Jul 13 2016

McIntosh Bush, frmly Watts Bush

Published by under Trampers

4. 13/7/2016. Hikers: Brighton Bush Walk. M. Leaders: Marjorie and Bruce.

July 13 Brighton Bush Walk. Distance by GPS 6.24 km, ascent 302 m, moving time 2 hr 4 min, moving average speed 3.0 km/hr. (Bruce pic and caption.)

July 13 Brighton Bush Walk. Distance by GPS 6.24 km, ascent 302 m, moving time 2 hr 4 min, moving average speed 3.0 km/hr. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Nineteen hikers were kindly guided by Colin MacKintosh around his properties at 51/ 75 Scurr Road, after reversing down the northern part of a drive way at 75 Scurr Road for the off street parking. From the parking area we went north-east initially along a farm track, passing a small gate on the right leading to the 20 hectares of QEII- covenanted native bush area from which we would emerge after lunch.

At the top of a hill was a corral and horse barn from which we had views over the native bush area and the “liquorice assortment” plantings of exotic timber trees with several varieties of eucalyptus including Tasmanian blackwood (of which the heart wood is black when it is first felled), macrocarpa, pinus radiata, and poplar. Many of these were planted by the previous owner of the property, Mr Watt.

Proceeding downhill in an easterly direction we passed three horses and then turned south going down a valley before  branching right, passing through a popular grove of trees with diamond patterned bark to the picnic area for morning tea with a king size macrocarpa slab top table, several smaller tables, and toilet facilities.

After morning tea Colin led us south through the southern half of the covenanted section pausing to show us a rare peripatus, …

Peripatus. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Peripatus. (Bruce pic and caption.)

… a creature with two feeler like appendages that exude “superglue” to immobilize prey such as huhu grubs in rotting pine logs. The carnivorous peripatus then injects enzymes into the prey to digest it. The peripatus is of very ancient origins and has stumpy legs. …

Above photo cropped to enlarge peripatus.

Above photo cropped to detail peripatus.

… Some also live at the Caversham motor way bypass and DOC, Stuart Street, have a free illustrated booklet on them.

After emerging from the native bush, which contained juvenile matai with a bush like appearance and many trees named for individuals, totara and the podocarps rimu and miro, we turned north east uphill beside an area of pinus radiata.

Uphill near Pinus radiate. (Bruce pic and caption.)

Uphill near Pinus radiate. (Bruce pic and caption.)

At the top we had an excellent view over Brighton and Ocean View.

View from hill.

View from hill.

A nearby road which linked with the Peter Dyne’s Transport property in Creamery Road, that we passed on the Bob Mitchell led walk a few weeks ago, was put in for taking out logs.

We then travelled north downhill beside the road along the fence line before turning right into an avenue of Eucalyptus trees. We turned left into a similar avenue, walking on the crunching dry leaves and bark before contouring around a hill and turning south west past the poplars  to a macrocarpa avenue …

Macrocarpa Avenue.

Macrocarpa Avenue.

… back to a track leading to the picnic area for lunch.

A ginormous dressed wood slab that won the admiration and awe of retired builder Doug.

The king-sized macrocarpa slab that won the admiration and awe of retired builder Doug. (N.B. the ‘elegant’ decoration inserted by a previous picnicker in the slab’s centre, that heedless vandal Bruce, quite insensitive to its beauty, helpfully tried to de-insert, before before being politely restrained by land owner Colin.)

After lunch and celebrating an 84th birthday milestone we entered a track leading uphill through the northern part of the covenanted area.

The track kept to the true right of the creek in the gully (on the right when facing downstream) and led back to the small gate …

Emerging through the small gate.

Emerging through the small gate.

… we passed soon after starting. We crossed several bridges and appreciated the extra step building and windfall clearing that Colin had done for us. Colin had left us at lunchtime for a bowling green appointment. We arrived back at the cars at approximately 1.30 pm before retiring to Wals. A number of birds were seen or heard including the calls of creepers, warblers, and fantails. – Bruce and Marjorie

3. 17/1/2007. Brighton Domain Beach, Rapley’s, Fulton’s, McIntosh, frmly Watts Bush, Former Deer Farm, out to Seaville Rd and Domain. Car ferry in middle of tramp. Medium. Leaders: George, Tash
2. 3/5/2004. Hikers. Watt’s Bush. Easy. Leaders: Mary M, Les W.
1. 12/2/2003. Trampers. Brighton Special: Big Stone Road, McIntosh Road, Watts Bush, Former Deer Farm. Medium. Leaders: George, Hazel, Dot T.
Hikers. As above, modified. Leaders: Dot B, Colleen.

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