Jun 22 2017

Upcoming Trips

Published by under Uncategorized

2017

Winter Start Time 9.30 a.m.

28 Jun. Low tide about 1.00 p.m. 0.0m.
Trampers. Beachwalk: Brighton/Kuri Bush. E. $3.00. Jill.
Hikers. City to Surf. Leith River Trail. E. $4.00. Jan Y and Peter.

5 Jul.
Both. Midwinter Dinner. Waihola. E. $6.00. Liz and Alex.

12 Jul. Low tide about 11.30 a.m. 0.3m.
Trampers. Machine Creek. E*. $6.00. Eleanor R.
Hikers. Kuri Bush. E. $5.00. George. Dot. Continue Reading »

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Jun 21 2017

Leishmans, Chalkies and/or Boulder Hill.

Published by under Trampers and tagged: ,

No. 68 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Leishmans Falls – (J Roy) Summer”
12. Trampers. Chalkies Circuit. Leader: Arthur.
A good frost began the day, which was also the shortest day of the year.
13 Trampers turned up at the car park, from where we travelled in 4 cars up “Silver-Stream Valley” road to park near the beginning of what used to be called “Leishmans Track”. DoC have renamed it as “Chalkies Circuit Track”, with no mention of “Leishmans” any more.
The track was very wet and muddy to begin with, drops of water were falling from the tree canopy – presumably from the thawing frost.

We soon came to the old pump house…

The old pump house. (Keith pic and caption.)

…and weir of the long dis-used water supply going to Mosgiel from Leishmans Creek.

We had to cross the creek several times, and also negotiate some steep slippery steps, eventually coming to “The Rope“. The rope was essential as the track going steeply up here was very wet, muddy and slippery.
All of the group made it up safely, and I was assured that it had been fun, (no, I’m not joking). We continued on for another 10 minutes or so, until above the steepest part, before stopping for morning tea.
The track was drier, mostly, now as we proceeded uphill, ever uphill.
Speaking of the track, the whole circuit had been attended to very recently by The Green Hut Track Clearing Group, who had made an excellent job. Thanks, chaps, well done.

We made it out onto the summit of Powder Hill (altitude 525 metres) in time to have our lunch at the “trig”.

Margreet pic.

Good views in many directions; to Saddle Hill; some snow on the Rock and Pillar. Pulpit Rock was quite prominent too. A smoke haze covered the whole of the Taieri Plain indicating an “inversion”, it being very thick over Mosgiel.

We continued our tramp, downhill now, stopping to inspect the limestone outcrops of “The Chalkies”, for a few minutes.

Chalky rock. (Keith pic and caption.)

Further down we were lucky enough to see a pair of South Island Robins. They were aware of our group (quietly) watching them feeding on the forest floor only 2 or 3 metres away, but weren’t bothered by us.

Out of the bush, and down the private road, after a time we came to the ford by the pumphouse. From there it was down the still frozen road to the cars, having covered 8 km doing the circuit.
Back to Mosgiel, the smoke haze was extremely bad as we drove down Factory Road and Bush Road on our way to “Wals“.
It had been a very happy group out today, and all had obviously enjoyed the day’s exercise. It was also pleasing to see the numbers of our group growing.
Thanks to all. – Art.
11. 26/8/2015. Trampers. Leishmans, Chalkies.
Leishmans Long Ridge Chalkies

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leishmans Long Ridge Chalkies. (Ken caption) Walked 11km; ave 3.4km/h; 3h 15m moving; climbed 730m; max 532m.

Todays tramp was different to what was in the program due to a problem getting permission for the farm walk we were supposed to do.
So we set off for Leishmans track in the Silverstream valley, which not many of the 7 trampers on the day had done before. This turned out to be quite a grunty climb to get up on the top of the ridge, & it was slow going with very slippery conditions underfoot. One member only got about 2 hundred meters into the track when he sat down in the first creek crossing, not a good start to the day !!! It was just past here that the track got steep as it wound it’s way up the hillside. After a few rest stops we eventually made it up into the flax & tussock area at the ridge top, & we made a short detour to see where the trig at the top of Chalkies track was, just to get our bearings. Then it was off along the 4WD track to try & find how to get onto Long Ridge.
We failed in this, so turned around & walked back down the road past the turn off to Leishmans, & away down heading in what seemed the direction of the Taieri. We eventually came across a track junction that I recognised from a few years back when a friend & I were in that area looking for deer.
After a short stop here we again turned around, & went back to the entrance of the Leishmans track, along here till the turn off to the trig at the top of Chalkies, & down here to the lookout area where we had quite a long break.
Lunch stop

Lunch stop (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch

Lunch (Ken pic and caption)

Then it was down Chalkies, being careful to not slip on the slippery surface, & back out to the cars via the Scout camp grounds. – Ken
10. 28/5/2014. Trampers. Leishmans, Chalkies.
GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leishmans Chalkies exploration. ((Ken caption)

GPS of route, courtesy Ken. Leishmans Chalkies exploration. ((Ken caption)

We started off to go up Leishmans, & down Chalkies tracks, however, when we got to the Silverstream Rd, there was a ROAD CLOSED sign up, not a good start !!
We drove up to the start of Leishmans where there was a track closed sign up saying ‘Closed for Maintenance’ — so what to do?? We walked up the track to see what was happening, & soon came across the problem, it was a real mess with trees down across it & virtually impassable, so we retraced our steps back to the road.
Here we decided to go & have a look at Chalkies track, so we drove up the road to the car park at the pump house, where we could hear logging operations going on in the Chalkies area. We decided to go & have a look anyway, so as the stream was running a bit high we went the long way around, & came back down the road to get to the bottom of the Chalkies road, which was a quagmire for it’s full length due to the forestry operations. All of the forest on the LH side going up is gone, & the track up to where you turn off onto the bush track has been dozed, & is very muddy & rough.
It was a pleasure to get onto the bush track, but it doesn’t get any less steep as time goes on !!
As we had taken loppers with us, we did some track clearing on the way up, which helped to fill in the day. At the junction to the Chalkies ledge, we dumped our packs, & worked our way to the top where the spear grass started to appear, & we could see the trig on Powder Hill about 3 – 4 hundred meters away.
It was now well after 12pm, so we went back to the ledge & had a leisurely lunch break, …
Lunch at Chalkies Ledge (Ken pic and caption)

Lunch at Chalkies Ledge (Ken pic and caption)

… after which we walked & slid our way out to the cars, this time crossing the stream to wash some of the mud off our boots, with some getting wet feet for their trouble. – Ken.
9. 16/11/2011. Trampers. Leishmans, Chalkies.
Seven of us did the shorter 7 km tramp up Leishmans, down Chalkies. We entered in past the weir and old Mosgiel water supply holding tank and negotiated our way to the small bluff at the foot of the ridge. We were surprised to find a sturdy new rope. So, ‘plus ca change plus c’est la meme chose’.  First the old rope. Then the ropeless period after its removal. Now a new one. Well, bravo, anyway. Safe and reassuring.

Morning tea on the only plateau on Leishman track.

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Jun 21 2017

Doctors Point area tramps

Published by under Beach,Hikers and tagged: , , ,

Distance from car-park to Waitati: 34 km.
Distance from car-park to Doctors Point: 38 km.
18. 21/6/2017. Hikers. Orokonui Estuary & Opeke Tracks. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
On a cold, frosty but rather dank morning 27 keen hikers parked their cars at the parking/picnic area on Orokonui Rd., where the Estuary track starts. From there we walked the short distance back. to the Waitati Cemetery where we had morning tea.

Clive pic.

Quite a few people hadn’t been there before so were interested to have a look around the graves. As it was rather cold though we didn’t linger too long. On down Orokonui Rd. till we reached the little bridge crossing the Waitati river which brought us out onto Killarney St. at the end of which was a new bit of track with some board walk coming out onto Doctors Point Rd. From there it was along the road till we reached the far end of Opeke track. By this time we were all feeling somewhat warmer after a reasonably brisk walk. Then it was down onto the Opeke track. This is a very attractive and interesting walk which gives pleasure to the many people who use it. Locals and visitors alike. Near the end of this track is a short detour into an area that has some seats and great views across Blueskin Bay to Warrington and the other side of STH 1. Ideal for our lunch stop.

Wednesdays walk was the nicest walk I have done. The plantings of native bush out there is so beautiful and the track was great as well. (Eleanor W pic and comment.)

We had a fairly leisurely lunch and then it was off again

At The cove was the royal blueskin Bay yacht club HQ just below the nesting tree of the Royal spoonbills. (Clive pic and caption.)

Clive pic.

to the end of the Opeke track and back onto Doctors Point Rd. The walk along the road helped to warm us up again as it had got a bit chilly sitting at lunch time!. We turned up Chelivode St. and along to the other end of the Estuary track. This took us back to the car park and the end of what everyone agreed was a most enjoyable and ideal walk for a winter”s day. The Estuary track is a lovely track with bush and birds plus lovely views. We all felt it a suitable one to repeat yearly. The day finished off as usual with coffee break at Blueskin Café. Lesley & Bev

17. 31/8/2016. E. Hikers. Orokonui Inlet Track via Orokonui Ecosanctuary exclosure fence lower gate. E. Leaders: Leslie and Bev.
Hikers' route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The "55.55' is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Hikers’ route map around Orokonui Inlet. Nike app updated again. To get all the goodies in, had to save it in landscape, rather than portrait. The “55.55′ is the elapsed walking time spot since start. Altitude and speed indicaters now seem accurate.

Cars at tramp start.

Cars at tramp start.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

Lunch spot beside Ecosanctuary fence.

View from further up along fence.

View from further up along fence.

16. 22/7/2015 Hikers. Opeke and Orokonui Inlet track and back blocks of Waitati. E. Leaders: Lesley and Bev.
iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

iPhone route map of Opeke and Orokonui Inlets.

What to start off with? Well, two things, actually. We are suffering a barrage of birthdays presently. Adrienne had a big one last Wednesday, Dorothy anticipates a bigger one next week and Ian a small one a few days ago. And the other? Maybe a record? A full twenty of the twenty-four hikers of the day socialised for coffee later. A beautiful Birthday Card, crafted by Pam and signed by all present, was presented to Dorothy, who responded with a most pretty speech.
Tramp matters. The day was calm and got really warm.
Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all.

Cuppa time in from the further lower entrance. Table, seats and all. (John pic)

Many who hadn’t been on the last visit to Opeke were struck with the embellishments added to the trackside. The CAR, and small limestone carvings to mention only two. We had parked at the bridge and road-walked between Opeke and the Orokonui Inlet Track.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch.

A calm and sunny spot for lunch. (John pic)

Two birthdays

Two birthdays (John pic)

The track crowns the inlet’s head and finishes off along the Orokonui Road. We took the foot bridge across the Waitati Stream to skirt a back-blocks or two …

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye

A neat vegy patch on a roadside property which caught the eye (john pic)

… before emerging onto the Doctors Point road and returning to the cars. Lesley and Bev had picked on doing this trek again, foregoing the earlier swap plan of exploring the Old Waitati Road area due to his colder shadiness under the hill. So thanks to Bev and Lesley for opening this newer area to even more Hikers. – Ian.

15. 15/4/2015. Hikers. Orokonui, Estuary and Opeke Track. E. Leaders: Bev and Lesley.

*** THE POEM ***

OROKONUI ESTUARY WITH THANKS TO LESLIE AND BOB

‘Twas a cold and windy morning – the sane ones stayed in bed.

But fourteen hardy hikers, bravely out were led.

They travelled to Waitati, the river was quite high –

They didn’t fancy wet feet, I can’t imagine why.

Instead, the estuary beckoned, with better shelter there.

With coats and hats and gloves on, they didn’t have a care.

 

The track was easy walking, through bush and flax and trees.

They lingered over morning tea, sheltered from the breeze.

A grassy bank was found for lunch, it wasn’t even wet.

John took lots of photos, you’ll see them on the net.

Leslie found a bird’s nest, she took it home to keep.

(I hope the birdies last night, did find somewhere to sleep).

 

On to Blueskin they did go, for coffee and a talk,

Joined by Jim and Betty, who didn’t do the walk.

Plans were laid for Luxmore, a short two weeks away,

With satisfaction they went home – It was a lovely day.

– Judy

***  THE REPORT ***

(Sorry, no route map. It seems a bug got into my application. Ian.)
On a day when only heroes and the mad go out, we found the Waitati Stream at the foot of the Waitati Valley Road too full to attempt the intended crossing. So leader Leslie, who with Bev had already recceed  the above  Orokonui Estuary walk set for later in the programme took fourteen of us on a route more suited to the day. We parked at the Estuary bridge and set off, well-clad in storm gear, to the Opeke track’s northern entrance for morning tea at the lovely setting of table and seating near its entrance. Fortunately although windy, (and here we were well sheltered) the day was dry.
Cuppa (John pic)

Cuppa at the table and seats by the Opeke track.  (John pic)

We completed the Opeke circuit – for the first time in this reporter’s experience – in an anticlockwise direction. It’s so revealing viewing stuff when going in the opposite direction. As well, quite a number of improvements were there to be discovered, not least an old wreck of a car…

What's this alongside the track? (John pic)

What’s this alongside the track? (John pic)

…tied down and waiting to be wreathed in nature’s verdure – apparently!

Trekking back from Opeke, we turned off just short of the bridge up Chelivode street, passed a hay-baled house, and turned down a newly-made track to skirt the side of the Orokonui Estuary.

Track (John pic)

Track (John pic)

The track wound up, down and around through bush and paddock to emerge at the head of the estuary to cross swampy ground…

Solid (John pic)

A walkway across swamp, solidly built to last a lifetime.  (John pic)

…to reach the back yard of a number of farm sheds accessed from Orokonui Road. The track diverted down around a paddock or two to soon parallel the Orokonui Road on one side, and a heavily swollen Waitati Stream on the other.

Waitati Stream

Waitati Stream (John pic)

We lunched on a now sunny bank, still clad however in our parka-covered woolly underlays.

Lunch

Lunch. (John pic)

Further along,…

The nest referred toby Judy in her poem. (John pic)

The nest referred to by Judy in her poem. (John pic)

..and we crossed the stream via the Erne Street footbridge to walk along Killarney Street and turn into Foyle Street. Here we came across a garaged honesty stall featuring jams and sauces…

Garage (John pic)

Garage (John pic)

…and lingered a while. Then it was out onto Doctors Point Road, back to the cars and to resort to the Blueskin Nursery cafe,…

Coffee (John pic)

Coffee at Blueskin. (John pic)

…- all 14 of us, augmented by Jim and Betty who turned up.

Thank you to Lesley and Bev, ably supported by back-marker Bob keeping us safely together, for devising such an appropriate alternative for such a challenging day. – Ian.

14. 21/1/2015. Hikers. Doctors Point. Mapoutahi Pa, Forestry and Urupu, return. E. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of route

Jim and Betty, who had been allocated leadership the last three visits to Doctor’s Point, gave the trip an original twist, – by dint of three recces to get matters precisely aligned to the tide. They led 29 of us to the Mapoutahi Pa site for the tea break.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site.

On former Mapoutahi Pa site. (John pic)

Via the beach beyond the peninsula we turned off into the FWD through the sandhills, past the cliffs and on to the beginnings of the road proper, at the corner of the forestry. Here Jim opened the gate and led us past the following sign.

Urupu notice

Purakaunui Urupu notice at forestry’s entrance.

Another FWD track led us a considerable distance through the forest to terminate at a historic Maori graveyard.

A Urupu site

The Urupu site (John pic)

Betty and Jim then led us on through the forest by a route that they had previously explored and marked (well done!) to take us out to the inlet’s entrance, where there was quite a cold wind persuading several to don more protective garments.

Panorama

Panorama  of Potato Point and Purakauni. (John pic)

Only a little way down towards the beach Jim let us into a well-sheltered spot amongst Marram Grass for lunch, where a warm sun persuaded garment-offing again.

Lunch

Lunch (John pic)

The return walk along the beach took us over the neck of Mapoutahi Pa peninsula to happily reveal that there was still a stretch of navigable beach at the bottle-neck by the rockfall not yet swallowed up by the incoming tide.

Returning through cave

Returning through the cave. Thought this photo worth displaying. (John pic)

A walk back to the cars ended a most satisfying day, with all of us congratulating and thanking Jim and Betty for the quality time they invested into their recce. Thanks to them here, too. – Ian.

13. 19/3/2014. Hikers/ Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Mapoutahi Pa, return. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.

GPS of Route

GPS of Route

This must be our most popular tramp, as we schedule it about twice a year. This time Arthur and Barbara gave us the full Waitati to Mapoutahi Pa road and beach walk, with Opeke for morning tea in between. The very low tide gave us the largest beach expanse this reporter has ever seen. The sea mist spoilt views but cleared just enough for us to glimpse the rail tunnel from the peninsula. The near record of 30 of us included three new members and one visitor. Thank you Barbara and Arthur for your good careful leadership. – Ian.
12. 9/10/2013. Hikers. Waitati, Opeke Walk, Doctors Point, Purakaunui inlet, Mapoutahi Peninsula. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of route

GPS of routes. First Opeke Walk. Second Drs Point to Purakaunui Inlet mouth, return, 8.53 km total.

We parked the cars first at Michies Crossing, and walked across the line Continue Reading »

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Jun 14 2017

Clarendon Area, Stone Stables, Lime Works, Whale Museum and Lookout

Published by under Both Hikers & Trampers,Farm

No. 82 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Old Stone Barn Clarendon Farm”
Background History of Stable and Cemetery
38 km from car park
14/6/2017. Clarendon, Cemetery,Sinclair Wetlands, Berwick Camp. Leader: Eleanore.
Today 7 hardy (maybe silly) trampers drove to Phosphate corner at Clarendon, then along Berwick road, parked up and walked up the hill to the Cemetery (my Great Great and Great Grandparents,  some Siblings and Children from Sinclair family are buried there.
We then drove further along Berwick road, parked and proceeded up the track to the hay barn for smoko.

Shed for morning tea out of the freezing wind. (Helen pic and caption.)

Mud to get to the shed. (Helen pic and caption.)

We all decided it would be no fun climbing round and up Mary Hill with frequent showers and a bitterly cold wind.
On the way back we briefly stopped at Sinclair Wetlands then drove into Berwick Camp, a year 8 class was there on camp, talked with the Activity Coordinator and strolled up to the dam.

On a bridge at the Berwick camp. (Helen pic and caption.)

It was plain to see what fun the young students were having, particularly when having a turn driving round with a leader in an old converted type of Land Rover in the mud.
So after all this strenuous activity we journeyed on to eat lunch (and cake) at a little hilltop cafe in Clyde street. – Eleanore.

Lunch at Eleanore’s with a lovely warm fire and cakes which were enjoyed by us all. (Helen pic and caption.)

24/4/2013. Hikers – and a few trampers. Limesprings Farm, McNeil Rd, Whale Museum, and return back through Farm by a different route. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
Route

Route, unfortuately stopped at Whale Museum, for some inadvertant technical reason! Cattle track up middle, McNeil Rd and extension at top.

The overcast day succeeded a wet 24 hours, and several trampers joined us after cancelling their bush walk up Raingauge Spur for safety’s sake. We parked the cars halfway along Driver Road and walked on to enter Limespring Farm. Continue Reading »

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Jun 14 2017

Brighton Walks

Published by under Beach,Both Hikers & Trampers

15 km from car-park.

14/6/2017. Hikers. Brighton walk. Leader: Alex and Liz.

Nike app route map courtesy Ian. Was a bit slow remembering to turn it on.

Eight hardy hikers enjoyed a walk along sand dunes at Ocean View with morning tea stop at playground.

Off to Brighton on a street walk with many points of interest given.

Climbing back down from top of Brighton’s Big Rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

Back to Ocean View…

Liz pic.

…for a one and half hour lunch stop with many topics discussed at the invitation of Marjorie and Bruce Spittle.  The weather was up and down but an enjoyable day had by all and off to Agnes’ coffee shop for refreshments and more wisdom. Great company.  – Liz and Alex.

Route map, courtesy Ian. (Begun a few minutes late.)

Beginning descent from Brighton Big Rock. (Ian pic and caption.)

8/8/2012. Hikers. Brighton Walk. Leaders: George and Chris.
Just thought I would say what a great day we had with our hikers’ day. The leaders Chris and George where the upmost of leaders.
The day started from the rugby club’s rooms at the Brighton Domain. Up and on through muddy fields.  And, I will say, a field with a very huge bull with his lot of cows. One of our group,  whom I will not name due to privacy laws, was very stressed about the bull. So we formed a group around her and we moved through. So far, so good.
Then we were approached by a group of horses  (sorry, are they called a group?). They demanded  food. Lucky for us George had a container of carrots!
Whew – we got through all that!
Then George found a wool stand to have lunch under cover. Well done, George.
What a day!  I think we must have done about  10 km.  Lots of laughs.
P.S.We girls did agree the uniforms of all the guys at the games are wonderful. – Elaine.
14/12/2011. All. Brighton Recreational Reserve. End of Year Tramp. Easy.
George first took 22 of us along a short beach walk and up to his property for morning tea. A light drizzle had set in, but not too discouraging. Thank you George for providing so many chairs.

Part of group on George’s front lawn having morning tea. (Ken pic and caption)

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Jun 07 2017

Bus Trip: Trotters Gorge

Published by under Bus Trips

7/6/2017. All. Bus Trip. Trotters Gorge. Leaders; Keith, Dave and Arthur.

Hike app route map, courtesy Ian. (About a km short, due to slowness to engage the app.)

It was cold waiting for the bus to arrive at the car park, which it did at 8.30 a.m. It only took a few minutes for all to embark, with their accoutrements, and we were away. The Brighton group meet the bus at Green Island, to bring the total for our day out to 41, which included 2 guests/potential members.
The sun was shining in the driver’s eyes as he gave us a smooth ride up S.H.1 before turning off. The bus stopped a short distance before the Trotters Gorge picnic ground, at the beginning of a forestry road, where the Hikers and Trampers would begin their combined tramp. The Ramblers stayed with the bus. It was just after 10 a.m.
The combined group walked a couple of hundred yards to have a brief morning tea in the sunshine. The day was sunny and cool after the morning frost, but later the cloud built up to overcast. It was ideal conditions for the tramp, which followed a main forestry road. These were pine trees, which had been planted after the area had been harvested just a few years ago. The young trees did not obscure our views of the surrounding terrain, which was good.

We followed the road in a north to north-west direction, winding around somewhat, and going…

Regroup at top of first rise. (Ian pic and caption.)

…uphill twice before descending again. The distinctive rock formations of the area could be frequently seen.

Eventually we came to a much longer uphill section, but the grade was good.

Heading up one of the long hills. (Helen pic and caption.)

A regroup was necessary at the top as the hill had sorted out the faster people.

At this time we turned onto Fantail Road, to change direction for the return half of our circuit. This was also at the highest elevation of our day, with good views out to Moeraki township and the sea.

There was a light breeze up here, so we found a sheltered spot in Fantail Road at which to stop for our lunch It was nice in the sun.

Lunch time in a sheltered area. (Helen pic and caption.)

Lunchtime over, it was only a few minutes’ walk till we left the road to begin the descent into Trotters Gorge. At first, for a short distance, the 4WD track was bare clay, steep, and a bit slippery. Once past that bit progress was good, and eventually we reached Trotters Creek. We were down in the canyon now, with ever-changing views of the rock cliffs.

beautiful rock formations. Lots and they were all different. (Helen pic and caption.)

Impressive cliff, (Ian pic and caption.)

They look like limestone, but are actually greywacke -breccia conglomerate formed about 80 million years ago. About 12,000 years ago Trotters Creek was a much larger river and carved out the gorge.

Our track followed the bottom of the gorge now, with 6 stream crossings to make,

One of the six water crossings. (Helen pic and caption.)

the water being 3 or 4 inches deep at each. We reached the picnic area and the bus just after 2 pm, after an enjoyable day’s tramp.

There we found that 6 of the Ramblers were missing in action, necessitating a search party being sent out – thanks Alex, Helen and Dave. Happily they were located, on the cave circuit track, coming back out.
So, it was back onto the bus for the return to Mosgiel. The planned coffee stop on the way home had to be forgone due to the time lost finding the Ramblers – but I expect that they will be “shouting” for all next week?
The Combined Group’s circuit had covered 10.7 km, and the Ramblers had done some bush walking from the picnic area.
The day had apparently been enjoyed by all. My thanks go to fellow leaders, Keith and Dave. Also to Shona for collecting the fares, and Bob for co-ordinating the bus. – Art.

 

?Ramblers report of day at Trotters Gorge.

After the trampers and hikers were dropped off, the 10 of us who had opted for a shorter walk stayed on the bus while the driver drove to the pick-up spot. This took him a bit of manoeuvring. By this time we were really looking forward to a cup of tea, so we walked along the road to a nice sunny spot to sit and enjoy it. We walked back to the bus and got a map from driver which showed a bush track with a shortish loop track not too far along. The 10 of set off on this really lovely track. After a while 4 of our group opted to go back leaving the rest to carry on. We came to the loop track and decided to have a look at it as there was a cave to view not too far a long. Anyway, our loop track proved to be rather more difficult than we had bargained on being very steep up hill and very slippery with mud etc. However, having hauled ourselves up using scrub, roots or a friendly hand, to say nothing of crawling on hands and knees, we decided to carry on as we weren’t keen on returning the way we had come and hoped that the way down would be less challenging! This proved to be marginally right. We decided at about 12.20pm to have lunch sitting in the cave. The way down was slightly better but still required a lot of care. Once again we managed by sliding on backsides, hanging on to trees or whatever else presented its self, and helpful advice and hands of companions. It has to be said here that the one in front with help and advice quite a bit of the time was none other than our 90 yr old and sight impaired Molly!!

Bev and Lesley about to go down a very steep track at Trotters Gorge.

We were at no time lost, and as there were 6 of us, in no danger of not having someone to go for help if needed. We had not been given any time to be back at bus and as, in the past, a bus trip has always meant a whole day out, we didn’t feel any concern about time as it was before 3pm. We actually felt quite proud of ourselves and what we’d achieved by just taking our time and giving each other support and help. – Bev

8/12/2004. Both. Bus Trip. Trotters Gorge. Leaders: Ria, Doug J, Catherine, Joyce.
Small stream crossing.

Small stream crossing. George, Who? Doug.

Track through cleft in rock on return.

Track through cleft in rock on return. Dorothy.

At bus at tramps' end.

At bus at tramps’ end.

8/10/2003. Both. Trotters Gorge. Bus. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Joyce, Pat McL; Hikers: Nancy, Catherine.

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May 31 2017

Ardachys – Blacksmith Flat

Published by under Lambing Sep-Nov,Trampers,Year round

No. 4 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Blacksmiths Flat. Hindon Stn. Bob Heenan. Farm. Lambing.”
No. 14 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Hindon. Ardachy to River.  D Graham. Haggie. Farm.”
Distance from carpark: 33 km.
13. 31/5/2017. Trampers. Ardachys – Blacksmith Flat. M. Leader: Arthur.
The weather wasn’t great, but good enough. 8 trampers out today, including one new member – welcome Phil. We travelled in low cloud all the way from Outram to our parking spot at Ardachy, but from there on we could clearly see down into the Taieri gorge. An improvement was expected though.

We first went to inspect the nearby “Lonely Grave” of Mr Don Graham.

Family grave in Ardachy Station. (Helen pic and caption.)

The Graham family have been on Ardachy for 120 years – check our club website for more details about the “Lonely Grave”. [Scroll further down this post for this. – Ed.]

A short stop was made in the tussock for morning tea, before continuing on down hill. 4 friendly horses greeted us when we reached “Blacksmith Flat”, beside the Taieri river.

Four friendly hores came to visit. (Helen pic and caption.)

We followed the “Flat” upstream for some distance, before turning and retracing our steps.

Mount Allan railway station was directly across the river from us, but no train today. It was a lovely and peaceful spot there, the river making the only noise, except for 6-8 fantails flitting around.

The return journey was up “Blacksmith Gully”, and we travelled some distance before stopping for lunch.

Lunch. Second photo I missed was a lovely view while no fog. (Helen pic and caption.)

The cloud had come down now, with no more than a couple of hundred metres visibility, and remained so until we returned to Outram.

Incidentally, the names “Blacksmith Flat” and “Blacksmith Gully” go back to the gold mining era around 1863. Gold was found in some quantity in the area, but after 2 0r 3 years the “rush” was over.
The leader decided that, as it was a relatively short tramp today, we would return by a slightly more strenuous route than had been planned originally, to give everyone a bit of a workout. All thought this a great idea, and enjoyed the extra bit. There were no complaints anyway!
We arrived back at the cars before 1.30 pm, having walked 8.8 km. The vertical difference in altitude between the river and the cars was approx. 250 metres.
On returning to Mosgiel we stopped in at Wals for hot drinks, sitting in front of the fire to enjoy them. It made a very good end to the day. – Art.
12. 20/8/2014. Trampers. Ardachy Station. Blacksmith Flat and Gully. Medium.
The tramp on Ardachy Station to Blacksmiths gully was not a very long walk, but the climb out at the end of the day means that it is not all easy going. 4 trampers turned up on the day, & we set off to where we park the cars, just around the corner from the lonely grave site above Hindon. As it was 10 AM when we arrived there, morning tea was taken before we set off on the tramp along the top of the ridge. The weather was fine, with a very slight, cool breeze, & some frost & frozen puddles underfoot. We spent some time down by the river looking at the destruction among the willows, caused by flood waters, & we were also amazed by how high up in the trees the flood debris was deposited. [probably about 6-7 mtrs. above the river level]
As it was only around 11:20 by this time, we set off along the picturesque valley floor, until we came upon a good sheltered, sunny spot for a lunch break, …
Lunch

Lunch spot (Ken pic and caption)

View from lunch site (Ken pic and caption)

View from lunch site (Ken pic and caption)

… not far from where we had to cross the stream, & start the climb back to the car. After a leisurely lunch, we moved on until we came to the old mine shaft, which we climbed up the bank to inspect. the fence around it is slowly getting wrecked as time goes on, but the bush growing around the hole is still protecting it well. After this, it was just a matter of climbing back to the car, which seems like a daunting task when looking up from the valley floor, but it only takes around 1/2 an hour to climb out.

We all agreed it was a good walk, with the area being new to two members of the party.Walked 6.44km
moving time 1hr 45min.
ave 3.7km/hr
climbed 326mtrs. -Ken
11. 8/8/2012. Trampers. Ardachy Station. Blacksmith Flat and Gully. Medium.

GPS 10.9km
moving ave 3.8km/h
moving tme 2h 52min
total ascent 445mtrs.

The pic below shows 3/4 of the party at the point on the ridge where on previous tramps we had crossed from the river side of the ridge to the other. We arrived at this point by keeping to the ridge and avoiding the river-side track. Here we stopped for morning tea.

There had been a little drizzle to this point, but from here on, the weather and the views cleared to give us a good day out. To those who remained at home, we proved that you make your own luck. Bravo.

The cross-over point on the ridge taken on previous tramps.

And from this point we still kept to the ridge and found a clear crack down the nose of the ridge to the river flats. Club pioneers! I think we’ll always wish to do the descent this way, now. We explored Blacksmith flat, noting a new electric fence put in no doubt to keep stock away from the river.

We then took the track down-river that leads to the further flat reached from the Mains Road tramp, and lunched, seated at the lovely BBQ area. Then it was back to take the Blacksmith Gully route up to the car.

The writer had forgotten just how far we have to ascend the gully floor before locating the FWD track that takes us back up to the car.

Ascending Blacksmith Gully

Then it was just a 25-minute hard-breathing one-foot-in-front-of-the-other climb, after first subjecting Judy to the obligatory mine shaft sighting.

Back at the car at top of ridge

And so back into the car and out along a road, good and smooth, but a bit sloppy from the earlier drizzle. A good try-out for Ian’s little new/old Corolla. – Ian.

10. 30/3/2011. Trampers. Ardachy Station. Blacksmith Gully. Medium.

GPS of route, courtesy Ken

We passed by the gravesite dedicated to Murdoch Graham and went onto the FWD track ahead.

 

Memorial Site

This gradually descended before eventually climbing again to cross the steadily descending ridge on our right.

Climb

At this point, through a gate in the fence on the ridge crest, we took a track descending on the ridge’s right, although the Google Earth map does show a track going on down the ridge to the bottom.

Ridge

The track to the right led us down into Blacksmith Gully which we pursued down to its end on the Taieri River.
After a wander round, we took the track going on down the river to lunch in warm sun by the water on a grassy flat.

Lunch by Taieri River (Ken pic)

Retracing our steps,

Walking back after lunch (Ken pic)

this time we went further up Blacksmith Gully till we took a track that at its first zigzag encompassed the fenced off mine shaft and threw down stones to gauge its depth.
Then it was steadily on up up up to regain the cars at the track’s top. – Ian.

Postscript: (A bit of Club history, recollected by George and confirmed by Bob Heenan.)

Daphne, then President and founding member of the Club, was also a member of  the Dunedin Photographic Club. She met Don Graham, Ardachy Station owner there and got talking. An upshot was that he invited the Club to do a tramp on his land. This the Club did in 1989. They parked where we still park today, and followed the ridge from there down to the Flats. An arduous effort, following the ridges ups and downs. (We follow an easier 4WD track today.) On their return, club members were surprised to find Don by the cars, with a billy boiling over a fire. He invited them to get their mugs out and filled them with tea. A very happy introduction to what has been a satisfying series of tramps there over the years.

Post-post-script: – from NZ Herald Sunday April 3 2011.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/otago-regional-council/news/article.cfm?o_id=600651&objectid=10408722

Home is the farmer, home to the hills

11:59 AM Wednesday Nov 1, 2006
It took a long battle with bureaucracy, but an Otago farmer has been returned to the soil he worked on all his life.

Don Graham, 72, was buried on his Ardachy Station property at Hindon this week in a ceremony attended by more than 120 family members and friends.

A bagpiper played as Mr Graham was interred in the place he had chosen on the property, among rolling hills and wind-swept tussock.

A piper plays as Don Graham’s casket is carried to his plot beside the Hindon station road overlooking his farm, Ardachy station, and the Taieri River. Picture / Otago Daily Times

Obtaining permission for the burial was a long legal process, including gathering affidavits and securing consents.

Funeral director Robert Campbell said it was the first time in 40 years he had been involved in a home burial.

“It’s very uncommon, because you have to get permission through the Burial in a Special Place Act,” he said.

The law stipulates that people must be buried communally if they lived within 32km of a cemetery.

But it allows for home burial “if there are exceptional circumstances making the burial of that body in that place particularly appropriate”

Mr Campbell said: “He was granted permission by the Ministry of Health four years ago, because he and his forebears had farmed the land for 105 years and had a close association with the property.”

The grave site looks over Ardachy Station towards the Taieri River.

“It’s a lovely spot in the hills overlooking the valley,” said Robin Gamble, who delivered the eulogy at the funeral.

Mr Gamble said Mr Graham was passionate about the area in which he lived, and always wanted to be buried there.

“But it was very difficult and involved. He had to get 10 affidavits from people to support his request, as well as regional council consents.”

Mr Graham lived all his life in the area, taking over Ardachy Station from his father-in-law in 1956.

Mr Graham’s widow, Leila, said it was an emotional day for her and her two sons.

“He spent very little time away from the farm, and he would have been so proud. We can look out the back window of the house and see him down there now,” she said.

Mr Graham enjoyed a laugh. On April 1, 1991, he appeared on the front page of the Otago Daily Times with a “shabbit”, a creature he claimed to have bred from a merino sheep and a rabbit.

The April Fool’s Day trick was so successful people were still ringing him up months later to ask about breeding stock.

– OTAGO DAILY TIMES

9. 1/3/2007. Ardachy Station, Blacksmith Gully and Flat. Medium+ Leaders: George, Doug M

Very good but long drive in.. Several fences and gates to negotiate.
Took Hindon turn-off from George King Memorial Drive.
Just before road dipped down to the Taieri Park, parked at corner on grassy surface off road.
Followed 4WD down to river. Proceeded down-stream for some distance and stopped for lunch. Returned clockwise up valley. At stone fireplace, turned steeply up right bank, viewed vertical mine shaft, and met 4WD track back up to cars.
8. 18/4/2001. Hindon, Ardachy Station, Blacksmith Gully. Leaders: Bob H, Colleen, Doug M.
7. 18/4/2002
6. 27/11/1996. Blacksmiths Gully Hindon. Leaders: Eric and Dot, Joan H.
5. 1996 Bob H
4. 25/10/1995. Hindon, Blacksmith Gully, (Old Battery). Medium+. Leaders: George, Ria L, Bob Q, Jack R.
3. 3/11/1993. Blacksmith Gully. Hindon. Medium. Leaders: Bob, Daphne, Margaret D, Bob Q.
Easier alternative:: Leaders: Les and Mavis.
2. 19/6/1991. Blacksmith’s Gully. Lovely views – a good climb home. Average+. Leaders: Mervyn, Wendy, Ted, Daphne.
1. 22/3/1989. Blacksmith’s Gully from Ardachy Station. Lovely walk to Taieri River. Steep return. Leaders: Kath, Jack and Joan.

 

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May 31 2017

Street walk, Green Island, farm walk

Published by under Farm,Hikers

4. 31/5/2017. Hikers. Green Island street walk. E. Leaders: Elaine and Chris.

Nike app map of route, courtesy Ian.

The above route map gives some indication of the intricacies of Elaine’s   planned route, designed to cross and recross, by way of tunnels and bridges galore, the barriers of railway line, stream and motorway dividing  Green Island from Abbotsford. It was a street-walk, most suitable on the day for an off-and-on light morning drizzle. We were treated to a whole gamut of lower Abbotsford house designs, most instructive of fashions favoured in different decades, complete with one or two older ones looking very old and very neglected. At the latter part of the hike, we also got to peek into some of the large industrial goings-on at the north end of the town, not least Harraways. All most impressive.

At one point where a railway line once crossed the old main road (remember it?), Elaine stopped us to point out how it once served a coal-mine of her grandfather. She has a photo of a small steam engine about to head north across the road.

Drizzly morning tea at the gardens. Most of the 22 who came out. (Ian pic and caption.)

Newly decorated railway underpass (newly decorated since Elaine’s recce), essential for linking homes and school. It was deemed safer for children than a bridge. (Ian pic and caption.)

a dry-seated lunch at the Green Island Rugby Football Club pavilion in Miller Park. (Ian pic and caption.)

18 of us at Coffee at Agnes’, where we got to enjoy a separate room all to ourselve, complete with en suite. (Ian pic and caption.)

Many were the remarks appreciative of the cleverness of the route. A big thank you to Elaine and Chris for a great day out. – Ian, (for Elaine [without her knowledge – yet!] whose recent rapidly failing eyesight prevented her from tackling a report.)

3. 25/2/2009 Hikers. Green Island. Farm Walk. Leaders: George, Dot B
2. 10/5/2006. Hikers. Green Island street and farm walk. Leaders: Chris, Dot B.
1. 8/2/2006. Hikers. Street Walk: Green Island Street and Farm Walk. Leaders: Dot B, Chris.

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May 24 2017

Botanic Garden, Logan Park, Northern Cemetery, Chingford

Published by under Hikers

Distance from carpark: 20 km.

21. 24/5/2017. Hikers. Botanic Garden and Logan Park. E. Leader: Marjorie.

28 hikers set off from the Gardens car park for a leisurely wander up to the azalea garden for morning tea. The fact that two groups became separated from the leading group, due to the multiple track system, reminded the leader of the need to regroup frequently. All reached the morning tea area…

Clive pic.

…and from there we proceeded out to Lovelock Avenue and entered the bush area, then proceeding up the track…

Clive pic.

…to the top of the cemetery. We walked through the cemetery on the main track,

Clive pic.

stopping to view the Thomas Bracken tombstone, and then followed the track through the bush to Logan Park car park. An easy stroll followed along Butts Road, through the area of the Sports Academy (old art gallery), along the sports field and back along the track on Butts Road. The 250 steps of Abbs Way were a good work out bringing us back to superb views over the city.

Clive pic.

Continuing up through the cemetery with a short detour to the Larnach tomb had us back into Lovelock Bush and then to the azalea garden for lunch. We ended the hike with a walk through the geographic gardens area and the bird aviaries, then down to the lower gardens where most of us had coffee at the Crocodile café. Some of the planned route had to be abandoned due to the closure of tracks for tree cutting but suitable alternatives were available. Although the overall distance was fairly short the steeper areas provided sufficient exercise. The Gardens were in their autumnal colourful splendour and there were many points of interest in the Gardens and the cemetery which made for a diverse and interesting day. – Marjorie.

20. 19/10/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh, Botanic Garden. E. Leaders: Dot and Bev.

Route Map (Courtesy Ian.)

Route Map. (Courtesy Ian.) A delightful Ramblers-style walk in the blaze of the Spring-blossomed Botanic Garden. – Ian.

Wednesday saw 25 happy hikers assemble in Duke St at the back of Woodhaugh Gardens to enjoy what proved to be a very relaxed and pleasant day out. We walked through bush tracks to emerge in the children’s play area, where some ‘older children’ couldn’t resist the challenge of a small flying fox,

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

and then on to the paddling pool section where we sat and enjoyed an unhurried morning tea break.

From there it was out to George St. and a walk along to the Gardens corner to enable us to cross to the Botanic Gardens with the safety of the traffic lights.

We walked right through the Gardens to the exit at Gore St. which we didn’t use but turned up the track to take us to Upper Gardens. From there we wandered round quite a few tracks that a lot of people hadn’t been on before. These took us through areas of bush, the rhododendron dell, and other not so well known areas of the Gardens.

We arrived at our designated lunch spot by 11.45 a.m. but nobody seemed to mind an early and extended lunch hour. Everyone took their time over lunch and from there were free to wander the Gardens at their own pace, meeting again at main gate at 1.30pm to walk back to, and through, Woodhaugh Gardens to the cars.

The Dunedin Botanic Gardens are looking beautiful and are well tended and maintained. Certainly well worth visiting at any time of the year.

Coffee stop was Plaza Café. – Bev.

19. 30/9/2015. Hikers. Logan Park. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Hikers' GPS

GPSs of route, courtesy Bruce.

Report on hikers’ trip to Logan Park 30 September 2015

Twenty-four hikers, including three students on holiday, set off, on a sunny spring morning, from the Gardens Car Park, opposite Mecure Dunedin Leisure Lodge, at 9.30 am and walked near the Gardens perimeter in a clockwise direction. We appreciated the new bark covered walkway near the themes of sculpturing hedge plants (topiary), coloured plants and plants with fragrancies. We went through the Clive Lister garden and after crossing the bridge viewed the brown trout sculpture near the duck pond commemorating the early breeding of trout in the Opoho Creek ponds in the 1860s. After looking at the two Peter and Wendy themed sculptures we crossed the stream and made our way up hill through the middle of the gardens for morning tea at 10.05 am at the Azalea/Rhododendron dell lawn area.

Refreshed, we passed through the Lovelock Bush on the other side of the road, went up the path and crossed Opoho Park to the right of the rugby club rooms to turn right into Opoho Road and then left into Warden Street. We proceeded to Opoho School at the end of Warden Street and then turned to the right down the driveway at the end of Blacks Road. We passed to the left of a tree at the end of the driveway to proceed downhill on a public walkway, that was initially covered with bark. The advance description of the hike noted that, “Some of the paths are very good, others are steep and less well formed.” The descent from Blacks Road to the Opoho Creek matched the latter description more than the former. Some bird song was heard in this area and a pair of tuis observed. The native bush, including large pungas was quite dense …

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

… and Jennifer noted that it was possible, at one time, to hear other trampers but not see them. The track followed alongside the Opoho Creek to a curved bridge where it met a mountain bike track. We continued downhill on this better track (right turn) and came to the remnants of the 1868 Opoho Creek trout breeding ponds about 75 m further along.

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We then continued downhill on the mountain bike trail until we came to a pile of gravel on the right when the playing fields of Logan Park school were visible and turned left up the Marshall mountain bike trail for approximately 50 metres where a large rock was present and then turned right contouring through bush towards a white cloth marker on a tree (Just above the rock in a sign, seen from the uphill side, on a tree with red and green arrows). We went slightly downhill, for about 20 m, to a ledge (part of a trail) and then up and to the right towards another white marker (20 m) and then straight ahead for 20 m to come to the Pelichet Bay rifle butt remains, a stone structure about 20 m long and 2 m high.

 Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We noted the hidden geocache container in the region.

The white cloth marker track led out the other end of the butts and turned to the right to cross a stream (a few metres above a steep descent in the stream where some brave souls saw the need to provide themselves with additional challenges by crossing here). We went downhill on an angle for 30 m and then uphill and to the right for another 30 m to a yellow marker and then followed the track out to the main Signal Hill mountain bike track and then down this to the top mown field at Logan Park to stop for lunch on the sheltered sunny north facing bank at 12.05 pm.

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Some required sun burn lotion to be applied.

After lunch we crossed the broad track above the mown field, on the left edge of the unmown rough area, to reach the gravelled track on the north side of the gully. About 100 m down this, on the top of a slight rise, the groups split into two. Les kindly led a group back to the car park via the gravel track to Dundas Street and then Leith Street. The others arrived about 30 minutes later after ascending the track through the bush on the right, up and to the right, to the corner of Opoho Park by the playground.

From there they crossed to the left hand end of the pine trees on the west side of the park, past the happy ribbon tree,

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

across to the top of the cemetery by the path, through a small part of the cemetery, back through the Lovelock Bush, over the road, downhill through the rhododendron dells, down a native bush path turning to the right down some steps just before the bridge and down a long board walk to Lovelock Avenue which featured a view of a large broadleaf tree that was just a seedling in the early days of Dunedin in 1844. We emerged on Lovelock Avenue just above the memorial stone and re-entered the gardens about 30 m further on to follow the excellent track above the left bank of the Leith Stream back to the car park.

Many had afternoon tea at the Croc-o-Dile.

The bush above the fish breeding ponds in Opoho Creeks was noticeably denser with more moisture than that near the conifers and manuka/kanuka near the rifle butts, and on the hillside between the school fields and Opoho Park. The track descending from Blacks Road to Opoho Creek may be better suited to trampers than hikers and future alternatives would include going from the car park to Lovelock Avenue along the left bank of the Leith track, walking on the streets to Logan Park school, and visiting the fish pond with a dog leg walk up the good quality mountain bike track.

Distance travelled: 8.2 km.

Bruce and Marjorie.

18. 8/10/2014.Hikers. Logan Park, Gardens, University. E. Leaders: Janice and Theresa.

Route

Route. Parked Logan Park HS. 1km: top of Northern Cemetery; 2km: Entering Upper Gardens; 3km: At the Worm; 4km: Near duck pond; 5km: Into Nth Leith St; 6km: Point where Leith turns towards the Harbour; 7km: coffee at University Plaza Cafe.

26 of us parked at the Logan Park High School, closed at the time for the school holidays. Walked further around Butts Road and climbed St Abbs Place steps to Brackens Lookout. Went into the Northern Cemetery to William Larnach’s tomb. Wandered around cemetery to find Brackens grave. Had morning tea amongst the graves, sheltered from the wind by a hedge of bushes. Came back out and climbed up the track behind the new planting out buildings of the Botanic Garden. Entered the Upper Garden at the top corner and went through them into the Rhododendron Dell. Came back up and across to the Mediterranean Garden Terrace.

Mediterranean

Mediterranean Garden Terrace

Next, went down to the flat and admired the Ouroboros stainless steel worm sculpture, designed to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Botanic Garden.

worm

Ouroboros worm sculpture

Walked through to the Gardens Corner exit and made our way along to the Woodhaugh Gardens for lunch on a set of some conveniently sheltered seats.

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch finished, we made our way across the gardens via the Duck Pond to Duke Street. We stopped and wondered at the white spanish type building at the foot of the Bullock Track, but no one could shed any light on it’s design origins. We continued down Duke Street into Nth Leith St, into Montgomery Avenue to cross the St David Street pedestrian bridge and to wander along the grass frontage to the original University Buildings, admiring the stepped Leith Stream flood works still underway. We emerged onto the Dundas Street pedestrian bridge, making our way through various newer buildings, past a fruit and vegetable co-op to return alongside the Leith Stream again. We crossed and recrossed this, emerging at last onto Anzac Avenue.

Tramp’s end now in sight, we had to sit down outside Plaza Cafe on the University Plaza adjacent to the Forsyth Barr Stadium to ponder whether to get our (now) customary coffee shot before or after getting back to the cars. Most decided before, several after. This, with much thought, determined and accomplished, wound up the tramp for the day.

Thanks to Jan and Theresa for a successfully conducted tramp, losing none of our straggling party through the many twists and turns of the day. The threatened rain held off and cool  temperatures made for good tramping conditions. A good day out, through many varied locations. Again, thanks Jan and Theresa. – Ian.

17. 11/9/2013. Hikers. Botanic Garden – Bracken View – Rhododendron Dell – Northern Cemetery. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
Last Wednesday 29 hikers turned up at the car park, led by the Woodfields. A nice sunny day.
We started at lower car park at the Botanic Garden and walked our way up the paths in the garden. We stopped at the Mediterranean Garden Terrace for the tea break and enjoyed the lovely cake made by Hazel for George’s Birthday.
The magnolia trees were just starting to show their blooms and the early rhododendrons were out. Roll on October when the main ones bloom.
Blossom
Lunch was at a grassy area at the upper garden. George, who was 85 – did you know GEORGE WAS 85? – shouted a lot of lovely brut,  bubbly and nibbles. This was a wonderful time …. How many of us will be still hiking around when we are 85? As usual we had lots of laughs.
We visited the northern cemetery and looked at the  William Larnach tomb and then we worked our way down through the Garden.
I think everyone had a good day as there certainly was a lot of talking going on.
Some of the group finished of the day at the Topiary Cafe at Wals Plantland  in Mosgiel for coffee with warm pikelets and cream and carrot cake.
Being retired is so good. – Elaine
 16. 23/5/2012. Hikers. Botanic Garden. Leaders: A & B Landrebe.

15. 26/10/2011. Hikers. Botanic Garden.

14. 17/11/2010 Dunedin Botanic Garden. Leader: Bev.
13. 11/11/2009 Hikers. Upper Gardens, Rhodendron Vale, Northern Cemetery, Aviary. Leaders: Lance and Lois
(Bill pic)

Just representational of the Rodo gardens and borders. Many of our group enjoyed guessing names of rhodos but there are so many, especially hybrids, that to get one right is near impossible. (Bill pic and caption)

 

(Bill pic)

Morning tea interest group. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Best to just listen. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Knarled convolutions. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Northern Cemetery. Another place worth a further (temp. only) visit. It was noticeable so soon after 31st October how many large cracks in the plastering there were. Do they repair these each year? (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Palmers Quarry. (Is that apostrophe s or s apostrophe? Probably apostrophe s.) This stop-to-view coincided with 11.11.11. and I wasn’t sure which bangs were quarrying blasts and which were cannon shots. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds. Thanks DCC. They got this one right. What a great use for a stadium. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds(2). (Bill pic and caption)

12. 25/6/2008. Woodhaugh, Botanic Gardens and Northern Cemetery. Leaders:
After some concerns about the weather the day before, we were pleased to wake up to relatively clear skies and no wind. The decision was made to proceed with our mid winter ramble in Woodhaugh and the Botanic Gardens and all fourteen participants set off enthusiastically. There was certainly a nip in the air and snow on the surrounding hills encouraged us to walk briskly along the banks of the Leith and around some of the well maintained bush paths. Sheds 3 and 4 provided shelter for our morning tea break and then we headed across the busy highways via Willowbank and Leisure Lodge to enter the Botanic Gardens. A stiff hill climb levelled out in the rhododendron area, the bushes bare of flowers but still sporting lush green leaves. Crossing Lovelock Avenue, we entered Lovelock Bush, to shortly emerge at the reservoir.
There followed a circuit of the northern cemetery. A warming sun came through the grey sky to enable us to proceed more leisurely and take in some of the interesting sights and historic old tombstones as well as admiring the sculptured trunks of the even older trees.
Lunch with the ducks

A rest at the cemetery

We made a fairly brisk descent to the lower Gardens via the aviary where the birds were in fine, if raucous, voice.

The Shakespeare Gardens

The Shakespeare Gardens

It was warm enough to eat lunch on the seats overlooking the duck pond and lower gardens where we were soon joined by hopeful seagulls, one drake and a blackbird. Some took the opportunity for a quick look at the information centre and glasshouses
Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

before we returned to the cars, well satisfied with our outing and happy to get off home before the weather deteriorated. – Marjorie
11. 19/11/2008 Botanic Gardens, NEV street walk, Chingford Park ret. Leaders: Graham.
Botanic Gardens - Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

Botanic Gardens – Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

The programme said “Chingford” but Graeme, our leader realised that it alone would not extend us, so we began at the Botanical Gardens carpark, completed numerous walks along Gardens paths, had morning tea among the rhododendrons, Continue Reading »

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May 24 2017

Purakaunui, Mopanui, north face, ret.

Published by under Trampers

4. 24/5/2017. Trampers. Purakaunui to Mopanui, return. M. Leaders: Neil and Margreet.
10 Trampers travelled in 3 cars, via Port Chalmers, to park at Purakaunui.
Our tramp began at 10 am in cloudy and cool conditions, which remained all day – ideal for tramping. Some sunshine though.
The morning tea stop was at the small picnic park beside the Purakaunui inlet.
We continued on to the top of the inlet, and then up “Purakanui Station Road” to the railway line. Not too much conversation as we walked up the road, due to the steeper gradient no doubt.
We followed the McKessar Track for a little, before turning on to a 4WD forestry track to take us in the direction of Mopanui. At one stage the track was getting rather overgrown with gorse, but we battled through.
Further on we came across a man cutting firewood. After a brief stop the group continued on, but had a long wait further on as two trampers had had to stop for a long chat with the “chainsaw man“.

The last uphill stage was through the bush, and got steeper, rockier and rougher. But we topped out at 12-15, to have our lunch (with a great view) beside the trig on top of Mopanui.

Lunch on Mopanui. (Arthur pic and caption.)

The south-west breeze was just a little cool here, though.

After enjoying the view and our lunch we moved on, the descent towards the Orokonui Sanctuary being a bit tricky to begin with on account of all the rocks, care being necessary.
However we were soon out on the road, to follow it down to the top of McKessars Track. We were able to admire “The Orokonui Drystone Wall”, a DOC sign giving information about it as we passed.

On the way down McKessars Track, we turned aside to look again at the stone walled ruins

Dairy and cowshed? (Keith pic and caption.)

of the McKessar house and farm shed.

Carol at McKessar house. (Arthur pic and caption.)

Downhill now, we were soon back to the beginning of our circuit up on to Mopanui, and from then on we were retracing our morning’s steps till regaining the cars at 3 pm.

Much birdlife had been noted during the day’s tramp, and at the top of the inlet on the return journey we were lucky enough to see 2 kingfishers, their brilliant colours showing up well in the sunshine.

Looking back to where we’d been. (Arthur pic and caption.)

One dived into the water, but we couldn’t tell if any prey had been caught.

In the morning the tide was right out as we walked around the inlet, but on the return journey it was full tide, which was much more enjoyable.

Today’s tramp was 14.6 km (thanks Keith), and Mopanui is 468 metres high.

Weary end. (Arthur pic and caption.)

One carload headed back to Mosgiel, and 2 carloads stopped at Emersons on the way for “drinkies”.
And a good day was had by all! – Art, (substitute leader).
3. 26/11/2014. Trampers. Purakaunui to Mopanui, return.
Purakanui Mopanui McKesslers Track. (Ken pic and caption)

Purakaunui Mopanui McKessar Track. (Ken pic and caption) GPS of route courtesy Ken. Walked 13.8km; Ave 4.3km/h; Time 3hr 10min; climbed 800m; max elevation 483m

We changed the scheduled tramp a bit this time, as the tides didn’t suit what we wanted to do. So we started at the far end of Purakaunui in the old garage car park, & walked the shoreline track around to the causeway at the head of Purakaunui Inlet. Then it was up the hill through the outskirts of Osborne, across the railway line, & onto the bottom of McKessar Track. From the next junction, we had a discussion on whether we should try the original way up to Mopanui, or continue on McKessar Track, & approach Mopanui from the Orok0nui side. We decided on the original, with the knowledge that we may have to retrace our steps, as in the past, we have not been able to find the correct way through the bush, & onto the rocky track leading up to the trig on top. However, after a couple of false leads, we managed to find a way up past some impressive stone walls, & onto a track that lead us to the marked track through the bush, & onto the rocky track up to the trig. [Bravo! Ed.]
When we arrived at the top, after the steep climb, we had to find shelter from the very strong wind that was blowing up there, so we could eat our lunch without getting blown off the mountain.
After lunch, we went down the other side onto Mopanui Rd. along here to McKessar Track, & back down to Osborne again, stopping on the way to show some of the group the old stone house ruins, as they had not been in this area before.Then it was back around the shoreline track to the car.
We all agreed that it was a good walk, with great views, & some nice sunshine to keep the temperature at a good level. – Ken

Enjoying the view from the top of Mopanui. (Ken pic and caption)

Enjoying the view from the top of Mopanui. (Ken pic and caption)

2. 20/3/2013. Trampers. Purakaunui to Mopanui, return.

Osborne Mopanui wrong way. GPS courtesy Ken

Osborne Mopanui wrong way. (Ken GPS, pic and caption)

Trig a the top of Mopanui (Ken pic and caption)

Trig a the top of Mopanui (Ken pic and caption)

 

Pura

Purakaunui Potato Point from the top [of Mopanui] (Ken pic and caption)

1. 12/5/2010. Trampers. Purakaunui to Mopanui, return. Leaders: Sabina, George.
The planned Doctors Point starting point was changed to Purakaunui, thanks to Ian having misread high tide time from low tide on the tide  tables.

At Purakaunui waterfront. Mopanui shrouded in mist.

The day was calm and fine. We set off on the Osbourne track around the inlet, stopping for morning tea on a sunny embankment. Station Road was as steep as ever as we climbed to the old Purakanui Station. Across the railway and it was up and along the McKessar Track till we reached the beginning of the zigzag gorse-strewn track that would take us up to Mopanui. Autumn grass was heavy and long. George had done some gorse clearing so it was not too bad. We avoided one gorse overgrown ‘zig’ (or was it ‘zag’?) corner by short-cutting through some manuka. We finally arrived at the bush track leading directly up to the top. A bit overgrown, but again, not too bad. A clamber over the large hilltop boulders and we were on the summit for lunch.

On Mopanui summit. George, Doug, Ken, Ria

Back down at the McKessar Track, we turned left to go farther up it, as George thought we might find it leading down to the Osbourne settlement, to make a round trip of it. A few hundred metres up, and George was inclined to give up and return back down. However, with time still on their side, Ken and Ian were prepared to recce the track to its end at Mopanui Road to see just what was there, the rest returning to the cars.
They did find one or two potential Osbourne leads, and followed one bulldozed track steeply down through some still-young pines but that lead eventually to a blind end and they had to labour back up again. Nearing the top of the McKessar Track, one or two other side roads led off to properties.

Remarkably intact stone ruin towards top of McKessar Track. (Shot taken into sun)

Finally Ken and Ian reached its junction with the Mopanui Road terminus.

Sign at top of McKessar Track. (Ken pic)

Looking up and along Mopanui Road and the ecosanctuary exclusion fence. (Ken pic)

Satisfied they had recced the entire track now, they returned back to the cars. When the got there, they found the rest of the party had arrived just before them, having invested their spare time to rest in the sun on the way.
A very good day, with tramping temperatures just right. – Ian.

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May 17 2017

Tramps Incorporating Three Kings

Published by under Hikers,Trampers,Year round

No. 26 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Wesleydale – Maungatua – via 3 Kings. L Wiffen. Year round.”

Abt 25 km from car park.

23. 17/5/2017. Hikers. Three Kings from Heenan Road. M. Leaders: Ian and Doug.

Route map courtesy Ian. Nike pp not turned until 1km into trip so add 1km to all distances. (Ian pic and caption.)

We navigated our cars to what for the Hikers was a new entry spot. Back in 2006 the Todd Group had denied us access through the paddock next to the old Wesleydale Camp which gave us access to a lovely track through the bush above it opening to gorse leading to the FWD track above. Now, back at the bottom of a big dip in  Heenan Road, there was an entry point to a parking spot up at the very bottom of that track, thanks to a hospitable owner’s permission.

Only 13 were able to turn out for the day. A first long-grassed paddock was the only steep effort, the track thereafter proving a delightfully modest steady gradient elevating us soon to impressive views over the Taieri plain. We stopped for morning tea at one such view,

Viewing the plain. (Ian pic and caption.)

but low cloud below us was  beginning to condense obscuring the former clear air.

Later, where we at last emerged from the bush part of the route, we stopped to point out to newer members the old way by which we used to reach this point. Beyond here, the track now steadily steepened the nearer we got to the Three Kings. We took it slowly, with frequent rests and regroupings. Until behold, there was a new track cut right across an extensive cleared area, changing the whole aspect of what we used to experience eleven and more years ago. The new track was even steeper, but at last all got there.

We hunkered down for lunch beneath the principle rock, sheltering from a brief but wetting rain shower.

Shelter for some. (Ian pic and caption.)

A clever perch. (Ian pic and caption.)

But that was it. The day remained calm, if cool. We returned back down the way we had come, all very pleased at having achieved our object. One older member expressed their delighted at achieving a return to the rocks after such a long absence, having given up all hope of ever making it again.

We stopped for coffee at George’s ‘hairy’ goat cafe, delighted to meet up there with the Trampers’ other half of the club, returned just before us.

A satisfying day. Roll on the wintry weekend ahead. – Ian.

22. 8/2/2017. Trampers. Maungatua Summit from Heenan Road. M. Arthur.

Route map, courtesy Tony. Trampers Maungatua trip.

I believe this tramp was a “first’ for the club. We have been up to the “3 Kings” area many times in the past, but today we continued on to the summit.

A small group out today, only 4 of our regulars, 1 potential member and  1 guest: 6 in total.

We left the cars parked up a farm drive off Heenan Road. Our tramp began at 9.00 a.m. on the uphill farm road which goes around the south end of Maungatua, and out towards Mahinerangi.

It was a fine day, sunny but with many clouds. A cool S.W. breeze kept the temperature down.

Morning tea was taken in the last available sheltered spot, the leader being rubbished for stopping 5 minutes early though!

Up a farm track and then in to the tussock taking us up more steeply to trig “F” at 702 metres, from where we could look down onto the “3 Kings“.

Onward on a farm track, before turning off into the tussock for the last 3.25 km, single file following the fence line.

Beautiful moss. (Helen pic and caption.)

The summit was reached at 12.05 p.m. for our lunch stop. Sitting down in the shelter of the vegetation was necessary to get out of the wind. The sunny periods were very welcome as we ate and rested.

Before taking our leave, the obligatory photo of the group at the summit marker post was taken.

Arthur Carol Neil Helen and Neil. (Helen pic and caption.)

Plaque on top. (Helen pic and caption.)

Just at this time the red helicopter flew over us at low altitude, our waves being returned.

Red helicopter giving us a wave. (Helen pic and caption.)

No rescue needed today, though, thankfully.

After about 2 km on the return journey we took to the farm track for the remainder. It was somewhat easier going, and also gave a little variation from the inward track.

The wind had eased early afternoon, and then changed to a southerly breeze. Showers were visible in the Balclutha-Milton direction, but were then going out to sea and not towards us.

Lower down we stopped briefly to admire the view out over the lower Taieri Plain. The whole area was bathed in sunshine, and was a real picture. The views from the top of Maungatua had been spoiled a little by all the cloud shadows on the landscape.

Back at the cars at 3.00 p.m. it had been a neat 6 hours from go to whoa. A very satisfactory day’s tramp in the leader’s opinion. Total distance was 17 km, and an altitude climb of 800 metres.

The timing was absolutely perfect!

As we sat down after ordering our drinks at “The Hairy Goat” the rain arrived!

Thanks to all who participated in the day’s very successful tramp. – Art.

21. 22/10/2014. Trampers. Three Kings. M.
This weeks tramp was to the “Three Kings” at the south end of the Maungatua’s. Six trampers travelled to McLaren Rd, drove around past the Lavender farm to our parking place just inside the farm yard gate. Jill went & got the key for us, & then drove back home again, leaving us to find our way up to the tops. The walk was on farm 4WD tracks all the way up, with just a short walk through tussock to the Three Kings where we had lunch in the shelter from a strong cold wind. Then it was a quick retreat back down again out of the wind, & back to the cars. Walked 12km; 4.1 km/h ave; 3hrs moving; climbed 690m.
The view from the top was very good, but the cold wind didn’t make for pleasant viewing. We practised our Coffee Club by calling into the Outram coffee shop on the way home where a good chat session was had. – Ken

18/10/2006 Jeff Todd of Todd Group 477 8902 (10/06). Todd Group had bought Wesleydale and paddock and allowed it to be used for army live firing! Access through all this area denied.

20. 26/4/2006. Trampers. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Evelyn C, Sabina.
19. 24/8/2005. Both. Wesleydale, Three Kings and option of Trig. Leaders: Ria, Irene, Val and Brian, Eleanor B.
18. 19/11/2003. Both. Three Kings from Farm sheds. Medium. Leaders: Trampers: Bill and Pat; Hikers: Les and Margaret, Carmel.
des

Down through Gorse. Wendy? Pat

Geo

George on rise, below Trig above Three Kings (19/11/2003)

17. 17/7/2002 Three Kings, Mill Creek, Kowhai. Spur Leaders: Bob H, Doug M, Wendy B
Long. Hard. Water. Steep down Kowhai Spur.
16. 10/7/2002. Wesleydale Methodist Youth Camp to 3 Kings. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara, Frank.
15. 22/11/2000 Leaders: Lex, Ian
14. 22/9/1999. Three Kings and Trig. Leaders: Lex, Bill H, Lesley S.
13. 12/8/1998. 3 Kings, Maungatua. Leaders: Irene, Shirley R.
12. 19/11/1997. Wesleydale to 3 Kings and Trig. Leaders Judith and Hugh, Ian.
11. 12/3/1997. Three Kings – Mill Creek Reserve – Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Graham, Barbara McC.
10. 1/5/1996. Duncan’s Farm Road and return Kowhai Spur. Leaders: Bill H, Les S, Graham S, Doug M
9. 3/4/1996 Three Kings from Heenan Road to McLaren Road Start past Little Creek. Medium.
Seek permissions
Leaders: Jack and Rosemary, Nelson and Dot.
8. 20/4/1994. Three Kings. Medium. Leaders: Margaret and Les, Ivan, Les W.
7. 6/10/1993. Mill Creek (back of the Maungatuas.) Medium. Leaders: Shirley McN, Ria L, Nel, Betty H.
6. 26/5/1993. Wesleydale Camp – uphill following 4WD track to Maungatuas. Great views. Medium. Leaders: Mary Y, Denise, Nola, Judith.
5. 9/9/1992. Wesleydale Camp to the Maungatuas. Follow 4WD Track. Average. Leaders: Joan, Betty, Jean, Diana.
4. 29/7/1992. Wesleydale Camp, up the hill following 4WD track to the Maungatuas. Lovely views. Average. Leaders: Daphne, Betty, Dave and Jean.
3. 23/10/1991. Maungatuas – Wesleydale to ‘3 Kings Rocks’. Steady up hill grade, but not a long tramp. Average+. Leaders: Nancy, Ray, Ted, Jack R.
2. 27/6/1990 Wesleydale to Three Kings. Average, if taken in easy stages. Don’t rush hill please. Leaders: George, Margaret D, Margaret B, Ria.
1. 8/3/1989. Three Kings. Good tramp up the Maungatuas. Great views of Lower Taieri. Leaders: Denise, George, Peggy.

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May 17 2017

Mount Hyde Station

Published by under Lambing Sep-Nov,Trampers,Year round

No. 5 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Mt Hyde to Taieri River. Aqueduct. D Moir. Farm. Lambing.”
Location: 23.5 km. Lambing September-November.
14. 17/5/2017. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leader: Neil.
A good turn out of 12 keen individuals to spend a few hours exploring the route to Taieri river and pipeline from Mt Hyde.The day was fine and overcast and very pleasant for a walk in the hills. Left the cars about 9:30 am and proceeded round the side of Mt Hyde and then started a steady descent down to the pipeline bridge.Had a stop at about 10:10 to keep everyone happy and the views around the river valley were quite spectacular. Wandered across the bridge

(Margreet pic.)

between the two pipes

(Keith pic.)

and comments were made about OSH rules in building something like this today. A 20 minute return trip up the hill over the fence and turned right to follow a farm track through several gullies and a couple of ridges before leading down to the gravel by the river. Proceeded upstream and found the old flying fox…

(Keith pic.)

…giving access across the river. No one seemed very keen to give it a go. Retraced our steps down river and started the return climb up the hill. At about 12 o’clock lunch was suggested but the majority wanted to go a bit further on an empty stomach as this would be easier. So we climbed about halfway up before stopping , where the view was again pretty good. There was only once that the talking had almost ceased on this uphill climb; an interesting observation!!!!  After lunch the track leveled out a little and the section to the top was a little easier. Arrived back at the cars at about 2:00 pm (I think).

Keith’s calculations:: Walked 10 km,  380 metres climb fromthe river to cars. .
Trundled back to the Wobbly Goat for a coffee and debrief, where a few wobbly goats were seen getting out of cars. Ha Ha!!!
A great tramping day that everyone appeared to enjoy. – Neil.
13. 27/2/2013. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. 9.25 km; 2h 33m; moving ave. 3.6km/h; climbed 561m.
Morning Tea

Morning tea break.

Taieri gorge train looking like a model train set

Taieri gorge train looking like a model train set

Ian on the Flying Fox

Ian on the Flying Fox

12. 17/11/2010. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Ken, Doug.

9 of us squeezed into 2 cars for the trip. Although we were on 4WD tracks all the way, over-night rain had left the grass soaking wet. We had received permission as the lambs were now well developed.

GPS of tramp, courtesy Ken. Follow anticlockwise. 11 km.

The road down to the bridge was as steep as ever, with fresh crushed metal on the lower portion rolling under our boots.

Arch structure of aquaduct.

We enjoyed morning tea on the bridge and admired the spring growth on river-side and banks. Evident on the bridge are the larger Deep Stream pipe and the smaller Deep Creek Pipe. It is they that carry the yellowy brown peat water to Mt Grand to be miraculously transformed into our pure drinking water.

Morning Tea on Viaduct at Mt Hyde (Ken pic and caption)

Distant view of Aquaduct.

When we arrived at our furthest point up-river, we were struck by the beauty of the smooth water.

Unruffled

A scramble up a bank and we were at the flying fox that George and Ria had promised to show us.

Keith in flying fox. (Ken pic and caption)

We then lunched by the stream.

Lunch on Mt Hyde by river. (Ken pic and caption)

We continued our circuit, climbing up the 4WD track under the power-lines, across paddocks and back to the cars. Another great day. The rain held off. Perfect. – Ian.
11. 16/4/2008. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Ian, Ken, Sabina.

Only 5 who braved the misty start to the day were rewarded with a great tramp on Mt Hyde station. The highlight of course was the
graceful arched aqueduct of Dunedin’s Deep Stream Pipeline traverse of the Taieri River.

Willow trees aligning waterways were at their autumnal golden glory and a plentiful harvest of mushrooms promised an appetizing garnish to the evening meal. Finding ourselves above the mist at the start, we steeply descended through some damp cloud to clear air nearer the river, enjoying a dry morning tea amongst a manuka stand on the way. We lingered long on the aqueduct, drinking in all the beauty of the river to the song of a nearby bellbird.

Then we had to re-ascend steeply for a short distance back up the way we had come until we could join a side track that paralleled the river upstream and descended to flats near where the Mullocky Stream debouches its meagre flow. Lunching on the gravel by the water we were pleasantly entertained by flights of paradise ducks and Canada geese up and down the river.
We elected to reconnect with the track by way of a very steep grassed gully, our footing thankfully assisted by cattle beast hoof marks. As we climbed ever higher, we got great views of the Taieri Gorge railway on the other side of the river and of the Wingatui Viaduct in the distance across the Mullocky.
Finally reaching the track again, it happily proved an easier gradient than the gully we had emerged from. A steady ascent, easing off later and we reached our car by about 2.00 p.m. Some steep work, but plenty of time to do it in. In all, a vindication for those willing to give the day a try, despite an unpromising beginning. – Ian
10. 11/4/2007. Trampers. Mount Hyde, Viaduct. Medium+. Leaders: Arthur and Barbara.
9. 19/7/2006. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Lex, Shirley.
8. 11/12/2002. Trampers. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Hazel, Graham, Molly.
7. 8/8/2001. Mount Hyde. Medium+. Leaders: Lex, Hazel, Molly.
6. 27/1/1999. Mount Hyde to Taieri River. Leaders: George, Lex, Colleen.
5. 17/5/1995. Mount Hyde. Medium. Shorter trip available. Leaders: Nancy, Judy C, Colleen, Judith D.
4. 26/1/1994. Mount Hyde. Medium. Leaders: Nancy, Les and Margaret, Doug M.
3. 5/2/1992. Mount Hyde. An interesting tramp. Average+. Leaders: Nancy, Margaret D, Peggy M, Barbara McC
2. 3/5/1989. Mount Hyde to Taieri River via aqueduct. Leaders: Ria.
1. 12/10/1988 Mount Hyde on George King Memorial Drive. Very interesting tramp to Taieri River, crossing via pipeline bridge. Leaders: Daphne, Hugh and Jean, Ria, Kaas.

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May 10 2017

Horsehoof Station Tramps

Published by under Lambing Sep-Nov,Trampers,Year round

No. 1 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Maugatua Microwave. J Roy. Year Round.” Permissions from Horsehoof.
Distance from car-park: 24 km.

20. 10/5/2017. Trampers. Maungatua trig via Horsehoof. M. Leader: Arthur.

Clear skies, a light breeze, and lots of sunshine gave perfect conditions for our tramp up onto Maungatua. The cars were left high up beside the farm road on Horsehoof, a group of 13 happy trampers setting out from here on the uphill dozed farm track.

About halfway up morning tea was taken, with stunning views to enjoy at the same time, in the clear air.

Onward and upward, we reached the top boundary of Horsehoof Station, and climbing through the fence were in the DOC reserve which encompasses all of the top of Maungatua. It was then single file through the tussock and turpentine shrubs on the faint track.

We stopped to admire the Big Rock,

The beautiful rock. (Helen pic and caption.)

photos being taken of the group.

The group of 12 plus me. (Helen pic and caption.)

Just as we were preparing to move on a pair of N.Z. falcons flew in and landed on top of Big Rock just above us. They weren’t at all worried by us humans, and it was marvellous to see them there.

In single file we moved on, and eventually came to the summit post at 12 noon – perfect timing for lunch.

From here, on the highest point (895 metres) we could see in all directions – 360 degrees. A huge fog bank right down the coast totally hid the sea and the Otago Peninsula, but the land was in clear view as far as the eye could see. What terrific scenery.

Margreet pic.

Lunch over we began the return journey, which meant retracing our steps. With an occasional brief rest/regroup stop, we were back past Big Rock, through the fence onto Horsehoof again, and down hill with a brief uphill bit to reach the cars.

A group of 13 happy trampers had had a great day, walking a total of 12 km. The perfect weather certainly added to the enjoyment of the day.

But, the tramp finished too soon (obviously too short), as it was necessary to stop in Outram for a while on the way home so that discussion that hadn’t had time to be had during the tramp could be concluded.

The leader was particularly pleased to have such a good turn out of trampers today – thank you to all. – Arthur.

19. 11/1/2017. Hikers. Maungatua Big Rock and Trig via Horsehoof. M. Leaders: George and Ian.

It wasn’t the best tramp to ease into after the relaxing holidays. However the easier programmed Kuri Bush beach walk had not taken the tide times into account. What to do? Something inland. George scouted Saddle Hill (summit not tackled by the Hikers since 2010) and Horsehoof (last done by the Hikers 2011). Relevant property owners for Saddle Hill could not be reached, so Horsehoof and Big Rock then.

Seventeen turned out on the day. A respectable number, given that some members were still on holiday. Admittedly the road entrance to Horsehoof is easily missed, as happened to some on the day, but eventually all the cars arrived and drove on up to park in the high paddock where the FWD track to the top corner of the station starts. At about 690m here, we had already made good inroads on Maungatua’s Big Rock elevation of 880m.

It was still a bit early so we trudged through that first unavoidable gully to merelyregain the cars’ height a kilometre or two further on, finding a bank to sit on for morning tea.

(Clive pic.)

No more gullies now but it was up, steadily up, with frequent regrouping stops to eventually reach the Horsehoof Station’s top corner. At 865m effectively all climbing was behind us. We had gained 225m since leaving the cars. One of us elected to stop here and await the return of the others, and Mollie, who hadn’t wanted to miss the chance of revisiting Horsehoof, was happy to keep her company.

Now it was 15 who scrambled through the fence onto the Maungatua reserve to push on through the tussock and dracophillum (turpentine bush) till we reached a point opposite to the Big Rock.

(Clive pic.)

Here, along with George, ten were happy to make this their destination stop,

(Clive pic.)

while a remaining group of five carried on with an assurance it was only another half hour to the trig. W-e-l-l not exactly. More likely three quarters, as one found the going harder than others. But we got there! Or rather two did.

Made it! 895m.(Ian pic and caption.)

Too bad,the other three had stopped off short of the last rise and lunched. However with the encouragement of the trig returnees (or is it returners?) they were encouraged to push on so that they could say they had made it too. And they did!

On the return we discovered the hypotenuse short-cut that avoids a right angle in the fence and which we had missed on the way in due to overgrowth disguising it at its other end. A shame. It needs a fence indicator.

When we arrived at Big Rock, we discovered the ten others had long since given up waiting for us, and were back waiting for us when we straggled up the last weary slope up to the cars – at least weary for this writer.

So there it is. A good traditional tramp perforce resurrected for the hikers by an unfortunate tidal assesssment. And an enjoyable stop and chat at the Wobbly Goat to finish it off. And roll on the better weather. – Ian.

18. 10/2/2016. Maungatua Summit. Leader: Arthur H.

Horsehoof Station to maungatua peak. GPS of route, courtesy Ken. (Ken pic and caption)

Horsehoof Station to maungatua peak. GPS of route, courtesy Ken. (Ken pic and caption) 13.2km; 3.7km/h; 3h 33m moving; total ascent 409m; max height 900m

Nine trampers set out in ideal conditions to conquer Maungatua. The day was sunny with some high cloud. The breeze was light all day – westerly, then changing to southerly for a while, and then died away altogether.

We drove in through Horsehoof Station, up the road towards the microwave. A car shuttle was set up by taking one car back 2-3 km, leaving it at the top of the hill above the woolshed.

We took the dozed farm track that winds its way up to the top of Maungatua, stopping for morning tea at a suitable spot.

We reached the top of the track, where the small shed and various aerials are situated, at 10.50 a.m. Climbing over the fence we were then in the DOC Reserve, which covers a large part of Maungatua.

From here there is a faint track heading to the summit, which is some 2.5 km away. This is undulating country.

We soon came to the large tor, and stopped for several minutes to inspect and photograph it.

Side trip to rock tor (Helen pic)

Side trip to rock tor (Helen pic)

Continuing on along the track, which follows the fence line, we gained the summit a few minutes before 12.00 noon. A black and white painted post now marks the spot, …

"Trig" post (Helen pic)

“Trig” post with rock placed on top by one of the party. (Helen pic)

… and is visible from a short distance. Sitting down in the tussock, we had a relaxed lunch on the spot. The slight breeze was just a tad cool, we noted.

Lunch at the "trig"

Lunch at the “trig”

From the summit there is a great 360 degree view, but unfortunately haze in all directions spoiled this somewhat.

Half of the group had a look over the brow, down in the direction of the 3 Kings -which isn’t visible. All of us then picked our way through the rough vegetation, in an easterly direction, to get a better view down on the Taieri Plain and Airport.

Making our way back up to the track, we returned along it to the shed and aerials, and over the fence. A brief stop here, where it was noted the altitude was 865m, compared to the 895m at the summit.

We now walked down a 4WD track through the tussock, following the western spur.

On fence llne track well down to the Lee Creek gully

On fence line track well down to the Lee Creek gully showing ‘uphill grunt’ on other side. (Helen pic)

A restful stop was made at the bottom, in the shade of the beech trees at the north branch of Lee Creek. A short uphill grunt gave a “tang” to the end of our tramp, and we were soon back at the “shuttle” car.

All agreed that it had been a good tramp and an enjoyable day. This had been a first time for most.

Seven held a debrief at Outram on the way back home.

Coffee at Outram. (Helen pic)

Coffee at Outram. (Helen pic)

The tramp distance was 13.2 km. – Arthur H.

29/3/2010. Private. Horsehoof, Maungatua Trig.
GPS of route from car to trig

GPS of route from car to trig

At the Maungatua Trig (1)

At the Maungatua Trig (1)

At the Maungatua Trig (2)

At the Maungatua Trig (2)

17. 4/5/2011. Both. Horsehoof upper paddock to Big Rock. Medium. Leader: George.

George had recceed the programmed McKendry Road tramp and found the mud too squishy and the undergrowth too thick so elected to fall back to Horsehoof Station again.
We took the cars on through several gates to the paddock that gave us a shorter walk up to the paddock corner at the top.
It was a misty day, but at our tea-break the weather cleared to reveal the wind turbines beyond Lake Mahinerangi.
Beyond the fence at the top corner, we went on to negotiate the turpentine shrub (dracophyllum longifolium), tussock and alpine moss to reach the large rock for an early lunch.
A cool westerly wind drove us to shelter in a cleft in the rock’s SW side.

A sheltered lunch spot.

An interesting bank of fog in the west.

The tarn beyond the big rock.

Obviously scientific, an exclosure on the tarn.

After all that, we returned the way we had come back to the cars. A good outing. – Ian.
16. 15/9/2010. Trampers. Horsehoof to Big Rock. Medium. Leader: George.
Walked up the 4WD track that went by the Microwave.

Morning Tea break. George. (Emma pic)

Lunched at the Big Rock.

Keith and George at the Big Rock. (Emma pic)

Returned back down through the Woodside Creek gully.
15. 6/5/2009 Both. Horsehoof Station. Bridge over Woodside Creek, top corner, back down the more regular farm road. Medium. Leaders: Bruce, Wendy.

Many were discouraged by the wet morning start, but 8 of us enjoyed a farm walk on what turned out to be an cold overcast day (which we were well wrapped up against) interspersed by sun at morning tea and lunch. From the regular parking spot, for a change we turned down steeply
click to enlarge

Descent to bridge

Descent to bridge

to cross the Woodside Creek upper tributary nearby

Woodside Creek

Woodside Creek

and to then climb steeply

Climb ahead

Climb ahead

to enjoy a cuppa at the set of rocks a little way up.

Cuppa.

Cuppa.

Then to carry on up to the top corner of the station. This was a route the club hasn’t taken for five years and more. We forewent going on to the big rock and tarn through the rather heavy wet dracophyllum we would have had to struggle through, so lunched at the top under the shelter of a bank

Lunch in sun

Lunch in sun

and returned by the more regular farm track.

Rock and Pillar Range in sun

Rock and Pillar Range in sun

Recycled car bolstering bridge. Wee waterfall behind.

Recycled car bolstering bridge. Wee waterfall behind.

We all enjoyed a good tramping day but regretted there were not more to share the walk with. Bruce stood in for Marjorie who was indisposed on the day. Our thanks to Wendy and Bruce for their leadership. – Ian.

14. 12/11/2008 Trampers. Horsehoof Station, Maungatua Trig. Leaders: George, Ria.

This turned out to be a tramp from Horsehoof Station rather than from the advertised Allendale Farm. So it was simply up by the regular farm road to the Maungatua Trig and back.
click to enlarge

Decorated Trig. George, Hazel, Ria, Emma

Decorated Trig. George, Hazel, Ria, Emma

Saddle Hill from Maungatua

What was different was the wind measuring masts

Mast for measuring wind?

and various markers presumably installed by Trustpower. A breeze pleasantly tempered the heat of the sun and 8 of us enjoyed a tramp in the tussocks and Maungatua top with the George making it easier and shorter by having the two cars parked further up the hill than on previous tramps. – Ian

13. 27/8/2008 Trampers. Horsehoof Station Upland road-walk Leaders: Ian, Ken
Winter conditions decreed a firmer road walk in place of the anticipated soggy ground we would have encountered at the Flagstaff big rock. So it was Horsehoof Station for a look at the fast disappearing snow conditions.
click to enlarge

Drift snow remains. Ken

Seven of us set off from our cars parked down at the shearing shed and walked steeply up in the general Maungatua direction. It was a good walk in the fresh air with general sunny conditions turning to threatening clouds later. The breeze was fresh but sheltering in the lee of a gully made for a comfortable morning tea.

Lunch was on the sheltered side of the repeater station,

Emma and Glenys approaching the Microwave. George ahead.

reached by cutting across a couple of wet gullies swollen with fresh snow runoff.

The return. Bill, Pat, Emma
A shorter day but the sun was out most of the time and the views and company were good. – Ian

The return. Bill, Glenys, Emma.

12. 18/6/2003 Horsehoof Station walk. Leaders: Shirley M, Bill & Pat.
1

Lex, Doug J, Arthur, Doug M

2

Snow on NE Maungatuas

11. 16/2/2005. Both. Maungatua with Summit option. Leaders:  Val and Brian, Arthur  and Barbara.
10. 18/9/2002. Microwave – Maungatua Summit. Medium. Leaders: Ria L, Barbara and Arthur.
9. 21/11/2001. Maungatuas Summit from Microwave. Medium. Leaders: Les W, Mary M, Shirley R.
8. 27/6/2001 Leaders: Claude, Bill, Pat
7. 8/12/1999. Maungatua, Microwave. Leaders: George, Hazel, Graham.
6. 18/8/1999. Microwave to Maungatuas. Leaders: George, Doug M, Hazel.
5. 3/12/1997. Microwave to Maungatua Summit. Leaders: Bob H, Judy C, Sabina.
4. 18/9/1996. Maungatua Trip, Micro Stn, Loop and return. Average+. Leaders: George, Ian, Nelson.
3. 6/12/1995. Microwave to Maungatua Summit. Medium. Leaders: Bob H, Jean, Ria H, Jack R
2. 26/8/1992 Leaders: George, Les W, Peggy A, Peggy M
1. 10/2/1989 Leaders: Graham, Shirley, Wendy

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May 10 2017

Chain Hills-Friends Hill Tramps

Published by under Hikers

No. 102 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Friends Hill Chain Hills Year Round”
Saddle Hill Hotel

34. 10/5/2017. Friends Hill, Chain Hills, Gladstone Road. M. Clive, Jay and Jan.

Nike app route map, courtesy Ian.

Autumn on the Taieri.   One of those Southern days of sunshine found an intrepid band of hikers (16) setting out from Wingatui racecourse to walk up Friends Hill and then across country to Chain Hills Road.   The going to start with was steep and a challenge for some,  but then it came to the stile to get onto the public pathway to Chain Hills Road; the step up to stile was about a meter and made for more limber people.   Well all rose to the challenge and made it over the stile to the sheep pens at the top of the hill where we rested for morning tea …

Morning tea. (Ian pic and caption.)

… and watched the fog in the valley roll away.    By now the temperature had risen to the promised 17 degrees and jumpers and fleecy jacket were shed to climb the next couple of hills to Chain Hills Road.   It was then we found that the first stile was just a taster for the next two stiles that were very high and over barbed wire.    Some gentleman from years past laid down his coat so that the ladies did not snare their stocking on the barbed wire. [’twas the reporter! – Ed.]    We gained Chain Hills Road by 11 o’clock so it was a nice walk along the ridge line to arrive above Mosgiel just before midday and a spot to sit and eat lunch.

Lunch. (Ian pic and caption.)

A herd of friendly cows watched from across the road and then when they realized we were not there to feed them showed their opinion in that unique bovine manner – pats all round.

Thanks for the view too, Clive, as well as all the above. (Clive pic, Ian caption.)

The walk off Chain hills had the leader focused on road safety and the safest way to negotiate Morris Road (a busy road), down to Quarry Road.   Then it was along the flat back to Wingatui to pick up the cars for afternoon tea and Blackstones cafe.   I think we got a suntan on the way! – Clive.

33. 18/5/2016. Flower Street, Friends Hill, Wingatui, Car Park. M. Leaders: Keith and Shona.
Hikers' Route.

Hikers’ Route. Morning Tea stop in rain at about 1 km. Lunch in sun at 6 km. Coffee at 10.6 km.

18 Went by bus from outside the Mosgiel Post Office, arriving Flower St, Fairfield about 9.30 a.m.

Wandered up to the top of Flower St to have morning tea in the gum trees, as there was still drizzly rain falling.

Rain eased and we progressed over the stile and up the grass track, exiting onto Chain Hills Rd. After turning right, followed it to the end. Negotiated the stile there safely and followed the fence line down, up, and around, …

Green Island(?) from Flower Street. (Sharyn pic.)

Green Island from a ‘down’ paddock. (Sharyn pic.)

Wingatui from Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

Wingatui from above Friends Hill. (Sharyn pic)

… eventually exiting onto Friends Hill Rd.

Walked to Wingatui Race Couse for lunch, where there were toilets and dry seats in the grandstand for the rain had stopped. Made our way down Wingatui Rd, through track, across Haggart Alexander Drive, down Green st to end at Blackstone Cafe for a coffee. – Shona and Keith.

32. 11/6/2014. Chain Hills, Flower Street. M. Leaders: Pam, Dawn.
GPS of route

GPS of route. Cars parked foot of Coalstage Rd, Morris Rd overpass, Chain Hills Rd, Flower St, Kennedy Rd, Walkway, Main Rd, Park by Fairplay St, Main Rd, Saddleview Pl, Underpass, Saddle Hill Rd, Coalstage Rd again. Distance: 8.93 km; Fastest 4.78 kph; Slowest 3.73 kph.

Pam and Dawn led us, thirty strong this trip, on a route largely familiar to most, but a little less so to this reporter. We took the SH1 overpass, stretched out indian-file, making quite a picture no doubt to motorists passing underneath, to judge by the horn toots we got.
Bridge

Overpass. (John pic)

Down Morris Road to turn sharply up Chain Hills Road.

We ‘morning-teaed’ at the red spot on the map between kilometer marks two and three on the GPS map.
Panorama

The customary morning tea spot on Chain Hills Road. (John pic)

A little further on as we took the Chain Hills Road right fork taking us down to Fairfield. The top of Flower Street lay through private land, guarded by locked gates provided with not-very-accommodating styles.

Style queue

The style at the Flower Street top locked gate. (John pic)

Further down again (or was it higher up?) we came across this mock farmyard, complete with tractor, water wheel, cow, et al.

Glove

A rubber glove udder for a tinny cow. (John pic)

Down in the paved part of Flower Street we were taken with a letter box making industry operating out of a private property.

Letter Boxes to order

Letter Boxes made to order.

Then it was into Kennedy Road, out through a walkway to emerge on the Main Road and on to lunch at a park abutting Fairplay Street.
Collage

Collage of lunch groups (John collage)

From there it was further up the Main Road, then to be pleasantly surprised by the leaders taking us not via the customary Morris Road but by Saddleview Terrace and through the SH1 underpass and up, very steeply up, Saddle Hill Road to Coalstage Road. A short distance along and we stopped to admire Janice’s house and to farewell her down the driveway. Then it was just on down back to the cars.

A good day out, despite an icy edge to the light wind at times. Thank you, leaders. – Ian.
31. 12/3/2014. Hikers. Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
We parked our cars  up Quarry Rd to the right of the overbridge on the north side of the
Saddle Hill.
25 fit and healthy Hikers started up over the bridge and up Chains Hill Rd.
We were met early on by a very fit brown lab dog who followed us all the way …
Dog

Dog (Pic John)

… to the morning tea stop.

Morning tea

Morning tea. (John, pic.)

It sat down and waited while we ate and sipped our tea and water.

Continuing on, we arrived at the Chain Hills Rd end. I thought the dog would have gone home. The DOG sat down and waited till we all leaped over the stile (some climbed carefully).
The DOG then left and went home.
Lunch was at a cosy spot …

Sheltered lunch spot

Sheltered lunch spot (John, Panorama pic.)

… out of the wind.
Fred gave out chocs.
The ground was even and not at all muddy. The views are worth stopping for to catch a breath.
When we reached Gladstone Rd North, we walked to the Wingatui Hall where we had cunningly had a car parked for those who needed a lift back  to the cars up saddle hill. Several Hikers took up the offer and Fred transported them up to their cars. We continued down Gladstone Rd North to the z station, then up quarry rd back to the cars.
Several hikers took up the offer of going for coffee to Wals at the end of the day. (Can’t guess who. – Ed)
A very hot day enjoyed by all. – Elaine.
30. 11/12/2013. All.  Friends Hill, Chain Hills. End of Year finger-food lunch at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.
GPS of route

GPS of route from Friends Hill to Chains Hill road, return.

Our leaders had to change our end of year location. Berwick Camp had been already booked. Where to plan the tramp? A brilliant choice. From the Hall, up Friends Hill to the stile and across the poled route to the Chain Hills road end for morning tea. It was the first time this reporter remembers doing the route UP from ‘Friends’ to “Chain’. He discovered how much easier it is doing the reverse route DOWN. The trampers among us were not disappointed either. Bravo, leaders. Our shared lunch was  another successful end-of-year treat. Thanks to Bruce for leading us in a sing-a-long. Happy holidays. – Ian.
29. 28/3/2012. Hikers. Chain Hills. Leader: Graham.
28. 23/11/2011. Hikers. Fairfield circuit, Fairfield. Leaders: Graham, Wendy.
27. 29/6/2011 Friends Hill. Leaders: Fred, Elaine.
Start Carpark at Saddle Hill overbridge,
to end of Chain Hills road,
across farmland …
Single

“Single File please people.” (As if we could do anything else.)(Bob pic and caption)

Downhill

Pleasant downhill walking. (Bob pic and caption)

What

Lunch queue? A good spot actually with shelter, sun, and log seats laid on. (Bob pic and caption)

Fred

Fred jealously guards his chocolates. (Bob pic and caption)

… down to Friends’ Hill Road.
Good leadership – except that Quasimodi challenged for the leader’s role, …
Quasi

Quasimodo joins the group. (Bob pic and caption)

… the leader threw down the gauntlet (ie orange jerkin), and the usurper reigned, …

gauntlet

Quasimodo surges into the lead. (Bob pic and caption)

…  and misled the people at one point,
at which the the old guard led the errant followers correctly.
Along Gladstone Rd, and
up Quarry Rd to cars.
We started with 18 and with defections reduced to 6!!
A lovely walk. Great weather. – Bob.
26. 26/1/2011. Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
Some 18 of us (the number varied a little at points in the walk) set out from the bridge carpark on Saddle Hill on a fine and calm morning, continued up Chain Hills Road with morning tea at the “potato planter” (pictured),

Morning tea by the potato planter. (Bob pic and caption)

Ditto. (Bob pic and caption)

across a small piece of farmland by the reservoir (where there was the possibility of a confrontation with a cattle beast

Does he want to have a beef with us? (Bob pic and caption)

– but avoided because of the amiable nature of all on two or four feet ) and so onto Flower St, Fairfield, and past several novel garden ornaments, one of which is pictured.

Neill admonishes the little people. (Bob pic and caption)

Lunch stop was at the park with shelter from the hall wall against the strengthening wind, and chocolates from Fred, and the last part of the round-trip was up the old main road (Morris Rd) in gathering drizzle. A frequent topic of conversation was the ailments (and recovery) of various people present or absent, and the name of Don who used to come out with us but whom we haven’t seen for some time and whose name eluded several. [Donny Hunter? – Ed] ( I am reliably informed that there are no longer “senior moments”, but rather “intellectual pauses”.) Two new faces, Jim and Betty, came to ‘try us out’. Thanks to Frank and Leslie for leadership. – Bob M
25. 9/6/2010 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.

I guess that the residents themselves are their best critics. (Bill pic and caption)

24. 22/4/2009 Hikers. Chain Hills Road, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy+. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
23. 28/5/2008. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley
22. 23/1/2008. Hikers. Chain Hills to Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Frank and Lesley.
21. 27/9/2006. Hikers. Chain Hills, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Eleanor W, Dot T.
20. 17/8/2005. Hikers. Overbridge, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Leaders: Margaret S, Carmel.
19. 28/7/2004 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hills, Fairfield. From over-bridge. Leaders: Les W, Ray, Mary M.
Dunedin from Mount Grand

Dunedin from Mount Grand

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

Mosgiel from Friends Hill

18. 16/7/2003. Hikers. Overhead Bridge, Flower Street, Fairfield. Easy. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
17. 19/2/2003. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Trampers. Leaders: Donny, Graham.
16. 19/6/2002 Alt. Winter walk from Fairfield Tavern. road walk. Leaders: Joyce S, Eleanor
15. 29/5/2002. Chain Hills Circuit from Fairfield Tavern. Medium. Leaders: Donny, Wendy, Graham.
14. 23/5/2001 Friends Hill. Leaders: Bev McI, Mary M, Val
13. 26/7/2000. Fairfield via Flower Street from carpark. Leaders: Lesley and Frank, Margaret D.
12. 24/5/2000 Fairfield Tavern, Chain Hill Circuit. Leaders: Ronny, Irene, Hazel
11. 17/5/2000. Chain Hills – Circuit. From Fairfield Tavern. Leaders: Donny, Irene, Hazel
10. 10/6/1998. Wingatui, Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Peg C, Molly.
9. 1/3/1998 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Margaret D, Lance, Lois
8. 25/6/1997. Maurice Road, Fairfield, Chain Hills. Leaders: Betty B, Judith D, Mary Y.
7. 20/11/1996. Friends Hill and beyond. Meet at Wingatui Hall. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B, Judith D.
6. 1/11/1996 Friends Hill, Chain Hills. Leaders: Mary Y, Betty B
5. 19/6/1996. Chain Hills – Fairfield Tavern for lunch – Return Main Road. No fare. (Alternative to Pole Line) Leaders: Daphne, Evelyn M, Colleen.
4. 16/8/1995. Saddle Hill, Old Brighton Road, Taieri Lookout, Chain Hills, Fairfield. Medium. Leaders: Bob Q, Dot and Nelson, Molly.
3. 16/9/1992. Wingatui Friends Hill Rd Halfway Bush Rd Three Mile Hill Rd Dalziel Rd Brinsdon Rd return
2. 6/5/1992. Walk from Glasgow Street car park, Saddle Hill, Chain Hills, Wingatui. Easy. Leaders: Jack M, W Bathgate,
1. 9/8/1989. Wingatui Racecourse. Over the Hill. Easy+ Leaders: Betty, Molly, Ria.

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May 03 2017

Outram – Allanton Flood Bank

Published by under Hikers

Outram 10 km from car park.

3. 3/5/2017. Both. Outram-Allanton Flood Bank. E. Leaders: Judy K, Lester.

Today’s tramp saw a very special milestone for the Club, with a celebration of life member Molly Vaughan’s 90th birthday.  Molly has been a member of the Club for 30 years and still tramps regularly.

In recognition of this great achievement 28 members, including Molly and her son Marty …

Clive pic.

… from Busselton in Western Australia, walked the stop-bank from Outram to Allanton, …

Morning tea. (Clive pic.)

Mollie with Saddle Hill in background. (Helen pic and caption.)

Taieri Times, 10/5/2017 Mollie article (Ian scan and caption.)

… to join another 20 at Scurr’s woolshed for a shared lunch.

The rain held off for most of the morning, although there was cold southerly breeze, and the walk, completed in two hours, was enjoyed by all.  The walkers were greeted at the woolshed by the rest of the group eying trestle tables groaning with food.

Clive pic.

This disappeared amid a great deal of noisy chatter and fun.

Clive pic.

Card, cake …

Mollie cutting 90th Birthday Cake. (Ian pic and caption.)

ODT 12/5.

ODT 12/5

… and candles followed, and an ODT reporter appeared to record the event, including a picture of Molly outside in the pouring rain.  I hope there were no ill effects!

Many thanks to drivers who helped ferry people to and from Outram, to Elaine and Colin Scurr for the use of their woolshed, and to all members for the yummy food.  It was great to see such a good turn-out. – Judy K.

2. 29/4/2015. Hikers. Allanton-Outram Flood Bank. E. Leaders: Lester, Fred and Jim.

GPS of route

GPS of route

The feature of this tramp was the wind. Wind? A gale, A GALE.

The walk began from the Allanton Saleyards Road. A car shuttle was arranged – for those who didn’t want the road walk back. We set off.

We walked alongside the Allanton Road and turned into Ken Scorgies yards to stop for morning tea. Then we headed along and up onto the flood bank…

apres cuppa

On the trek after morning tea stop.

…to which we kept for practically the whole of the morning with only a few diversions to the flats alongside the Taieri River.

The day started off fine with only a moderate cold breeze, presently followed by a brief shower of rain, and a bit later another short shower. Some donned parkas early on, others waiting out the light showers. We made our way along, sometimes on the bank, sometimes off it. A wealth of mushrooms were a sore temptation for some.

mushrooms

Bags and bags of mushrooms.

stretched

Stretched out along the flood bank.

As we progressed the wind intensified to the extent that we couldn’t keep a steady footing. Along with the wind, a third, and this time, persisting shower, forcing everyone into parkas this time. This was complicated by a misjudged bit of the route which led us along the edge of a turnip paddock into a corner fence, with its electric wire, barring access back onto the flood bank. However with the help of poles lifting the wire and boots lowering the barbed wire fence we all in turn got through the narrow-neck eventually.

We were on the bank again. This time there were now walnuts galore. We ended up with enthusiasts lugging their plastic bags of mushrooms, walnuts, and even one lugging a bag of cow pats for their rhubarb patch. Somewhere about here we passed a small transformer station, and houses were appearing. We came off the bank onto a back street of Outram…

letters

A distinctive letter box in the back streets of Outram.

…and negotiated our way to a large shed which afforded us both lodging and shelter. Most welcome. We lunched. We hung around. We pondered doing the return road walk in the rain and wind. Eventually decided against. A car-load of drivers set off to be ferried to their cars and come back and rescue us. Car-load by departing car-load, the trip ended.

This reporter forgot to say that there were thirty-one of us. At least half that number resorted to Outram’s 8 on 87 cafe for a social coffee. Our number included aa earnest small group around a table end, complete with pen and paper finalising details for their impending overnight at Luxmore Hut on the Kepler Track, on Monday, I think, overseen by Hut Wardens for the week, Judy and Elaine. We lingered. A warm dry finish to a fearsomely windy day, aggravated by a big rain shower as well. (No surprise that there were no photos taken during the bad parts of the day.)

Thanks to Lester, Fred and Jim for their planning and leadership. – Ian.

18/5/2011. Hikers. Outram – Allanton Flood Bank. Leaders: Peter and Wendy.

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