this get here? Noticed on the way back.

It was a good day out. All the more enjoyable for contrasting with the previous week’s extended rain. – Ian
9. 23/12/2009. Trampers. Ken and George. Quoin Point to Bull Creek.
A good walk on Wednesday, lots of rock hopping. It was a perfect day for it as well, with virtually no wind, and not too much sun either.
Returning from Bull Creek. George. (Ken pic)

Returning from Bull Creek. George. (Ken pic)

8. 4/4/2007. All. Quoin Point to Bull Creek. Easy+. Leaders: George, Hazel, Eleanor B, Joyce S
7. 1/3/2006 All. Quoint Point, Bull Creek. Easy. Leaders: Dot B, Glenis, Frank & Lesley
6. 6/4/2005. Both. Quoin Point. Leaders: Hazel, Dot B, Anne R, Colleen.
Ian and Bob

Tea Break. Ian,  Bob H.

Seascape

Seascape (Ian pic and caption.)

High tide at Bull Creek. No crossing today!

High tide at Bull Creek. No crossing today! (Ian pic and caption.)

5. 22/1/2003. Both. Quoin Point, Bull Creek. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Bill and Pat, Denise.
4. 24/4/2002. Quoin Point Bull Creek. Medium. Leaders: Graham, Bill & Pat
3. 28/11/2000. Quoin Point. Leaders: George, Pam, Audrey K.
2. 29/3/2000. Quoin Point Bull Creek Leaders: George, Hazel, Bev J.
1. 15/5/1996. Quoin Point – Bull Creek. Return. Russell Road. Medium. Leaders: Jack M, George, Ted, Jack R.
Alternative: Woodhaugh – Leith Valley. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Mary Y

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Mar 28 2018

Balclutha River Walk

Published by under Uncategorized

69 km from car park.

28/3/2018. Hikers. Balclutha River Walk. E. Leaders: Bev and Lesley.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Luckily the day was bright and sunny as we were going a bit further afield for our hike today, to Balclutha. There were 17 met at Naish Park in Balclutha  and as it was 10am we sat in the sun and enjoyed a leisurely morning tea before setting out on the walk.

Morning tea at the park. (Clive pic and caption.)

Naish Park is a lovely area with beautiful trees, garden, aviary and childrens play ground.

Naish Park. (clive pic and caption.)

It was originally a market garden and orchard, donated to the people of Balclutha by the Naish Family.

The walk is called the Blair Atholl walkway and goes along the stop banks beside  the Clutha river.

Along the flood bank beside the Clutha River. (Clve pic and caption.)

We went to the end of it…

The terminus tree that the leaders made us all  circumnavigate before returning. (Kevin pic.)

… and up a side track by a rhododendron dell that must be a great site in the right season. We had a our lunch here. Once again taking out time and enjoying the sun. Then back the way we had come till the track divided and we went along a loop that was closer to the river. Unfortunately where you had to cross an inlet the water was higher than expected. However, some elected to wade across…

Back to the park (some through the ‘ford’). (Clive pic and caption.)

…while the rest of us retraced our steps and followed the path we had started on. We then adjourned to the Heart & Soul café for the after walk social get together. – Bev.

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Mar 28 2018

Camp: Sutton. Redan Crater, Salt Lake, Rock And Pillar

Published by under Bus Trips,Camps,Year round

No. 109 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Sutton Salt Lake – Bus Trip Year Round”

For an excellent aerial photo of the crater click on this Middlemarch website

6. 28/3/2018. Redan Crater/Taieri Ridge (Dry Ridge). M. Leader: Theresa.

On a sunny day that got hotter as the tramp progressed, 13 people enjoyed the day in the Strath Taieri.
Leave Mosgiel and go highway 87 to Middlemarch. At the northern end of the township turn right. Go east, cross the Taieri river bridge and take the first left on Hartfield road. Continue up the road, pass the Renwick (the land owner) homestead on the left then park up at the first gate on your right. Cross paddocks…

and they are off…to the Crater (on the horizon). (Phil pic and caption.)

…and continue to the top on a 4WD track. At the top while we had lunch there were views to the East of the Waikouaiti hills and the Nenthorn and Moonlight valleys. South we could see Saddle Hill – well half of it.

Still on  the top, follow the track for about 20 mins then head NW down towards the crater. This is a very obvious crater rim.

Nearly there… (Phil pic and caption.)

To view it from the  highway on the Rock & Pillar side looking towards the Taieri Ridge you should be able to pick it out. Lots of rock outcrops can also be seen but the crater rim is a stand-out example of the volcanic action in the area.

After a safe walk inside the crater…

– Redan Crater…and bubbling pool?,(Phil pic and caption.)

… it was down and back to the cars. There was a gully to negotiate…

Following sheep and goat tracks will get us there! (Phil pic and caption.)

…before we rejoined the track we took on the way up.

Coffee at the Kissing Gate in the outside seating was the usual debrief…

Enjoying the KissMeKate cafe. (Phil pic and caption.)

…with lots of laughs and good company. – Theresa.

5. 27/4/2016. Taieri Ridge, Redan Crater. M. Leader: Arthur H.

The day dawned fine and sunny. Even better, it was a Wednesday –  and the day for our tramp up onto Taieri Ridge. Perfect.

12 Trampers left Mosgiel at 9.05 a.m. in 3 cars. A brief pit-stop was made at Middlemarch and to reassemble the convoy. We parked on the roadside at 10.10 a.m. and sat in the sunshine to partake of morning tea.

The Start. (Helen pic and caption)

The Start. (Helen pic and caption)

It is some 6 km to the top of Taieri Ridge, uphill all the way.

Across several paddocks above the road and then up a 4WD track through the rocks and tussock.

Back to Rock and Pillar Range (Helen pic and caption)

Back to Rock and Pillar Range (Helen pic and caption)

The grade is a little variable, but good all the way. Beautiful country to walk through.

We stopped for lunch on top, just after noon.

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption)

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption)

We had good views in the direction of Nenthorn, and both Saddle Hill and Maungatua were visible away in the distance to the right. To the left the valley pointed the way to Moonlight and Macraes. Neither could be seen however.

We had just resumed our walk along the top when a tiny orange piglet shot across in front of us. He was obviously in a hurry as he didn’t stop to say hello. From lunch-stop we had a 20 minute walk before turning downhill to the Redan Crater. We sidled round the highest remaining piece of the ridge and gazed down into the crater where a few sheep grazed.

Rim View. (Helen pic and caption.)

Rim View. (Helen pic and caption.)

It is a few hundred metres in diameter – I forgot to take my tape measure so can’t be more specific. Sorry.

The Redan Crater is about 20 million years old, the result of volcanic action. There are other volcanic sites in the area, but this one is the best example of a volcanic crater in Otago.

We walked through the center …

Helen and Theresa walking inside the crater. (Margreet pic and caption)

Helen and Theresa walking inside the crater. (Margreet pic and caption)

… and out the other side, and down the ridge. Following the sheep tracks showed us the way to cross two deep gullies. Across a fence and then uphill briefly, when the day became noticeable hotter.

Soon we were back to the 4WD track and followed it back down. We arrived back at the cars at 2.55 p.m., having travelled 14.6 km.

The coffeeholics were in dire need of a “fix”, so a stop was made at Middlemarch to alleviate the problem. Showing normal good social manners, the rest of us accompanied them.

Coffee to end day. (Helen pic and caption)

Coffee to end day. (Helen pic and caption)

And so 12 happy trampers returned to Mosgiel. It had been a good day! – Arthur.

4. 9/11/2008 Sutton Camp. Leaders: Bill and Pat. (See Sutton camp post)
The Youth Adventure Trust/Rotary camp, based on the former School House, Hall and Cottage complex at Sutton was ideal and 19 of us enjoyed a very pleasant weekend stay, due in no small part to the organising and ‘recceing’ of Bill and Pat. – Thank you! The highlight was the tramp up to the Redan Crater.
Crater on Taieri Ridge.

Crater on Taieri Ridge. (Bill pic.)

Crater viewed from side. (Bill pic).

Crater viewed from side. (Bill pic).

with 18 of us reaching the highest point of the tramp and 13 of us making it on back down to the Crater.

Group pic on Redan Crater NE rim. Ria, Joyce, Evelyn, Leonie, Ian, Doug, George, Bill, Molly, Graham, Bev, Lesley, Bob. (Bill pic)

There were many rock formations to wonder at on the way.

Rock seal? (Bill pic)

Rock seal? (Bill pic)

Monster Owl Rock. (Elaine pic)

Monster Owl Rock. (Elaine pic)

Another Rock (Bill pic).

Another Rock (Bill pic).

And yet another. (Bill pic).

And yet another. (Bill pic).

Another one still?

Another one still? (Bill pic).

Surely this is the last. (Bill pic).

Surely this is the last. Is that an eye, a face? (Bill pic).

Maybe this is the last, then. (Bill pic).

Maybe this is the last, then. (Bill pic.)

Goats climbing Crater slope.

Goats climbing Crater slope. (Bill pic.)

A magnificent achievement, if a bit long and tiring for some. The day was beautifully sunny with an early morning tempering wind preventing us for overheating. The more adventurous headed back by going over and down from the crater with the rest retracing the more prudent longer but gully-free track back.
Sunset at Sutton

Sunset at Sutton. (Bill pic and caption.)

The Sunday proved more problematic with an overcast sky, but nine of us attempted the three-hour 4WD track which turned off the highway 9.5km north of Middlemarch (RAPID 7291 – no DoC sign) and led up the ridge leading to Leaning Lodge. But we had made it only a little way up before we experienced the WIND. We snatched as much shelter as we could find for an early morning tea…
Windy tea break

Windy tea break. Bev, George, Ria. (Ian pic and caption.)

…but had climbed only a little bit further before several of us wanted to turn back, with the remainder following suit only a little later when they could no longer keep their feet as the northerly only increased in strength. Prudence triumphed over ambition. But we vowed we would return some time in the future as the gentle gradient of the zig-zag route was a gift of a climb. The other trip was to the Sutton Salt Lake, within a comfortable walking distance from the camp. And it was as wonderful as it ever was.
Sutton Salt Lake view point. Bill H, Lesley S, Pat. (Elaine pic).

Sutton Salt Lake view point. Bill H, Lesley S, Pat. (Elaine pic).

Lake Walkers. Sutton Salt Lake. Graham, Leonie.

Lake Walkers. Sutton Salt Lake. Graham, Leonie. (Ian pic and caption.)

Group photo, Sutton. (Elaine pic).

Group photo, Sutton. (Elaine pic).

Enjoyment of the weekend was so high that there was discussion of options for another camp some time in the autumn. – Ian Camp Contact:  03-464 3473
3. 28/5/2003.Crater and Lake day trips:  Leaders: Bob, Arthur H, Val and Denise

 

Tea

Morning Tea out of the strong wind.

cllimb

Long steady climb. Graham. (Ian pic and caption.)

Into Crater

Down Into Crater. Doug recognisable. (Ian pic and caption.)

heart

Crater heart. Arthur, Lex recognisable. (Ian pic and caption.)

030528.Slt Lke Ent

Salt Lake entrance. (Ian pic and caption.)

salt

Close-up of lake. (Ian pic and caption.)

2. 14/11/1990 Leaders: Bob H, Betty B.

1. 23/11/1988 Bus Trip. The Redan, an extinct volcanic crater on Mr R Renwick’s property, Middlemarch. Leaders: Bob & Audrey, Jack M

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Mar 21 2018

Broad Bay, Turnbulls Bay, Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill, Broad Bay

Published by under Trampers

No. 49 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill Larnach Castle – Farm”

Location: 32 km.

Trampers park cars at Broad Bay. DCC Public Land; Hikers park at top of Bacon Street.

(15) 21/3/2018. Hikers. Bacon Street only.

The planned tramp to Harbour Cone had 22 trampers depart from Mosgiel in light rain.  During the drive to the start point the rain intensified, and it became a simple decision to abandon the tramp.  A coffee stop was suggested for the return trip to Mosgiel …

Coffee at the Good Oil. (Ian pic and caption.)

… which was attended by 19 of the party. -Cheers Jim.

14. 9/11/2016. Trampers. Harbour Cone.E+. Leader: Arthur.

The early rain cleared before assembly time at the car park and conditions were looking good. Ten eager trampers travelled in three cars to park by the Broad Bay Boating Club. The sky was brighter in the vicinity compared to the cloud down on the hilltops back in the city direction. A northeast wind to start with, which later turned southwest.

As an experiment we had decided to do this (circuit) tramp anticlockwise. The club had previously only ever gone clockwise. A short road walk back took us to Camp Road. The ascent was variable, with some easier gradients in between the steeper ones.

Morning tea was taken after 30 minutes with the worst behind us. From there the view was excellent and we could look across to Harbour Cone which seemed a long way off.

We continued uphill, gently now, past the two decrepit old buildings where “elf and safety” signs warning of the hazard they presented were noted. A little further and we turned left towards Harbour Cone, down hill. Funny, but it didn’t seem that steep going down as it had climbing up that part on a previous occasion. And then up a little took us to join the uphill paddock track from Bacon Street. Easier going for a while got us to Highcliff Road, with a stile on each side to climb over. And then climbing some more.

A brief rest stop on Rocky Knob gave us good views, especially over Hoopers Inlet. On  a bit, before descending a little to view the ruins at Nyhon Farm (there is a sign at the site now).

From then on it was uphill all the way to the summit. Comments such as “don’t look up”, “take short steps”, and “just keep putting one foot in front of the other” were heard. All good advice.

The cool (but not cold) wind was behind us as we climbed, and helped push us up, at least psychologically. In a short time we were picking our way through the rocks and came to the trig station on top.

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

Harbour Cone trig. (Margreet pic.)

The 360 degree views available to us were just a tad hazy, but the Mt Cargill mast stayed hidden in the clouds. What a great place to be! Not far below us, to the east of north, the white buddhist shrine stood out clearly in the sunshine. It was only 11.40 but on the summit was the only place to have lunch, even if a little early. Just over the brow it was sunny and nicely sheltered for this important ritual.

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Lunch. (Margreet pic.)

Thirty minutes for lunch and then it was downhill all the way.

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

We descended to the ruins of the Allen Farm

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

Old building. (Helen pic and caption.)

(no sign seen here), crossed the road, before going down the old track to Bacon Street.

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

Down track to Bacon Street. (Helen pic and caption.)

A walk back around the harbourside took us back to the cars at 1.00 p.m. The day’s distance was 8.25 km, not long perhaps, but we had quite a bit of uphill work. The summit of Harbour Cone is 315 metres by the way.

Several commented that doing an anticlockwise circuit had worked very well and it gave us the opportunity to have our lunch on the summit.

On the way home two cars stopped at Macandrew Bay to allow their occupants to visit the coffee shop. Another very enjoyable day’s tramp out on the fresh air over. – Art.

13. 22/7/2015 Trampers. Harbour Cone

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken.

Harbour Cone 2 GPS of route courtesy Ken. We walked 10km; 3.6km/h ave; 2h 45min moving; total ascent 586m; max height 358m.

I must be getting old, I put the group wrong on where we were starting the tramp from, I had it in my mind that we were going to Portobello — how wrong was I !!! I apologise for the mix up !
Anyway, after we arrived at Bacon St. we parked up & made ready for the days exercise. 10 trampers, some new to the group set off, & we stopped at the normal spot under the Macrocarpas just past the top end of Bacon street, where the ground is dry, for morning tea. For today’s tramp, I had decided that we would go up the marked track in the paddocks, instead of climbing up the fence line track. This was a new way for all of us, which made it more interesting.
As we made our way up, I could see that it was going to be a longer walk going this way up to Harbour Cone, than the fence line track would be. However the gradient is much more gentle.
We all made it to the top of Harbour Cone, some in better condition than others !! So we spent some time up there admiring the views,…

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

1 Atop Harbour Cone admiring the stunning views

… & resting up before carefully negotiating the boulders on the way back down.
Now, there was a water trough down near the bottom where you go through the gate by the stone wall in the next paddock, this water trough is fed by a pipe running down the hillside from above, & it is constantly overflowing, with the ground around & below it VERY WET, So, what does one member do — he walks down through the wet patch & promptly falls on his butt, then after standing up, he repeats this, just for good measure, & to make sure he was well covered in mud.!!! He arrived at the lunch stop by the stone wall looking very muddy & wet.
After lunch, we retraced our steps down into the valley, then up the other side to the Camp Rd. track below Larnachs Castle. This climb was almost the last straw for a couple in the group, but with some help everybody made it up there, & we had a lengthy rest break here for them to regain some energy, before setting off down Camp Rd.
When we reached the car park with the toilet in it at broad Bay [ where we should’ve stopped originally !!] I suggested that anybody who wanted to wait there could do so, & we would pick them up on the way back from getting the cars. this suggestion was eagerly pounced upon by 6 members of the group. [ now if we had parked there in the morning, all party members would’ve had to walk the full distance, so my mistake let them off the hook !]
The other 4 of us walked back to the cars, & then returned to pick up the ‘survivors’, & then we headed off to Macandrew Bay coffee shop for a chat session, & to keep up the ‘Trampers Coffee Club’ tradition.
I hope this trip which is really quite hard, doesn’t put off the new members we had on this tramp, as most of our tramps are not this steep. So hope to see you all again next week for our assault on Swampy summit.

12. 12/2/2014. Hikers. Harbour Cone from Bacon Street in Turnbull Bay. Leaders: Dorothy and Chris.

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Discretion being the better part of valour, the leaders spurned the steep fence track, choosing instead the much more graduated DCC yellow poled line one to the right, despite its many fence stiles. We had our cuppa amongst the clump of macrocarpa trees, (a point where a side track leads off to the right, through a gully and steeply up to underneath Larnachs Castle). But after our stop, we carried on up and across Highcliff Road to turn left and further up to Rocky Knob. Here the leaders and one or two others forewent the option of going further, allowing a hardy 12 to go over and across the next paddock, down through the gate by a stone wall and on up endlessly, it seemed, to the rocky-strewn summit of Harbour Cone.

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone

Some of the 12 Hikers on top of Harbour Cone.

We returned down to lunch on the stone wall before going on to join the others on Rocky Knob. Then it was just simply to retrace our steps back down to the cars. Threatening rain on a couple of occasions failed to eventuate. The day was lovely and calm and not too hot. A perfect and satisfying tramp, well-planned by the leaders. – Ian.

11. 21/8/2013 Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

Anti-clockwise GPS of route, courtesy Ken, (omitting Harbour Cone climb).

Stone walls of old settlement, adjoining Highcliff Road and below Harbour Cone.

After Harbour Cone climb, we went round via Rocky Knob and under Lanarch Castle. Half of us chose to go partly by Highcliff Road and then contour round Peggys Hill, the other half to follow the track poles over paddocks, deeply down through a gully and then very STEEPLY up to meet the others under the north side of Larnach Castle, where we lunched. – Ian

Heads from lunch spot on north slop under Lanarch Castle, just above derelict sheds of Lanarch’s old Model Farm.

Panorama video clip from north slope below Lanarch Castle

Hedge invariably beautifully trimmed

Hoopers Inlet to Highcliff Rd. Otago Peninsula
Accessed from Hoopers Inlet Road. 2.20 ret. Route. Manager: DCC CAM
Very steep track. Suitable for experienced and agile parties only.

10. 28/4/2010. Trampers. Harbour Cone from Hoopers Inlet Track and Nyhon Track. Hard. Leader: Ian

The day was fine. A week of wet weather had stymied any recce, so this was it. Thanks to Antony Hamel’s description and map in his book Tracks and Trails around Dunedin, the leader was confident we could readily find our way. Not. First mistake up the Nyhon track was to turn right at the first stile. (It should have been the second). However, an inviting gully presented itself, so this was the route up, we thought. Not. It was very steep but we made it to what we first thought must be Rocky Knob, even if it looked a little different from what some of us remembered it as.

Hoopers Inlet from first knoll. (Ken pic.)

Morning tea in the sun on the knoll was very pleasant. But confusingly, a small distance away was another knoll, slightly higher.

Second knoll across from first knoll. Doug. (Ken pic.)

This too, when reached, didn’t quite match up to our recollections. It was only when we had made our way through an old homestead macrocarpa-surrounded block of stone walls

Interesting remains.

and up a further rise that we realised where we really were.  There, down a slope to our left was the obvious vehicle track that descends from the true Rocky Knob. An easy walk up, and we were there.

From there it was over well-remembered ground

Rocky Knob behind us.

to then grind our way up to Harbour Cone.

The long climb up.

A short stop to admire the view and then back down again, across to Rocky Knob, and down the vehicle track to zigzag  into the gully below the knob – the gully we should have taken on the way up. There we stopped for lunch.

About to stop for lunch. Beyond, track angles up hillside.

and were met by Ken who had more adventurously taken the original steep descent down through the bush.

Overlooking steep marked descent, adventurously taken by Ken from Rocky Knob.

He had made it all right, but not without entangling a hand in some vicious bush lawyer.
After lunch, accompanied by the squawks of a complaining bellbird, we made our way down through some bush, and across some marshy reeds on a narrow netting-covered boardwalk.

But then, surprise. Markers took us up steeply to hug a fence line over a rise to descend further along, now very steeply and to the marshland again.

The steep fence line track. Wasn’t there another way?

Another board, bridging a stream, stile to climb and we were out into a grass paddock again.

Before us loomed the Nyhon Track climbing (plenty of steepness again) up over a hill. We had plenty of time available so we decided to follow it across to Sandymount Road. It was muddy and slippery but we made it. (Was this now the fourth or fifth hill we had climbed that day?)  At the top we decided to carry on to Sandymount Road rather than retrace our steps back down again) and do a round trip. At the road,

Nyhon Track sign on Sandymount Road. (Ken pic.)

we carried on down and back across to Hoopers Inlet and the cars. It had been a good hard day, but all seemed to have enjoyed it, even a visitor who had learnt about us and had seen the website. And there were nine of us too. We had done good, to quote a client’s words to his barrister. – Ian

9. 8/12/2010. Hikers. Harbour Cone. Leaders: B Harvey, C Hughes.

8. 15/7/2009. Trampers. Bacon Street, Harbour Cone, Rock Knob, Camp Street.

We were immediately into macrocarpas and elected to stop here for our morning tea.

Cuppa under macrocarpas.

Cuppa under macrocarpas. Pat, Bill, Hazel, Doug, Arthur, Ria, George.

Despite DCC-inserted yellow-topped poles leading off up a valley, we stuck to the original public walkway taking us directly up the steep hill to the macrocarpas on Highcliff Road. Across the road and past the building ruins we turned our attention to the relentlessly steep ascent of Harbour Cone. The polled track took us straight up and through the boulders at the rocky top to the trig.

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Harbour Cone. Ian (Bill pic)

Amongst the wonderful views was the sight of two strange monuments in a property above Portobello as seen in the following pic.

Strange

Strange structures above Portobello. Viewed from top of Harbour Cone.

Returning down the south side of Harbour Cone we stopped for lunch in the saddle between the Cone and Rocky Knob. Then it was up a stone-walled track to the Knob. A virtual former cliff-face track led down to Hoopers Inlet, although now a new polled track made an easier descent around a farm track to the left, but that was not the way we were going today. We stopped to enjoy the sights of Sandymount, Hoopers Inlet and Varleys Hill but it was too windy to tarry.

Varleys Hill

Varleys Hill viewed from top of Rocky Knob. (Bill pic)

Going on down and back to Highcliff Road, most elected to go on up the road to enjoy a more level approach to Camp Road while four hardier (stupid?) ones took the yellowed poles track on across the road, down through a deep gully and then very steeply up to join the others where Camp Road enters the trees under Lanarchs Castle. Here we could take in another wonderful number of views.

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

Harbour Cone viewed from below Larnachs Castle

The poled track took us around a contour under the Castle to eventually go steeply down into Broad Bay and so back to the cars. – Ian.

7. 30/11/2007. Broad Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill. Leaders: George
6. 11/7/2007. Trampers. Park Broad Bay Boat Club. Turnbull Bay, Harbour Cone, Peggys Hill. Leaders: George, Glenis
5. 2/12/1998. Harbour Cone, Peggy Hill – Larnach Castle. Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.
4. 23/7/1997. Broad Bay, Peggys Hill, Larnach Castle Road. Leaders: Doug J, Irene, Jack R
3. 8/6/1994. Harbour Coone. Peggy Hill. Leaders: Jack R, Bob H, Barbara, Peg C
2. 29/1/1992. Harbour Cone. – A good warm up to start the year. Average+. Leaders: Jack R, Ted, Betty B, Jean A, Peter R

1. 21/12/1988 Leaders: Chris, Ria H, Jean.

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Mar 21 2018

Tunnels Track, Yellow Hut, The Gap, Gap Ridge

Published by under Trampers

Click Silver Peaks Forest for background information on the area.

Accessed from Mountain Road from old forest HQ 6 hr ret, Route, DOC and private land.

(Green Hut access: 41 km from car park.)

6. 21/3/2018. Trampers. Tunnels Track. (Yellow Ridge.) Leader: Arthur.

The rain started as we left Mosgiel, but despite this, it wasn’t cold and the eight trampers were VERY DETERMINED to go tramping.

The cars regrouped at Waitati, and ONWARD was the only option – no one wanted to cancel. So it was up Double Hill Road and Semple Road to Mountain Road. A key allowed us through the locked gate and we drove up to, and parked at, the beginning of the Tunnels Track. The rain continued.

Our plan was now just to do a short tramp. It was very dark in among the trees as we descended the track, some wag asking for the street lights to be switched on!

After twenty minutes we came to the old gold mining tunnels …

At tunnels…no one home. (Phil pic and caption.)

… where we had a stand-up morning tea. No one was electing to sit on the wet ground. A N.Z. robin kept us friendly company here, which was nice.

From the Tunnels we followed the old water race to the main track, and then descended to the South Branch of the Waikouaiti River which was up a bit and a little discoloured.

At South Waikouaiti Branch. (Phil pic and caption.)

No use going further in the rain, so it was uphill back to the cars to finish at 11.15 a.m.

We had travelled slightly less than 4 km, and all had greatly enjoyed our little excursion, which had taken one and a half hours.

Surprisingly, the tracks were not slippery, even on the steepest bits.

Into the cars and to Blueskin Nurseries for hot drinks, before returning to Mosgiel.

Eight trampers had decided that a little but of rain was not going to spoil their day, even if it was a shortened tramp. Thanks to all participants. – Art.

5. 11/2/2015. Trampers. The Gap, via Yellow Ridge.

GPS Yellow Ridge to The Gap, courtesy Ken.  We walked just on 12km We climbed 1000mtrs.
ave speed 3km/hr moving time just over 4hrs. Stopped time 3hrs max elevation 700mtrs.

A good number of 6 trampers, & one visitor + dog turned out for the 8:30 start for the tramp to the Gap via Yellow Ridge. 4 members of the group had not been there before, so it was a bit of an experience for them. We started by walking down to the tunnels, for the ones that had not seen them before, then it was along the old water race back onto the main track, where we had morning tea…

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

Morning tea break. (Ken pic and caption)

…at the grassed area before crossing the Waikouaiti River, & then climbing the steep track up to the new Philip J Cox hut for a breather.
We then carried on towards the Gap, but two of the new members were starting to struggle a bit by now, & as we approached the last couple of climbs up to the Gap, they decided that they would find a nice spot for lunch, & then go back down to the hut & wait for us there. The rest of us carried on to the Gap, where we had lunch,

Lunch at the Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

& admired the views.

View looking north from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking north from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South west from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South west from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South-West from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

View looking South-West from Gap. (Ken pic and caption)

A quick trip was taken up to the trig on the northern side of the Gap to say we had been there, & then it was on with the packs, & back the way we had come. We caught up with the others at the hut, just a few minutes after they had got there, so an extended break was in order for refreshments,…

At Philip J Cox hut on the way back out. (Ken pic and caption)

At Philip J Cox hut on the way back out. (Ken pic and caption)

…& another breather before the steep decent into the Waikouaiti River again.
At this time, one of the group decided that he would start off down the track, thinking that he had told somebody that he was leaving, & it was not until we all got about 15mins down the track that I noticed he was not in our group, & asked where he was. We stood around waiting, thinking that he was still behind us, but in the end I asked our fittest member if he would go back & check. While he was doing this, we decided that the others would go down to the bottom, & see if he was down there, while I stayed to wait on the member we had sent back up the track. All this took approx 1/2 hr to accomplish, so we knew we would be a bit late getting back to the cars. As it turned out, the missing member was at the bottom waiting for the rest of us to arrive, & was very apologetic for his mistake.
We took another break at the grassed area…

Resting at Philip J Cox hut on the way out. (Ken pic and caption)

Resting at Philip J Cox hut on the way out. (Ken pic and caption)

…before we tackled the last climb up the steep track back to the cars. We had decided beforehand to go out the north end of Mountain Rd. as the road is in much better condition at that end. However, when we got to the last locked gate, we couldn’t unlock the padlock with the key that was given to us by City Forests, so it was about turn & drive all the way back to the south end & down to Waitati.
The weather was good, with no wind, & not too hot, & the low cloud that we observed when driving in was non existent when we got to the Gap. This is probably one of the harder tramps that we do, & is one that I might forgo in the future, although I managed it quite well, a result I put down to drinking Gatorade, & more fluids than I normally do on a tramp. – Ken.

4. 14/11/2012 Tunnels Track, Yellow Ridge, The Gap, Gap Ridge

GPS Yellow Ridge to The Gap, courtesy Ken. We climbed just over 1000mtrs.
ave speed 3km/hr
moving time just over 4hrs.
max elevation 668mtrs.

Four intrepid trampers gathered at the Bush Rd. car park before setting off at 8:30am on an adventure that 3 of us had never done before. The fact that Dermot had managed to get a key from City Forests for the gates on Mountain Rd. saved us about 9km of walking time, as we were able to drive right to the start of the Tunnels track. We set off down this track at about 9:30, & went to explore the tunnels themselves, a new experience for 2 of the group. Arriving at the grassy area at the bottom by the river, we had morning tea, & then set off across the river, without getting wet feet, & started the relentless climb up Yellow Ridge. On reaching the new Philip J. Cox hut, we had a short break to regain our breath, admire the hut, it’s fixtures & facilities. {We even swept the floor when we left]

Ready for the next part of the trip. (Ken pic and caption)

The next task was to get to the Gap for lunch, however remote this possibility seemed as, the track actually goes past it, instead of towards it for a while, & you start to wonder when you will be getting closer.

Nearing the top with The Gap showing. (Ken pic and caption)

At this point, one member of the group decided that he would go back to the hut & wait for us there. We eventually did get to the Gap,

Sign at the top. Thank God for something to lean on. (Ken pic [taken by Heb] and caption)

where we had lunch, then a short walk up to the trig on the top of the Northern part of the Gap,

Trig above Gap north rock. (Ken pic and caption)

where the views are magnificent, despite the lowering cloud/fog that had been hanging around all day. We then retraced our steps, carefully, due to the slippery nature of parts of the track that were very steep. Someone commented ” why didn’t they just provide a ladder” !! We stopped again at the Phipip J. Cox hut to have another drink, & to pick up our other group member, who we discovered had left a note for us, saying that he had left the hut 1/2 hr ago, & was making his way slowly back to the car. As we travelled back to the river, & up the Tunnels track, he had left numerous arrow signs, & the time that he had drawn them in the soft ground. So we knew how far in front of us he was, & when I arrived at the car, he had only been there about 3 minutes or so.

Everybody agreed that it was a worthwhile trip, & even although it’s a bit of a ‘gut buster’ it’s worth doing, but the early start, & the gate key is a must if you want to get home at a reasonable time. We made it back to the Bush Rd. car park just after 5pm, & I was home by 5:30pm. – Ken.

3. 20/2/2002 Tunnels Track, Yellow Ridge, The Gap, Gap Ridge Leaders: George, Ian, Hazel
Mountain Road, Tunnels track, Yellow Ridge, the Gap.
On Monday 4 Feb 2002, George Haggie, Hazel Leslie and Ian Fleming receed the route for the Taieri Recreational Tramping Club. We left Green Island meeting point at 8.30. On George’s prompting we drove further north and entered Mountain Road at Merton and drove 17 kms back to the Tunnels Track DoC sign on a good well metalled road arriving there a 9.30.  The south branch of the Waikouaiti River was shallow enough but the track up to the manuka scrub was in poor condition with a large slip crossing it.
Once in the trees conditions improved greatly and it was most pleasant all the way to Yellow Hut which we found to be in poor condition inside.  A DoC sign recommended going any further for experienced trampers only due to Silver Peaks notoriously changing weather conditions.
Beyond the hut we were into large tussock which being largely dry was not too much trouble to wade through although we walked more by faith than sight through the sea of tops, confirming we were still on the track with our feet. in many cases.
The route does a left-hand semicircle on a broad ridge. We lunched at the Gap at 12.15 in a very slight smirry rain but under dry rock overhang.
Returning, the tussock, now wet was much more difficult to push through, with the wet leaves lying lower onto the track, tangling our feet and tripping us up. The notorious steep never-ending climb back up from the Waikouaiti to Mountain Road keeps getting longer with more rest stops as one ages.
We got back to the car at 3 pm and continued round Mountain Road, now striking many potholes with several spots so severe as to be almost impassable.  This part was 13 km from Tunnels Track to Waitati. The sandy road metal contrasts with the rock metal on the northern part and although a few kms shorter and with many main highway kms eliminated  is not to be recommended at the moment. Returned home just on 5 pm, having driven 103 kms.
2. 23/2/2000. The Gap via Yellow Hut. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ian.
1. 12/11/1997. Tunnels Track to Yellow Hut and Gap. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Claude.

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Mar 14 2018

30th Anniversary people pics

Published by under Anniversaries

Group Photo

Ray and Diana (formerly Blair) Wiggins

Les & Margaret Smith, Bev McIntosh, Bill Hunt, and Ted Chirnside.

Elizabeth (formerly Gamperle) & George Haggie

Audrey & Bob Heenan

Judy Knox & Doug Moir

Nancy Strang, Joyce Shaw and Ted Chirnside

Clive Crossman, Jay Devlin, Marjorie & Bruce Spittle, Ian Fleming, Mary Lawlor, Jan Butcher, Who?

Pat Randall, Bev Harvey, Lesley Gowans, Shirley Fleming.

Elaine Day and Peter Davie.

Alex & Liz Griffin

Jim & Betty Finnie

Lance & Lois Woodfield

Denise Pearce, Chris Hughes and Dot Bennett

Keith & Shona Munro.

Ann and Kevin Burke

Dawn Pool & Pam Clough

Margreet & Neil Simpson with President Jill Dodd at rear

Judy Dennison & Helen Morris

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Mar 14 2018

30th Anniversary

Published by under Anniversaries

The day dawned sunny but cool, so for a leg-stretch, 18 walkers left from the bowling club for a street walk. We walked a couple of ks to, and through, the new Heathfield subdivision off Gladstone Road into the Woodlands settlement at the bottom of the Mosgiel sign. From here we climbed a steep pinch up to near the Mosgiel sign

(Clive pic.)

which was erected in June 1987 by the local Rotary club under the guidance of one of our tramping club members, Neil Buckley. It is a landmark at the entrance to Mosgiel – our little Hollywood replica!!

After a leisurely coffee stop at the reservoir and the panoramic vista over Mosgiel, – the Silver Peaks to the north – across to the Maungatuas in the West

(Ian pic.)

– and down the Taieri Plains. – A casual walk back into Mosgiel where some had another coffee stop before heading over to the the bowling club for the celebratory lunch.

30 Anniversary of our Club’s Inauguration.

We had 82 members, partners and past members in attendance for a delicious buffet lunch interspersed with a speech from George Haggie representing the early members and one from Dave Mellish, one of our newer members.
Also the Skylarks quartet presented an entertaining song composed by Bruce Spittle to the tune from Gilbert and Sullivans HMS Pinafore, titled “Some Years ago in 1988”. Thanks Bruce Ian Judy D and Margreet.

*****Click here For a video of “Some Years Ago in 1988″*****

A real highlight for the whole event was the presentation to Margaret and Les Smith of Life Membership.

(Shirley pic.)

A real honour and well deserved. Right from the start of the club’s inauguration till present day, of years of service: committee, trip organizing and hosting club activities.

Another memorable event was the launching of Judy Knox’s book:
Taieri Recreational Tramping Club – 30 th Anniversary Publication.

*****Click here for people pics taken at the Dinner*****

(Shirley pic.)

An amazing record of our history. Thanks to Judy for her research and Ian Fleming’s meticulous care in maintaining the website for access to members, where Judy collected a lot of her information.

Cake cutting was by Molly Vaughan (90+) and George Haggie (almost 90), …

(Official pic.)

… original members and untill very recently, still tramping. An inspiration to us all.

The cake fairies Pam and Dawn distributed the cake. This cake was beautifully decorated using a similar topping as on the 20th year cake, along with little boots, pack and sticks.

(Official pic.)

“Well Done” to the decorator.

Several member also spoke towards the end of the lunch describing various aspects of a very happy fun-loving group of outdoor folks who enjoy a coffee fix at the end of the day regarding encountering the day’s outing.

“Well done” everyone!

30 years is a fine achievement, and onwards and upwards for another 30 years.

I would just like to thank the committee and fellow-trampers for making this club so special.

Happy tramping! – Jill Dodd, President 2017 -2018

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Mar 07 2018

Clarksbrae, Clarks Junction

Published by under Uncategorized

35 km

2. 7 Mar 2918. Both. Clarksbrae, Clarks Junction. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. Station House to Deep Stream.

On Wednesday 7th March 40 trampers and hikers completed a walk on “Clarksbrae” farm, Clarks Junction.  After a 30 minute car ride we arrived on a lovely summer’s day at “Clarksbrae” Farm and parked close to the woolshed. I must say the tidiest and cleanest woolshed I have ever seen.

From there we had to take 6 cars to the end of the walk to shuttle people on completion of the walk.

It was 10.30 when we started

Some cars were hidden in a valley about 10k from Clarksbrae and we set out to find them. We set out across well tended farmland … (Clive pic and caption.)

and the walk was on  a designated stock laneway. It was a steady but gentle climb through beautiful farmland

… and live stock. (Clive pic and caption.)

and wonderful views of the Maungatua, The Lammermoor Range, the Rock and Pillar Range through to Middlemarch. At the end of the laneway we turned left and walked up to the trig station where we had our lunch at 12.30.

With a late start we missed morning tea but made the most of lunch at the trig point. (Clive pic and caption.)

After lunch we followed a track that in place​s was marked out with painted arrows and warratahs with plastic bags on ​put in place by the farmer so as we knew which direction to take to get back to the cars. This part of the walk was generally down hill.

Downhill to search for the cars. (Clive pic and caption.)

Hurray, we found them. (Clive pic and caption.)

Many of our walkers filled plastic bags with beautiful fresh mushrooms.

The distance travelled was 11.5ks. Coffee was at the ” Wobbly Goat” in Outram. – Jay and Jan B

30 August, 2017. Hikers. Clarksbrae, Clarks Junction. Leaders: Jay and Jan.

Tramp Report from the hikers group.  Our walk today comprising of 21 enthusiastic  folk started at “Clarksbrae” Farm, Clarks Junction. Farm owner, Richard Nichol gave permission to us to walk along the stock lane way which was very comfortable under foot.   The walk was a gentle climb with three steep short gullies to get the heart rate up a bit. Very doable for all concerned.  The scenery encompassed The Maungatua, the Lammermoors, the Rock and Pillar Range and the Kakanui Range.  We had lunch at the trig station which gave us 360 degrees views. The walk back was all down hill. All up we walked 10.3ks.  – Jay and Jan.

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Feb 28 2018

Maori Peak

Published by under Trampers

Background Notes on Maori Peak
No. 15 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Seacliff. Enchanted Forest & Maori Hill. Farm.”
46 km from car park.
15.

28 February 2018 – Maori Peak and Split Rock

After parking the cars in Russell Rd (at Seacliff) 12 trampers set out on the day’s hike. It was a calm, warm Dunedin morning and in fact during the course of the day the temperature got up to 24 degrees; so conditions were ideal.

We walked up the road, entered a farm, and enjoyed morning tea in a sheltered area past the wool shed.

Then we rambled through grassy paddocks until we reached Maori Peak at 11.30. It was a nuggety climb to the top but well worth it to get the spectacular coastal and mountain views.

Atop Maori Peak. (Phil pic and caption.)

Still too early for lunch so we descended and started making our way towards Split Rock.

We enjoyed a leisurely lunch at a sun-drenched ‘possie’ overlooking Karitane.

The hike through the paddocks to Split Rock was spoiled a little by waist high thistles

Sting’s next hit…Fields of Thistles. (Phil pic and caption.)

but we had forewarned our crew to wear appropriate protective clothing, so no real issue.

Split Rock was new to some and they were most impressed by the narrow cleft in the rock that we all had to squeeze through. The red colour of the rock lichen was beautiful

Split Rock. (Margreet pic and caption.)

and there were also lots of bush orchids to admire. The views from the top of the rock were not to be missed.

Atop Split rock towards the Harbour heads. (Phil pic and caption.)

Then it was an easy walk through paddocks and farm tracks back to the cars. Before going for coffee at Blueskin Bay we ventured into the Seacliff Recreational Reserve for a quick look at the memorial plaque that gives a brief history of the lunatic asylum that used to be there. The lawns are now beautifully manicured and it is a very peaceful place to reflect on the former infamous history of this place and its unfortunate inmates.

In all we hiked around 11 km and comments about the day were very positive.

Margreet & Neil

14. 21/10/2015. Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock.
On a very windy day, 12 trampers set out for the walk to Maori Peak, & Split Rock. After walking up the road, we had morning tea at the woolshed …
Morning tea break

Morning tea break

… before setting out for Maori peak, where some clambered up to the top for a look around. We then had a leisurely early lunch …
Lunch alongside Maori Peak (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch alongside Maori Peak (Ken pic and caption)

… before heading off to Split Rock.
There were a few in the group who had not been here before so they all had a good look around,
Exiting the split (Ken pic and caption)

Exiting the split (Ken pic and caption)

Getting back up to flat ground from the split (Ken pic and caption)

Getting back up to flat ground from the split (Ken pic and caption)

& some even climbed up onto the top for a great view.
Admiring the view from on top of Split rock

Admiring the view from on top of Split rock

On the way back, the majority of us decided we would follow the farm track back out to the road, while 3 others decided they knew best & went out the way that we had returned on a previous trip. Having now done the return both ways, I think i prefer the walk back through the paddocks, instead of the farm track, which is a bit boring, although it does offer some new views.

When everybody was ready to leave, we all decided that a stop at Blueskin Cafe was a good idea to keep up the coffee club tradition. On the way to the cafe, we caught up with the steam train that was visiting Dunedin for Labour weekend [powered by the steam engine ‘The Passchendaele”] which stopped at Waitati, where some of the group went to have a look at it.

Apart from the strong wind all day, everybody enjoyed the walk.

walked 9.1km
4.1km/h
climbed 530mtrs. – Ken.

 13. 18/6/2014. Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium.
Mud, mud, glorious mud !!!!
From the above statement, you will have guessed that we had a very muddy tramp. We started early as one of our party had an appointment at 3:30pm, so we had to be sure of getting home in time for that.
When we arrived at Russell Rd. outside the Truby King Reserve, the condition of the road surface gave us a taste of what was to come, it was very wet & sloppy. As we walked up Russell Rd. the farmer came by on his tractor, so we had a good chat with him before moving on to the top of the road & into the farm land where we had morning tea at the woolshed not far from the road. We squelched our way over to Maori peak, where some climbed to the top to admire the view, & then it was off again retracing our steps back up to the top, & around to Split Rock, where it was obligatory for some to make their way through the split, & back again.
Enter

Enter

Exit

Exit

We had lunch at Split rock,

Lunch

Lunch

then it was off for more squelching back to the cars for an early trip home. It was a good walk, made harder by the amount of mud we were carrying on our boots, & by the very wet/soft ground.
We walked 9.4km; moving time 2h 17min; ave 4.1km/hr; climbed 342mtrs; max elevation 431mtrs. – Ken
12. 25/7/2012. 7 Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. 

Average speed: 4.1km/hr
2h 39min actual moving time
311 max elevation of walk
GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

As you might determine from the GPS of the route,  we pioneered/recconnoitred some new ways of connecting Russell Road, Maori Peak and Split Rock, some better, some worse.
By going across at the immediate end of the road, we avoided having to climb the paper road over the top and the deep gully across to Maori Peak. Our gradients were more gradual. Bravo. However, on the return, at the large water tank, instead of going down, we went across and got into a no-trespassing area. (Compare route on map below on previous tramp for difference.) So, we climbed up and up and came out at the top of the road again! Ah well, it was still a good day out, and the extra exercise did nobody any harm. – Ian

Karitane from the top of Maori Peak. (Ken pic and caption)

NE from the top of Maori Peak (Ken pic and caption)

Ian and Jill at lunch below Maori Peak (Ken caption)

Ian about to go through Split Rock (Ken pic and caption)

Jill turns to go through Split Rock (Ken pic and caption)

Jill at the exit, before returning back through.

11. 10/3/2010. Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. Leaders: Ken, Hazel, Ria.

Map of route. (Scanned by Bob from Google Earth)

We were late arriving at Russell Road, delayed by a Fulton Hogan “mill” relaying a long stretch of road near St Barnabas Church. We morning-tead up the road, crested the ridge and then down to avoid the heavy gorse infestation to skirt a large winter turnip paddock to make our way down, across and up to what Ian was sure was Maori Peak.

First peak. What Ian THOUGHT was Maori Peak. (Bob pic)

It wasn’t. So it was down again and on, down, and then up to the real peak.

Approach to Maori Peak. (Bob pic)

Several of us scrambled up its last steep ascent to lunch on the top and drink in the great views all around.

On top of Maori Peak. Ken, Ian, Ria, Hazel. Other peak behind to SW. (Bob pic)

Then it was back down again (carefully).

A careful descent. From top: Hazel, Sabina, Ian, Ria. (Bob pic)

The recce had been a failure due to opaque low fog so from here on it was a case of relying on memories as hazy as Ian’s. Despite some mutterings, George charted an original route to get us to the bush marking the track through it to Split Rock.

Taking in the view from the top of Split Roc. Bob, Sabina, Ken.

George at Split Rock entrance. (Bob pic)

Ken inside split rock. Fortunately no earthquake occurred at the time.

Ken near the split rock exit.

From here, we traced, in some places originally again, the general route back via a water tank and implement sheds to the side road above the old Asylum buildings to Russell Road and the cars. A good day for seven of us – and for three of whom, a visit to Maori Peak and Split Rock for the first time. We shall generously excuse faulty route memories of the old hands due to the six years’ time lapse since the last visit to Maori Peak. – Ian

The old Seacliff Asylum buildings.

10. 9/6/2004 Trampers. Seacliff, Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. Leaders: Hazel, George, Dot B
9. 9/6/2004. Hikers. Seacliff, Maori Peak. Medium. Leaders: Peter and Wendy
Tea Break. Recognisable: Dot, Glenice, Arthur, Wendy, Margaret, Doug, Claude

Tea Break. Recognisable: Dot, Glenice, Arthur, Wendy, Margaret, Doug, Claude

Sheer climb. Lex, Ria, Glenice, Who? Arthur, Who? George

Sheer climb. Lex, Ria, Glenice, Who? Arthur, Who? George

Split Rock Exit. Bob (Hi, Shirl), George

Split Rock Exit. Bob (Hi, Shirl), George

8. 23/4/2003. Trampers. Seacliff: Maori Peak, Split Rock. Medium. Leaders: Doug M, Arthur H, Graham.
7. 12/12/2001. Alt. Enchanted Forest – Maori Peak, from Russell Road. Easy. Leaders: Catherine, Margaret D, Val.
6. 18/3/1998. Seacliff and Maori Peak. Leaders: Nancy, Lesley S, Bill H.
5. 4/12/1996. Karitane – Seacliff to Maori Peak. Park at Old Hospital. Leaders: Nancy, Joyce, Peg C.
4. 28/8/1996. Seacliff to Maori Peak. Combined. Park Seacliff Hospital entrance. Average. Leaders: Nancy, Joyce, Daphne.
3. 1/12/1993. Karitane, Maori Peak. Round trip. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Ria L, Marie, Nel
2. 15/4/1992 Seacliff to Maori Peak. Round trip. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Nancy, Peg A, Stan R
1. 14/4/1989 Leaders: Catherine T, Nancy, Lesley S

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Feb 28 2018

McNally Walkway

No. 83 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “McNally Track, Milton. Year Round”

44 km from car-park.
Access: Milton M 91km ret. Opposite Presbyterian Church, turn left at Ossian Street and follow on down Moore and Tokoiti Streets to Cemetery near which is the entrance to the McNally Walkway. Park cars by the side of the road.

Combined potential.

16. 28/2/2018. Hikers. McNally Walkway. M. Leaders: Bob and Lesley.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

This was the walk up the hill we were all expecting it was the other three that were unexpected! (Clive pic and caption.)

The high point conquered by Ian. (Clive pic and caption.)

Paradise revisited. – Milton. (Clive pic and caption.)

Lunch at the the trig point with views to the Blue Mountains

 

15. 4/5/2016. Both. McNally Walkway. Leaders: Jennifer, Dawn.

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Morning Tea. (Helen pic and caption)

Lunch. (Margreet pic)

Lunch. (Margreet pic)

Margreet pic.

Sign. (Margreet pic)

Cold drinks at Waihola. (Helen pic and caption)

Cold drinks at Waihola. (Helen pic and caption)

14. 14/5/2014. Trampers. McNally Walkway.

GPS of McNally Walkway, courtesy Ken. We walked about 8 1/2 km. Climbed 476 mtrs. – Ken.

Wednesday morning, we burst out of the Taieri Valley mist into sunshine about 4 kms north of Milton and headed to the hills that lie between the coast and Milton cemetery.

McNally Track (which opened in 1980) took us up along the fence-line past the sheep, and further up past orange guide poles and over stiles to a well-placed seat, offering a panoramic view across Milton (and morning tea).  Continuing upwards we had the choice of a native bush track or ‘open’ track and opted for the former which presented some mud slipping and sliding.  None of this mattered, as through this part the birds’ songs rang through the trees; just beautiful.

Further on and up to the trig and sun-dial where at the top there was an awesome 360 degrees view which encouraged us to a further amble around the area and lunch under cover of the haybarn.

Lunch at the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

En route, a couple of us slipped and brought mud back to the car in places other than our boots….. but while parts of this track tested our lung capacity, the varied nature of the well-kept track made it a very pleasant tramp of Medium level, taking about two to 2 1/2 hours’ walking time. – Neil & Carol

12. 8/2/2012. Trampers. McNally Walkway.

Morning Tea on McNally Track. (Ken pic and caption)

Milton from morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch stop and view from the top of the track. (Ken pic and caption)

The plane table at the lookout at the top of the hill.

11.3/12/2008. McNally Walkway. Leaders: George, Dot B, Glenis

There had been no recce as of course it was a track well-remembered by many of us – not. Memories fade as we age. We started off well, climbing steeply through a couple of paddocks to morning tea on a steep slope with good views.

Our President's big strides

Our President’s big strides

A little further up, we were faced with a choice of direction around the top loop. We chose “main track” rather than “loop”, which resulted in us travelling anti-clockwise. Later on, on crossing a styled fence into bush, we found a track sign arrowed only backwards! What to do? Thinking the bush track must wrong for us, we came back out and pushed further up on open grass. But when we eventually reached the crest of the slope,

A breather stop

A breather stop

we were able to pick out some yellow track-poles a long way down on our left that indicating where that bush track emerged from the bush again. Ah well… So it was all the way down to rejoin the track in order to then climb back up on the other side of the gully to eventually reach the lookout and our lunch stop.
There was a great view. Signposts there helped clarify matters a bit, so with more enlightenment, and renewed confidence, we continued on our anti-clockwise loop, bravely ignoring now, any reverse-indicating arrows, and so arrived back at the loop’s stem.
There were 19 of us, and there was plenty of time so were able to unhurriedly manage the many steep bits. The weather was fine and it was good being all together. – Ian.

10. 8/9/2004. Both. McNally Track. Medium. Jim & Thelma, Evelyn C, Lance, Ria L

Lower McNally Walkway.

Lower McNally Walkway. Overlooking Milton. Recognizable in foreground: Helen, Evelyn, Lex.

9. 1/5/2002 Combined. McNallys Track. Medium. Leaders: Catherine, Colleen, Ria L
8. 27/2/2002. Alt. McNallys Track, Milton. Medium. Leaders: Les W, Ray and Diana.
7. 12/7/2000 McNallys – Track. Milton. Leaders: Peggy M, Denise, Evelyn M
6. 21/7/1999. McNally Track, Milton. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Doug J.
5. 10/9/1997. McNally’s Track, Milton. Leaders: Ray and Diana, Peggy M.
4. 26/2/1997. McNeilly Track. Leaders: Betty B, Mary Y
3. 13/3/1996. McNally Track. Leaders: Ivan and Bev, Doreen.
2. 22/3/1995 McNally Track. Easy. Leaders: Daphne, Peg C, Peggy M, Joan H
1. 15/7/1992 McNally Track. Milton. Easy. Leaders: Nancy, Peg C, Jack & Rosemary

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Feb 21 2018

A cancelled tramping day

Published by under Uncategorized

Thirteen turned out for coffee. (Judy K pic and caption.)

Thirteen turned out for coffee. (Judy pic and caption.)

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