Dec 13 2017

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2018

Summer Start Time: 9.00 a.m.

10 Jan.
BothHikers: Taieri River Lookout. M*. $3.00 Ian and Doug.
Trampers: Davies Track Circuit. M $4.00. Helen. To be announced. Varleys Hill. * Janine.

17 Jan.
Trampers: Davies Track circuit $4.00 M Mahinerangi Area. M* $9.00. Jill.
Hikers: Friends Hill area M $3.00 Jay and Jan B

24 Jan.
Trampers: To be announced. Davies Track Circuit. $4.00 M. Helen.
Hikers: Bull Ring/Ben Rudd area E-M $4.00 Judy

31 Jan.
Trampers: Yellow Ridge, Phil Cox Hut M-H* $8.00 Neil M
Hikers: Mahinerangi/ Waipori area M $9.00 Bob and Leslie

7 Feb.
Both: Pulpit Rock. M $8.00 Clive

14 Feb
Trampers: Aspiring Hut. Eleanor R
Hikers: Signal Hill/Normanby area M Shona and Pam

21 Feb.
Trampers: Maori Peak/Split Rock M* $9.00 Neil and Margreet
Hikers: Quarry/Chingford Park area E $4.00 Woodside Glen. E $4.00 Jan Y and Peter

28 Feb.
Trampers: Purakaunui/Canoe Beach $8.00 Jill and Judy D
Hikers: McNally Walkway E+ $9.00 Liz and Alex

7 Mar.
Both: Clarkesbrae/Nichol’s Farm M* $7.00 Jay and Jan B

14 Mar.
Trampers: Lamb Hill/Three O’Clock M-H* $8.00 Art and Keith
Hikers: Saddle Hill area M* $3.00 Bob and Jill

21 Mar. Low Tide, about 1.15 p.m. 0.3 mtrs
Trampers: West Otago camp Helen
Hikers: Clarendon area M $8.00 Clive

28 Mar.
Trampers: Redan Crater M* $10.00 Theresa
Hikers: Salt Lake E $10.00 Adrienne and Bev

4 Apr. Low Tide, about 12.15 p.m. 0.3 mtrs
Both: Quoin Point M* $9.00 Helen and Dave G

11 Apr.
Trampers: Honeycomb/Rongomai M+ $7.00 Dave M
Hikers: Lee Stream ramble E+* $5.00 Ian and Raelyn

18 Apr.
Trampers: Deep Stream/Welshes Road M* $10.00 Art and Keith
Hikers: Harbour Cone M+ $6.00 Betty and Jim

25 Apr. ANZAC Day
Trampers: To be announced
Hikers: Street Ramble from 1 pm $4.00 Margreet, Neil and Lester

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Dec 13 2017

Harwood – End of year picnic

37 km.

6. 13/12/2017. All. Picnic lunch. E. Leaders: Alex and Liz

Route map, courtesy Ian. (Ian pic and caption.)

Having just emerged from ‘gorse forest’ track onto golf course. (Ian pic and caption.)

The leaders for the day. (Judy pic.)

Pot luck Christmas lunch.(Helen pic and caption.)

5. 27/9/2017. Hikers. Portobello to Harwood. E. Leaders: Chris and Dot.

Map of route, courtesy Ian.

The track from Portobello to the aquarium being made difficult with slips and mud, the leaders decided on a new hike for the day.  20 keen members left the cars at the Portobello show-grounds and headed the short distance up the hill to the cemetery for morning tea.

Coming away from morning tea.(Ian pic and caption.)

It was a glorious morning, calm and mild, and there were many comments on the fact that cemetery sites always seem to have the best views…. this one right across Portobello and the tranquil, beautiful harbour.

The thought of walking all the way to Harwood seemed a bit daunting to some, but in fact was very pleasant, following the cycle track all the way so that traffic was never a problem.  The predicted north-east breeze never arrived and jackets were gradually shed along the way.  Round Lower Portobello Bay several slips were commented upon, and we reached the picnic grounds for a leisurely lunch by mid-day.

Lunch at the Harwood Picnic Grounds. (Ian pic and caption.)

After the young-at-heart had a play on the swings…

Stop gazing round. Swing!.(Ian pic and caption.)

…and slides not to mention the hammock,

Help! Someone get me out. (Ian pic and caption.)

we made our way back to the cars by the same route, and so to Macandrew Bay for coffee etc.

A hike not done before, so thanks to Chris and Dot for some thick quinking (thanks Jay!) in finding a great alternative for the day. – Judy.

4. 17/12/2012. All. Harwood. End of year picnic. Leaders: Chris and Dorothy.
3. 15/12/2004. All. Christmas finger food lunch at Harwood. Leader: Chris.
Pause at sign.

Pause at sign.

Lunch in Harwood Hall. Dorothy, Wendy, Carmel.

Lunch in Harwood Hall. Dorothy, Wendy, Carmel.

x

Lunch in the Harwood Hall. Wendy, Carmel.

2. 17/12/2003. All. End of year Tramp. Share finger food. Leaders: Jean, Chris.
Setting off.

Setting off.

1. 19/12/1998. Xmas Lunch, Harington Point. Leader: Chris.

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Dec 05 2017

Taieri Mouth

Published by under Year round

No. 78 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Knarston Park Sth Coast (Ask Jean Young) Farm”
Location: 31.5 km.

5/12/2017. Both. Livingstonia Park. Moturata Island. M. Leaders: Bob and Phil.

Route Map, courtesy Ian. (Ian pic and caption.)

A combined 32 Trampers and Hikers ventured down  through Brighton to Taieri Mouth , certainly not expecting traffic lights at Kuri Bush!  Livingstonia Park was the starting point after being warmly welcomed by Bob and we set off towards Akatore passing a range of new property developments; just prior to moving on up the rise to the highest point of the walk, Bob detoured us onto the lawn, surrounded by sheltering trees, at the old NZ Forest HQ.

Morning tea at Forestry HQ. (Phil pic and caption.)

Some of us pondered the thoughts of this site having a ‘second coming’ with the new governments initiative of a billion trees…….

We then headed south with the breeze at our back, up the gradually increasing rise, enjoying the views of forest and farmland and sea, interrupted regularly by shouts of ‘truck’ and ‘car’. before Bob again turned us off ( clearly a man with great local knowledge and contacts!)   and headed down through farmland to the seaside.  Here we mounted the stile and various scouts attempted to find their way onto the beach.  This was more easily achieved by Bob when his hands were free after helping at the stile!

A mix of short beach walks, interrupted by rocky headland became the norm, requiring some inventiveness to move through the formations,

Into the promise land? (Phil pic and caption.)

as well as some rather intimate team bonding as some larger rocks were mounted!  Well done everyone!

Eventually the main Taieri Beach came into view and on we set following the curve of the surf to the ‘bar’; nothing changes when tramping, initial hesitancy to getting the feet wet to plain old just barge on in or take the boots off.  Rumours of a channel were probably proved correct as a ‘minor river’ was crossed before the main bar being traversed …

Sand bar, not showing heavy-flowing channel needing to be waded. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and we reached the Island at around 12.30pm, to be greeted by large numbers of nesting gulls;

 

Birds nesting on Moturata Island close up. (Ian pic and caption)

apparently the island was used to collect guano in the good old days, and you could understand why.

Colours on the rocks over on the Island. (Helen pic and caption.)

With low tide being over half an hour past, it was decided to return to Knarston Park for lunch, and shelter from the incessant sea breeze.  This was a good decision as the ‘minor river’ had increased in volume, requiring river crossing techniques for some.

The scale of the bar was impressive, being much larger than thought, as were the patterns in the sand and rock formations both at the island and on the rocky headlands.

Following a late lunch, (more so because of the early morning tea!) everyone safely made their way back to the cars and met up with others who had completed a shorter walk.

I am reliably informed  the full walk was 11.4 km and well, we won’t specify the altitude will we….

The day was very satisfyingly repleted at the new Brighton Café, where it seemed we had more than 32 folk chatting away!

New coffee bar in Brighton.(Helen pic and caption.)

( Ice creams from next door more than welcome, as both shops are apparently owned by the same folk).

Ho ho and have a happy festive season. – Phil.

26/6/2013. Hikers. Knarston Park. Moturata Island. Leaders: J Knox, P Clough
Route

GPS of Route

It was a treat of a day. Well, yes, a bit of a cold wind, but – the sandbar!

We parked, morning-tead at Knarston Park on concrete picnic table seats that were not at all warm.

Then out to the sandbar. The tide was super-low, half a metre below sea-level. The bar was broad as broad. And dry. We walked and walked. This writer was overwhelmed with the experience of being on such a wide and long stretch of sand so under the waves at other times.  Eventually we reached the island.

There

At Moturata Island

We sauntered round. The tide was so-o-o low we were assured of plenty of time before heading back. We headed to the rocks the north end of the islands and scrambled over them to see the surf breaking on the seaward side of the island.

Rock

Rock at northern end of island.

And then we sauntered back. Marvellous, as John Campbell would say.

The wind was still a bit sharp however, so we went back to the cars and on round the road past the fishing boats. A couple of fisherfolk said they had already noticed us and it was good to hear that locals keep a sharp eye out for the sandbar trekkers. Then on further to the start of the John Bull for lunch. (5km marker on GPS route map).

Lunch

Lunch at terminus of John Bull track.

Back down and across the bridge to walk round the beach on the river’s true left. Yes, back to the cold wind, but it was behind us. We observed the cliffs below the houses until we thought it best to get off the beach.  We climbed a set of steep large steps and up through a property and a wire fence to reach the highway at the top. (7km on map)

Onto road

Onto road

We took the road back, crossed the bridge and reached our cars at near the 10km mark. Thanks to Judy and Pam carefully checking out our chances the day before and their leadership on the day.

A most satisfying day. – Ian

5/9/2012. Both. Knarston Park. Moturata Island – NOT! Leaders: Ian, Margaret.
Click to get full photo.

Morning tea time – when we were still optimistic of a successful outcome!

Tide, wind and flood were all against us.
Tide – Even though we had got the low tide time exactly as we had wanted, we failed to take in consideration that minimum low tide was still o.9 metros. Must aim for nearer 0.0 next time!
Wind – Although a boisterous wind was from off the land, whipping up sand and breaker spray, the waves were still coming in stronger than we had expected.
Flood – The Taieri River was in quite flood mode, breaking two channels across the sand-bar we had hoped to traverse.
S-o-o-o-o-o. We had morning tea. We walked down the beach to where the rocky part begins and back. We waited. And waited. Some more hopeful than others. Some more resigned to failure. We early lunched. Then walked down the beach again, aiming for a round trip through Livingstonia Park and back along the road, but short-cutted through a bit before that.
And then behold. KB contractors drilling a pipe-line for fibre-optic (we think) alongside the road with a wonderful machine. Complete with GPS guidance showing on a screen to the operator, it automatically screwed and push-drilled successive pipes through alongside the road and  under the ground, with a clever drill-head (we learnt on asking) that could tilt the pipe’s direction left and right, and up and down on the operator’s bidding. Marvellous! (To the technically-minded anyway.)
We were now close to the cars again. The day had been wind, but grew warmer as it progressed. Everyone was philosophical about the way the day had turned out.
Perhaps, as was suggested, a low-tide day late summer or autumn, when the Taieri is NOT in flood would be a much wiser day to tackle the Island next time.
7/8/2011. Both. Taieri Mouth. Knarston Park. Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Graham.
There was a full tide around 11.30 a.m., which we cunningly exploited by negotiating the narrow beach parts before and after its peak.
The beach walk down river however, was rather constrained by the rising tide at one brief point, splitting the ‘(Fool(?)-Hardy Paddlers’ from the ‘Off-Beach-Detourers’ before we could make it to the large beach seen on the next pic.

The Taieri Mouth in the distance behind us.

 

Further south, the ‘cuppa’ in the morning sun. Nice.

Inevitably, we had to come to the rocky outcrops and were forced to make our way up a rope-lined track to paddocks.

A careful steep climb.

The track climbed. (Elaine pic.)

A view from the paddocks. (Elaine pic)

Further on, we were able to descend to another beach.

At one point, we were treated to a swimming seal lumbering its way out of the water to sun itself on a rock

Then it was time for lunch before retracing out steps back to our cars.
While we were seated, our President read out a text sent to us by Leslie S from hospital, saying she was feeling better and sitting up. (Today’s trip was a replacement for the scheduled trip to Waipori with Leslie and Bill as leaders.)

The lunch stop.

30/6/2010. Hikers. Taieri Mouth. Beach Walk. Easy. Leaders: Lesley G, Neil.
A bitterly cold wind to start with. – Bill.

Taieri Beach, well wrapped up. Early lunch lunch stop. (Bill pic and caption)

Guess whose knees. (Members only.) (Bill pic and caption)

A necessary warm-up coffee stop. (Bill pic and caption)

17/1/2007. Hikers. Taieri Mouth Easy. Leaders: Chris, Ray.
14/6/2000 Taieri Mouth – Beach Walk. Leaders:Dot B, Joan H, Pam H

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Nov 29 2017

Chingford Park, Quarry

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers

Distance from car-park: 20 km.

5. 29/11/2017. Hikers. Quarry, Chingford Park. Easy. Leaders: Jan Y and Jan B.

Route Map, courtesy Ian.

We had a good turnout of hikers and 3 trampers – 23 in all.  Parked in Selwyn Street and meandered along the Lindsay Creek track, then up through a bush track till we reached the lookout on the top terrace.

(Kevin pic.)

After morning tea descended down along the various levels of the quarry (with the odd spot of back tracking – it really is a maze of tracks).  Gardens are all pretty overgrown now, but tracks were still in reasonable condition.  A few late flowering rhododendrons, but most were finished.  When the quarry closed in 1980, Jim Hunter (the owner of the quarry) planted out 34,000 trees and shrubs.  The amphitheatre where the quarry concerts were held in the 1990s obviously used for grazing now.  Because we had trampers with us, suggested they walk up Baldwin Street and pleasantly surprised at the number of hikers who took the opportunity to do this.

Balwin Street. Watching the  tourists. Taken by one who didn’t take the opportunity. (Ian pic and caption.)

A cruise ship was in town, so a lot of activity with tourists coming and going.

Carried on to Chingford Park past the old stables.

(Kevin pic.)

Betty Finnie had stayed at the homestead when she was a child, and had good memories of it.  The house was built by PCNeil,  a prominent Dunedin businessman, and was demolished in the 60s.  We then walked the bush track and wandered round the redwoods before adjourning to the cricket pavilion area for lunch. Interesting to see that there is a disc golf course layout in the grounds.  Returned to the cars via North Road and the Lindsay Creek track, and stopped off at the Museum Cafe for refreshments.  An ideal day for walking in bush as quite hot, and the bush provided good cover. – Jan Y.

4. 19/11/2014. Hikers. Chingford Park, Quarry. Easy. Leader: Lance, Fred.

Route

Route. A bit complex at start, with two and fro walking in Chingford before morning tea.

Lance led 28 of us here and there on the Chingford flat, filling in the early period before morning tea.

There was no shortage of wonderful trees, tall and otherwise. Here is an ‘otherwise’.

Remarkable trunk(s). (John pic)

Remarkable trunk(s?). (John pic)

Overnight rain left the grass very wet, with storms threatening. Lance’s plan was to have assured shelter for the cuppa. As it turned out, we dined and supped in wonderful sunshine.

Morning tea panorama (John pic)

Morning tea panorama (John pic)

Following that, Lance led us up behind the stables, up through a wonderful plantation of English beeches right to the top fence line of the property. Then down an out through the Afton Terrace exit. Then it was down Kelvin Road and Watt Road out to North Road. Some heavy rain forced us into parkas but soon succeeding sun had us almost  wishing out of them again. Then it was into Palmers Quarry Garden.

Palmers

Palmers Quarry Garden.

We climbed the steep roadway on the right of the quarry, and branched out along the first terrace to view the lovely picnic area below.

Palmers

Picnic area (John pic)

We entered the next terrace to stop for lunch, still in good sunshine.

Lunch (John pic)

Lunch (John pic)

Back out again and up to the third terrace, which we followed right on along its contour through broom and bush till we reached a a large grassy area, where the track turned sharply back and steeply down to reach the Lindsay Stream opposite Felix Street across the water. A wide track on the true right led us downstream till we came to a bridge on Selwyn Street, which street we followed out to North Road again. Then it was just a case of treking back up to the cars again, catching another brief shower just before we got there. where we dispersed to go our various ways. For some, coffee was to be at the Museum Cafe.

Coffee

Coffee at the Museum Cafe. (John pic)

Thanks to Lance for another well-conducted tramp. We’re sorry Lois wasn’t up to coming out today. – Ian.

3. 6/6/2012. Both. Chingford Park, Quarry. Easy. Leaders: Joyce, Elaine

Joyce and Elaine led 15 of us on a well-planned walk. I had not realised the full extent of the tracks in the Quarry and Chingford Park.

The route. The numbers are the km marks.

We stopped for a cuppa behind the Hospice.

View of Baldwin St from behind the Hospice.

The Youth Grow plant centre was a good place to stop for lunch with a convenient garden edging to sit upon. I failed to detect the black dot of Venus crossing the sun by projecting the sun’s light through a monocular upon a sheet of white paper. Disappointing.

 

Lunch at the Youth Grow plant centre in Norwood St.

It was a lovely sunny walk for our  first Wednesday of winter. – Ian.
2. 16/6/2010. Hikers. Chingford Park, Quarry. Easy. Leaders: Joyce, Elaine
We parked at the foot of Baldwin St, but no, we didn’t ascend it.

We think we’d drink the creek rather than the trough. (Bob pic and caption)

Instead we mounted some equally steep paths and tracks on the other side of NE Valley, first of all in Palmers Quarry and then along to Chingford Park . The day was bright, still and cool, and the fresh morning air and clear views from the various terraces above the quarry were invigorating. We remembered the Park of years ago when it was a most successful amphitheatre for concerts and other gatherings, and the extensive plantings by Palmers had turned it into a wonderful garden setting, now sadly all unkempt, grazed or fenced off.

An enjoyable view across the “amphitheatre”. (Bob pic and caption)

Morning tea was taken in a sunny upper corner, and then we progressed through stands of natives and plantings of eucalypts and others of garden origin including an aromatic shrub unidentified but admired, via a meandering route, and after that, along NE Valley Rd to Chingford Park where we took an early lunch and conversed by talkative Lindsay’s Creek. We explored the rear of the park above the stables, first of all hugging a giant macrocacarpa

And now it’s time to hug a tree and give it … (Bob pic and caption)

….a circle of friends. (Bob pic and caption)

and then following trails through a mixture of native bush and then a great stand of English beech, richly carpeted beneath by the leaves of years.

We tread lightly if not quietly across the carpet of Beech leaves. (Bob pic and caption)

A very stable group. (Bob pic and caption)

Two very prop-er men! (Bob pic and caption)

A short walk and an early finish, but probably well timed as the clouds were gathering and the day cooling off in the growing breezes. Thanks to Elaine and Joyce for allowing a relaxed and sometimes impromptu jaunt. – Bob.
1. 18/4/2007. Hikers. Chingford Park, Quarry. Easy. Leaders: Molly, Mary M.

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Nov 29 2017

Orbells Cave & Fiddlers Hut; ABC Cave & The Gap

Published by under Farm,Trampers and tagged: ,

No. 10 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Lamb Hill to 3 o’clock creek. Farm. Lambing.”
Farm walk. Lamb Hill Station, Hindon Road, Hindon. Seek permission. Check at house before you do any tramping.
Lamb Hill: 43 km from car-park.
Bendoran: 75 km from car-park.
8. 29/11/2017. Trampers. Bendoran over-night, Orbells Cave. H. Leader: Art.

Route Map, Bendoran to Orbells Cave/3 O’Clock Creek/Fiddlers Hut, courtesy Art.

This tramp was a First Time for our club.
Two cars(six trampers) left Mosgiel at 8.00 a.m. rendezvousing at Cherry Farm before travelling together to reach the Bendoran Huts at 9.30. Morning tea was taken, and five eager trampers set out just after 10 am on the day’s adventure. One stayed in camp to heat water for showers later.
The day was sunny and warm enough. High cloud drifted across after an hour, but it remained hot. We stopped several times to take on water – and we were going downhill!
We descended down to Orbells Creek, and followed it for some distance, being on a grassy 4WD track all day. Tussocky hills surrounded us, with many interesting rocks, such beautiful country.
A mob of grand Hereford cows with calves (beef) moved in front of us for a time, before going up a side gully.
Eventually we came to the first ascent of the day, leaving Orbells Creek for a time, the 4WD track going up and over a saddle. At the top we had a short descent and then a climb up to a second saddle.
But from here it was downhill all the way to the cave. We met Barney, the Bendoran Farm Manager, out with his dogs shifting a mob of cows and calves – black with white faces this time (Angus Hereford Cross).
We came back to Orbells Creek by the cattleyards, crossed over, and in a few minutes were at Orbells Cave (with Orbells Garden flourishing in profusion in front (foxgloves). It had been hot work, but to our great relief found that it was very pleasantly cool in the cave. The time was 12.20 pm. We sat and rested for half an hour here, while eating our lunch.

In the cave for a cool place to have lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

 Fiddlers Hut was our next objective, about 2 km further on. Was we left, bird calls from high above the cave alerted us to the presence of a N.Z. falcon circling there. We saw it – or another one –  later in the day, too. Crossing 3 O’Clock Stream, we arrived at Fiddlers Hut at 1.3. We admired the stone walls, very neatly constructed, and with a vey sound modern corrugated iron roof.

Fiddler’s hut. (Helen pic and caption.)

But sadly the interior had been badly neglected, birds obviously had been the only tenants for some years past.

As we began the homeward journey, a light and very pleasantly cool north-east breeze arrived to provide some relief, especially helpful on the uphill bits. Five tiny little Paradise duckings were on the water when we crossed back over 3 O’Clock Stream. All water bottles were refilled.
The same route was followed going back as we had travelled out earlier. It was a long climb back up to the two saddles. At the top of the first one, 10 minutes was well spent in resting, while taking on water, eating fruit, etc.
In time we came back down to Orbells Creek, and walked, the kilometres behind us, with an occasional brief stop (water).

One long hill awaited us – the climb out from Orbells Creek. The hill seemed to go on forever, but by putting one foot in front of the other, we found the top. But our legs were mighty tired now, and there was only a few hundred metres left to go. And so we arrived back at the Bendoran Hilton …

View of Bendoran huts. (Helen pic and caption.)

… just before 5 p.m. A good list down and rest seemed to be the logical thing to do now, so that’s what we did!

All five had thoroughly enjoyed the day. An energetic tramp to equal any other that our club has done. VERY SATISFYING.

Total distance was 20 km. Orbells Cave was approx. 8 km from Bendoran, and Fiddlers Hut a further 2 km beyond. Bendoral Huts are at an altitude of 500 metres, Fiddlers Hut about 200 metres. – Art.
On completing the tramp we had a lovely muffin and cup of tea before showers and liquid refreshments. Fire lovingly looked after by camp mum Jennifer. Eleanor our great organiser had Also arrived by this time.
Tea was prepared consisting of silverside, stuffed chicken, new potatoes, carrots and two salads. Dessert: chocolate brownie berries and yogert. All had bought some part of it.
Jill Arthur Phil Wyn and Helen the walkers.
It helped revive us. – Helen
75 km from car-park.

11. 8/3/2017. Trampers. The Gap, and ABC Caves. M. Leaders: Arthur and Eleanor.

After a one and a half hour drive from Mosgiel, we arrived at Bendoran Huts.  David Malloch the station owner arrived to welcome us and give us a brief history of the 5000 acre property.

Us with David Malloch. (Helen pic and caption.)

After unpacking and eating lunch, we walked in a cool s.w. wind, overcast with a few skiffs of showers to Mount Misery @ 714 metres.

Eleanor on Mt Misery. (Arthur pic and caption.)

A great view for those brave enough to tackle the wind on such a rocky peak.  From there we ventured onto “Terry’s Knob” (refer Hamel’s book page 7:13), …

Terrys Knob. (Arthur pic and caption.)

… before returning to Bendoran for drinks and muffins.  After lighting up the coal range to heat the water and apple crumble, we then enjoyed home baked Chicken, vege’s and salad.  Next job was firing up the open fire, sitting round chatting for the evening.

Before 8.30am next morning we were up and away tramping in ideal conditions for 3 hours to the “Gap” @ 670 metres.

The Gap from morning tea stop. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After numerous photo shots of surrounding valleys, peaks, ranges and the trig,  we then headed down onto a new track, where after a lunch stop, we approached the A.B.C. Caves.

Helen Janine & Eleanor at abc caves. (Arthur pic and caption.)

After a challenging tramp, we were impressed by the cave interior, …

From in ABC cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

… but were disappointed the “visitors book” left no room for our claims to reaching this  monumental milestone!   We then had to return steeply uphill a little before bush-bashing a track across a gully to join back onto our original track, leading us back to our cosy “Bendoran home”.

Bendoran where we stayed. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Arriving back @ 4.15pm, we found 2 members (who returned without going to A.B.C. Cave) had the coal range going with the kettle boiling for drinks and a HOT shower!!  All fresh and clean again, we dined …

Dinner. (Helen pic and caption.)

… in front of the open fire on beef casserole, new potatoes, peas and salad, followed by brownie and peaches—-not your average tramping food, and certainly above standard accomodation.

It was an exceptional tramping trip for Arthur, Neil, Carol, Helen, Janine and Eleanore, with new tracks and experiences for some of the party. – Janine and Eleanor.

10. 25/3/2015. Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

On a day when the weather was a bit suspect, we arrived at the Bendoran Huts to see fog in the valleys, but clear around the tops. Because of the distance travelled to get there, we decided to have a late morning tea break,…

Late morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

Late morning tea stop. (Ken pic and caption)

…at one of the high points on the track. After this, we walked around the road [farm track] to a point at the head of the valley leading to ABC cave, where we arrived for a late lunch in sunshine.
After lunch we more or less retraced our steps back to the cars, with a couple of refreshment stops on the way.
The day turned out ideal for tramping, with just a trace of breeze at times, a little bit of sunshine for lunch, & the temperature just right, & the fog actually lifted during the day.
Next time we do this, it would be a good idea to start early, as it’s a long way to drive, & the road in is all narrow gravel. – Ken.

9. 8/5/2013 Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 13.6km, 4hrs moving, 2hrs stopped, total ascent 839mtrs, max elevation 701mtrs.

There have been MANY new tracks bulldozed in around the area, making it very difficult to know which track to take. The original idea was to go to the Gap, & then down to the ABC cave, but we were running out of time, due to the distance travelling there, getting held up for about 1/4 hr by a very large mob of sheep with no sign of humans or dogs anywhere. Plus as we didn’t know where to go, we ended up bush-bashing our way down a ridge on the top side of the bush, as you can see by the Google pic. We eventually got down to the DOC track leading between the GAP & ABC, so just carried on to ABC, had a quick drink/snack, & left there at just on 2pm. Then we struggled up another ridge that was a lot clearer than the one we had came down, but it was steep, & it took us an hour to reach the top. From there, it was a relatively easy walk back to the 4wd track that we had left to go down past the bush. One or two of the climbs on the track back to the car were certainly a bit ‘trying’, but we all made it back to the cars OK, & after the drive back to town, got home at just after 6pm.

George didn’t go down the ridge to the cave, so he sheltered for a while, then wandered back to the cars, leaving suitable signs that he had passed that way. There were 7 of us in the group, one of whom was heard to say on the way in, “you think this group is a serious walking group?” so by the end of the day when I asked if they still didn’t think we were a serious walking group, the answer was ” that was a serious walk”. – Ken.

8. 22/2/2010. Trampers. ABC Cave from Bendoran Huts.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

It had been many years since any of us had done this tramp, and memories were hazy. So much so, that we parked the cars at the end of Blucher Road, mistaking the shearing shed location there for the actual Bendoran Huts site about six kms further on. So we walked the farm 4WD route to the huts, instead of driving it!

 

A hut ruin on the route. The fog was round us all the way. But it was dry! A fog, not a mist, as one of us distinguished.

An pic of interest on the way.

Lunch across from one of the Bendoran huts. (Ken pic)

Lunch in lee of the hut. (Ken pic)

We walked on beyond the huts on the track we should have originally started on, for a further km, but there was nothing to be seen through the fog which accompanied us all the way, except for only one brief respite. We then retraced our steps to the cars. About 14 km walked that day. – Ian
7. 30/1/2013 Trampers. Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.
Lunch at the old hut.

Lunch at the old hut.

Orbells Cave from the track.

Orbells Cave from the track.

Running repairs before we start the real climb back out

Running repairs before we start the real climb back out

6. 19/1/2011. Trampers. Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.

Small scale GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

If you look closly at the small scale pic, you can see the shed at the Nth. end of the airstrip, right at the bottom of the pic where the track starts. As you can see from the spacing of the GPS squares, we were still driving for a while till the squares become very close together. this is where we started to walk from. You can also see the track going off to the left of the airstrip at it’s south end, going down to the ford where the track peters out, & then starts again on the other side. That is where the 2003 tramp went (see below).

Large scale GPS map of route, courtesy Ken.

The large scale pic shows the decent via the wrong ridge, we should’ve been one over to the right. Anyway, we ended up just a short distance from Orbells creek, so walked into that valley, & up to Orbells caves which is the track on the RH side of the pic.

Cute cave we found on the way down to Three O’clock Stream. (Ken pic)

Orbells Caves. (Ken pic)

Dermot in the obviously lived-in cave. (Ken pic)

We then retraced our steps back to Three O’clock Stream, and went downstream to a crossing, where Dermot and I went to the old hut to have lunch (which is the track on the left side of the stream in the GPS pic).

Hut on the other side of Three O’clock Stream. (Ken pic)

Relaxation area of the hut. (Ken pic)

Then after walking across the river flats, we struggled up the very steep hills back to the cars.
The weather was fine, but VERY windy, and I nearly lost my footing a couple of times coming back up the steepest parts. BTW, the hut is not on Lambhill Station, it’s on the neighbours property.
Everybody did very well, including George, who didn’t go to the caves, along with Hazel. They just went over to the hut to have lunch there.

Hazel packing prior to leaving. (Ken pic)

George got a dose of cramp on the way back up the hills, but managed to overcome it ok, and carry on. – Ken.
5. 21/5/2006 Lamb Hill to three o’clock creek. Old Stone Hut. Orbells Cave. Medium+.Leaders: George, Keith, Glenice, Hazel
4. 21/5/2003. Both. Lamb Hill to Three O.clock Creek. Medium. Leaders: Wendy B, Bob H, Nancy & Molly
View when we first arrived.

View when we first arrived.

Morning tea break.

Morning tea break.

Descent to creek

Three O'clock Creek

Three O’clock Creek

At creek ford.

Lunch at top of climb.

Lunch at top of climb. Pat, Lex, Doug J, Evelyn, Doug M, Bob, Arthur.

3. 17/5/2000 Lamb Hill, Three O’Clock Creek. Leaders: Wendy, Colleen, George
2. 15/4/1998. 3 O’Clock Creek, Lamb Hill. Leaders: Nancy, Wendy B
1. 8/11/1989 Lamb Hill to Three O’Clock Creek and old stone hut. Harder grade. George, Mary M, Molly, Catherine

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Nov 22 2017

Allans Beach, Cape Saunders, Puddingstone Rock, Mt Charles

Published by under Farm,Trampers

No. 99 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mt Charles Mr Neil Farm”

27 km from car-park.

Click here to read about Cape Saunders Lighthouse and the two graves

9. 22/11/2017. Trampers. Mount Charles. M. Leader: Phil.

Mt Charles – 22 November 2017 – Leader: Phil.

Following a quick rendezvous of 4 vehicles at Macandrew Bay it was follow the leader via Allans Beach Road, with the leader doing a feint turn the wrong way at Hoopers Inlet, just to test the following car drivers, before arriving and parking under the pine and macrocarpa at the end of the road.  There was then a few recounts on the numbers of intrepid trampers as I was reliably informed we had 16 when we left Mosgiel, but now we had 18!  Wow Mt Charles must have a reputation!

So off we set at 10 to 10 back down the road to the gate with ‘closed’ on it; there was a promise of the most well earned morning tea for the year at the stile at the top of the first paddock….this was achieved comfortably by all but clearly the steep start had an affect,

Up, up, and more up. (Helen pic and caption.)

with everyone sitting for a good 20 minutes…maybe it was the views?  This was said to be about ‘halfway up- yeah right!’

We then set off up a variety of knobs and farm tracks, and following the fence lines to ridges and little saddles and then via a track – commented to be the stairway to heaven –  that dissected some remnant native bush (and where the level of craic was very low), before we emerged on a little plateau, and veering left and with the help of some gentlemanly fence lifters to get under the barbed wire arrived and ‘summited’ Mt Charles at 11.30.

 

Group at the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

On the last part of the ascent we had been accompanied by a herd of inquisitive and very well conditioned cattle, that set about corralling and dividing us before realising we had no barley sugars to give them so off they bashed through the forest. At the summit we were greeted by the mist clearing and revealing 360 degree views, only to be tested by a swarm of bush flies and other flying objects, so after admiring the views and taking the obligatory photos

View from the top. (Helen pic and caption.)

we headed off through the fences and along the ridge to start the descent down the sea side (East) of the mountain. Around half way down the lumpy and steep hillside we found a spot for lunch, where someone had nicely placed boulders and logs for us all to be comfortably seated and take in the surroundings,

Lunch stop. (Margreet pic and caption.)

including a top dressing plane, piloted by Snoopy. The plane  made numerous and continuous sorties along the coast

‘’Snoopy buzzing the team’’ (Phil pic and caption.)

and around the mountain for the duration of the rest of the walk. At about this time the sea mist moved back and the summit was shrouded in….

Gradually we descended and returned along the ‘flat’, parallel with the coast, and then over a small saddle and down to the road end and carparks, where we were warmly met at 1.15 by Jill D and Clive, who having completed 90% of the ascent, returned and undertook a walk along the beach.  Well done folks for the inspiring effort.

We then had sometime at the beach, walking to the headland, dipping toes in the sparkling seas, or just lounging and taking in  the peace and tranquillity, but for Snoopy! Then onto the Mac Café, where as a sign of the season, and in very Mediterranean like conditions,  there were probably more ice creams, and cold drinks consumed  than coffees and tea.

Although the walk was ‘only’ 5.7km it was 403 m up a mountain, and of course 403m down!

This was NZ walking at it’s best; a mountain, 360 degree views of land and sea scapes, and lovely weather followed by a walk on the beach and admiring wildlife, with great company. – Phil

 8. 8/4/2015 Trampers. Mount Charles M.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. We walked 7km; 2 hrs moving time; 3.1km/hr; climbed 452mtrs; max elev.412mtrs

Having met up with the others at the meeting place in Andy Bay, 6 of us travelled to the end of Allans Beach Rd. where we parked under the pines, & geared up for the climb up Mt. Charles. We walked back along the road for the 3-400m to the stile over the fence at the start of the climb, then it was up, up, & more up!
We stopped just after 10am for morning tea break, then resumed the climb. An hour later we reached the trig on top of Mt. Charles,…

1 At top of Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

1 At top of Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

…where we spent some time admiring the view, which was fantastic.

2 View from Mt. Charles, with Harbour Cone on left. (Ken pic and caption)

2 View from Mt. Charles, with Harbour Cone on left. (Ken pic and caption)

4 Allans Beach, & Hoopers Inlet from Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

4 Allans Beach, & Hoopers Inlet from Mt. Charles. (Ken pic and caption)

We also found the trig station was falling to bits, with all of the bolts securing the stays to the legs missing.

3 looking at he damaged trig. (Ken pic and caption)

3 looking at he damaged trig. (Ken pic and caption)

As there was a bit of a breeze blowing up there, we decided to go down the seaward side, & walk back around that area to the cars. So we set off following sheep trails through the bracken, & Onga Onga, down a steep slope until we were approx halfway down, where we had lunch in a pleasant spot with a great view.

5 Lunch stop with a view. (Ken pic and caption)

5 Lunch stop with a view. (Ken pic and caption)

6 Allans Beach with Sandy Mount in the background

6 Allans Beach with Sandy Mount in the background. (Ken pic and caption)

We then finished the descent,…

7 The clay road down there was our destination for the walk back out. (Ken pic and caption)

7 The clay road down there was our destination for the walk back out. (Ken pic and caption)

…& made our way back past Belmont House out to the cars.
As it was still quite early in the day, we then went out to the beach, where we had to detour around a sleeping sea lion on the track. There were others on the beach also, ignoring the presence of humans.
The trip up Mt. Charles is a serious climb to get to the top, but I think we all enjoyed the experience. And we stopped off at Mac Bay for a coffee & chat before driving back to town. – Ken.

7. 10/8/2011. Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock, return. Medium.

GPS of route from Allans Beach to Puddigstone Rocks, return, courtesy Ken. 13.8 Km. Total metres climbed: 690.

It was a brilliant winter’s day as can be seen from the pics.

Looking South at Allans Beach. (Ken pic and caption). – Sandymount beyond.

Looking north towards on Cape Saunder’s coast. (Ken pic and caption)

Cape Saunders ‘LightHouse’. (Ken pic and caption)

The site of the old Lighthouse Keeper’s house which was vandalised and later destroyed by fire. Site very tidily cleared.

Our intention had been to return via Mount Charles, but an early evening appointment of one of our party indicated a return by the way we had come would be more prudent than risking the – perhaps over-time commitment – of tackling Mount Charles as well. (Note: Making this a summer tramp would lessen such time constraints.) – Ian
6. 11/2/2009. Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock Cape Saunders Road, Mt Charles, round trip. Medium. Leader: Bill

45 minutes’ drive to Alans Beach by Hoopers Inlet. 37.5 km from car-park.
(Click to enlarge thumbnail pics)

Route Map
The trip this time was enhanced by a group from the Christchurch Over Forties Tramping Club joining us for the day. The day was pleasant as we made our way from the Belmont homestead over a ridge or two to our tea break spot with a fine view of a small beach and the Wharekakahu Rock islet.

Down to tea break

Down to tea break

Beach and Whatekakahu Rock Islet at tea break

Beach and Whatekakahu Rock Islet at tea break

A bit of a climb from there brought us to the experience of an abrupt cliff face

A cliff edge

A cliff edge

before climbing a fence line to make our way across to the Cape Saunders road and down to the Matakitaki Point lighthouse.

While there we showed our visitors the ancient grave site of two young children (see information at bottom of this post)

Picket fence grave site

Picket fence grave site

before climbing back up to the Kaimata Road and down to our lunch stop.
click to enlarge

Lunch time

Lunch time

Then it was down a paddock or two to view the seals on the Puddingstone Rock ledge,

Seal and offspring?

Seal and offspring?

Seals frolicking

Seals frolicking

before climbing the road back out to the Cape Saunders Road and along to the NE of Mount Charles to climb through paddock and bush to the trig.

Sandymount from Mount Charles

Sandymount from Mount Charles. Hazel, Angela

Last climb to trig

Last climb to trig

After that it was down the conventional ascent route, much steeper than the one we had climbed, and along to the cars.

5. 23/5/2007 Trampers. Allans Beach, Belmont, Cape Saunders, Kaimata Road, Puddingstone Rock Cape Saunders Road, Mt Charles, round trip. Medium. Leaders: Bill, Pat
Keyhole in rock

Keyhole in rock (31/3/2004)

click to enlarge
Lunch time

Lunch time

4. 29/11/2006. Trampers. Allans Beach, Mount Charles, Cape Saunders. Medium. Leaders: Bill, Pat

click to enlarge

Off-shore islet

Off-shore islet

Surf on Cape Saunders

Surf on Cape Saunders

Cute gate

McLeods’ gate

Victory Beach from Mount Charles

Victory Beach from Mount Charles

Struggling against the wind up Mt Charles Pat, Wendy, Hazel

Struggling against the wind up Mt Charles Doug, Pat, Wendy, Hazel, Glenice.

Cresting Mt Charles. Who? Doug, Ian, Pat, Wendy, Hazel

Cresting Mt Charles. Who? Doug, Wendy, Pat, Hazel, Glenice.

Cautious descent in wind. Pat, Wendy.

Cautious descent in wind. Wind, Glenice, Pat, Hazel, Wendy.

Allans beach from Mt Charles. (Bill pic)

Allans beach and Sandymount from Mt Charles. (Bill pic)

Papanui Inlet, Otago Harbour from Mt Charles.

Papanui Inlet, Otago Harbour from Mt Charles.

3. 7/12/2005. All. Cape Saunders from Allans Beach. Leaders: Bill, Pat, Bob, Nadia
2. 26/1/2005 Mount Charles Hoopers Inlet, Allans Beach. Leaders: Dorothy S, Shirley
Prospect. Before the climb.

Prospect. Before the climb.

Mount Charles summit. Dorothy, Pat.

Mount Charles summit. Dorothy, Pat.

Lunch

Lunch lee Mt Charles. Peter, Lex, Ian, Dorothy S, Dot B, Ria, Pat Wendy, George, Margaret, Tom

1. 31/3/2004. Trampers. Cape Saunders, Puddingstone Rock. Easy+. Leaders: Bill, Pat
Tea Break. Pat, Molly, Bill, Joyce, Nancy

Tea Break. Pat, Molly, Bill, Joyce, Nancy

Peter, Bob & Bill on edge

Peter, Bob & Bill on edge

Wave surge. Lunch. Margaret, Who? Bev H, Peter. Old grave.

Wave surge. Lunch. Margaret, Who? Bev H, Peter. Old grave.

Keyhole in point.

Keyhole in point.

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Nov 22 2017

Port Chalmers and environs

Published by under Hikers

Click Dunedin’s Hills’ History for background Information.
30 km from car park.
20. 22/11/2017. Port Chalmers. Leaders: E. Judy and Elaine.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Battery died within the last half km. So really 9 km.

22nd November saw two members celebrating the same birth date (Dave Mellish and the writer).  Are there any other shared birthdays in the Club?

Anyway, after some rather off-key singing, 18 hikers set off for Port Chalmers and the Careys Bay car park on a beautiful warm sunny morning.  The planned morning tea stop on Boiler Point didn’t happen, as the track was closed for new wharf development, so it was a bit of a slog up to the lookout (with a look inside the church on the way) and the Hotere garden for a well-earned break.

With a cruise ship in, there was plenty to see, and it took a while to gather the troops for the walk down to Back Beach, then around the point past the school …

(Kevin pic.)

… and rugby grounds, across the railway line and so up to the rhododendron dell for lunch.  Everyone sought whatever shade could be had, and we were entertained by rock climbers on the cliffs behind.

(Kevin pic.)

The excitement of watching a container ship berthing delayed some after lunch, and the group split at this point, eight continuing up the hill to the Scott Memorial, …

Radiance of the Seas and recently berthed container ship, taken from Scott Memorial. (Ian pic and caption.)

… then up and around the track beyond the car park on the far side (sorry, the leader forgot it went up some steepish bits for a while) and down in leaps and bounds to the Blueskin Road, across it to the track again, and so down to the Iona Church and a look inside here too.  There were quite a few cruise ship visitors about, and it was a good excuse for a rest as we stopped and chatted….  The choice then for these eight was either up and through the cemetery, or straight down to the road – guess which way we went?  Well, we were pretty hot and tired by then.

The remainder of the group were well installed in the hotel by the time we arrived, having taking an easier route through the cemetery and straight down to the Bay.  After some liquid refreshment and a leisurely chat, it was quite a late return home! – Judy.

19. 3/8/2016. Both. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Judy and Peter D.
On a cold wet winters day with snow predicted to 200 mtrs 9 hardy trampers left the carpark for Port Chalmers. We were farewelled by 6 fellow members who opted to go for a coffee fix rather than getting wet right from the start of the outing.

However our trip was very pleasant. Leaving the carpark at the back beach …

Back Beach. (Helen pic & caption.)

Back Beach. (Helen pic & caption.)

… of Port Chalmers following the road round the harbour with views of the Peninsula and further down the harbour towards Dunedin in the haze to the Harbour side rugby pavilion where we had shelter from the northerly driving rain, to enjoy our morning tea break.

Morning tea at rugby club. (Helen pic & caption.)

Morning tea at rugby club. (Helen pic & caption.)

We didnt dilly dally for too long as it didn’t take long to start chilling off. From here we proceeded along the railway line to the main road into Port Chalmers up to Ajax St and along Church St over the main trunk line to  the junction of the road to Lady Thorn Dell and up the short steep gravel track to the Blueskin Bay Rd.  Over the road and into the bushes following the Rangi track till we came out to a clearing greeted by a colourful array of noisy roosters at the Scott Memorial.

(Margreet pic.)

Two of the brave (?) few. (Margreet pic.)

(Margreet pic.)

One of the brave (?) few and a noisy (?) rooster (?) (Margreet pic.)

In this area we were very sheltered by the canopy of bushes . At the lookout we had panoramic views …

(Margreet pic.)

A rainy view. (Margreet pic.)

… of the container port at work and into the haze we could see right down to Tiaroa Heads. Quite surreal. Still no snow. From the monument we followed the Brailley Track to the Port Chalmers Cemetery where we found a shelter for lunch.

Lunch at Cemetery. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunch at Cemetery. (Helen pic and caption.)

Careys Bay was beneath us so a quick zig zag through the cemetery to the famous Hotel where they allowed us to hang our wet gear in their front foyer while we enjoyed the warmth of the environment  and the open fires.

Coffee at Careys Bay hotel. (Helen pic and caption.)

Coffee at Careys Bay hotel. (Helen pic and caption.)

Two of our men did the gentlemanly act by fetching their cars and brought them round to Careys Bay to save the rest of us from further exposure from the elements !!

We walked 6.6 kms and ascended 200 mtrs, all satisfied that Wednesday’s tramp was a good day out – different from the many sunny days we have had in the past !! – Jill.
18. 22/4/2015 Hikers. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Judy and Jennifer.
GPS of route

Nike app GPS of route around Port Chalmers.

Judy, well backed up by Jennifer, led 30 Hikers an interesting trek around  Port Chalmers, pointing out several locations associated with her ancestors.
From the car park on Peninsula Beach Road she immediately took us up onto the  Island Terrace road whose northern end put us  onto the steep fenceline track that took us struggling up to the Flagstaff Point, (as it was originally called, but also variously known as Observation Point, Flagstaff Point and Flagstaff Hill,  in case you really wanted to know). (abt 0.22 km.) From here we took in the view of a China Shipping Line (a term new to this reporter)…
China Shipping Line. (John pic)

China Shipping Line. (John pic)

…ship, riding high in the water, loading containers. Back into the Hotere Sculpture Garden…
Hotere Gardens. (John pic)

Hotere Garden. (John pic)

…we morning teaed…

Cuppa. (John pic)

Cuppa. (John pic)

…and wandered round the well labelled (well, they were brass plates really) exhibits.
Judy then took us down and along the full length of Constitution Street before turning down – at its end – to right at the other end of Island Terrace, and down a bush track to the Peninsula Beach. Road. (abt 0.8 km) We walked to the Peninsula’s end and reflected on the sinking of the Yarra. (abt 2 km)
Yarra. (John pic)

Yarra. (John pic)

From here the road became Victory Place and yet further along, Wickliffe Terrace. Around about here Judy pointed out, half-hidden about us, what could well be the largest old house in Port Chalmers, the home of a former Dock Master, one of Judy’s relatives. At this point we turned off down a track that got us (abt 3 km) across to Albertson Avenue and thence to the southern end  of George Street, which we crossed, to climb-  in turn – Ajax Road and Church Street. Crossed the Railway line,  (abt 4 km) pass the gate of Lady Thorn Rhododendron Dell, on and up to end up via Braille’s Track at the Scott Memorial…
Lunch at Scott Memorial (John pic)

Lunch at Scott Memorial (John pic)

…and the “Nine Fathom Foul” large anchor (which used to foul fishermens’ nets)…
Anchor

“Nine Fathom Foul” Anchor. (John pic)

…for lunch.
Back down Braille’s Road, this time turning off into the Port Chalmers Cemetery,…
Cemetery

Port Chalmers Cemetery (John pic)

…noting on the way one of Judy’s Knewstubb relatives graves. Out near the bottom, now on Church Street again, (abt 4.8 km) across onto Harbour Terrace, viewing a wee ‘but-and-ben’ of Judy’s parents when young, down Slant Street to Join Macandrew Road by the Careys Bay Hotel. Along that road, past the dock entrance (abt 6.5 km) and along Beach Street back to the cars.
Thanks, of course, very much, to Judy and Jennifer for keeping us safe and well informed on a very well-planned route. – Ian.
17. 8/5/2013 Hikers. Sawyers Bay, Old Road, Lady Thorn Dell, Lookout, Back Road, return. Leaders: Mollie and Pat.
Route

Route

25 of us parked in Stevenson Road in Sawyers Bay, walked
from its end around Borlases Road, turned up Ajax Rd above the steepled Presbyterian Church, onto Church Rd, crossing the railway line to reach Lady Thorn Dell for morning tea amongst the Rhododendrons, small groups disported between the seats and tables there. The day was fine and the view from the viewing platform down to the container wharves excellent.

It was then back down Church Rd, Ajax Rd, onto Mount St, to cross State Highway 88 to climb steeply up Grey St, Scotia St and Constution St to the Lookout at its top. We spent some time there watching bundles of logs being slowly craned into the bowels of a rather rusty looking ship. A passing ship towed a tug on up the channel heading presumably to the fertilizer or the petroleum wharves nearer Dunedin. We then crossed the point, steeply down this time to reach Peninsula Beach Road at the back, and to have an early lunch there. Happily the group supporting blind trampers passing by noticed us and came across for a chat, with a number in each group recognizing friends in the  other.

After lunch, we completed the circumnavigation of the peninsula, detoured off across a rugby paddock to walk alongside the railway to the railway crossing, and back along State Highway 88 to Sawyers Bay Station Rd and up to the cars.

A point to note is that Hiker numbers are growing larger, making group control by the leaders more of a task, as our wide range of individual fitness led to us becoming a rather straggled out band at times. However, the weather was pretty ideal, if a little windy at lunch time and draughty when walking alongside logging trucks, and the social chatting side was well attended to. Thanks to Pat and Mollie for a most satisfactory day. – Ian.

16. 10/8/2011 Hikers. Port Chalmers, Scott Memorial, Lady Thorn Dell. Leaders: Bob and Evelyn

15. 16/9/2009 Hikers. Aramoana, and Port Chalmers. Leaders: Lex, Marjorie.

15(?) of us set out on a fine, mild day with only light breezes – an ideal hiking day – led by Lex and Marjorie, to walk at Aramoana. As that was deemed to be too short, we called in first at Port Chalmers, where, from Mount St, we ascended Grey St, passing the grand old Presbyterian Manse whose 14 rooms, recalled Lex from his courting days, were occupied by bachelor minister George Jeffries and several student ‘tenants’ – hence its nickname “Holy Fryers (Friar’s?) Abbey”. Lex’s reminiscences of his courting days continued as we passed his wife’s old family home and pictured him sunbathing on the lawn. We discovered, again from the Learned Lex, why Meridian and Magnetic streets are so named. (Answers are at the end (1) if you need them). Morning tea was enjoyed at the top on a grassy knoll looking at the splendid view towards Portobello.

Morning tea in a 'room with a view". (Bob caption and pic).

Morning tea in a ‘room with a view”. (Bob caption and pic).

A couple of coneheads. .. or ... a couple of pointy heads. (Bob caption and pic).

A couple of coneheads. .. or … a couple of pointy heads. (Bob caption and pic).

The descent was by Fox St to Peninsula Beach Rd and back to the cars by Beach St past the stacks of logs and chips. On to Aramoana. We parked at entrance to the township, puzzled over three signs of a crossed-out “H” in a circle alongside an arrow head, (a prize for the one who answers 1st as the answer is NOT at the end (2) if you need it) and walked to the north end of the beach, and along the beach to the Mole and a self-satisfied sea lion basking on the sand. Lunch at the start of the Mole looking out across sparkling waters

Lunch by the Mole. (Bob caption and pic).

Lunch by the Mole. (Bob caption and pic).

and asking how far we could see was most enjoyable. (We didn’t know the answer but see the end (3) for an informed guess). Of course we walked along the Mole and stood by the new “lighthouse”

The new "lighthouse" at Molesend. (Bob caption and pic).

The new “lighthouse” at Molesend. (Bob caption and pic).

(What was the date inscribed in the concrete base – see the answer (4) at the end), and noted albatrossesses whitely plumped on Taiaroa Head and also saw one or more flying. The dredge entertained us as we tried to determine its movements (See (5) at the end for a guess), and one of the divers was pleased to chat.

The long Mole ... and ... (Bob caption and pic).

The long Mole … and … (Bob caption and pic).

The short Mole (?) (Bob caption and pic).

The short Mole (?) (Bob caption and pic).

Lesley reckoned she had found a clump of Capt Cook’s scurvey grass, but noted that there seemed to be much less of the rare plant than there used to be around there. (See (6) at the end for some more information). And so to the memorial to the Aramoana Massacre where we sat briefly and talked of the events and the film “Out of the Blue”. Chris had played a part in its production and recalled the actor playing the role of David Gray (See (7) at the end for the name)) being very empathetic in the role. Consensus was that it was a good film in being even-handed in its treatment of Gray. But did the police need to be stalking in white shirts? Perhaps they were taken by real surprise at such an event.

The memorial to the massacred 14 (Bob caption and pic)

The memorial to the massacred 14 (Bob caption and pic)

To the park and out along the boardwalks

Salt marsh boardwalk. (Bob caption and pic)

Salt marsh boardwalk. (Bob caption and pic)

and gravelled paths among flax to the salt marshes, where Joyce delighted in betting on the crab races.

Elaine and Bev conspire to push Joyce over the edge. (Bob caption and pic)

Elaine and Bev conspire to push Joyce over the edge. (Bob caption and pic)

And back to the cars. A view near Deborah Bay of a wee house wedged between road and water where the Lewis family lived with 17 children!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A pleasant walk. One learns new things every time one comes out with the TRTC. Thanks to all who share their knowledge and entertainment. Bob Answers 1 Magnetic Street points to the magnetic North, while nearby Meridian Street points to the geographical North 2 a prize for the 1st correct answer 3 on looking at a map, probably Shag Point or perhaps the more distant Katiki Point where the Moeraki lighthouse is situated. 4 March 2009 5 It appeared to dump its load, acquired from out by the buoys, near the Spit Beach as it returned to the sea so much higher in the water 6 on the following website you can see a picture of the plant Lesley found which looks very like Cook’s Scurvey Grass http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/documents/NZ%20Favourite%20Plant%202005.pdf 7 Matthew Sunderland

14. 27/8/2009. Hikers. Port Chalmers: Iona Church, Rangi Park, Cemetery, Scott Memorial, Lady Thorn Dell, Observation Point, Hotere Garden, Back Beach, Stinking Point, Walton Park, return.Leaders: Fred, Bob.

Eighteen keen hikers set off from around Iona Church (Peter claimed that we were moving in religious circles, and when Bob said “Iona Church” he wondered how he had come to be the “owner” ), and climbed up the Rangi Park track. We were diverted past the old cemetery

Graveyard

Graveyard Shift. (Bob pic and caption) Les, Peter, Wendy, Lesley G, Mollie, Bill, Lesley S, Evelyn

where we were regaled by stories of Lex’s youth, drinking there before the annual ball and being “late”. The steep track is well formed, though some of the steps are high, and passes through a most extensive grove of Brachyglottis Rangiora (or Rangiora )

Rangiora Row

Rangiora Row. (Bob pic and caption). Pat, Elaine.

that large-leafed, white-backed foliage you can write on with a ballpoint. Several lookout points were good for stops to admire the views across the port, harbour, islands and peninsula.

We descended from the Scott Memorial and Nineteen Fathom Foul anchor along Brailleys track to the new cemetery and thence into Church St and the Lady Thorn Rhododendron Dell

Rock Dwellers

Rock Dwellers. (Bob pic and caption). Lesley G, Evelyn, Les.

for a welcome morning tea – a warm and picturesque spot with early shrubs coming into blossom, and seats for all.

Round the church again (2 churches really with 2 spires – 1872 and 1883), down to the town centre,

Stopp Twins

Stopp Twins

up Grey, Scotia and Aurora streets to great views at Observation Point.  Neil was so engrossed there in pointedly chatting up a young lady that he made no observation that the rest of us had moved off.  A few moments were spent in the Hotere sculpture garden where Les and Peter tested the smacking law with some choice whacks of the inverted male’s bottom,

An inverted sense of humour

An inverted sense of humour? (Bob pic and caption. Les, Peter.

and there was a photo opportunity for some old hulks to pose by the old hulk, “Black Phoenix II”.

Old hulks

Old hulks pose by an old hulk. (Bob pic and caption). Fred, Bill, Peter.

Down the hill to the Yacht Club and the public toilet,

Revenge

Revenge: This is the woman who nominated me for Vice President. (Bill pic and caption). Margaret.

where there was much toilet humour, and then along the Back Beach walkway to a sheltered, planted picnic spot for lunch.

The Lunch Room.

The Lunch room. (Bob pic and caption). Bill, Neil, Lesley, Les, Dot, Arthur, Peter, who? Pat, Fred, Angela, Margaret, Elaine.

Now rested, we could complete the journey along the gravelled Peninsula Beach Road, past Russell Moses’ “Koputai” – the boat-shaped groyne sculpture,

The Groyne Sculpture

Groyne boat (Bob pic and caption).

round Stinking Point (where there was no smell but a useful seat) and the Pride of the Yarra Plaque (where there was a
plaque and another seat.) Along Victory Place and Wickliffe Terrace to the track above the school we strode, descending to Walton Park at Mussel Bay and along the grassy waterfront track to the railway line. A stack of uplifted tracks provided tiered seating for a wee rest out of the breeze,

Tiered seating

Tiered seating. (Bob pic and caption). Who? Evelyn, Fred, Lesley S, Pat, Bill, Les, Elaine, Peter, Lex, Dot, Joyce, Who? Margaret

and a garden filled with ornaments of all kinds offered a wee feast for the eyes.

An ornamented

An ornamented landscape. (Bob pic and caption).

The last stretch of the journey was along the George St shops and up Mount St to the cars. Less than 10km walking, but 4 hours of good exercise, and a route with some new ingredients for most.  Fred and Bob led luminously in the club’s fluorescent  jerkins. – Bob.

13. 26/11/2008 Hikers.Port Chalmers. Leaders: C. Hughes, G. Baxter

12. 16/1/2008. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Tash, Lex.


Scott Memorial

On a lovely calm and warm summer morning 15 hikers parked their cars at Sawyers Bay and set out for Port Chalmers. We went round the back road and then up the hill to the Scott Memorial and Centenary Lookout. Perfect place for morning tea break. Lovely views, shade or sun to sit in and the colourful company of the resident ‘free-range’ roosters and hens who are always very interested to check out the visitors! Then it was down the hill and through the Port Chalmers cemetery to the port itself. No cruise ships that day but two left recently and another due in that night. Up the hill then to the Conservation Point Flagstaff Lookout. Perfect day for great views all round. We sat in the recently developed little reserve that has a sculpture by Ralph Hotere as well as a couple of other rather intriguing and interesting ones, and enjoyed a restful and relaxing lunch break. Then, down the hill again to the back beach road. About half way along we went up a track that took us up to the top of the hill again. From there it was down the road, across the railway line and back along main road to Sawyers Bay and the cars. A happy and convivial day out. – Bev.

11. 16/1/2008. Hikers. Port Chalmers. Park cars at Sawyers Bay. Easy.Leaders: Lesley S, Eleanor B

10. 7/2/2007. All. Port Chalmers from Sawyers Bay – Cruise Ship. Easy.

 Leaders: Peter and Wendy, Molly, Lois.

9. 28/6/2006 Hikers. Sawyers Bay, Back Beach. Leaders: Jean A, Chris

8. 13/8/2003. Hikers. Port Chalmers, Careys Bay. Easy. Leaders: Lesley W, Denise.

7. 21/8/2002. Alt. Port Chalmers Careys Bay Back Beach. Leaders: Dot B, Joan H, Anne R

6. 17/10/2001. Alt. Port Chalmers, Back Beach. Leaders: Nelson and Dot, Mavis.

5. 6/6/2001.All weather. Overgrown. Port Chalmers, Deborah Bay. Easy+. Leaders: Bill H, Lesley S, Winnifred

4. 8/11/2000. Port Chalmers. Leaders: Mavis, Peggy M, Catherine.

3. 7/6/2000. Deborah Bay. Leaders: Bev H, Les & Margaret

2. 8/1/2000 Port Chalmers Careys Bay Back Beach, Rangi Park walkway. Leaders: Mary M, Catherine T

1. 12/7/1995. Port Chalmers. Deborah Bay. Easy+. Leaders: Shirley, Bev H, Ria H, Jean A

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Nov 16 2017

The stone-wall ruins on the McKessar Track

Published by under Uncategorized

The stone-walled house was burnt out by a bushfire in 1914 after the McKessar family had left the district and the farm had been taken over by a neighbour.

George and Emma (Driver) McKessar had lived and farmed there. George was born in 1836 and Emma in 1853 and they had six children. Emma was a child of Richard and Elizabeth (Robertson) Driver. Richard was the first official pilot for Otago Harbour, and she had been born at the pilot house at Taiaroa Head. She died  at Purakanui at 47 in 1900 and George at 75 in 1912. – edited from research by Clive Crossman on various websites.

 

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Nov 15 2017

Walrus Bridge. Nardoo Scientific Reserve. Little Peak.

Published by under Trampers

Distance from Bush Road Car-park: 50 Km.

Tramp area map

8. 15/11/2017. Trampers. Nardoo Reserve Walrus Bridge. Leader: Art.
3 vehicles conveyed 9 Trampers out past Lake Mahinerangi to the Nardoo Reserve, for a day in the tussock. It was an hour’s journey.
On the last few kilometres up the farm road on Waipori Station we were able to admire all the ewes with their lambs. They obviously wanted to keep up their fitness, as instead of moving off sideways, they preferred to run uphill on the road in front of us!
From our car park we walked for 10 minutes to have smoko by the D.O.C. sign, as we entered the Reserve.
Up the zig zag and into the tussock. There was a faint trail to follow all the way, but concentration was needed at times so as not to lose it.
We stopped a few times to regroup and have a rest, uphill all the way. But our precautions taken to guard against sunburn were wasted as we remained under low cloud all day.
At one of the rest stops it was noticed the cloud was flowing up the gullies on either side of us, converging, and then going upslope in front of us. The cloud was close above us further up, but we had good visibility of several hundred meres on the group in all directions.

‘’ come on up Bruce, there’s a better view of the mist here”. (Phil pic and caption.)

And so we came to Walrus Bridge, some time being spent on admiring and photographing it, before drawing up to the festal board (we ate our lunch).

Walrus Rock. Dave up on top. Rest underneath. (Helen pic and caption.)

A swallow arrived, and to our pleasure began flying backwards and forwards over the water and under Walrus Bridge, no doubt looking for a snack.
Before turning for home, some time was spent by the botanists among us, in studying the large area of mosses, etc, just beyond Walrus Bridge.

There was a lot of interest in the flower. ‘’Possibly the buttercup ranunculus gracilipis (slender) ( A Mark ‘ Above the treeline’)’’. (Phil pic and caption.)

We retraced our path in the beautiful tussock, downhill now of course, and eventually arrived back at the D.O.C. sign for a photo opportunity.

The group. (Helen pic and caption.)

And so it came to pass the 9 very happy trampers returned to the cars after a very enjoyable day in the tussock.

A brief stop was made at the Waipori Cemetery on the way back. A tranquil place. And Lake Mahinerangi was very low, we could see.

Back at Outram refreshments were obtained at the “Gobbly Woat”.

A few figures now – our day’s tramp distance was 8.7 km. We parked the cars at an altitude of 624 metre, and Walrus Bridge was at 934 metres.

My thanks to all my fellow “tussock jumpers” for such a good day out. – Art.

7. 28/10/2015 Trampers. Nardoo Reserve.
On a cool morning, 11 trampers, 9 who had not been there before, set off to visit Nardoo Reserve,
After a tentative drive along the road from Lake Mahinarangi, past the old Waipori cemetery, desperately looking for any sign that I remembered where we were, we finally arrived at the parking spot where we would start walking from.
As it was already just after 10am, we decided to have morning tea before setting off on our walk. Then it was off along the old 4WD track around to the boundary fence of Nardoo Reserve, where we were puzzled by the fact that the gate was open into the reserve. This was later explained to me by the owner of the surrounding land, who had a legit reason for it being open.
On the way up…
Some great scenery (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Some great scenery (Heb pic, Ken caption)

… the long climb to Walrus Bridge, I let some of the group take turns with the GPS so they could follow the track on the GPS display of our previous trips here.
Taking a break on the way up (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Taking a break on the way up (Heb pic, Ken caption)

I also did this on the way home again, as I think it wise to let others see how the GPS can guide you in this type of featureless country, which is all tussock, with no track showing in most places, as it’s many years since anybody has had a vehicle up there. Most agreed that they had no idea how to return to the cars, & I think there would’ve been a lot of head scratching going on if they had to find there own way back.
After having lunch at Walrus Bridge,
Lunch at Walrus Bridge (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Lunch at Walrus Bridge (Heb pic, Ken caption)

where everybody was suitably impressed by the sight of the pool under it, we decided to go on a little further as it was still quite early. Se we trudged across to another rocky point where we had a rest & a good look around, trying to decide in which direction Lawrence, & some other towns were. Then we made our way all the way back to the cars,
Exiting the reserve (Heb pic, Ken caption)

Exiting the reserve (Heb pic, Ken caption)

where some expressed amazement that the walk was quite short, but felt as though they had walked much further.
There were some appreciative comments made about the trip, so I think everybody enjoyed the day out on the open tops. And I for one have some sunburn on the back of the hand I use with my Trekking Pole.Walked 9km
3.1km/h
2h 54mins moving
climbed 382mtrs
max height 972mtrs.
6. 27/10/2010. Trampers. Nardoo Scientific Reserve. Little Peak. Medium. Leader: Ian.

GPS of Tramp. 10km. courtesy Ken.

The day was hot. Tempered by a strong but pleasant cool wind. Five of us enjoyed a return to Little Peak. To access Nardoo Reserve we had to drive through part of Waipori Station, whose permission was kindly given. The protected tussock of the Reserve was as long as ever but the 4WD track was still detectable. We stopped early at the customary zig-zag for the tea break.

Morning tea on the zig-zag. (Ken pic)

Then it was on up, across to the left, then right, along a bit of a gully before climbing to top the wee hill to our left, (see the first left point of the two major zigs on the GPS map.

View of Little Peak just discernable on skyline. About to climb wee hill on our left. 4WD track visible in tussock.

Then the swing down to our right, across a wet mossy decline, and up again, angling on a long reach to our left to reach Little Peak, (see the second major left point on the GPS route). Here we rested beside Walrus Bridge rock.

Break at Walrus Bridge. (Ken pic)

We had made good time and it was too early for lunch. We decided to head in the direction of Peak No. 2. The tussock on the top here shares pride of place with a large variety of mosses, and a profusion of celmisias. We made our way across these to a solitary rock on a bit of a rise and decided to lunch there.

Rock where we had lunch. Little Peak rocks in back-ground.

We were struck by the deep blue of a group of able 5 tarns in a dip, looking towards the Lake.

Deep blue of tarns viewed from lunch spot. Lake Mahinerangi. (Ken pic)

Then it was back down and across to Little Peak and to retrace our steps back to the car. Ken let us take turns with holding his GPS navigator to note just how accurately we were keeping to the track it had marked out on the ascent. (A good tool were we ever to get lost.) Only five of us, but good company. Wish there were more to share our enjoyment of yet another brilliant Wednesday. – Ian
5. 16/1/2008 Trampers. Walrus Bridge, Red Rock, Nardoo Scientific Reserve. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Bill M
Today, which saw the mercury rise uncomfortably high , 10 of us travelled in 3 very different cars to the start of the tramp, well past the turnoff to the Waipori cemetery beside Lake Mahinerangi.
This was going to be the day we all needed a large supply of water. Luckily it was only a slow leak from the water bladder and Ian did not run out of water. Ria, who is very fit, found the slow pace hard to take , although the rest of us appreciated the regular breathers Bill allowed us on the rather hot, tussocky ascent. Wonderful views surrounded us over the nearby slopes of the Lammermoors, and back over lake Mahingerangi. The area we were in was a scenic reserve called Nardoo and had been fenced off from the stock which roamed over the rest of Waipori Station.
Nardoo sign

Nardoo sign. (Bill pic)

This had allowed regeneration of the native plants and tussocks and on the summit of Little Peak 1 the Celmisias were everywhere and a real treat to see their lovely silver foliage and white, daisy like flowers. Walrus bridge is a large rock spanning a deep dark tarn and it was here we sought shelter from the midday sun and had our lunch.
Walrus Bridge

Close-up view under Walrus Bridge/ (Bill pic)

We posed. Emma, Marjorie, Tash, Doug, Hazel, Ian, Bruce.

We posed. Emma, Marjorie, Tash, Doug, Hazel, Ian, Bruce.

Bruce suggested it was called Walrus because a walrus moustache is shaped like a bridge over the mouth and droops down the sides rather like a walrus’ long incisor teeth. Hazel needed a good wake up call
Lunch snooze.

Lunch snooze. Ken, Doug, Bruce, Tash, Emma, Marjorie (Bill pic)

Overhang rock

Rock overhang. A walrus? (Bill pic)

Mahinerangi view

Mahinerangi view

as we headed back down after lunch and Ian managed to end up fighting to get up from the tussocks after falling dramatically into them. And so back the way we came, but this time all down hill.
Us on way back down. Ria, Hazel, Doug, Tash, Emma, Bruce, Marjorie, Ken, Ian

Us on way back down. Ria, Hazel, Doug, Tash, Emma, Bruce, Marjorie, Ken, Ian

A great day out in beautiful, wild country with blue skies, and white shaped clouds.
Cloud effect

Cloud effect (Bill pic)

A quick visit to Waipori Cemetery and memorial on the way out, and we still hadn’t seen a living soul.- Tash
4. 15/2/2006. Trampers. Red Rock, Nardoo, Walrus Bridge. Leaders: Ian, Bob H, Judy G.

Walrus Bridge.

3. 20/4/2005. Both. Nardoo, Walrus Bridge. Leaders: Helen S, Ria, Lance and Lois.
2. 19/3/2003. Both. Lake Mahinerangi, Red Rock, Walrus Bridge, Nardoo. Medium. Leaders: Ria, Evelyn, Molly, Mary M.
1. 14/4/1993. Lake Mahinerangi, Red Rock, Walrus Bridge, Nardoo. Medium+. Leaders: Ria L, Ria H, Jean, Lesley S.

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Nov 15 2017

McKessar Track

Published by under Uncategorized

37 km from car park to Mopanui Road end.

2. 15/11/2017. Hikers. Purakaunui Station. McKessar Track, Mopanui Road. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Starting off from the site of the old Purakanui railway station, a party of twenty hikers made the short road walk down hill to the Purakaunui inlet for an then returned, for the morning tea stop at the cars.

(Clive pic.) [Cars at the station a first for the Club. – Ed.]

This was followed by the hike up the McKessar Track in very pleasant conditions to our lunch stop at the end of Mopanui Road.  We had a breather on the uphill climb where Ian showed us the relics of the old McKessar homestead.

(Clive pic.)

An after-lunch

(Clive pic.)

stroll beyond the road end, took us to a point which gave us an excellent view to the north.  Little time was required for the pleasant stroll down hill back to the cars, which took us to our refreshment stop at the stadium Plaza cafe. –  Betty and Jim

1. 9/3/2016. Hikers. Mopanui Road, McKessar Track, Albert Road. E. Leaders: Bev, Lesley.

GPS of McKessar trek

GPS of McKessar trek

Horse Drinking Trough on Mount Cargill Road.

Horse Drinking Trough on Mount Cargill Road.

Orokonui Village

Orokonui Village

Hikers' cuppa at top of McKessar Track

Hikers’ cuppa at top of McKessar Track

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Nov 08 2017

Flagstaff forest walks.

Published by under Hikers

No. 37 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “DCC Forest. Three Mile Hill. W Bathgate. Permit DCC. Year Round”

Location: 10 km.
Click Flagstaff Creek Walking Track for background information.
Park at Three Mile Hill lookout, or Bullring or Pottery, Whare Flat.
Permit from City Forest, Dunedin 455 5512.
Flagstaff Forest road map

Map of all Roads

click to enlarge

Flagstaff Forest Tracks

Map of lower tracks/roads

Jack Roy's Map of Flagstaff Forest roads/tracks

Jack Roy’s Map of Flagstaff Forest roads/tracks

21. 8/11/2017. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest. Stuart and High Streets. M. Leader: Adrienne.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

A dozen Hikers set out from the Taieri Lookout Car Park, crossed the Three Mile Hill Road and turned down the Flagstaff Creek walking track, crossed south road and descended the occasionally steep recently well-stepped track to the weir and the old, well-rusted flow wheel,

Can you detect it? Try enlarging.

now almost completely obscured by undergrowth where we had morning tea. The closed wooden bridge across Flagstaff Creek being now blocked off with its access track fully obscured by undergrowth, we had to climb back up to South Road the way we had come down, and follow the road around, past Durham and High Streets to climb the unsigned (where’s it got to?) Stuart Street to where it joined up with High Street. Sheltered hitherto for most of the tramp from a strong cold wind, we found ourselves now well exposed to it. We went up High Street a little way and turned up a track labelled Tank Surge Road <?> to the partial shelter of its narrow tank for lunch. Then, it was back down High Street and along South road to where it crosses Flagstaff creek by the piped concrete bridge, and up the  Douglas Fir Grove track leading across to the car park again.

Although the cold wind back at the Bush Road car park had been a bit discouraging, we all agreed at the end it had been a most enjoyable energetic day out, pleasantly completed with companionable coffee at the Aurora. With co-leader Bev laid aside through illness, (and the locator beacon still in her car boot!) Adrienne did a text-book perfect leadership job, faultlessly grouping us at each fork in the route. Thanks, Adrienne. – Ian.

20. 14/10/2015. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest. Stuart and High Streets. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.

GPS of the route

GPS of the route

Nineteen hikers parked at the Lookout. Lesley led us in at the upper entrance and down the track to South Rd. Then along South Rd …

A study in verticality

A study in ‘verticality’

What appears to be a chipper - for transforming forestry rubbish into pellet fire product, perhaps.

What appears to be a chipper – (saw-duster?) for transforming forestry rubbish into pellet fire product, perhaps.

… to the foot of Stuart St whose road sign at its foot is now unhelpfully missing. Up Stuart St which gets only steeper each time we tackle it, but now cleared of all trees on either side. Where Stuart St ends at High St, the leaders took eight of the party down High St, entrusting the balance of eleven to the leadership of Keith to take them up High St to lunch at its end at Longridge. The two parties met again on South Road where it crosses Flagstaff Stream and returned to the cars via the large steep steps taking them up along the Douglas Fir Grove track. – Ian.

19. 17/7/2013. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest. Leaders: Les and Margaret.

Wed. saw us park up at the lookout at three mile hill road.
We walked into the forest and around a few of the roads like High St, Stuart St, etc.
It turned out a great day with lots of sun between the trees.
the douglas firs are so TALL in the forest I wonder if they will mill them.
It was very sunny at the lunch stop. Fred supplied the usual chocs so all was well for us all.
We made our way back up some huge steps {made by a Big Man?}
There are a lot of felled trees in there and I wonder what they are going to do with it all.
With so many families crying out for wood and the price it is… and here is all this wood just rotting away. – Elaine.

18. 12/9/2012. Trampers. Flagstaff Forest Tramp. Leader: Ria.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Unaccountable lapse in record. Deduce omitted route yourself!

A pic from earlier in the tramp before we got to the top.

Fast melting snow on route back down from top.

17. 28/4/2010. Hikers. Flagstaff Forest walk. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Thirteen hikers parked at the Taieri lookout and set off on the bush track opposite which was a very pleasant walk. Although it had rained, pine needles made a soft dry carpet. The variety of trees and bird calls, including rosellas, provided interest and we admired the tall straight trunks of the giant trees.
We had morning tea and lunch at the same spot by the Flagstaff stream but between we did a circular walk around forestry roads. These provided us with good walking underfoot and although it was quite a grind up Stuart Street we all managed it with ease by taking our time and stopping to admire the view of the Taieri Plains and Saddle Hill. After lunch we completed the bush walk back to the cars.
It was quite a short walk, although no-one took up the offer to go round again. Another time a further circle could be added on at the top of Stuart Street. The weather was ideal with not a breath of wind and mild temperatures. – Marjorie

16. 1/7/2009 Both Hikers and Trampers. Flagstaff Forest. South Rd, High St, Laings, High St, Stuart St, South Rd.
Leaders: Neil, Ria

It was a good day for 20 members of the club from both groups. We entered the forest from opposite the Taieri Lookout car-park and made our way down to where the track comes out at South Road. We followed this around to turn up High Street, but before doing this we stopped for
our morning tea break in a rare sunny spot.
click to enlarge

Morning Tea on South Road.

Morning Tea on South Road. Lex, Bob, Who? Wendy, Who? Neil, Ria, Peter, Mollie, Pat, Bill, Bev, Evelyn, Angela.

We made our slow way up, up, up High Street, stopping for frequent rests to eventually reach Long Ridge Road only to immediately turn back off it to travel along Laing Road until Ria judged it time to stop for lunch.

Lunch

Lunch. Evelyn, Bob, Chris, Glenice, Who? Ria, Neil, Wendy, Peter.

Returning back we enjoyed great views of the Taieri Plain,

Taieri Plain

Taieri Plain

turned back down High Street and then off to the right and down Stuart Street. When it reached South Road, we turned left, passing the foot of High Street to reach the bridge/culvert over Flagstaff Creek. Here we turned down the Flagstaff Creek Walking Track to at last cross the Creek on a fine wooden bridge to reach a water race

Race Entrance

Race Entrance

Weir and Overflow

Weir, water-race entrance and Overflow

containing an old water meter wheel stiffened up with age and rust.

Upside Water Meter

‘Up-race’ of Water Meter

Downside Water Meter

‘Down-race’ of Water Meter

Back up the track a bit we turned up to the right to climb a many-stepped track up to cross South Road and back up the initial track to the car park again. Thanks, Ria and Neil for a most enjoyable, if wrapped-up, winter’s day out. – Ian

15. 25/2/2009 Trampers. Three Mile Hill Lookout. Flagstaff forest walk, Three Mile Hill. Round trip. Lookout, South Rd, High St, Longridge Rd, Whare Flat Rd, Laings Rd, High St, South Rd. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

The misty overcast day left  ground wet and muddy underfoot and ruled out the planned tramp on Swampy. So Ria had sought permission for the six of us to walk the Flagstaff Forestry roads. It was a good work-out, extended by a climb from the Bullring to near Flagstaff summit to fill in time before lunching in the welcome shelter of Ria’s daughter Ingrid’s property’s haybarn down Whare Flat Road.

Lunch in Ingrid's Haybarn. Ian

Lunch in Ingrid’s haybarn. Ian

Lunch in daughter Ingrid's haybarn. Ria

Lunch in daughter Ingrid’s haybarn. Ria

Lunch in Ingrid's haybarn. Hazel, Glenice

Lunch in Ingrid’s haybarn. Hazel, Glenice

Lunch in Ingrid's haybarn. Bill, Pat

Lunch in Ingrid’s haybarn. Bill, Pat

Then it was back up Whare Flat Road to Laings Road and so back to the Lookout where we had parked the cars. Thanks to Ria and Hazel for a good alternative tramp.

14. 20/9/2006. Hikers. Three Mile Hill area. Easy. Leaders: Jean, Anne R, Eleanor B.
13. 30/3/2005.DCC Forestry Walk.
Water wheel

Water wheel

12. 11/9/2002. Alt. Three Mile Hill. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Peg C
11. 27/6/2001 Three Mile Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Eleanor, Mavis
10. 25/4/2001. Three Mile Hill. Leaders: Daphne, Peg C, Mary M.
9. 19/7/2000. D.C.C. Forestry Circuit. Leaders: Shirley R, Arthur and Barbara.
8. 18/8/1999. DCC Forestry Walk. 3 Mile Hill. Leaders: Margaret D, Winifred, Joan H.
7. 11/11/1998. DCC Forest – 3 Mile Hill. Leaders: Betty, Joan H, Winifred.
6. 28/5/1997. Flagstaff Forest Walk. Leaders: Peg A, Peg M, Margaret D
5. 22/1/1997. Flagstaff – Creek Forest. Leaders: Peggy M, Margaraet D, Peg A.
4. 26/6/1996. D.C.C. 3 Mile Hill Forestry Round Trip from Coburns. Medium. Shorter alternative in some areas. Leaders: J Roy, Ian, Catherine.
3. 30/3/1994. D.C.C. Forestry, Whare Flat, Look-out, Three Mile Hill Road. WET FEET! Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Wendy B, Evelyn M, Doreen
2. 9/12/1992 DCC Forest. Round trip. Cars meet Three Mile Hill Lookout. Average. Leaders: Marie F, Nel K, Doreen, Lesley S
1. 22/6/1988 Three Mill Hill from Taieri Lookout. Pleasant pine walks. Leaders:

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Nov 08 2017

Rollinsons, Swampy, Swine Spur

Published by under Trampers

Location: 15 km.
Click Swampy ridge track for background information.

6. 8/11/2017. Trampers. Swine Spur. M. Leader: Dave.

Last Wednesday’s tramp could have been called a number of names and probably was!!

(a) Swine spur – was it the pig rooting or the steepness of the trail in a gale?

(b) A walk on snow in wintery gale conditions in November    or

(c) How many differently named tracks can you do in a day?

Ten keen trampers’ left the car park having some idea what the weather might be like for the day ahead. We parked in Rollinson’s road just below the bridge adjacent to the entrance into the bush with the sign ‘swine spur’.  The bushes and trees were wet from the rain the night before. It was pleasant walking through the Kanuka with lots of clematis flowering.  However it wasn’t long before the colour of the track resembled the colour of the clematis! SNOW WHITE!!

Started off in snow.!! (Helen pic and caption.)

As we wandered up the track the snow got thicker and the wind got stronger. We decided to have morning tea in the last bit of shelter before the track upwards became exposed. The wind was very strong – we could just stand up! Keeping together we supported each other, through flax and dracophylum, up to the top to the green building on Swampy. The wind was so strong that there was little shelter even behind the building.

A very short break and then we followed down ‘swampy ridge road’ until we reached ‘Porkys track’ – this faced into the gale. We slipped and slid where the snow lay on the grass. Gradually we headed down to where the shrubs became trees. After a while we came to a track junction and then followed ‘possum busters track’. There were a number of creeks, full of water, from the rain the night before. To cross – you had to get wet again!

 

Tricky creek crossings. (Helen pic and caption.)

A welcome lunch was had amongst the trees in the shelter.

It was then on to the junction with ‘smithies track’ which we followed for a while through attractive natives.  ‘Whare Loop track’ was then followed to Whare lake.

The group at Lake Whare. (Helen pic and caption.)

At this spot the Maoris of the past used to soak the flax in the lake – later making both twine and linen. See Flax in New Zealand – Wikipedia. The remains of a stone house were inspected before completing the loop and out onto the road where the cars awaited.  A distance of approximately 10.2 km was covered.

The group decided to go for a well, deserved coffee at a usual coffee shop but alas the power was off, probably because of the winds. We soon found another where we recounted our adventure which was enjoyed by all.

Many thanks to Neil M and Arthur for the track clearing they have done, this was very evident. Others have volunteered to help them.

– Dave M

5. 12/3/2014. Trampers. Rollinsons Rd, Swine Spur, Swampy Ridge, Rollinsons Rd, Picnic Tables, return to cars.
Swine Spur route.

Swine Spur route done. Red indicates the heavy Swine Spur work, yellow the faster road work!

At the car park, the trampers lacked a leader knowledgeable of the Swine Spur track programmed for the day, so this hiker was dragooned into going with them, with his traitorous act objected to strongly by one of the hikers (who shall considerately remain nameless) with his friendly invitation for the writer to never go with the hikers again.

A careful inspection of the access road roadside eventually elicited the heavily grassed over entrance to the Possum Busters track. We made it through Manuka-Kanuka wood and the two steep guts of Mckenzie Creek and the other unnamed one, to stop for the cuppa at the traditional stop at the intersection of Possum Busters and Swine Spur tracks.

Then we turned left up the Swine Spur through the easily graduated track that was to inevitably bring us to the foot of the near vertical strenuous climb to Swampy Ridge roadway.

A word of appreciation here of the sterling track clearing from the route of all the impedimenta the once-in-a-life-time wet snow storm of last August brought down across it. Bravo, you track clearers! It was obviously a massive job.

Anyway, we reached the small concrete-block aerial navigation building sitting there at the top and turned left along the road to pass the Airways Corporation combined VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Radio) and DME (Distance Measuring Equipment – where’s an easier name?) setup to head down the access road. We forewent going on through Swampy to Hightop, as had been programmed, indulging in an easier day instead. (A concession to the hiker, the writer suspects.)

Well, that was to be just a boring road walk back to the cars, but most pleasantly interrupted with a lunch stop at the 0ld-trampers’ picnic area at the head of the Steve Amies track. With all the time in the world, we just lazed there around the tables before eventually deciding to head back out and down to the cars. We arrived back at the car park BEFORE the hikers! One for the record book? – Ian.

4. 20/10/2010. Trampers. Rollinsons Road, Possum Busters, Swine Spur, Swampy Ridge, Rollinsons Track, Rollinsons Road. Leaders: Ria, Hazel.

Navmap of tramp, courtesy Ken. Rollinsons Track at top, part of it hidden on slope behind Swampy Ridge

Ria and Hazel led us into the start of Possum Busters from off Rollinsons Road. The two deep gullies were still there, but with the steep banks provided with wonderful sets of steps. Bravo, track-clearers. We stopped for a tea-break at the Swine Spur junction, wishing we had the tools to re-attach Les Murcott’s track signs to the remaining-standing manuka trunk. Then it was up the gentle incline of the Swine Spur track before it steeply climbed onto the actual Swine Spur.

Snow on track near top of slope of Swine Spur.

We were delighted to find the last bit onto the Spur was now a well-defined route, replacing the half-dozen or so attempts through the over-grown area. Reaching the top, we stopped for a brief shelter from some cold wind.

Sheltering from wind at building at top of Swine Spur.

Then it was along the road to Swampy Summit.

Snow on Swampy Summit

The Swampy Summit Track beyond the summit led us down through slippery frozen snow and on to our next turn-off. The Rollinsons Track was well-indicated and its route well-defined with copious track markers. Another good change from a time when it was really hard to detect parts of the track. Again, thanks to some excellent recent work by some good people, added to by our leaders on their recce.

Lunch scene. Foreground: track marker on bush, background: left to right, Pulpit rock, Silver Peaks No. 2, Rocky Ridge, The Gap.

The track kept high on the slope, avoiding the wetter parts of Swampy.

Tarn at heart of Swampy

The track wound its way back up and out of Swampy to join with the Rain Gauge track. Again, the track sign had been clearly renamed “Rollinsons” instead of the “Swampy Tarns” sign that had been put over the old faded sign. Then it was just out to Rollinsons Road at the hairpin bend and on down to the cars.
Thanks to Ria and Hazel for this lovely tramp over the whole Rollinsons again – a replacement for the trip into Jubilee Hut that  had been thoughtlessly scheduled for during lambing. – Ian.
3. 15/3/2006. Trampers. Rollinson, Burns, Swine Spur. Medium+. Leaders: Doug J, Ian, Shirley.
2. 30/4/2003. Both. Access Road, Rollinson Track, Swampy Saddle, Swine Spur Track. Medium+. Leaders: Ria, Bill and Pat, Denise, Anne R.
1. 19/9/2001. From Access Road, Rollinsons Track, Swampy Saddle, Swine Spur Track. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Doug and Myrie, Joyce.

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Nov 01 2017

Pyramids, Victory Beach

No. 48 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Pyramids & Beach Area. (Victory Beach) Beach Walk only. Year Round”
Location: 38 km from car park.

Topo of Area

25. 1/11/2070. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders:  Bruce and Liz.

Route map of Hikers medium sub-group only, less the small pyramid, climbed by others, courtesy Ian. Trampers also climbed the larger pyramid.

Report 1 November 2017. Pyramids and Victory Beach.
Thirty-five hikers and trampers set off from the Pyramids car park in Dick Road at approximately 9. 45 am towards Papanui Inlet passing 7 Sheldrake ducklings and their parents in a pond on the way.

We entered into the saltmarsh at the sign and followed a path to the inlet, turned to the left, walked approximately 400 m around the edge of the inlet, and then climbed a small bank on the left to get on to the 4-wheel drive track. We went along this about 100 m to a relatively sunny spot for morning tea.

 

A great place for morning tea. (Clive pic and caption.)

After morning tea, we continued along the 4-wheel drive track towards the sea crossing a plank bridge and then the style into the DCC Okia reserve. We continued on the track to where it veered to the left into the scrub and went instead to the right down a small bank on to the sand bordering the inlet. The bank was about 10 m before where the concrete square on the bank used to be. The square has now fallen down the level of the inlet. We proceeded around the edge of the inlet on relatively firm sand. The tide was coming in, with at 2.0 m high tide due at 3.16 pm. We soon met our first sea lion sleeping in the sun and later sitting up in the water facing us and periodically giving us a view of its oral cavity.
Another sea lion was on the point and lumbered towards us before settling down to rest. After turning to the left around the point of the beach we proceeded up the beach. A group of four sea lions consisting of a mother and 3 younger members of the species where resting…

Sea lions and fur seals were on the beach. (Clive pic and caption.)

…near the site of the 1861 Victory wreck, the upper crescent of the fly wheel of which was visible periodically when the waves subsided. We were strung out along the beach as we travelled north passing another sea lion and a dead sea lion or seal pup in a state of partial decomposition.

We congregated for lunch at the foot of the sand hills, about 70 m before the track leading to the pyramids, between approximately 12. 15 pm and 12.30 pm.

The birthday boy Clive in his 70th with chocolates. (Helen pic and caption.)

After lunch a group of 16, led by Arthur, departed slightly before rest with the intention of returning to the car park via the end of the beach, the large pyramid and then the small pyramid.

The remaining 19 went 70 m north to enter the track to the pyramids which is marked by a yellow and black pole, approximately 50 cm high, in a steel square framework. After passing a board referring to the wildlife we split into two further groups with 7 continuing on the grassy track straight ahead to the pyramids, and then the car park, while the other 12 turned to the right and followed a more circuitous route via some initially longish grass, the rosette, and the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff to the cave in the small pyramid which, uncharacteristically, had water covering the floor.

Cave flooded. First time ever for us. Extensive flooding of marshes and tracks never seen before. Wet winter! (Ian pic and caption.)

Approximately 6 members then climbed the small pyramid.

We were then met by the returning trampers and, after some more pyramidal ascents were mad,e we returned to the carpark and then, for most of us, had refreshments at the Bay Café, Macandrew Bay.

A pond was present just before the rosette and a temporary bridge and detour was present on the track just after the Margaret Hazel slope turnoff because the track was flooded. The track was partially built up for a few metres near the small pyramid, evidence of a wetter than usual winter. Some pot holes were present in Weir Road. The Pyramids/Victory beach area remains as a place where a level round walk with varied scenery in the country is possible.

The weather was good with some early mist, relatively high temperatures and a cooling breeze on the beach. The distance travelled, depending on the route chosen was approximately 10.5 to 13 km. Including the rosette and the small pyramid ascent the distance was 11.7 km.
My thanks are due to Liz Griffin for stepping in and performing admirably as co-leader/back marker at short notice.
– Bruce

Trampers’ addendum report.

16 trampers left the main group after the lunch stop, and continued along the beach to the north end. It was rather a scramble to get up the steep sand dune, to find that the track along the top was quite overgrown. However the leader unerringly led the group 100 metres or so until the mown track was reached, and easy going.

As we took a last look at the sea,

Bruce on his first tramp back after surgery . (Helen pic and caption.)

2 or 3 porpoises were spotted frolicking in the surf. The wildlife was wonderful today.

12 trampers climbed to the top of the big pyramid,

Both Pyramids. (Helen pic and caption.)

to gain the superb views on offer. Down again, we continued and caught up with the Hikers, the last of whom were just descending the small pyramid.

4 trampers also ascended it, to claim having climbed both pyramids today.

And so we returned to the cars together, after a most enjoyable day’s tramp. – Art.

24. 2/11/2016. Both. Papanui Inlet, Victory Beach and Pyramids. E. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

Thirty-one hikers and trampers met at the Pyramids car park on Dick Road at 9.50 am on a calm sunny morning. Low tide at Dunedin was 0.3 m at 1258 and the Papanui Inlet tide is about 1 hour later. Three of the group (Leslie, Bev and Molly) accepted the shorter route option of taking the direct yellow-marker route to Victory Beach via the Pyramids while the other 28 proceeded via Dick Road past some bovine mothers and children who found us to be of interest.

 

Bruce

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Cows and calves. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We entered the salt marsh by crossing the ditch opposite the sign

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

Crossing creek. (Helen pic and caption.)

and walked straight ahead to the estuary before turning left for approximately 400 m …

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

Tide out. (Helen pic and caption.)

… to have morning tea on the 4-wheel drive track approximately 200-300 m from the gate at the north end of the road. Overgrowth of the lupins and bank erosion made it easier to walk on the estuary for a distance to where the bank up to the 4-wheel drive track was less steep. A suitable morning tea site, with access to the pine forest and some logs for sitting on, was present after the barbed wire fence on the left stopped.

After morning tea we proceeded along the track, over the railway sleeper bridge and then the style into the Okia Reserve and followed the track with white markers to the estuary edge where a large concrete block was present. The bank was eroded here and most of us went down a slightly easier place a few metres before the block.

We then walked on the firmer sand near the water’s edge going to the end of the estuary, passing some Paradise (Sheldrake) ducks and then around the sandy point with dunes to Victory Beach. We paused to inspect two sea lions.

Sealions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Sea lions. (Bruce pic and caption.)

The fly wheel of the Victory was partly submerged.

[Scroll down to (20. 16/7/2014 tramp report) to view a new photo insertion (I’ve just learnt how to make out of a video frame), of Bruce standing on top of the Victory flywheel back at that date. (There’s also a video to click on just below it.) – Ian.]

At 12.05 pm the groups of 3 and 28 merged and we lunched on the sand at the base of the track marked by an orange pole and two green crayfish pot floats.

 

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Lunch on Victory Beach. (Bruce pic and caption.)

After lunch Molly and Clive followed the shorter option path back to the Pyramids and cars while the other 29 took the 4-wheel drive track to the right and then when almost at the cliffs at the end of the beach turned to the left to follow the track around to the rock rosette.

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Rock Rosette. (Bruce pic and caption.)

We continued on the loop track to the Margaret Hazel Slope track.

Margaret Hazel slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Margaret Hazel Slope. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Five of the trampers made a detour from here back to the cars via the top of the large Pyramid.

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.) [of smaller pyramid - Ed.]

Us on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

The rest continued back to the junction near the small Pyramid where most waited while approximately 6 visited the cave in the small Pyramid to inspect the pentagonal and hexagonal basalt column crystal structures.

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Basalt columns in cave. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Approximately 8 persons took the 10 minute track up to the top of the small Pyramid for the expansive viewbefore following the others back to the cars via Dick Road. Everyone was back at the car park by approximately 3 pm and refreshments were consumed at the Portobello Café.No major calamities occurred on the day. A potential problem may occur if the track up the small pyramid is strayed from because of the steepness of the terrain. The persistent sun may have caused some sunburn. The route followed requires the low tide to be at an appropriate time.

The distance travelled by the main group was approximately 12.3 km with the small and large pyramid ascents adding approximately another 0.15 and 1.2 km respectively. – Bruce.

23. 20/4/2016. Trampers. Pyramids, Victory Beach and Papanui Inlet. Leaders: Neil and Margreet.Ten trampers set out at 0945 on a warm autumn day to explore this scenic reserve and beach.  We stopped for morning tea at a well concealed cave

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.)

Neil in Cave. (Helen pic and caption.) [Note: Ed. recalls climbed by only an adolescent before.]

and then followed the undulating track to the beach. Even though it was still near low tide, we could only see a small part of the fly wheel of the wreck of the “Victory” at the South end of the beach. Much more impressive were all the seals …

One of many seals on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

One of many sea-lions on the beach. (Margreet pic and caption)

… lazing on the sand and gambolling in the waves. There was also a lone, grounded Mollymawk …

Mollyhawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

Mollymawk on the beach (Margreet pic and caption)

… on the beach, seemingly injured.

Once we reached the end of the beach we turned into the Papanui Inlet and had lunch in a scenic spot where we were entertained by young seals frolicking in the water nearby.

We meandered around the inlet and then followed the gravel road back to the car-park.

As we had made good time, it was decided to drop our packs at this stage, and do some more exploring. Four trampers climbed Little Pyramid

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

Great view from Little Pyramid. (Margreet pic and caption)

and the other six went up the larger pyramid

Girls on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

Girls on top of big pyramid … (Margreet pic and caption)

Then nen on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

… then men on top of big pyramid (Margreet pic and caption)

via Margaret Hazel Slope. It was worth the clamber to get great views of the beach and surrounding hills from the summits.

A coffee stop at Portobello completed an enjoyable day’s outing.

In total we walked 11.85 km. – Margreet and Neil Simpson

22. 13/5/2015. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leaders: Chris and Adrienne. Later: also Bruce.
GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

GPS of route, courtesy Bruce.

Today’s tramp was an alternative to Murray’s Farm which was deemed too wet following the previous day’s rain. After regrouping at the gate into the reserve, we resorted to the club’s habitual setting in the nearby cave for morning tea, happily in sunshine.
Then followed the trek out to the beach along along the usual, but surprisingly cleaned-up track, extravagantly cleared to a width greater than we had ever encountered before, complete with side bays as well. Obviously a scrub-cutter operator had enjoyed their job.
But at the beach entrance, whoa! Full tide! Even Keith and Ian’s trek along the narrow wave-touched strip of remaining sand ‘pour encourager les autres’ (to encourage the others) to reach less wave-washed sand further on, failed to inspire the leaders, indeed earned only their rebuke for ‘not staying behind the leader’. Sigh.
An alterative suggestion from Bruce to visit the viewing spot of the 30 metre wide circular geologically-formed rock “rosette” on the cliff-face of the larger pyramid found favour, so thence we trouped.
 This proved an occasion for some interesting discussions. “Where is it?” “There it is. Can’t you see it?” “No, I can’t”. “Look, it’s right THERE.” Well, I suppose we can’t all be brilliant.
Presently, returning the way we had come, we stopped on a slope of the track for an early lunch,
Lazy lunch. (John pic)

Lazy lunch. (John pic)

lazing enjoyably in the sun with not too much wind to disturb us. Following lunch, back on the main scrub-cleared track, came an early afternoon decision time. A goodly half of our number (of 28), elected to return to the cars, but not all …. Now, over to Bruce. – Ian
Loop group. After lunch a group of 13 headed out to the beach some distance north of our earlier entry point to the beach before lunch. A sand cliff was present where the track reached the beach due to sea erosion and we had to make a short detour on a less defined track, 20 m further north, and a short slide to the beach.  Going to the earlier entry point further south would, in retrospect, have been better. We proceeded down the beach…
Along the beach. (John pic)

Along the beach. (John pic)

…past 6 sea lions who were mainly at the southern end of the beach. The fly wheel of the Victory was partly visible between waves.
Flywheel. (John pic)

Flywheel. (John pic)

After rounding the point at the end of the beach we proceeded up a rather boggy narrow stretch of sand on the edge of the inlet until we reach the pine tree stump, approximately 500 m along the inlet, where we climbed a short slope of bank , beside a concrete slab on the top of the bank, to get on to the grass road…
Smile, please. (John pic)

Smile, please. (John pic)

…leading the style at the edge of the reserve. After crossing the style we passed the holiday homes on our right, in the Clearwater property, and then crossed the bridge providing vehicular access to the cribs. It had been repaired with macrocarpa sleepers since our last visit. We continued along this grass track until we reached the gate at the end marked private property (inverted). We then went down a diagonal track to the left of the gate, past Ian’s sheltered morning tea spot, and along the edge of the Inlet. Because of the high water level, approximately 25 cm  deep, it was necessary to cut across the corner of the paddock. We did not cross the water filled inlet/ditch leading to the Salt Marsh sign on Dick road until we were nearly at the road. We then crossed the next ditch parallel to the road beside the sign and walked 2 km along the road back to the car park arriving there at or slightly before 2.45 pm. Another idea for another time would be to consider walking from north to south along the beach to see the fly wheel and any sea lions that might be about and then returning along the beach to cut out the 2 km of walking on the gravel of Dick road. The weather today for this part of the hike remained calm and warm. – Bruce.
Hang on, P.S., BTW or whatever. The Loop Group coffeed at Portobello…
Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

Coffee at Portobello. (John pic)

…and the ‘others’ were going to go to Nichols. – Ian.
21. 12/11/2014. Hikers. Pyramids. E. Leader: Bruce, with Bev as back-up.
Route

Route

Twenty-two intrepid hikers were undeterred by the forecast of an afternoon southwesterly change and after proceeding through Portobello to Weir Road turned left into Dick road and parked at the Pyramids and Victory Beach car park. They crossed the style and proceeded along the Riddle Road causeway, through the gate at the end and passing to the left of the little pyramid turned to the right on the beach track (not to the left on the loop) and, a short way along, took a short track to the right to have morning tea in the cave at the little pyramid.

 

Cuppa. (John pic.)

Morning tea. (John pic.)

We confirmed the basalt blocks were five rather than six sided.

After morning tea, we retraced our steps and turned to the left onto the loop track. We passed the Margaret Hazel slope (marker 4) noting that one can reach the top of the large pyramid by going up it and turning left. (Earlier we noted a 10 minute track to the top of the small pyramid started just after the gate at the end of the Riddle Road causeway). We continued to the right on the loop track and stopped at marker 6 to view the circular rock rosette feature …

Rosette (Bruce pic.)

Circular rock rosette (Bruce pic.)

… on the cliff face. Antony Hamel describes this as a 30 m wide pod of lava which is inaccessible to grazing animals and that it contains less common native plants such as the Easter orchid.

We should then have turned sharp right to the yellow marker pole and then a sharp left to the beach at markers 8 and 9 but ended up on a more circuitous route ending up with a short slide to the beach.

Slide (John pic.)

Short slide to the beach.  (John pic.)

We proceeded down Victory Beach noting one sea lion and a partially submerged Victory flywheel (1861) just before the end of the beach where we found sheltered spots for lunch at 12.10 pm.

Lunch (John pic)

Sheltered spots (more or less) for lunch (John pic)

Another sea lion was resting at the water’s edge between our lunch spot and the inlet. After lunch we travelled along the water’s edge to where a grass track leading to the cribs starts. It was marked on the bank by a concrete rectangle but one needed to climb up the bank to see it. It was just past the end of the pine trees between the cribs and Victory beach. Some of our party overshot the turnoff and rejoined the track further on while others backtracked a little to get onto the grassy track. We all met up again …

Met up (John pic)

Met up again. All ‘parkaed-up’ after the short storm blast. (John pic)

…  just before the locked gate and stile at the boundary of the Okia reserve.

After crossing the style we continued along the grassy vehicle track on the inlet side of the fence separating the inlet from the property of Jason Clearwater. We crossed over a somewhat rickety bridge containing a round fencepost alongside the rectangular hardwood decking. At the end of the grass track we came to a locked gate with an inverted Private Property sign. We went down a track then to the left of the gate and along the inlet beach until level with the sign, about 300 m on, marking the salt flat conservation area. We headed at right angles to the sign along a narrow path alongside a snail-containing water course to a corresponding sign next to Dick Road. We crossed the relatively firm ground in the ditch beside the sign on to Dick Road and then walked, mainly in the sun, back to the carpark where we arrived at 1.55 pm.

Distance travelled 11.73 km by Garvin GPS, 10.6 km by Iphone, 12.33 -12.48 km by pedometer. Overall the weather could have been worse. A cold wind blew for a short time near the end of Victory beach and some spots of rain fell shortly after lunch leading us to put on our coats but it soon stopped and it was not enough to get wet with. Several of the group stopped for coffee or fruit juice at MacAndrew Bay …

Coffee

Coffee

… on the return journey to Mosgiel. Thanks were expressed to Bruce for leading and Bev for backmarking. – Bruce.

20. 16/7/2014. Hikers. Victory Beach. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
GPS

GPS

A Herd

A Herd

Marsh start

A Marsh

Harbour Cone

A Harbour Cone pic

A log

A Log

Silhouette

A Flywheel. (of wrecked Victory)

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

Bruce on Victory Flywheel.

And A rare extremely-low-tide video of the Victory Flywheel, with Bruce standing on the top

19. 24/11/2010. Trampers. Ryans Beach. M.
Since learnt: “Ryans Beach is entered legally only by the landowner (Penguin Place) and scientists.”

GPS of route, courtesy Ken.

The climb out of Victory Beach up to the headland.

The descent to Ryans Beach.

Pam supporting the mast.

Close-up of the wreck.

Close-up of the wreck.

Smile please. Enjoying the view from the headland.

View from headland of Okia. Older beach lines showing.

18. 11/8/2010 Hikers Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Dorothy, Chris.

The Logarithmics ? – Lunch on an accommodating log. (Bill pic and caption)

17. 19/8/2009 Hikers Victory Beach, return road. Easy. Leaders: Mollie.
16. 29/7/2009 Trampers. Larger of two pyramids, Victory Beach, return lupins. Leaders: Arthur H, Ian.

click to enlarge

"Elephant" Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption)

“Elephant” Pyramid. Note the elephant: ears, eyes, trunk, shoulders, curled trunk. (Bill pic and caption) Pat, Ian

"Large" Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

“Large” Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope

Ascending Margaret Hazel Slope. George, Pat, Sabina, Doug, Glenice, Bill, Arthur

Ascending Larger Pyramid

Ascending Larger Pyramid. Club members barely detectable on skyline.

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

On Large Pyramid. (Bill pic and caption). Who? Ian, who? Pat, Sabina

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View Towards Beach from the Larger Pyramid

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

View from larger Pyramid to Planation

Starting the descent

Starting the descent. George, Glenice, Pat, Sabina.

Striations on nearby cliff

Striations on nearby cliff

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

The Two Pyramids. (Arthur H pic)

Through dunes to beach

Through dunes to beach. Pat, Sabina, Arthur

Paddle Wheel of Victory Ship

Fly Wheel of Victory Ship at low tide. (Arthur pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

A scene. (Arthur H pic)

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Harbour Cone from Inlet

Returning to Pyramid

Returning to Pyramid

15. 1/10/2008. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Medium. Leaders: Bill H. Lesley, Molly.
14. 20/2/2008 Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Bob, Neil.

Another lovely Wednesday, as we have come to expect over the years. Large muster of 21 hikers today, due possibly because it was another beach walk and a very popular one at this time of the year. It was the Pyramids and Victory beach. After parking cars and getting everyone organised and over the stile, it was along to the Pyramids for morning tea. Refreshed and ready to go, it was on down the track to the beach. How very pleasant and enjoyable it was. The sun made the sea really sparkle, and the seals and sea lions were out frolicing or lying in the sun relaxing on the rocks or the sand as the fancy took them. We went to the left first as far as we could to the rocks. Then we turned round and walked to the other end of the beach, watching the seals and sea lions playing or resting as we went along. Cameras got plenty of use and I’m sure we’ve got some good photos to keep in our collections. Lunch was at the Papanui Inlet end of the beach and a very pleasant place to sit and relax it was. On round the end of the beach and back across the grass by the cribs and then the swampy bit to the road. Some of us didn’t have to walk all the way back to cars as Bob H. and Peter went and picked up drivers to save some of that road walking. Very good hike, enjoyed by all. – Bev

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt Rock above cave at Pyramids. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Basalt rock on slope of Pyramid. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Tea break at Pyramids cave. Chris, Joyce. (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion in rocks (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Sealion stretching? (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

Tangled seals (Bill pic)

13. 15/2/2007. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Bob H, Margaret D.
12. 15/2/2006. Hikers. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Leaders: Les and Margaret, Mary M.
11. 27/10/2004. Both. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Graham, Ian, Ann R, Chris, Betty
Cave in Pyramid.

Cave in Pyramid.

Ships Wheel? of "Victory"

Paddle Wheel of “Victory” Ship

Drift wood. Dog?

Drift wood on Victory Beach. Dog?

10. 3/9/2003. All. Pyramids. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Catherine.
Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Glenice, Bill, Bob, Ria. Track access to Victory Beach

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

Okia Reserve Track. Dot? in rear.

9. 4/12/2002. All. Pyramids, Victory Beach. Easy. Leaders: Lesley S, Evelyn C, Pam McD
8. 4/7/2001. Combined. Pyramids – Ryans Beach. Easy+. Leaders: George, Ray and Diana.
7. 21/7/1999. Victory Beach, Pyramids. Leaders: Chris, Sylvia, Diana.
6. 10/3/1999. Pyramids – Victory Beach. Leaders: Barbara McC, Sabina, Irene.
5. 18/2/1998. Victory Beach, Pyramids, Ryans Beach. Leaders: Chris, Bev H, Ria H.
4. 30/10/1996. Victory Beach – Pyramids. Average. Leaders: Joan H, Ria H, Jean
3. 31/5/1995. Pyramids, Victory Beach, Ryans Beach. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Mary Y, Betty B, Margaret D
2. 16/2/1994. Pyramids, Taiaroa Hill. Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Denise, Alison, Mary Y. Easier alternative: Leaders: Bev McI, Frances M.
1. 23/3/1988. Victory Beach and Pyramids. Seals, penguins, rock formations. Leaders: Kath R, Dave M.

2 responses so far

Oct 25 2017

Careys Creek track, Black Gully Dam to Evansdale.

Published by under Trampers

Distance from car-park: 40 km

Black Gully Dam. Accessed from Semple Road. Black Gully Dam/Seacliff Dam. Av Time 1 hr; Route. Manager: DOC.
Click http://trtc.blogtown.co.nz/1980/12/14/seacliff-dam-historical-track/ for information on the Creek and pipeline.
Extension of Route to Black Gully Dam/Seacliff Dam. to Honeycomb track  junction. return. 4 hours return. Managed by DOC.
Best done in summer when Careys Creek is low, as there are many crossings. Attractive bush surrounds, which give good shelter from a hot sun.

8. 25/10/2017. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale. M. Leader: Keith.

Nine trampers left the car park and after delivering one vehicle to the tramp end,we left the car park at Semple road at 9.50am.

We made good progress on an times slippery and steepish track and stopped for smoko at 10:15.
As we followed the old pipe line down, the creek crossings became more frequent…

River crossing. (Helen pic and caption.)

 …and the track more muddy.
Lunch was had at 12:15…

Lunch. (Helen pic and caption.)

…and soon after the rain began, so it was on with the coats.

The hairy goat and his kids. (Helen pic and caption.)

Every one was quite wet by the time we got to Evansdale Glen but it was a good tramp and a great coffee at Blueskin cafe.
Distance Semple Rd car park to Evansdale walk bridge 11.6 km – Keith
7. 16/3/2016. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale. Leader: ?
On a day that didn’t promise much weather wise, we had 9 trampers on the Careys Creek tramp. For a change, the women outnumbered the men as well !!!
After doing the car shuttle thing, & having morning tea,

1 Packing up after morning tea (Ken pic and caption)

1 Packing up after morning tea (Ken pic and caption)

we all met up not far down valley from the Black Gully Dam,

2 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

2 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

3 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

3 Black Gully dam (Ken pic and caption)

& continued on at a leisurely pace,

4 track (Ken pic and caption)

4 track (Ken pic and caption)

being careful  of the quite slippery conditions.
The many creek crossings …

5 Crossing the creek (Ken pic and caption)

5 Crossing the creek (Ken pic and caption)

6 An easy crossing (Ken pic and caption)

6 An easy crossing (Ken pic and caption)

… were also treated with great care, as the boulders were mostly treacherous to stand on. It was pleasing to see the new much larger orange triangle track signs that have been installed along the places where it is necessary to walk the riverbed.
We had lunch alongside the creek at a suitable place, & then continued on downstream, where we met up with a quite a large group of Kings High School boys with two supervisors. They were making a lot of noise, & could be heard from some distance away. We spent the rest of the trip mixing with these boys, as they would race ahead, then stop to pick Blackberries, which they were going to make into a Blackberry Pie later that night.
We had some of our group who had not done this tramp before, & all agreed that it was a good day, which most of us finished off with a coffee & chat at Waitati.Walked 11.7km
3.6km/h
3h 13mins
climbed 173m – Ken.

6. 1/10/2014. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale.
Careys Creek track was the destination for this tramp, & 6 trampers turned up for the day out. We drove to Evansdale, & left one car there, & then drove up to the top of the track at Black Gully Dam track. Morning tea was taken at the wooden seat part way down this track just before the steep steps leading down to the creek. The dam was inspected, along with the old hut that is situated there, & then we made our way downstream over the many slippery creek crossings to a late lunch spot, not far from the signposted junction of Rongomai track. We then made our way back out to Evansdale Glen via the ‘new’ track, where two of us left the others to have a spell, & a look around the area, while we went & retrieved the two cars, so we could ferry everybody back to town. Once again, this tramp had not been done by some, & for others it had been a long time [many years] since they had been there, so even although most got wet, or damp feet, it was enjoyed by all, & the weather was brilliant !
We walked 10.8km
2h 45m moving time
ave 3.9km/h
climbed 163m – Ken.
5. 18/9/2013. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale.
Seven trampers gathered at the top of the Careys Creek track after leaving a vehicle at the Evansdale end.  The descent through the bush was pleasant easy going, with a stop to view the Black Gully dam and then another in a patch of sunlight for morning tea, where George shared his birthday goodies.

The creek was low so the numerous crossings were made with dry feet, except for one member who measured her length over slippery rocks and now sports a bruised cheek and knee, not to mention scratched specs.

The party then split, with three opting for an early lunch and the rest pressing on to the Rongomai junction.  Here the others caught up again, for an easy ramble out to the road.  – Judy

4. 26/1/2011. Trampers. Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Evansdale. Ken, Ian, Sabina.

GPS of Careys Creek track route, Semple Road to Evansdale, courtesy Ken.

With two cars between only three of us we nevertheless decided to do a car shuttle between Semple Road and Evansdale and to do the entire Careys Creek track. Ground conditions were wet and slippery, which would have ruled out the steep Honeycomb track anyway.
We were reminded again of just how many and how steep the steps down to the dam were. But they are well benched-in, so not too bad.

One of the more level parts of the track down to the Dam.

We took Sabina up to see the Dam and the slightly greater overflow didn’t auger well for the many creek-crossings and creek-wadings ahead, where the track is just the actual creek-bed. But again, things weren’t too bad.

The Dam waterfall was slightly heavier than usual.

Along the way we met up with several small groups of the Green Hut Track Group. They have almost completed clearing the entire track. Bravo! We were delighted to find several areas modified. These were where difficult parts of the track had, where occasion warranted, been either better benched, stepped or even completely re-routed. Again, bravo!
And then, just past the foot of the Rongomai, behold, a track now mown where  at all possible, all the way down to Evansdale Glen.

An example of the mown track nearer Evansdale.

This had been the first time the club has done the entire 10 km of creek in a long time. And it felt good. – Ian
3. 31/12/2009. Holiday tramp. Black Gully Dam, down Careys Creek some distance and back. 4 hours. Ian, Ken, George.
The weather forecast had promised a fine day but it turned out overcast. Rain on the previous wet day had left the track muddy and slippery necessitating great care not to slip. Exposed parts of the track produced lush rank grass and buttercups, and rain during the day left steep grassy slopes extremely slippery. The track is well-cleared for a considerable distance but from near its highest point and onwards, it was much more heavily overgrown than when we did the recce. First of all, of course, we climbed the track to the old Seacliff dam.
Looking across dam. Ken, George.

Looking across dam. Ken, George.

Dam and overflow.

Dam and overflow.

Peering through foliage to see extent of dam pond.

Peering through foliage to determine extent of dam pond.

Then it was down the Careys Creek old pipe-maintenance track. As mentioned above, this part was well cleared.
Track down Careys Creek. George, Ken.

Track down Careys Creek. George, Ken.

Of course there were very many stream crossings, some entailing a walk quite a distance down the creek before entering the track again. These were well-marked with indicators suspended from branches overhanging the stream-bed.
One of many stream crossings. George, Ken

One of many stream crossings. George, Ken

There was a restriction on time as George had belatedly discovered he had to be back home mid-afternoon, so although we managed a short-notice early 8.15 a.m. setting out, we were unable to make the full distance down to the Honeycomb Track turn-off before having to turn back. A memorable part of the tramp was a (unnoticed at the time but decidedly stinging later on and into the night) brush with some concealed onga-onga, Ken on his left wrist, George on a finger and Ian on his right knee. But all in all, a very enjoyable way to finish the old year off. – Ian
2. 5/12/2009. Recce of Black Gully Dam, Careys Creek, Honeycomb, returned Mountain Road, Semple Road. 5.5 hours. Ian, Keith, Glenis.
Track is well-cleared for most of its length.
The road-walk back is about 8 km.
1. 19/10/1994 Evansdale, Black Gully Dam/Seacliff Dam, Double Hill. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Marie F, Jack R, Bob H

2 responses so far

Oct 25 2017

Ross Creek and environs

Published by under Uncategorized and tagged: , , ,

No. 94 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Ross Creek – McGlashan College Year Round”

25, 25/10/2017. Hikers. Ross Creek, Craigieburn, Cycle tracks, McGouns, Ross Creek. M. Leaders: Dawn and Pam.

Route map courtesy Ian. It stopped recording 1.5 km before finish! (Ian pic and caption.)

(Clive pic.)

Morning tea. (Clive pic.)

Steep descent. (Clive pic.)

Did they really order that much?. (Clive pic.)

24. 24/4/2016. Hikers. Ross Creek, McGouns, Tanner Lookout, Craigieburn. M. Leaders: Dawn and Pam.
GPS of route. Failed to complete it at time; hence straight line indicating car travel to Plaza Cafe. We did just on 7 km, despite the '6' not showing. (Hidden by the "1"?) Distracted by Spittles' wonderful disbursement of blackboy peaches.

GPS of route. Failed to complete it at time; hence straight line indicating car travel to Plaza Cafe. We did just on 7 km, despite the ‘6’ not showing. (Hidden by the “1”?) Distracted by Spittles’ wonderful disbursement of blackboy peaches.

Panorama of some of the 26 hikers lunching.

Panorama of some of the 26 hikers lunching.

23. 20/1/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh Gardens, Ross Creek reservoir, Craigieburn, Tanner Lookout. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
GPS route map of Ross Creek tramp courtesy Bruce.

GPS route map of Ross Creek tramp courtesy Bruce. Distance covered 10.6 km, moving time 2 hours 55 minutes, moving average 3.6 km/hour, stopped time 1 hour 44 minutes, overall average 2.3 km/hour, and total ascent 221 m.

Twenty-two hikers departed at 9.30 am from the Gardens’ Carpark opposite Mecure/Leisure Lodge on a sunny calm day, in contrast to the previous drizzly afternoon. We turned to the left in the Gardens and followed the north perimeter with the themed borders to the main gate, crossed at the traffic lights to the north side of Bank Street and walked around to the Woodhaugh Gardens, past the mural of the Otago University Clocktower building with a portrait of the architect Maxwell Bury (1825–1912), painted under the Pine Hill Road bridge.

Clock tower mural under bridge. (Bruce pic and caption)

Clock tower mural under bridge. (Bruce pic and caption)

We kept to the left in the Woodhaugh Gardens circumnavigating the duck pond by proceeding along a bush track and stopped at 10. 00 am for morning tea near the paddling pool.

Morning tea at Woodhaugh (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh. (Bruce pic and caption)

Morning tea at Woodhaugh. (Bruce pic and caption)

We then followed the path near the right bank of the Leith to Malvern Street, crossing at the bridge and turning left opposite the building that was originally the Woodhaugh Hotel into Woodhaugh Street. We followed the track on the left on the left bank of the Leith Stream and passed an excavator at work clearing the boulder trap built in 1963. We ambled along the track up the valley past the New Zealand Motor Caravan Association’s property before crossing the foot bridge and continuing to the site of the disused Woodhaugh Quarry and the explosives store. Our path continued up the valley and along the true right side of the Ross Creek reservoir (facing down the valley) after which we crossed the bridge over Ross Creek and after proceeding about 300 m down the true left side of the reservoir took the track uphill on the left. Where this branched after another 100 m or so we turned to a relatively new and level track to the left which later passed close to some rimu trees before swinging right and coming out on the grassed area below the Craigieburn cow byre. After passing the byre and the left hand end of the stone wall further ahead we stopped at Tanner View at 11.40 am for lunch. After lunch we turned to the right on the track and then, at a sign, to the left passed the cobbled road to the little ruin.

Little ruin at Craigieburn. (Bruce pic and caption)

Little ruin at Craigieburn. (Bruce pic and caption)

From the ruin we took the track to the rimu forest eventually emerging at the bridge at the top of the Ross Creek reservoir that we had crossed earlier. We made our way down the left hand side of the reservoir and then followed our earlier route back to the gardens,

Group photo Woodhaugh Gardens. (Bruce pic and caption)

Group photo Woodhaugh Gardens. (Bruce pic and caption)

reaching Crocodile at 2.10 pm where many stopped for refreshments.

– Bruce and Marjorie

22. 25/3/2015. Hikers. Ross Creek and McGouns Track. Leaders: Pam and Dawn.
GPS of Hikers' route

GPS of Hikers’ route

The hike was planned well. First, we parked our cars at the beginning of Malvern Street. Pam and Dawn  then led us into the Upper Leith Walkway
Upper Leith Walkway (John pic)

Upper Leith Walkway recent sign. (John pic)

that runs alongside Woodhaugh Street till we came to and crossed the large footbridge onto the other side of the Leith and through the old quarry that lies under the cliffs that bound the north end of Maori Hill, where Braeview Crescent runs along their top. The path then twisted us up into Ross Creek, with cliffs now on our right marking the boundary of Rockside Road houses above. On and up until very steeply up to crest the big earth dam (that is scheduled to be reinforced some time) of Ross Creek Reservoir.
Plaque. Ross Creek Water Works. (Jphn pic)

Plaque. Ross Creek Water Works. (John pic)

Meantime the water level is kept remarkably low to relieve stress on the dam wall. Morning tea was up at the second part of the reservoir, which we found to be surprisingly set up for water polo, but absent any players.
Morning tea. (John pic.)

Taken by the morning tea stop. Unusual dewatered view of reservoir. (John pic.)

Then on up through the bush tracks. We passed through the Craigieburn area…
The Little Ruin. (John pic)

The Little Ruin. (John pic)

…to emerge at the intersection below Booth Road. This was an important regrouping point before Pam led us on through a gate…
A new McGouns Track sign. (John pic)

A new McGouns Track sign at entrance to McGouns Road. (John pic)

into McGouns Road leading to the start of the McGouns track. This took us across to the Pineapple Track and back down to Booth Road.
Back into the top of Ross Creek bush, but this time up to…
Tanners View sign. (John pic)

Tanners View sign. (John pic)

… the old cow byre …
Tanners View (John pic)

Old Cow Byre (John pic)

Lunch (John pic)

Lunch on old cow byre site. (John pic)

…for lunch.

After lunch it was simply back out and down through the Ross Creek environs to the cars.

Thanks to Pam and Dawn for a well planned hike. – Ian.
21. 12/6/2013. Hikers. Ross Creek and surrounds. Leaders: Lex and Fred.
Route

Route. 9.65km

We parked our cars at the north end of Burma Road. Lex led us through the bush to exit up on Tannock Road. Along a bit and down Leighton Road to  morning tea in the grassy reserve at the road’s end.
Then back along Tannock Road, (just past 1km on map) down through the bush and along the reservoir to the dam at its end. It was a shock to see how much the water had been lowered.
Low water

Low water in Ross Creek Reservoir.

Of course, because of the cracks that have been detected in the earth dam.

Looking down

Looking down the dam face to cleared bush below.

We crossed the dam, turned left and down to walk past the cleared bush site …

Looking up

Looking back up the face of the dam.

and on down to reach the junction of Rockside Road at its bottom and Malvern street. (2km mark on map)

Then it was to walk leisurely up Malvern Street, stopping for Lex to point out various interests on the way. What surprised ss was a string of tall posts diagonally across the Leith above the first set of houses we passed. We thought it might be to trap flood debris.

Just further up Lex pointed out a weir, immediately below which he used to swim in when a small boy. Ian and Lex talked about the Clark family house that used to be across the locked pedestrian bridge overlooking the weir.

Then it was yet further up to the old Jacksons’ beautiful stone house when Ian recalled, (as a boy in company with others) stealing  cream out of a jar left to cool in the clear cooling water of a ditch, replacing what was removed with water. Just a bit further up, at the foot of Fulton Rd was the house of the late artist Eana B Jeans with only the gate of Ian’s old home showing a sort distance up Fulton Road. On up, to turn from Malvern Street up to the left onto Islay Street, (Beyond 4km mark on map) upon which, in a sunny spot, we stopped for lunch, just above the road connecting across to Fulton Road. Ian and Lex recalled calling the three roads the steepy (Fulton), the toppy (Islay) and the greeny (the connecting less-used road, now (surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly) closed.

Lunch

Lunch on a bank in the sun on Islay Street.

At the top, opposite Lex’s childhood house we went over to the former plantation road (nr 5km mark on map) that led to the start of the McGoun Track and stopped to view the stone cairn 1996 Tannock memorial. Further on and up until we reached the top of the (comparatively) recent set of mountain bike tracks (2/3 of way to the 6km mark). These we took, zig-zagging down to reach the large car-park at the end of Wakari Road. (7m mark) It was here that one or two of our party of 17 elected to take a short cut down to the cars while Lex took the rest of us along Wakari Road, past the end of Polewarth Road to turn down Joshua Place (a bit before the 8km mark) and from the along to a track that led us back to Polewarth Road. This we turned down heading for Burma Road at its other end, until called back by some at the rear who had noticed a dog worrying a flock of sheep in a paddock. We cell-phoned the DCC to inform them of such, along with the dog’s registered number. – Good deed for the day. Then on down Polewarth Rd to join the Burma Rd (abt 9km mark) and along it back to the cars. Thanks to Lex and Fred for yet a further novel changed route – and the chocs! – Ian.

20. 24/10/2012. Hikers, Ross Creek. Leaders: Lance and Lois.

19. 30/5/2012. Hikers. Wakari Road. Cycle Tracks etc. Ross Creek. Leaders: Lex, Jill.

18. 25/5/2011. Hikers. Ross Creek area. E. Leaders: Lex, Molly
17. 21/7/2010. Hikers. Ross Creek area. New track. E. Leaders: Lex, Graham
16. 26/3/2008. Hikers. Ross Creek. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Jean.
In Ross Creek

In Ross Creek

As we’ve come to expect, Wed. was fine and 15 happy hikers parked by the Meter House, near the corner of Wakari & Burma Rds, ready to set off on the Ross Creek area and tracks.

Lex was our leader, and as he lived in that region from childhood he is very knowledgeable about the territory, which makes a popular walk even more interesting. We did various tracks through the lovely bush, stopping every now and then for Lex to tell us about some trees that had been planted and trialled, or other things of interest about that part. It was lovely to hear so many birds whistling and singing cheerily all round us. So often these days one is very disappointed at the lack of birdsong in a region where once you would have heard them. We arrived at Prospect Park

Lunch at Prospect Park

Lunch at Prospect Park

View from the Bullock Track

View from the Bullock Track

via bush and road and relaxed and soaked up the sun while enjoying our lunch. Then it was off down the Bullock Track to the lovely little trail along the Leith Stream through the old Woodhaugh Quarry area. From there it was back up one of the bush tracks to the cars. A lovely pleasant day out, as usual. – Bev Harvey

15. 26/3/2008 Leaders: Lex, Jean A

14. 14/11/2007 Trampers. Woodhaugh, Ross Creek, Davies, Flagstaff Track, Pineapple, Ross Creek return.

13. 21/2/2007. Hikers. Ross Creek, McGouns Track. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Dot B.
12. 14/7/2006. Ross Creek Reserve – Woodhaugh. Leaders: Doreen, Rosemary and Jack.
11. 28/9/2005. Hikers. Ross Creek. Leaders: Betty B, Nelson T
10. 13/10/2004 Ross Creek, Burma Road. Leaders: Lex, Doug M, Margaret D

Tree canopy

9. 2/10/2002. Combined. Ross Creek, Burma Road. Easy. Leaders: Lex, Doug M, Evelyn C.

8. 1/10/2001. Alt. Ross Creek – Cannington Road. Leaders: Joan H, Jean, Peggy M.
7. 18/4/2001. Ross Creek. Leaders: Bev and Ivan, Peggy M.
6. 24/11/1999. Ross Creek area. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Jean.
5. 8/9/1999. Rose Creek Reserve. Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Jean.
4. 29/7/1998. Ross Creek, John McGlashan. Leaders: Ivan and Rosemary.
3. 19/11/1997. Ross Creek, School Creek from McGlashan College. Leaders: Bev and Ivan.
2. 7/8/1991. Ross Creek area from John McGlashan College. Easy. Leaders: Nel, Margaret B, Ivan, Margaret D.
1. 13/6/1990. Ross Creek and School Creek from John McGlashan College. Easy. Leaders: Margaret S, Joan, Jean and Jack.

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