May 24 2017

Botanic Garden, Logan Park, Northern Cemetery, Chingford

Published by under Hikers

Distance from carpark: 20 km.

21. 24/5/2017. Hikers. Botanic Garden and Logan Park. E. Leader: Marjorie.

28 hikers set off from the Gardens car park for a leisurely wander up to the azalea garden for morning tea. The fact that two groups became separated from the leading group, due to the multiple track system, reminded the leader of the need to regroup frequently. All reached the morning tea area…

Clive pic.

…and from there we proceeded out to Lovelock Avenue and entered the bush area, then proceeding up the track…

Clive pic.

…to the top of the cemetery. We walked through the cemetery on the main track,

Clive pic.

stopping to view the Thomas Bracken tombstone, and then followed the track through the bush to Logan Park car park. An easy stroll followed along Butts Road, through the area of the Sports Academy (old art gallery), along the sports field and back along the track on Butts Road. The 250 steps of Abbs Way were a good work out bringing us back to superb views over the city.

Clive pic.

Continuing up through the cemetery with a short detour to the Larnach tomb had us back into Lovelock Bush and then to the azalea garden for lunch. We ended the hike with a walk through the geographic gardens area and the bird aviaries, then down to the lower gardens where most of us had coffee at the Crocodile café. Some of the planned route had to be abandoned due to the closure of tracks for tree cutting but suitable alternatives were available. Although the overall distance was fairly short the steeper areas provided sufficient exercise. The Gardens were in their autumnal colourful splendour and there were many points of interest in the Gardens and the cemetery which made for a diverse and interesting day. – Marjorie.

20. 19/10/2016. Hikers. Woodhaugh, Botanic Garden. E. Leaders: Dot and Bev.

Route Map (Courtesy Ian.)

Route Map. (Courtesy Ian.) A delightful Ramblers-style walk in the blaze of the Spring-blossomed Botanic Garden. – Ian.

Wednesday saw 25 happy hikers assemble in Duke St at the back of Woodhaugh Gardens to enjoy what proved to be a very relaxed and pleasant day out. We walked through bush tracks to emerge in the children’s play area, where some ‘older children’ couldn’t resist the challenge of a small flying fox,

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

Liz on Flying Fox in Woodhaugh Gardens. (Ian pic and caption.)

and then on to the paddling pool section where we sat and enjoyed an unhurried morning tea break.

From there it was out to George St. and a walk along to the Gardens corner to enable us to cross to the Botanic Gardens with the safety of the traffic lights.

We walked right through the Gardens to the exit at Gore St. which we didn’t use but turned up the track to take us to Upper Gardens. From there we wandered round quite a few tracks that a lot of people hadn’t been on before. These took us through areas of bush, the rhododendron dell, and other not so well known areas of the Gardens.

We arrived at our designated lunch spot by 11.45 a.m. but nobody seemed to mind an early and extended lunch hour. Everyone took their time over lunch and from there were free to wander the Gardens at their own pace, meeting again at main gate at 1.30pm to walk back to, and through, Woodhaugh Gardens to the cars.

The Dunedin Botanic Gardens are looking beautiful and are well tended and maintained. Certainly well worth visiting at any time of the year.

Coffee stop was Plaza Café. – Bev.

19. 30/9/2015. Hikers. Logan Park. Leaders: Bruce and Marjorie.
Hikers' GPS

GPSs of route, courtesy Bruce.

Report on hikers’ trip to Logan Park 30 September 2015

Twenty-four hikers, including three students on holiday, set off, on a sunny spring morning, from the Gardens Car Park, opposite Mecure Dunedin Leisure Lodge, at 9.30 am and walked near the Gardens perimeter in a clockwise direction. We appreciated the new bark covered walkway near the themes of sculpturing hedge plants (topiary), coloured plants and plants with fragrancies. We went through the Clive Lister garden and after crossing the bridge viewed the brown trout sculpture near the duck pond commemorating the early breeding of trout in the Opoho Creek ponds in the 1860s. After looking at the two Peter and Wendy themed sculptures we crossed the stream and made our way up hill through the middle of the gardens for morning tea at 10.05 am at the Azalea/Rhododendron dell lawn area.

Refreshed, we passed through the Lovelock Bush on the other side of the road, went up the path and crossed Opoho Park to the right of the rugby club rooms to turn right into Opoho Road and then left into Warden Street. We proceeded to Opoho School at the end of Warden Street and then turned to the right down the driveway at the end of Blacks Road. We passed to the left of a tree at the end of the driveway to proceed downhill on a public walkway, that was initially covered with bark. The advance description of the hike noted that, “Some of the paths are very good, others are steep and less well formed.” The descent from Blacks Road to the Opoho Creek matched the latter description more than the former. Some bird song was heard in this area and a pair of tuis observed. The native bush, including large pungas was quite dense …

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

In the bush. (Bruce pic and caption)

… and Jennifer noted that it was possible, at one time, to hear other trampers but not see them. The track followed alongside the Opoho Creek to a curved bridge where it met a mountain bike track. We continued downhill on this better track (right turn) and came to the remnants of the 1868 Opoho Creek trout breeding ponds about 75 m further along.

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond. (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Opoho fish pond 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We then continued downhill on the mountain bike trail until we came to a pile of gravel on the right when the playing fields of Logan Park school were visible and turned left up the Marshall mountain bike trail for approximately 50 metres where a large rock was present and then turned right contouring through bush towards a white cloth marker on a tree (Just above the rock in a sign, seen from the uphill side, on a tree with red and green arrows). We went slightly downhill, for about 20 m, to a ledge (part of a trail) and then up and to the right towards another white marker (20 m) and then straight ahead for 20 m to come to the Pelichet Bay rifle butt remains, a stone structure about 20 m long and 2 m high.

 Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet Bay rifle butts (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

Pelichet bay rifle butts 2 (Bruce pic and caption)

We noted the hidden geocache container in the region.

The white cloth marker track led out the other end of the butts and turned to the right to cross a stream (a few metres above a steep descent in the stream where some brave souls saw the need to provide themselves with additional challenges by crossing here). We went downhill on an angle for 30 m and then uphill and to the right for another 30 m to a yellow marker and then followed the track out to the main Signal Hill mountain bike track and then down this to the top mown field at Logan Park to stop for lunch on the sheltered sunny north facing bank at 12.05 pm.

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Opoho. Lunch. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Some required sun burn lotion to be applied.

After lunch we crossed the broad track above the mown field, on the left edge of the unmown rough area, to reach the gravelled track on the north side of the gully. About 100 m down this, on the top of a slight rise, the groups split into two. Les kindly led a group back to the car park via the gravel track to Dundas Street and then Leith Street. The others arrived about 30 minutes later after ascending the track through the bush on the right, up and to the right, to the corner of Opoho Park by the playground.

From there they crossed to the left hand end of the pine trees on the west side of the park, past the happy ribbon tree,

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

Happy ribbon tree Opoho Park. (Bruce pic and caption)

across to the top of the cemetery by the path, through a small part of the cemetery, back through the Lovelock Bush, over the road, downhill through the rhododendron dells, down a native bush path turning to the right down some steps just before the bridge and down a long board walk to Lovelock Avenue which featured a view of a large broadleaf tree that was just a seedling in the early days of Dunedin in 1844. We emerged on Lovelock Avenue just above the memorial stone and re-entered the gardens about 30 m further on to follow the excellent track above the left bank of the Leith Stream back to the car park.

Many had afternoon tea at the Croc-o-Dile.

The bush above the fish breeding ponds in Opoho Creeks was noticeably denser with more moisture than that near the conifers and manuka/kanuka near the rifle butts, and on the hillside between the school fields and Opoho Park. The track descending from Blacks Road to Opoho Creek may be better suited to trampers than hikers and future alternatives would include going from the car park to Lovelock Avenue along the left bank of the Leith track, walking on the streets to Logan Park school, and visiting the fish pond with a dog leg walk up the good quality mountain bike track.

Distance travelled: 8.2 km.

Bruce and Marjorie.

18. 8/10/2014.Hikers. Logan Park, Gardens, University. E. Leaders: Janice and Theresa.

Route

Route. Parked Logan Park HS. 1km: top of Northern Cemetery; 2km: Entering Upper Gardens; 3km: At the Worm; 4km: Near duck pond; 5km: Into Nth Leith St; 6km: Point where Leith turns towards the Harbour; 7km: coffee at University Plaza Cafe.

26 of us parked at the Logan Park High School, closed at the time for the school holidays. Walked further around Butts Road and climbed St Abbs Place steps to Brackens Lookout. Went into the Northern Cemetery to William Larnach’s tomb. Wandered around cemetery to find Brackens grave. Had morning tea amongst the graves, sheltered from the wind by a hedge of bushes. Came back out and climbed up the track behind the new planting out buildings of the Botanic Garden. Entered the Upper Garden at the top corner and went through them into the Rhododendron Dell. Came back up and across to the Mediterranean Garden Terrace.

Mediterranean

Mediterranean Garden Terrace

Next, went down to the flat and admired the Ouroboros stainless steel worm sculpture, designed to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Botanic Garden.

worm

Ouroboros worm sculpture

Walked through to the Gardens Corner exit and made our way along to the Woodhaugh Gardens for lunch on a set of some conveniently sheltered seats.

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch finished, we made our way across the gardens via the Duck Pond to Duke Street. We stopped and wondered at the white spanish type building at the foot of the Bullock Track, but no one could shed any light on it’s design origins. We continued down Duke Street into Nth Leith St, into Montgomery Avenue to cross the St David Street pedestrian bridge and to wander along the grass frontage to the original University Buildings, admiring the stepped Leith Stream flood works still underway. We emerged onto the Dundas Street pedestrian bridge, making our way through various newer buildings, past a fruit and vegetable co-op to return alongside the Leith Stream again. We crossed and recrossed this, emerging at last onto Anzac Avenue.

Tramp’s end now in sight, we had to sit down outside Plaza Cafe on the University Plaza adjacent to the Forsyth Barr Stadium to ponder whether to get our (now) customary coffee shot before or after getting back to the cars. Most decided before, several after. This, with much thought, determined and accomplished, wound up the tramp for the day.

Thanks to Jan and Theresa for a successfully conducted tramp, losing none of our straggling party through the many twists and turns of the day. The threatened rain held off and cool  temperatures made for good tramping conditions. A good day out, through many varied locations. Again, thanks Jan and Theresa. – Ian.

17. 11/9/2013. Hikers. Botanic Garden – Bracken View – Rhododendron Dell – Northern Cemetery. Leaders: Lance and Lois.
Last Wednesday 29 hikers turned up at the car park, led by the Woodfields. A nice sunny day.
We started at lower car park at the Botanic Garden and walked our way up the paths in the garden. We stopped at the Mediterranean Garden Terrace for the tea break and enjoyed the lovely cake made by Hazel for George’s Birthday.
The magnolia trees were just starting to show their blooms and the early rhododendrons were out. Roll on October when the main ones bloom.
Blossom
Lunch was at a grassy area at the upper garden. George, who was 85 – did you know GEORGE WAS 85? – shouted a lot of lovely brut,  bubbly and nibbles. This was a wonderful time …. How many of us will be still hiking around when we are 85? As usual we had lots of laughs.
We visited the northern cemetery and looked at the  William Larnach tomb and then we worked our way down through the Garden.
I think everyone had a good day as there certainly was a lot of talking going on.
Some of the group finished of the day at the Topiary Cafe at Wals Plantland  in Mosgiel for coffee with warm pikelets and cream and carrot cake.
Being retired is so good. – Elaine
 16. 23/5/2012. Hikers. Botanic Garden. Leaders: A & B Landrebe.

15. 26/10/2011. Hikers. Botanic Garden.

14. 17/11/2010 Dunedin Botanic Garden. Leader: Bev.
13. 11/11/2009 Hikers. Upper Gardens, Rhodendron Vale, Northern Cemetery, Aviary. Leaders: Lance and Lois
(Bill pic)

Just representational of the Rodo gardens and borders. Many of our group enjoyed guessing names of rhodos but there are so many, especially hybrids, that to get one right is near impossible. (Bill pic and caption)

 

(Bill pic)

Morning tea interest group. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Best to just listen. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Knarled convolutions. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Northern Cemetery. Another place worth a further (temp. only) visit. It was noticeable so soon after 31st October how many large cracks in the plastering there were. Do they repair these each year? (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

Palmers Quarry. (Is that apostrophe s or s apostrophe? Probably apostrophe s.) This stop-to-view coincided with 11.11.11. and I wasn’t sure which bangs were quarrying blasts and which were cannon shots. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds. Thanks DCC. They got this one right. What a great use for a stadium. (Bill pic and caption)

(Bill pic)

The birds(2). (Bill pic and caption)

12. 25/6/2008. Woodhaugh, Botanic Gardens and Northern Cemetery. Leaders:
After some concerns about the weather the day before, we were pleased to wake up to relatively clear skies and no wind. The decision was made to proceed with our mid winter ramble in Woodhaugh and the Botanic Gardens and all fourteen participants set off enthusiastically. There was certainly a nip in the air and snow on the surrounding hills encouraged us to walk briskly along the banks of the Leith and around some of the well maintained bush paths. Sheds 3 and 4 provided shelter for our morning tea break and then we headed across the busy highways via Willowbank and Leisure Lodge to enter the Botanic Gardens. A stiff hill climb levelled out in the rhododendron area, the bushes bare of flowers but still sporting lush green leaves. Crossing Lovelock Avenue, we entered Lovelock Bush, to shortly emerge at the reservoir.
There followed a circuit of the northern cemetery. A warming sun came through the grey sky to enable us to proceed more leisurely and take in some of the interesting sights and historic old tombstones as well as admiring the sculptured trunks of the even older trees.
Lunch with the ducks

A rest at the cemetery

We made a fairly brisk descent to the lower Gardens via the aviary where the birds were in fine, if raucous, voice.

The Shakespeare Gardens

The Shakespeare Gardens

It was warm enough to eat lunch on the seats overlooking the duck pond and lower gardens where we were soon joined by hopeful seagulls, one drake and a blackbird. Some took the opportunity for a quick look at the information centre and glasshouses
Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

Botanic Gardens Glasshouse

before we returned to the cars, well satisfied with our outing and happy to get off home before the weather deteriorated. – Marjorie
11. 19/11/2008 Botanic Gardens, NEV street walk, Chingford Park ret. Leaders: Graham.
Botanic Gardens - Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

Botanic Gardens – Bob Joyce Pat Elaine

The programme said “Chingford” but Graeme, our leader realised that it alone would not extend us, so we began at the Botanical Gardens carpark, completed numerous walks along Gardens paths, had morning tea among the rhododendrons, and then progressed up NE Valley Rd to Chingford Park itself

Lunch

Lunch in the shade

Lovely scene

Lunch with Chingford Stables in background

where we had lunch and walked back just as the rain began. Graeme had put a bit of thought into our route, and all of us found that we had visited corners of the Gardens we hadn’t been to or had even known existed. The writer had never been in Lovelock Bush and was amazed at the extensive boardwalk in the Rhodo Dell.  A mild, light-grey day amidst very pleasant surroundings that are kept in excellent condition, and a good 10km exercise.- Bob M

10. 12/10/2007 Dunedin Botanic Gardens. Leader: Lex. Because of gale force winds on Tuesday the planned hike in the Berwick forest area had to be abandoned. So, our leader for the day, Lex, took us for a very pleasant and interesting walk through the Dunedin Botanic Gardens. We parked cars at Prospect Park. Walked down the Bullock Track and along the road to Duke St. entrance of the Gardens. Wandered along till we found a very pleasant spot on the grass just above the confluence of Lindsay Stream and the Waters of Leith to have our morning tea. We spent the next 1½hrs enjoying a comprehensive tour of the gardens. We were very lucky to have Lex Donaldson and Lesley Gowans with us as they both have a great knowledge of plants and trees and Lesley is very informative on our birdlife. All added to the enjoyment of our day. We picked another pleasant spot to have our lunch. By the time we were ready to move on there were some very black clouds around so felt it was time to head back to cars fairly rapidly. We went through Woodhaugh Gardens and back up the Bullock Track. The rain started when we were in the Woodhaugh Gardens and by the time we got back to cars we were all rather wet. Nobody minded though as had had a lovely day day and, as usual, enjoyed the company a good hike. Bev.

9. 12/10/2007 Botanic Gardens. Leader: Lex

8. 14/11/2007. Hikers. Gardens from Old Art Gallery. Easy.Leaders: Betty B, Anne

7. 8/11/2006. Hikers. Gardens from Logan Park. Easy. Leaders: Dot T, Betty.

6. 16/10/2002.  Alt. Logan Park to Gardens. Leaders: Daphne, Jack & Rosemary

5. 24/10/2001. Alt. Botanic Gardens. Leaders: Betty, Mary  Y, Daphne.

4. 11/10/2000. Botanic Gardens. Leaders: Chris, Winifred, Mary L.

3. 6/10/1999. Logan Park, Botanic Gardens. Leaders: Frank and Lesley, Barbara McC

2. 21/10/1998. Botanic Gardens. Leaders: Margaret D, Mary Y.

1. 9/10/1996. Hikers. Botanic Gardens – Bracken View – Rhododendron Dell – Northern Cemetery.

    Leaders: Margaret D, Mary Y, Mavis.

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