Nov 09 2016

Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream

No. 89 on old hardcopy list of 113 club tramps. “Outram Glen – Lee Stream Year Round”

9. 9/11/2006. Hikers. Outram Glen to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jennifer and Dorothy S.

Route map, courtesy Ian.

Route map, courtesy Ian. Total elevation of 433m the product of  ALL the UPS on the track, – the by-product of all the downs!

Morning tea by the Taieri. (Ian pic and caption.)

Morning tea by the Taieri. Threatening rain cautioned some to don parkas but there were hot sunny periods in the day as well.  (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream. (Ian pic and caption.)

Lunch at Lee Stream “beach” at the confluence of the stream with the Taieri River. (Ian pic and caption.)

8. 10/8/2016. Hikers. Outram, Historical Park and Museum, Outram Glen. E. Leaders: Alex and Liz.

Nike GPS Route Map

Nike GPS Route Map

A good frost today but lovely and sunny for our hike around Outram

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

Morning tea at storage sheds at Balmoral.

which was varied with a visit to the Museum,

Museum

Waiting in the sun outside the Museum to regroup.

Vintage Park and then onto the Glen track.

Wheelbarrow

Standing aside to allow a motorised tracked wheelbarrow returning empty from delivering gravel to resurface the track. A sunny spot. (Liz pic.)

Frost (Liz pic.)

And a shaded spot. Frost. (Liz pic.)

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point.

Lunch in the sun beside the river by the track/route boundary point of the Outram Glen – Lee Stream Track.

We numbered 25 and finished off with the Local Coffee Shop.
It was a wee bit different owing to the unknown conditions from the nasty weather three days earlier but as usual the company was good and we achieved our goals thanks to everybody. – Liz and Alex.

7. 26/3/2014. Hikers. Taieri Musem, Outram Glen Track to Lee Stream. Leaders: Jim and Betty.
GPS of track to Lee Stream

GPS of track to Lee Stream

We were met with a surprise variation to simply walking the Outram Glen track. The leaders took us first up to the Taieri Historical Museum via an interesting side track shortly up the George King Memorial Drive by the bridge over Traquair/Whare Creek. We were seduced by the machinery museum building at the top of the property with its wonderful variety of early Taieri farming implements. They found it hard to drag us away.
We made our way down the driveway this time, and past a surprising number of cars to the track beginning. Time had passed so the leaders made our cuppa stop at the crest of the track’s large rise just past the entrance and in a nice sunny spot.
Then on we went till we reached the great set of steps that took us up from the river side to the high undulating bush track, or more officially, ‘route’. From the top of the steps on to the end of the route was a long series of regrouping pauses, where the more able waited for the less able to catch up. But get to the end we did.
A note to the side: On our way to the start of the track, we noticed Bob’s ute had joined our parked cars while we were up at the Museum. Some knew that he did have a prior commitment and must have presumed he would have caught up with us somewhere on the track but knew nothing of the leaders’ plan to visit the museum first. Eventually we did meet him, towards the end of the track, returning. It was all just too sad a misunderstanding.
We discovered the reason for the group of cars at the start when we reached the end. By the Lee Stream mouth was a large group of young St Mary’s School pupils being instructed on safety measures pertaining to launching inflatable rafts drawn up nearby.

Launching

Launching the rafts

There were eight rafts in all, four setting out at a time to practise the art of paddling in the stiller waters upstream before heading off down over the first set of rapids below.
Afloat

The paddling rehearsal before negotiating the first rapids

By this time we had finished our lunch and just prior to entering the bush track again, were surprised again to see the rafts anchored against a cliff on the opposite side of the river, and each pupil being required to leap off a ledge in the cliff into the water, resurface, and to drift with their life jackets down to and be helped back into their rafts immediately downstream. They did this wonderfully, some choosing a yet higher ledge to leap from. Bravo.
We seemed to make much faster return time down the track than when earlier coming up, and were regaled from time to time by excited shouts and screams below us as the rafters made their way downriver.
As we neared the end, it was just a case of now of negotiating the rise at whose summit we had earlier in the day had our cuppa, (it’s steeper and more laborious on the up-track side of the rise and this reporter, at the tired end of the tramp, hates it) and we were back at the cars and en route to home.
Thanks to Betty and Jim for their imaginative planning of the day and careful looking after us. – Ian.
6. 5/10/2011. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Leader: George.
Lambing got in the way of the programmed Lee Stream ramble. The Outram Glen walk was a most successful replacement. 20 of us went. The first bit’s nice and flat in general. We stopped early for morning tea by the river. A cold wind drove us back up to shelter in the approach track.

Down-track view.

Up-track view.

Beyond the sign indicating the more difficult part of the track was the (never less) challenging (never-ending as well) set of steps. They are now well-worn but still very serviceable. We all made the ascent at our individual rates of speed. Beyond that, the various ups and downs are still well serviced by the sets of stone steps. They have stood the test of time and are firmly embedded. Well made. We all made our way to the Lee Stream confluence with the Taieri, some arriving earlier, others later. Again an early lunch enjoyed with the warmth of sun and calm, and cooler bits of  breeze. But still comfortable enough.

Some of us at lunch.

The confluence of the two streams at lunchtime.

Again, we wandered back each at our own pace. A pleasant day, sheltered by bush from the coolish wind. – Ian
6. 3/9/2008. Both. Outram Glen, Lee Stream. Easy. Leaders: Evelyn and Bob.

Nineteen of us walked the riverwalk from Outram Glen to Lee Stream. The weather was threatening but we had just a little rain, and with no wind and a mild temperature it was an enjoyable 12 kilometre expedition. Many of us had not seen the Taieri River so brown and surging for a long time.
The track in the upper reaches was quite slippery so we needed to watch our feet. Some birdsong from bellbird and fantail was appreciated as was the presence of wood pigeons. We had lunch at Lee Stream where a number could remember past picnics beneath willow trees.
Congratulations to Evelyn and Bob for leading the group. Evelyn did a stalwart job in trying to keep the group together, trying to both race ahead to hold back the fast movers and take care to see the rear guard were still with us. She even managed to end up with one more tramper at the finish than she had at the start. Well done Evelyn!
Bob provided us with some drama by taking a tumble. However he bounced back and even did it again to keep the medics on their toes. He finished the tramp in fine fettle and good humour, leading the bulk of the group on the homeward stretch. We hope the scratches and bruises do not cause too much discomfort.
George celebrated his 80th birthday and first great grandchild by handing out beautiful chocolates to all.
Altogether it was a satisfying day with a return to home base before the southerly caught up with us. – Marjorie

Leaders: Bob & Evelyn
5. 6/6/2007 Ian, Doug M, Eleanor B, Joyce S

4. 3/5/2006. Both. Outram Glen. Leaders: Ian, Doug, Les & Margaret S, Bev H
3. 9/2/2005. Both. Outram Glen. Leader: Nancy
2. 19/8/1998. Outram Bridge, Taieri Gorge. Leaders: Nelson and Dot.
1. 25/3/1992. Outram Bridge – Taieri Gorge. Average. Leaders: Ria L, Catherine, Doreen, Molly

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